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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

bpfh-20191231
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in interest-related cash outflows attributable to changes in the LIBOR component of FHLB borrowing liabilities2525At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company was in compliance with the above 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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from to .
       
Commission File Number 001-35070

BOSTON PRIVATE FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Massachusetts 04-2976299
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
Ten Post Office Square
Boston, Massachusetts
 02109
(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (617912-1900

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each ClassTrading Symbol(s)Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common StockBPFHThe NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
_______________________________________________________________

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Act.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerxAccelerated filer     
Non-accelerated filer    oSmaller reporting company     
Emerging growth company     
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.)    Yes      No  ☒
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the last reported sales price on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2019 was $1,004,597,108.
The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding on February 21, 2020 was 83,363,841.
Documents Incorporated by Reference:
Portions of the registrant’s proxy statement for the Company’s 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference in Item 5 of Part II and Items 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 of Part III.


Table of Contents



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  EXHIBITS
  CERTIFICATIONS

i

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Certain statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K that are not historical facts may constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and are intended to be covered by the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties. These statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe our future plans, strategies and expectations, can generally be identified by the use of the words “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “plan,” “potential,” “estimate,” “project,” “believe,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “target,” and similar expressions. These statements include, among others, statements regarding our strategy; evaluations of future interest rate trends and liquidity; expectations as to growth in assets, deposits and results of operations, future operations, market position and financial position; and prospects, plans, and objectives of management. You should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. You should exercise caution in interpreting and relying on forward-looking statements because they are subject to significant risks, uncertainties and other factors which are, in some cases, beyond the Company’s control.
Forward-looking statements are based on the current assumptions and beliefs of management and are only expectations of future results. The Company’s actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of, among others, factors referenced herein under the section captioned “Risk Factors”; adverse conditions in the capital and debt markets and the impact of such conditions on the Company’s business activities; changes in interest rates; competitive pressures from other financial institutions and non-banks; the effects of weakness in general economic conditions on a national basis or in the local markets in which the Company operates, including changes that adversely affect borrowers’ ability to service and repay our loans; changes in the value of securities in our investment portfolio; changes in loan default and charge-off rates; the adequacy of loan loss reserves; decreases in deposit levels necessitating increased borrowing to fund loans and investments; changes in government regulation; the risk that goodwill and intangibles recorded in the Company’s financial statements will become impaired; operational risks, including, but not limited to, cybersecurity, fraud, natural disasters and pandemics; the risk that the Company’s deferred tax assets may not be realized; risks related to acquisitions, dispositions, and restructurings; and changes in assumptions used in making such forward-looking statements, as well as the other risks and uncertainties detailed in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and other filings submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made. The Company does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect circumstances or events that occur after the date the forward-looking statements are made.

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PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

I. General

Boston Private Financial Holdings, Inc. (the “Company,” “BPFH,” “we,” “us,” or “our”), a Massachusetts corporation, is a bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the “BHCA”), and the holding company (the “Holding Company”) of Boston Private Bank & Trust Company (the “Bank” or “Boston Private Bank”), a Massachusetts trust company whose deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”).
We offer a full range of banking and wealth management services to high net worth individuals, families, businesses, and select institutions through a financial umbrella that helps to preserve, grow, and transfer assets over the financial lifetime of a client through our two reportable segments: (i) Private Banking and (ii) Wealth Management and Trust. Each reportable segment reflects the services provided by the Company to a distinct segment of the wealth management market as described below.
Private Banking
The Private Banking segment is comprised of the banking operations of Boston Private Bank, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. The Bank is a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Boston Private Bank primarily operates in three geographic markets: New England, Northern California, and Southern California. The Private Banking segment is principally engaged in providing banking services to high net worth individuals, privately-owned businesses and partnerships, and nonprofit organizations. In addition, the Private Banking segment is an active provider of financing for affordable housing, first-time homebuyers, economic development, social services, community revitalization and small businesses.
Wealth Management and Trust
The Wealth Management and Trust segment is comprised of Boston Private Wealth LLC (“Boston Private Wealth”), a registered investment adviser (“RIA”) and wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bank, and the trust operations of Boston Private Bank. The Wealth Management and Trust segment offers planning-based financial strategies, wealth management, family office, financial planning, tax planning, and trust services to individuals, families, institutions, and nonprofit institutions. On September 1, 2019, KLS Professional Advisors Group, LLC (“KLS”) merged with and into Boston Private Wealth. The results of KLS previously were reported in a third reportable segment “Affiliate Partners” as further discussed below. The Wealth Management and Trust segment operates in New England, New York, Southeast Florida, Northern California, and Southern California.
Prior to the third quarter of 2019, we had three reportable segments: Affiliate Partners, Private Banking, and Wealth Management and Trust. For the first two quarters of 2019, the Affiliate Partners segment was comprised of two subsidiaries of the Company: KLS and Dalton, Greiner, Hartman, Maher & Co., LLC (“DGHM”), each of which are RIAs. Prior to the first quarter of 2019, the Affiliate Partners segment also included Anchor Capital Advisors, LLC (“Anchor”) and Bingham, Osborn & Scarborough, LLC (“BOS”). The Company completed the sale of its ownership interests in Anchor and BOS in 2018 as described below under “Asset Sales and Divestitures.” With the integration of KLS into Boston Private Wealth, the Company reorganized its segment reporting structure to align with how the Company's financial performance and strategy is reviewed and managed. The results of KLS are now included in the results of Boston Private Wealth within the Wealth Management and Trust segment, as described above, and the results of DGHM are now included within the Holding Company and Eliminations segment.
For revenue, net income, assets, and other financial information for each of the Company’s reportable segments, see Part II. Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 20: Reportable Segments.”
The Company’s internet address is www.bostonprivate.com. The Company makes available on or through its website, without charge, its annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, and current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The Company’s reports filed with, or furnished to, the SEC are also available at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. The quarterly earnings release conference call can also be accessed from the Company’s website. Press releases are also maintained on the Company’s website for one year. Information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this document and should not be considered part of this Report. Shareholders may access the Code of Conduct and Ethics by accessing the Company’s website at www.bostonprivate.com, selecting the “Investor Relations” link at the bottom of the page, and then selecting “Corporate Governance” under “Governance.”

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II. Asset Sales and Divestitures

On December 3, 2018, the Company completed the sale of its ownership interest in BOS to the management team of BOS for an upfront cash payment and an eight-year revenue sharing agreement with BOS. The present value of the estimated proceeds from the revenue sharing agreement was included in the gain on sale of BOS in the fourth quarter of 2018. Changes to the amount of actual proceeds from the revenue sharing agreement will result in future positive or negative revenue adjustments. In the fourth quarter of 2019, the Company recorded a favorable valuation adjustment of $1.1 million on the revenue sharing agreement.

On April 13, 2018, the Company completed the sale of its ownership interest in Anchor to the management team of Anchor for an upfront cash payment and future payments that had a net present value of $15.4 million at the time of closing.
In November 2016, the Bank sold two of its Southern California offices, one located in Granada Hills and the other located in Burbank, together with approximately $104 million of deposits.
In December 2009, the Company divested its interest in Westfield Capital Management Company, LP, formerly known as Westfield Capital Management Company, LLC (“Westfield”).
For further details relating to the Company’s divestitures, see Part II. Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 3: Asset Sales and Divestitures.”

III. Competition

The Company operates in the highly competitive financial services marketplace. The Bank encounters competition from larger national and regional commercial banking organizations, savings banks, credit unions, and other financial institutions and non-bank financial services and financial technology companies, which may offer lower interest rates on loans and higher interest rates on deposits. The Bank’s competitors also include major financial companies whose greater resources may afford them a marketplace advantage by enabling them to maintain numerous banking locations, mount extensive promotional and advertising campaigns, and invest in technology. To compete effectively, the Bank relies on personal contacts by officers, and employees; customized service; and the Bank’s reputation within the communities that it serves.

Boston Private Wealth and DGHM compete with a wide variety of firms, including national and regional financial services firms, commercial banks and trust companies, mutual fund companies, investment advisory firms, stock brokerage firms, accounting firms, law firms, and digital advice platforms, which may offer lower fee services. Investment advisers that emphasize passive products have gained, and may continue to gain, market share from active managers like us, which could have a material impact on our business. The RIAs’ ability to compete is dependent upon their respective quality and level of service, personal relationships, the marketing and distribution of investment products, and investment performance.

IV. Employees
At December 31, 2019, the Company had 779 employees. The Company’s employees are not subject to a collective bargaining agreement, and the Company believes its employee relations are good.

V.  Supervision and Regulation
The following discussion addresses elements of the regulatory framework applicable to bank holding companies and their subsidiaries. This regulatory framework is intended primarily to protect the safety and soundness of depository institutions, the federal deposit insurance system, and depositors, rather than the shareholders of a bank holding company such as the Company.
As a bank holding company, the Company is subject to regulation, supervision, and examination by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”) under the BHCA. The Company is also subject to supervision and examination by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks (the “Commissioner”) under Massachusetts law. As a Massachusetts-chartered trust company and Federal Reserve member bank, the Bank is subject to regulation, supervision and examination by the Commissioner and the Federal Reserve. The Bank’s California offices are also subject to regulation, supervision and examination by the California Department of Business Oversight Division of Financial Institutions (the “DFI”).
The RIAs are subject to extensive regulation by the SEC, the Department of Labor, and state securities regulators.
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The following is a summary of certain aspects of the various statutes and regulations applicable to the Company and its subsidiaries. This summary is not a comprehensive analysis of all applicable laws, and is qualified by reference to the full text of statutes and regulations referenced below.
Regulation of the Company
The Company is subject to regulation, supervision, and examination by the Federal Reserve, which has the authority, among other things, to order bank holding companies to cease and desist from unsafe or unsound banking practices; to assess civil money penalties; and to order termination of non-banking activities or termination of ownership and control of a non-banking subsidiary by a bank holding company.
Source of Strength. Under the BHCA, as amended by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), the Company is required to serve as a source of financial strength for the Bank. This support may be required at times when the Company may not have the resources to provide support to the Bank. In the event of a bank holding company’s bankruptcy, any commitment by the bank holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a bank subsidiary will be assumed by the bankruptcy trustee and entitled to a priority of payment.
Acquisitions and Activities. The BHCA prohibits a bank holding company, without prior approval of the Federal Reserve, from acquiring all or substantially all the assets of a bank; acquiring control of a bank; merging or consolidating with another bank holding company; or acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of any voting shares of another bank or bank holding company if, after such acquisition, the acquiring bank holding company would control more than 5% of any class of the voting shares of such other bank or bank holding company.
The BHCA also generally prohibits a bank holding company from engaging directly or indirectly in activities other than those of banking, managing or controlling banks or furnishing services to its subsidiary banks. However, among other permitted activities, a bank holding company may engage in, and may own shares of companies engaged in, certain activities that the Federal Reserve has determined to be closely related to banking or managing and controlling banks, subject to certain notification requirements.
Limitations on Acquisitions of Company Common Stock. The Change in Bank Control Act prohibits a person or group of persons from acquiring “control” of a bank holding company unless the Federal Reserve has been notified and has not objected to the transaction. Under a rebuttable presumptions of control established by the Federal Reserve, the acquisition of control of more than 5% of a class of voting securities of a bank holding company, together with other factors enumerated by the Federal Reserve, could constitute the acquisition of control of a bank holding company
In addition, the BHCA prohibits any company from acquiring control of a bank or bank holding company without first having obtained the approval of the Federal Reserve. Among other circumstances, under the BHCA, a company has control of a bank or bank holding company if the company owns, controls or holds with power to vote 25% or more of a class of voting securities of the bank or bank holding company; controls in any manner the election of a majority of directors or trustees of the bank or bank holding company; or the Federal Reserve has determined, after notice and opportunity for hearing, that the company has the power to exercise a controlling influence over the management or policies of the bank or bank holding company.
Regulation of the Bank
The Bank is subject to the regulation, supervision, and examination by the Commissioner and the Federal Reserve, and with respect to its California offices, the DFI. The Bank is also subject to regulations issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), as enforced by the Federal Reserve. The Federal Reserve may also directly examine the other subsidiaries of the Company. The enforcement powers available to federal and state banking regulators include, among other things, the ability to issue cease and desist or removal orders, to terminate insurance of deposits, to assess civil money penalties, to issue directives to increase capital, to place the bank into receivership, and to initiate injunctive actions against banking organizations and institution-affiliated parties.
Deposit Insurance. Deposit obligations of the Bank are insured by the FDIC’s Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”) up to $250,000 per separately insured depositor for deposits held in the same right and capacity. In 2016, as mandated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (the “FDIA”), the FDIC’s Board of Directors approved a final rule to increase the DIF’s reserve ratio to the statutorily required minimum ratio of 1.35% of estimated insured deposits. On September 30, 2018, the DIF reserve ratio reached 1.36%. Small banks, which are generally banks with less than $10 billion in assets, were awarded assessment credits for the portion of their assessments that contributed to the growth in the reserve ratio from 1.15% to 1.35%. In January 2019, the Bank received notification from the FDIC that it was eligible for small bank assessment credits of $2.0 million. Credits were applied on the September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2019 invoices and will continue to be applied until exhausted.
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Deposit premiums are based on assets. In 2016, the FDIC’s Board of Directors adopted a final rule that changed the manner in which deposit insurance assessment rates are calculated for established small banks, generally those banks with less than $10 billion of assets that have been insured for at least five years. Under this method, each of seven financial ratios and a weighted average of CAMELS composite ratings are multiplied by a corresponding pricing multiplier. The sum of these products is added to a uniform amount, with the resulting sum being an institution’s initial base assessment rate (subject to minimum or maximum assessment rates based on a bank’s CAMELS composite rating). This method takes into account various measures, including an institution’s leverage ratio, brokered deposit ratio, one year asset growth, the ratio of net income before taxes to total assets, and considerations related to asset quality. For 2019, the FDIC insurance expense for the Bank was $1.3 million.
The FDIC has the authority to adjust deposit insurance assessment rates at any time. In addition, under the FDIA, the FDIC may terminate deposit insurance upon a finding that the institution has engaged in unsafe and unsound practices; is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations; or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC.
Acquisitions and Branching. Prior approval from the Commissioner and the Federal Reserve is required in order for the Bank to acquire another bank or establish a new branch office. Well capitalized and well managed banks may acquire other banks in any state, subject to certain deposit concentration limits and other conditions, pursuant to the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994, as amended by the Dodd-Frank Act. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes a state-chartered bank, such as the Bank, to establish new branch offices on an interstate basis to the same extent a bank chartered by the host state may establish branch offices.
Activities and Investments of Insured State-Chartered Banks. The FDIA generally limits the types of equity investments that FDIC-insured state-chartered member banks, such as the Bank, may make and the kinds of activities in which such banks may engage, as a principal, to those that are permissible for national banks. Further, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (the “GLBA”) permits state banks, to the extent permitted under state law, to engage - through “financial subsidiaries” - in certain activities which are permissible for subsidiaries of a financial holding company. In order to form a financial subsidiary, a state-chartered bank must be well capitalized, and must comply with certain capital deduction, risk management and affiliate transaction rules, among other requirements. In addition, the Federal Reserve Act provides that state member banks are subject to the same restrictions with respect to purchasing, selling, underwriting, and holding of investment securities as national banks.
Lending Restrictions. Federal law limits a bank’s authority to extend credit to its directors, executive officers, and persons or companies that own, control or have power to vote more than 10% of any class of securities of a bank or an affiliate of a bank, as well as to entities controlled by such persons. Among other things, extensions of credit to insiders are required to be made on terms that are substantially the same as, and follow credit underwriting procedures that are not less stringent than, those prevailing for comparable transactions with unaffiliated persons. The terms of such extensions of credit may not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features and may not exceed certain limitations on the amount of credit extended to such persons, individually and in the aggregate, which limits are based, in part, on the amount of the bank’s capital.
Brokered Deposits. The FDIA and FDIC regulations generally limit the ability of an insured depository institution to accept, renew or roll over any brokered deposit unless the institution’s capital category is “well capitalized” or, with the FDIC’s approval, “adequately capitalized.” Depository institutions that have brokered deposits in excess of 10% of total assets are subject to increased FDIC deposit insurance premium assessments. However, for institutions that are well capitalized and have a CAMELS composite rating of 1 or 2, reciprocal deposits are deducted from brokered deposits. Section 202 of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (the “Economic Growth Act”), which was enacted in 2018, amends the FDIA to exempt a capped amount of reciprocal deposits from treatment as brokered deposits for certain insured depository institutions.
Community Reinvestment Act. The Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”) requires the Federal Reserve to evaluate the Bank’s performance in helping to meet the credit needs of the entire communities it serves, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, consistent with its safe and sound banking operations, and to take this record into consideration when evaluating certain applications. The Federal Reserve’s CRA regulations are generally based upon objective criteria of the performance of institutions under three key assessment tests: (i) a lending test, to evaluate the institution’s record of making loans in its service areas; (ii) an investment test, to evaluate the institution’s record of investing in community development projects, affordable housing, and programs benefiting low- or moderate-income individuals and businesses; and (iii) a service test, to evaluate the institution’s delivery of services through its branch offices, ATMs, and other offices. The Bank’s most recent performance evaluation from the Federal Reserve was an “outstanding” rating. Massachusetts has also enacted a similar statute that requires the Commissioner to evaluate the performance of the Bank in helping to meet the credit needs of its entire community and to take that record into account in considering certain applications.
Capital Adequacy and Safety and Soundness
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Regulatory Capital Requirements. The Federal Reserve has issued risk-based and leverage capital rules applicable to U.S. banking organizations such as the Company and the Bank. These rules are intended to reflect the relationship between the banking organization’s capital and the degree of risk associated with its operations based on transactions recorded on-balance sheet as well as off-balance sheet. The Federal Reserve may from time to time require that a banking organization maintain capital above the minimum levels discussed below, due to the banking organization’s financial condition or actual or anticipated growth.
The capital adequacy guidelines define qualifying capital instruments and specify minimum amounts of capital as a percentage of assets that banking organizations are required to maintain. Common equity Tier 1 capital generally includes common stock and related surplus, retained earnings and, in certain cases and subject to certain limitations, minority interest in consolidated subsidiaries, less goodwill, other non-qualifying intangible assets and certain other deductions. Tier 1 capital for banks and bank holding companies generally consists of the sum of common equity Tier 1 capital, non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock, and related surplus, and, in certain cases and subject to limitations, minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries that do not qualify as common equity Tier 1 capital, less certain deductions. Tier 2 capital generally consists of hybrid capital instruments, perpetual debt and mandatory convertible debt securities, cumulative perpetual preferred stock, term subordinated debt and intermediate-term preferred stock, and, subject to limitations, allowances for loan losses. The sum of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital less certain required deductions represents qualifying total risk-based capital. Prior to the effectiveness of certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act, bank holding companies were permitted to include trust preferred securities and cumulative perpetual preferred stock in Tier 1 capital, subject to limitations. However, the Federal Reserve’s capital rule applicable to bank holding companies permanently grandfathered non-qualifying capital instruments, including trust preferred securities, issued before May 19, 2010 by depository institution holding companies with less than $15 billion in total assets as of December 31, 2009, subject to a limit of 25% of Tier 1 capital. In addition, under rules that became effective January 1, 2015, accumulated other comprehensive income (positive or negative) must be reflected in Tier 1 capital; however, the Company and the Bank were permitted to make a one-time, permanent election to continue to exclude accumulated other comprehensive income from capital. The Company and the Bank have made this election.

Under the capital rules, risk-based capital ratios are calculated by dividing common equity Tier 1 capital, Tier 1 capital, and total capital, respectively, by risk-weighted assets. Assets and off-balance sheet credit equivalents are assigned to one of several categories of risk-weights, based primarily on relative credit risk. The Tier 1 leverage ratio is calculated by dividing Tier 1 capital by average assets less certain items such as goodwill and intangible assets, as permitted under the capital rules.
Under the Federal Reserve’s capital rules applicable to the Company and the Bank, the Company and the Bank are each required to maintain a minimum common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets ratio of 4.5%, a minimum total Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets ratio of 6.0%, a minimum total capital to risk-weighted assets ratio of 8%, and a minimum leverage ratio of 4%. Additionally, these rules require an institution to establish a capital conservation buffer of common equity Tier 1 capital in an amount above the minimum risk-based capital requirements for “adequately capitalized” institutions of more than 2.5% of total risk-weighted assets, or face restrictions on the ability to pay dividends, pay discretionary bonuses, and to engage in share repurchases.

Under the Federal Reserve’s rules, a Federal Reserve supervised institution, such as the Bank, is considered well capitalized if it (i) has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% or greater; (ii) a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or greater; (iii) a common Tier 1 equity ratio of 6.5% or greater, (iv) a leverage capital ratio of 5.0% or greater; and (iv) is not subject to any written agreement, order, capital directive, or prompt corrective action directive to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure. The Bank is currently considered well capitalized under all regulatory definitions.
Generally, a bank, upon receiving notice that it is not adequately capitalized (i.e., that it is “undercapitalized”), becomes subject to the prompt corrective action provisions of Section 38 of the FDIA that, for example, (i) restrict payment of capital distributions and management fees; (ii) require that its federal bank regulator monitor the condition of the institution and its efforts to restore its capital; (iii) require submission of a capital restoration plan; (iv) restrict the growth of the institution’s assets; and (v) require prior regulatory approval of certain expansion proposals. A bank that is required to submit a capital restoration plan must concurrently submit a performance guarantee by each company that controls the bank. A bank that is “critically undercapitalized” (i.e., has a ratio of tangible equity to total assets that is equal to or less than 2.0%) will be subject to further restrictions, and generally will be placed in conservatorship or receivership within 90 days.
Current capital rules do not establish standards for determining whether a bank holding company is well capitalized. However, for purposes of processing regulatory applications and notices, the Federal Reserve’s Regulation Y provides that a bank holding company is considered “well capitalized” if (i) on a consolidated basis, the bank holding company maintains a total risk-based capital ratio of 10% or greater; (ii) on a consolidated basis, the bank holding company maintains a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6% or greater; and (iii) the bank holding company is not subject to any written agreement, order, capital directive, or prompt corrective action directive issued by the Federal Reserve to meet and maintain a specific capital level for
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any capital measure. A banking organization that qualifies for and elects to use the community bank leverage framework described below will be considered well capitalized as long as it is not subject to any written agreement, order, capital directive, or prompt corrective action directive issued by the Board to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure.
Section 201 of the Economic Growth Act directs the federal bank regulatory agencies to establish a community bank leverage ratio of tangible capital to average total consolidated assets of not less than 8% or more than 10%. In November 2019, the federal banking agencies published in the Federal Register a final rule to implement Section 201 of the Economic Growth Act. Under the final rule, depository institutions and depository institution holding companies that have less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets and meet other qualifying criteria, including a leverage ratio (equal to Tier 1 capital divided by average total consolidated assets) of greater than 9%, will be eligible to opt into the community bank leverage ratio framework. A community banking organization that elects to use the community bank leverage ratio framework and that maintains a leverage ratio of greater than 9% will be considered to have satisfied the generally applicable risk-based and leverage capital requirements in the banking agencies’ generally applicable capital rules and, if applicable, will be considered to have met the well-capitalized ratio requirements for purposes of Section 38 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. The final rule includes a two-quarter grace period during which a qualifying banking organization that temporarily fails to meet any of the qualifying criteria, including the greater than 9% leverage ratio requirement, generally would still be deemed well-capitalized so long as the banking organization maintains a leverage ratio greater than 8%. At the end of the grace period, the banking organization must meet all qualifying criteria to remain in the community bank leverage ratio framework or otherwise must comply with and report under the generally applicable rule. The final rule became effective on January 1, 2020. At this time, the Company does not anticipate opting in to the community bank leverage ratio.
Safety and Soundness Standards. Guidelines adopted by the federal bank regulatory agencies pursuant to the FDIA establish general standards relating to internal controls and information systems, internal audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate exposure, asset growth, asset quality, earnings and compensation, fees and benefits. In general, these guidelines require, among other things, appropriate systems and practices to identify and manage the risk and exposures specified in the guidelines. The guidelines prohibit excessive compensation as an unsafe and unsound practice and describe compensation as excessive when the amounts paid are unreasonable or disproportionate to the services performed by an executive officer, employee, director or principal stockholder. In addition, the federal banking agencies adopted regulations that authorize, but do not require, an agency to order an institution that has been given notice by an agency that it is not satisfying any of such safety and soundness standards to submit a compliance plan. If, after being so notified, an institution fails to submit an acceptable compliance plan or fails in any material respect to implement an acceptable compliance plan, the agency must issue an order restricting asset growth, requiring an institution to increase its ratio of tangible equity to assets or directing action to correct the deficiency and may issue an order directing other actions of the types to which an undercapitalized institution is subject under the “prompt corrective action” provisions of the FDIA. See “-Regulatory Capital Requirements” above. If an institution fails to comply with such an order, the agency may seek to enforce such order in judicial proceedings and to impose civil money penalties.
Dividend Restrictions
The Company is a legal entity separate and distinct from its subsidiaries. The revenue of the Company (on a parent-only basis) is derived primarily from dividends paid to it by the Bank. The right of the Company, and consequently the right of shareholders of the Company, to participate in any distribution of the assets or earnings of its subsidiaries through the payment of dividends or otherwise is subject to the prior claims of creditors of its subsidiaries, including, with respect to the Bank, depositors of the Bank, except to the extent that certain claims of the Company in a creditor capacity may be recognized.
Restrictions on Bank Holding Company Dividends. The Federal Reserve has the authority to prohibit bank holding companies from paying dividends if such payment is deemed to be an unsafe or unsound practice. The Federal Reserve has indicated generally that it may be an unsafe or unsound practice for bank holding companies to pay dividends unless the bank holding company’s net income over the preceding year is sufficient to fund the dividends and the expected rate of earnings retention is consistent with the organization’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. Further, under the Federal Reserve’s capital rules, the Company’s ability to pay dividends is restricted if it does not maintain capital above the capital conservation buffer. See “Capital Adequacy and Safety and Soundness -Regulatory Capital Requirements” above.
Restrictions on Bank Dividends. The Federal Reserve has the authority to use its enforcement powers to prohibit a bank from paying dividends if, in its opinion, the payment of dividends would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice. Federal law also prohibits the payment of dividends by a bank that will result in the bank failing to meet its applicable capital requirements on a pro forma basis. In addition, a state member bank may not declare or pay a dividend (i) if the total of all dividends declared during the calendar year, including the proposed dividend, exceeds the sum of the bank’s net income during the current calendar year and the retained net income of the prior two calendar years or (ii) that would exceed its undivided profits, in each case unless the dividend has been approved by the Federal Reserve. A state member bank may not declare and pay a dividend that would exceed the bank’s undivided profits. The payment of dividends by a bank is also restricted pursuant to various state regulatory limitations.
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Certain Transactions by Bank Holding Companies with their Affiliates

There are various statutory restrictions on the extent to which bank holding companies and their non-bank subsidiaries may borrow, obtain credit from or otherwise engage in “covered transactions” with their insured depository institution subsidiaries. An insured depository institution (and its subsidiaries) may not lend money to, or engage in covered transactions with, its non-depository institution affiliates if the aggregate amount of covered transactions outstanding involving the bank, plus the proposed transaction exceeds the following limits: (i) in the case of any one such affiliate, the aggregate amount of covered transactions of the insured depository institution and its subsidiaries cannot exceed 10% of the capital stock and surplus of the insured depository institution; and (ii) in the case of all affiliates, the aggregate amount of covered transactions of the insured depository institution and its subsidiaries cannot exceed 20% of the capital stock and surplus of the insured depository institution. For this purpose, “covered transactions” are defined by statute to include a loan or extension of credit to an affiliate; a purchase of or investment in securities issued by an affiliate; a purchase of assets from an affiliate unless exempted by the Federal Reserve; the acceptance of securities issued by an affiliate as collateral for a loan or extension of credit to any person or company; the issuance of a guarantee, acceptance or letter of credit on behalf of an affiliate; securities borrowing or lending transactions with an affiliate that creates a credit exposure to such affiliate; or a derivatives transaction with an affiliate that creates a credit exposure to such affiliate. Covered transactions are also subject to certain collateral security requirements. Covered transactions as well as other types of transactions between a bank and a bank holding company must be conducted under terms and conditions, including credit standards, that are at least as favorable to the bank as prevailing market terms. If a banking organization elects to use the community bank leverage ratio framework described in “Capital Adequacy and Safety and Soundness - Regulatory Capital Requirements” above, the banking organization would be required to measure the amount of covered transactions as a percentage of Tier 1 capital, subject to certain adjustments. Moreover, Section 106 of the Bank Holding Company Act Amendments of 1970 provides that, to further competition, a bank holding company and its subsidiaries are prohibited from engaging in certain tying arrangements in connection with any extension of credit, lease or sale of property of any kind, or the furnishing of any service.
Consumer Protection Regulation
The Company and the Bank are subject to federal and state laws designed to protect consumers and prohibit unfair, deceptive or abusive business practices, including the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act, the Home Ownership Protection Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, as amended by the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (“FACT Act”), the GLBA, the Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”), the CRA, the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, the National Flood Insurance Act and various state law counterparts. These laws and regulations mandate certain disclosure requirements and regulate the manner in which financial institutions must interact with clients when taking deposits, making loans, collecting loans and providing other services. Further, the CFPB also has a broad mandate to prohibit unfair or deceptive acts and practices and is specifically empowered to require certain disclosures to consumers and draft model disclosure forms. Failure to comply with consumer protection laws and regulations can subject financial institutions to enforcement actions, fines and other penalties. The Federal Reserve examines the Bank for compliance with CFPB rules and enforces CFPB rules with respect to the Bank.
Mortgage Reform. The Dodd-Frank Act prescribes certain standards that mortgage lenders must consider before making a residential mortgage loan, including verifying a borrower’s ability to repay such mortgage loan, and allows borrowers to assert violations of certain provisions of TILA as a defense to foreclosure proceedings. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, prepayment penalties are prohibited for certain mortgage transactions and creditors are prohibited from financing insurance policies in connection with a residential mortgage loan or home equity line of credit. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act prohibits mortgage originators from receiving compensation based on the terms of residential mortgage loans and generally limits the ability of a mortgage originator to be compensated by others if compensation is received from a consumer. The Dodd-Frank Act requires mortgage lenders to make additional disclosures prior to the extension of credit, and in each billing statement, for negative amortization loans and hybrid adjustable rate mortgages. The Economic Growth Act included provisions that ease certain requirements related to mortgage transactions for certain institutions with less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets.
Privacy and Customer Information Security. The GLBA requires financial institutions to implement policies and procedures regarding the disclosure of nonpublic personal information about consumers to nonaffiliated third parties. In general, the Bank must provide its clients with an initial and annual disclosure that explains its policies and procedures regarding the disclosure of such nonpublic personal information and, except as otherwise required or permitted by law, the Bank is prohibited from disclosing such information unless otherwise provided in such policies and procedures. However, an annual disclosure is not required to be provided by a financial institution if the financial institution only discloses information under exceptions from GLBA that do not require an opt out to be provided and if there has been no change in its privacy policies and practices since its most recent disclosure provided to consumers. The GLBA also requires that the Bank develop, implement and maintain a comprehensive written information security program designed to ensure the security and confidentiality of client information (as defined under GLBA), to protect against anticipated threats or hazards to the security or
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integrity of such information and to protect against unauthorized access to or use of such information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any client. The Bank is also required to send a notice to clients whose “sensitive information” has been compromised if unauthorized use of the information is “reasonably possible.” Most states, including the states in which the Bank operates, have enacted legislation concerning breaches of data security and the duties of the Bank in response to a data breach. In addition, Massachusetts has promulgated data security regulations with respect to personal information of Massachusetts residents. Pursuant to the FACT Act, the Bank has developed and implemented a written identity theft prevention program to detect, prevent, and mitigate identity theft in connection with the opening of certain accounts or certain existing accounts. Additionally, the FACT Act amends the Fair Credit Reporting Act to generally prohibit a person from using information received from an affiliate to make a solicitation for marketing purposes to a consumer, unless the consumer is given notice and a reasonable opportunity and a reasonable and simple method to opt out of the making of such solicitations.
Anti-Money Laundering
The Bank Secrecy Act. Under the Bank Secrecy Act (“BSA”), a financial institution is required to have systems in place to detect certain transactions, based on the size and nature of the transaction. Financial institutions are generally required to report to the U.S. Treasury any cash transactions involving more than $10,000. In addition, financial institutions are required to file suspicious activity reports for any transaction or series of transactions that involve at least $5,000 and which the financial institution knows, suspects or has reason to suspect involves illegal funds, is designed to evade the requirements of the BSA or has no lawful purpose. The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the “USA PATRIOT Act”), which amended the BSA, together with the implementing regulations of various federal regulatory agencies, has caused financial institutions, such as the Bank, to adopt and implement additional policies or amend existing policies and procedures with respect to, among other things, anti-money laundering compliance, suspicious activity, currency transaction reporting, customer identity verification and customer risk analysis. In evaluating an application to acquire a bank or to merge banks or effect a purchase of assets and assumption of deposits and other liabilities, the applicable federal banking regulator must consider the anti-money laundering compliance record of both the applicant and the target. In addition, under the USA PATRIOT Act, financial institutions are required to take steps to monitor their correspondent banking and private banking relationships as well as, if applicable, their relationships with “shell banks.”
OFAC. The U.S. has imposed economic sanctions that affect transactions with designated foreign countries, nationals and others. These sanctions, which are administered by the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”), take many different forms. Generally, however, they contain one or more of the following elements: (i) restrictions on trade with or investment in a sanctioned country, including prohibitions against direct or indirect imports from and exports to a sanctioned country and prohibitions on “U.S. persons” engaging in financial or other transactions relating to a sanctioned country, or with certain designated persons and entities; (ii) a blocking of assets in which the government or specially designated nationals of the sanctioned country have an interest, by prohibiting transfers of property subject to U.S. jurisdiction (including property in the possession or control of U.S. persons); and (iii) restrictions on certain transactions with or involving certain persons or entities. Blocked assets (for example, property and bank deposits) cannot be paid out, withdrawn, setoff or transferred in any manner without a license from OFAC. Failure to comply with these sanctions could have serious legal and reputational consequences for the Company.
Regulation of Other Activities
Registered Investment Advisers; ERISA. The Company conducts its investment advisory business through Boston Private Wealth and DGHM, each an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended (the “Advisers Act”). The Advisers Act imposes numerous obligations on RIAs, including compliance with the anti-fraud provisions of the Advisers Act and fiduciary duties arising out of those provisions. RIAs must maintain a compliance program reasonably designed to prevent violation of the Advisers Act and are also subject to, recordkeeping, operational, and disclosure obligations. RIAs are also subject to regulation under the securities laws and fiduciary laws of certain states.
The Dodd-Frank Act requires the SEC to study the standard of care for brokers and investment advisers and report its findings to Congress. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act permits the SEC to impose a uniform standard of care on brokers and investment advisers based on the study’s findings. Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC must also harmonize the enforcement of fiduciary standard violations under the Exchange Act and the Advisers Act. It is unclear how the studies and rulemaking relating to the fiduciary duties of brokers and investment advisers will affect the Company and the RIAs.
Each of the mutual funds for which DGHM acts as sub-adviser is an investment company registered with the SEC under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). Shares of each such fund are registered with the SEC under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the shares of each fund are qualified for sale (or exempt from such qualification) under the laws of each state and the District of Columbia to the extent such shares are sold in any of such jurisdictions.
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As a sub-adviser to registered investment companies, DGHM is subject to requirements under the 1940 Act and related SEC regulations, which limit such funds’ ability to enter into certain transactions with us or our affiliates. In addition, under provisions of the 1940 Act and Advisers Act governing advisory contracts, an assignment terminating a registered investment company’s sub-advisory contract with an RIA can occur as a result of the acquisition of that RIA by another company.
The Company, the Bank, and their respective subsidiaries are also subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”), and to regulations promulgated thereunder, insofar as they are a “fiduciary” under ERISA with respect to certain of their clients. ERISA and the applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), impose certain duties on persons who are fiduciaries under ERISA and prohibit certain transactions by the fiduciaries (and certain other related parties) with such plans.
The foregoing laws and regulations generally grant supervisory agencies and bodies broad administrative powers, including the power to limit or restrict certain subsidiaries of the Company from conducting their business in the event that they fail to comply with such laws and regulations. Possible sanctions that may be imposed in the event of such noncompliance include the suspension of individual employees; limitations on the business activities for specified periods of time; revocation of registration as an investment adviser, commodity trading adviser and/or other registrations; and other censures and fines.

VI.  Taxation
Federal Taxation
The Company and its incorporated affiliates are subject to federal income taxation generally applicable to corporations under the Code. In addition, the Bank is subject to Subchapter H of the Code, which provides specific rules for the treatment of securities, reserves for loan losses, and any common trust funds.
The Company and its incorporated affiliates are members of an affiliated group of corporations within the meaning of Section 1504 of the Code and file a consolidated federal income tax return. Some of the advantages of filing a consolidated tax return include the avoidance of tax on intercompany distributions and the ability to offset operating and capital losses of one company against operating income and capital gains of another company.
The Company’s taxable income includes its share of the taxable income or loss from its subsidiaries that are limited liability companies.
Effective January 1, 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) reduced the federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% and eliminated the exemption for performance-based executive compensation.
State and Local Taxation
The Company and its affiliates are subject to the tax rate established in the states and certain municipalities in which they do business. Substantially all of the Company’s taxable state and local income is derived from Massachusetts, California, Florida, New York, and the City of New York.
The Massachusetts tax rate is 9.0% on taxable income apportioned to Massachusetts. Massachusetts’ taxable income is defined as federal taxable income subject to certain modifications. These modifications include a deduction for 95% of dividends received from entities in which the Company owns 15% or more of the voting stock, income from federally tax-exempt obligations and deductions for certain expenses allocated to federally tax-exempt obligations.
The California tax rate is 8.84% for corporations that are not financial institutions and 10.84% for financial institutions. The California tax is on California taxable income, which is defined as federal taxable income subject to certain modifications. These modifications include income from federally tax-exempt obligations and deductions for certain expenses allocated to federally tax-exempt obligations.
The Florida tax rate is 5.5% on taxable income apportioned to Florida. Florida’s taxable income is defined as federal taxable income subject to certain modifications. These modifications include income from federally tax-exempt obligations and deductions for certain expenses allocated to federally tax-exempt obligations.
The New York state tax rate is 6.5% on taxable income apportioned to New York (subject to alternative minimum taxes that may be based on business capital or a fixed dollar minimum), plus a surcharge for business operations in the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation district. New York taxable income is defined as federal taxable income subject to certain modifications. These modifications include income from federally tax-exempt obligations and deductions for certain expenses allocated to federally tax-exempt obligations.
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The New York City tax rate is 8.85% on taxable income apportioned to New York City (subject to alternative minimum taxes that may be based on business capital or a fixed dollar minimum). New York City taxable income is defined as federal taxable income subject to certain modifications. These modifications include income from federally tax-exempt obligations and deductions for certain expenses allocated to federally tax-exempt obligations.
ITEM 1A.RISK FACTORS
Before deciding to invest in us or deciding to maintain or increase your investment, you should carefully consider the risks described below, in addition to the other information contained in this report and in our other filings with the SEC. The risks and uncertainties described below and in our other filings are not the only ones facing us. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also affect our business. If any of these known or unknown risks or uncertainties actually occurs, our business, results of operations, and financial condition could be seriously harmed. In that event, the market price for our common stock could decline and you may lose some or all of your investment.
Our strategic plan and growth strategy may not be as successful as we project or expect.
We have adopted and are in the early stages of implementing a three-year strategy to increase our revenue by growing our wealth management platform, deposit base and commercial loan portfolio, while at the same time lowering our efficiency ratio and engaging in a complete digital and operational platform redesign. The successful implementation of the strategic plan will require, among other things, that we focus on organic growth as well as acquisitions. We believe that we have established a strong platform to support future growth, but there is no guarantee that our strategic plan or other initiatives that we may pursue will be as productive or effective as we expect, or at all.
We may be unable to attract and retain highly qualified employees.
Our success depends on the talent and ability of our employees. Competition for the best people can be intense, and we may not be able to hire or retain the employees that we depend upon for success, or the employees that we do hire may be restricted for a period of time in the activities that they may perform for us as a result of agreements with their previous employers. The unexpected loss of services of one or more of our key employees could jeopardize our relationships with our clients and lead to the loss of client accounts and relationships, causing an adverse impact on our business. This loss could further lead to a loss in employee skills and institutional knowledge. Frequently, we compete in the market for talent with entities that are not subject to comprehensive regulation, including with respect to the structure of incentive compensation. Our inability to attract new employees and retain and motivate our existing employees could adversely impact our business.
If we acquire or seek to acquire other companies in the future, our business may be negatively impacted by certain risks inherent in such acquisitions.
We continue to consider the acquisition of other private banking and wealth management and trust companies, as well as companies with other potential capabilities in the financial services industry. To the extent that we acquire or seek to acquire other companies in the future, our business may be negatively impacted by certain risks inherent in such acquisitions. These risks include, but are not limited to, the following:
we may incur substantial expenses in pursuing potential acquisitions, which may negatively impact our results, whether or not the acquisition is completed;
management may divert its attention from other aspects of our business;
an acquired business may not perform in accordance with our expectations, including because we may lose key clients or employees of the acquired business as a result of the change in ownership;
difficulties may arise in connection with the integration of the operations of the acquired business with our existing businesses;
we may need to make significant investments in infrastructure, controls, staff, emergency backup facilities or other critical business functions that become strained by our growth;
we may assume potential and unknown liabilities of the acquired company as a result of an acquisition; and
an acquisition may dilute our earnings per share, in both the short and long-term, or it may reduce our regulatory and tangible capital ratios.
As a result of these risks, any given acquisition, if and when consummated, may adversely affect our results of operations, and financial condition. In addition, because the consideration for an acquisition may involve cash, debt or the
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issuance of shares of our stock and may involve the payment of a premium over book and market values, existing shareholders may experience dilution in connection with any acquisition.
Our business may be adversely affected if we fail to adapt our products and services to evolving industry standards and consumer preferences.
The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. The widespread adoption of new technologies, including internet services, cryptocurrencies and payment systems, could require substantial expenditures to modify or adapt our existing products and services as we grow and develop our internet banking and mobile banking channel strategies in addition to remote connectivity solutions. We might not be successful in developing or introducing new products and services, integrating new products or services into our existing offerings, responding or adapting to changes in consumer behavior, preferences, spending, investing and/or saving habits, achieving market acceptance of our products and services, reducing costs in response to pressures to deliver products and services at lower prices or sufficiently developing and maintaining loyal customers.
We face significant and increasing competition in the financial services industry.
We operate in a highly competitive environment that includes financial and non-financial services firms, including traditional banks, digital banks, financial technology companies and others. These companies compete on the basis of, among other factors, size, location, quality and type of products and services offered, price, technology, brand recognition and reputation. Emerging technologies have the potential to further intensify competition and accelerate disruption in the financial services industry. In recent years, non-financial services firms, such as financial technology companies, have begun to offer services traditionally provided by financial institutions. These firms attempt to use technology and mobile platforms to enhance the ability of companies and individuals to borrow, save and invest money. Our ability to compete successfully depends on a number of factors, including our ability to develop and execute strategic plans and initiatives; to develop competitive products and technologies; and to attract, retain and develop a highly skilled employee workforce. If we are not able to compete successfully, we could be placed at a competitive disadvantage, which could result in the loss of customers and market share, and have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Our ability to attract and retain clients and employees, and to maintain relationships with vendors, third-party service providers and others, could be adversely affected if our reputation is harmed.
We are dependent on our reputation within our market areas, as a trusted and responsible financial services company, for all aspects of our relationships with clients, employees, vendors, third-party service providers, and others with whom we conduct business or potential future business. Our ability to maintain these relationships could be adversely affected to the extent our reputation is damaged. Our actual or perceived failure to address various issues could give rise to reputational risk that could cause harm to us and our business prospects. These issues include, but are not limited to, legal and regulatory requirements; privacy; cybersecurity; properly maintaining client and employee personal information; record keeping; money-laundering; sales and trading practices; ethical issues; appropriately addressing potential conflicts of interest; and the proper identification and disclosure of the legal, reputational, credit, liquidity, and market risks inherent in our products and services. Failure to appropriately address any of these issues could also give rise to additional regulatory restrictions, reputational harm, and legal risks, which could, among other consequences, increase the size and number of litigation claims and damages asserted or subject us to enforcement actions, fines, and penalties and cause us to incur related costs and expenses. In addition, our businesses are dependent on the integrity of our employees. If an employee were to misappropriate any client funds or client information, our reputation could be negatively affected, which may result in the loss of accounts and have an adverse effect on our results of operations, and financial condition.
We may incur significant losses as a result of ineffective risk management processes and strategies.
We seek to monitor and control our risk exposure through a risk and control framework encompassing a variety of separate but complementary financial, credit, operational, compliance, and legal reporting systems; internal controls; management review processes; and other mechanisms. While we employ a broad and diversified set of risk monitoring and risk mitigation techniques, those techniques and the judgments that accompany their application may not be effective and may not anticipate every economic and financial outcome in all market environments or the specifics and timing of such outcomes.
We may not be able to successfully implement future information technology system enhancements, which could adversely affect our business operations and profitability.
We invest significant resources in information technology system enhancements in order to provide functionality and security at an appropriate level. We may not be able to successfully implement and integrate future system enhancements, which could adversely impact the ability to provide timely and accurate financial information in compliance with legal and regulatory requirements and result in possible sanctions from regulatory authorities. Such sanctions could include fines and
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suspension of trading in our stock, among others. In addition, future system enhancements could have higher than expected costs, fail to achieve their intended operating efficiencies, and/or even result in operating inefficiencies, which could increase the costs associated with their implementation as well as ongoing operations.
Failure to properly utilize implemented system enhancements in the future could result in write offs that could adversely impact our results of operations, and financial condition and could result in significant costs to remediate or replace the defective components. In addition, we may incur significant training, licensing, maintenance, consulting and depreciation expenses during and after systems implementations, and any such costs may continue for an extended period of time.
We face continuing and growing security risks to our information base, including the information we maintain relating to our customers.
In the ordinary course of business, we rely on electronic communications and information systems to conduct our business and to store sensitive data, including our confidential information and financial and personal information regarding customers. Our electronic communications and information systems infrastructure could be susceptible to cyberattacks, hacking, identity theft, computer viruses, malicious code, ransomware, phishing attacks, terrorist activity or other information security breaches. This risk has increased significantly due to the use of online, telephonic and mobile channels by clients and the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime, hackers, terrorists and other external parties. We have implemented, and regularly review and update, extensive systems of internal controls and procedures as well as corporate governance policies and procedures intended to protect our business operations, including the security and privacy of all confidential customer information. In addition, we rely on the services of a variety of vendors to meet our data processing and communication needs. No matter how well designed or implemented the controls are, we cannot provide an absolute guarantee to protect our business operations from every type of problem in every situation. A failure or circumvention of these controls could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
We regularly assess and test our security systems and disaster preparedness, including back-up systems, but the risks are substantially escalating. As a result, cybersecurity and the continued enhancement of our controls and processes to protect our systems, data and networks from attacks, unauthorized access or significant damage remain a priority. Accordingly, we may be required to expend additional resources to enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities or exposures. Any breach of our system security could result in disruption of our operations, unauthorized access to confidential customer information, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, significant regulatory and remediation costs, litigation exposure and other possible damages, loss or liability. Such costs or losses could exceed the amount of our available insurance coverage, if any, and could adversely affect our earnings. Also, any failure to prevent a security breach or to quickly and effectively deal with such a breach could negatively impact customer confidence, damaging our reputation and undermining our ability to attract and keep customers.
We rely on other companies to provide key components of our business infrastructure.
Third-party vendors provide key components of our business infrastructure such as internet connections, network access and core application processing. While we have selected these third party vendors carefully, using established criteria and complying with applicable regulatory guidance to evaluate each vendor’s overall risk profile, capabilities, financial stability, and internal control environment, we do not control their daily business environment and actions. Any problems caused by these third parties, including as a result of their not providing us their services for any reason or their performing their services poorly, could adversely affect our ability to deliver products and services to our customers, impair our ability to conduct our business efficiently and effectively, and/or result in regulatory action, financial loss, litigation, and loss of reputation. Replacing these third party vendors could also entail significant delay and expense.
Our business is highly regulated, and changes in the laws and regulations that apply to us could have an adverse impact on our business.
We are subject to extensive federal and state regulation and supervision. Federal and state laws and regulations govern numerous matters affecting us, including changes in the ownership or control of banks and bank holding companies; maintenance of adequate capital and the financial condition of a financial institution; permissible types, amounts and terms of extensions of credit and investments; permissible non-banking activities; the level of reserves against deposits; and restrictions on dividend payments. The Federal Reserve and the Commissioner have the power to issue cease and desist orders to prevent or remedy unsafe or unsound practices or violations of law by banks subject to their regulation, and the Federal Reserve possesses similar powers with respect to bank holding companies. These and other restrictions limit the manner in which we and the Bank may conduct business and obtain financing. In addition, our RIAs are subject to regulation under the Advisors Act, federal and state securities laws and fiduciary laws. The Advisers Act imposes numerous obligations on RIAs, including fiduciary, record keeping, operational and disclosure obligations.
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The laws, rules, regulations, and supervisory guidance and policies applicable to us are subject to regular modification and change. These changes could adversely impact us. Such changes could, among other things, subject us to additional costs, including costs of compliance; limit the types of financial services and products we may offer; and/or increase the ability of non-banks to offer competing financial services and products. Failure to comply with laws, regulations, policies, or supervisory guidance could result in enforcement and other legal actions by federal or state authorities, including criminal and civil penalties, the loss of FDIC insurance, the revocation of a banking charter or registration as an investment adviser, other sanctions by regulatory agencies, civil money penalties, and/or reputational damage, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. See Part I. Item 1. “Business - Supervision and Regulation.”
We are subject to numerous laws designed to protect consumers, including the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws, and any failure to comply with these laws could lead to a wide variety of sanctions.
The CRA, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act and other fair lending laws and regulations impose community investment and nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. The CFPB, the Department of Justice and other federal agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. A successful regulatory challenge to an institution’s performance under the CRA, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act or other fair lending laws and regulations could result in a wide variety of sanctions, including damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, restrictions on mergers and acquisitions, restrictions on expansion and restrictions on entering new business lines. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. Such actions could have an adverse effect on our business, reputation, results of operation, and financial condition.
We may become subject to enforcement actions even though noncompliance was inadvertent or unintentional.
The financial services industry faces intense and ongoing scrutiny from bank supervisors in the examination process and aggressive enforcement of regulations on both the federal and state levels, particularly with respect to compliance with anti-money laundering, BSA and OFAC regulations, and economic sanctions against certain foreign countries and nationals. Enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices. We maintain systems and procedures designed to ensure that we comply with applicable laws and regulations; however, some legal/regulatory frameworks provide for the imposition of fines or penalties for noncompliance even though the noncompliance was inadvertent or unintentional and even though there were systems and procedures designed to ensure compliance in place at the time. Failure to comply with these and other regulations, and supervisory expectations related thereto, may result in fines, penalties, lawsuits, regulatory sanctions, reputational damage, or restrictions on our business.
We face significant legal risks, both from regulatory investigations and proceedings and from private actions brought against us.
From time to time we are named as a defendant or are otherwise involved in various regulatory investigations and legal proceedings, including class actions and other litigation or disputes with third parties. There is no assurance that litigation with private parties will not increase in the future. Future actions against us may result in judgments, settlements, fines, penalties or other results adverse to us, which could negatively affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition, or cause serious reputational harm to us. As a participant in the financial services industry, it is likely that we could experience a high level of litigation related to our businesses and operations.
Climate change, severe weather, natural disasters, acts of terrorism and other external events could harm our business.
Natural disasters, including severe weather events of increasing strength and frequency due to climate change, can disrupt our operations, result in damage to our properties, reduce or destroy the value of the collateral for our loans and negatively affect the economies in which we operate, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, and financial condition. A significant natural disaster, such as a tornado, hurricane, earthquake, fire or flood, could have an adverse impact on our ability to conduct business, and our insurance coverage may be insufficient to compensate for losses that may occur. Acts of terrorism, war, civil unrest, or pandemics could cause disruptions to our business or the economy as a whole. While we have established and regularly test disaster recovery procedures, the occurrence of any such event could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Our business may be negatively impacted by changes in economic and market conditions.
A worsening of economic and market conditions, downside shocks, or a return to recessionary economic conditions could result in adverse effects on us and others in the financial services industry.
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Our Private Banking segment primarily serves individuals and smaller businesses located in three geographic regions: New England, Northern California, and Southern California. The ability of our clients to repay their loans is impacted by the economic conditions in these areas. The Bank’s commercial loans, with limited exceptions, are secured by real estate, marketable securities, or corporate assets. Substantially all of the Bank’s residential mortgage and home equity loans are secured by residential property. Consequently, the Bank’s ability to continue to originate real estate loans may be impaired by the weakening or deterioration in local and regional economic conditions in the real estate markets, including as a result of, among other things, natural disasters. A borrower’s default on its obligations under one or more Bank loans may result in lost principal and interest income and increased operating expenses as a result of the allocation of management time and external resources to the collection and workout of the loan. Where collection efforts are unsuccessful or acceptable workout arrangements cannot be reached, the Bank may have to charge off the loan in whole or in part, and the Bank may acquire the real estate or other assets, if any, that secure the loan. The amount owed under the defaulted loan may exceed the value of the assets acquired.
Our Wealth Management and Trust segment may be negatively impacted by changes in general economic and market conditions because the performance of such businesses is directly affected by conditions in the financial and securities markets. The financial markets and businesses operating in the securities industry are highly volatile (meaning that performance results can vary greatly within short periods of time) and are directly affected by, among other factors, domestic and foreign economic conditions and general trends in business and finance, all of which are beyond our control. Declines in the financial markets or a lack of sustained growth may adversely affect the market value of the assets that we manage. In addition, our management contracts generally provide for fees payable for services based on the market value of assets under management, although there are a portion of our contracts that provide for the payment of fees based on investment performance in addition to a base fee. Because most contracts provide for a fee based on market values of securities, fluctuations in the underlying securities values may have an adverse effect on fees and therefore our results of operations, and financial condition.
Prepayments of loans may negatively impact our banking business.
Generally, the Bank’s clients may prepay the principal amount of their outstanding loans at any time. The rate at which such prepayments occur, as well as the size of such prepayments, are within our clients’ discretion. Fluctuations in interest rates, in certain circumstances, may also lead to high levels of loan prepayments, which may also have an adverse impact on our net interest income. If clients prepay the principal amount of their loans, and we are unable to lend those funds to other borrowers or invest the funds at the same or higher interest rates, our interest income will be reduced. A significant reduction in interest income could have a negative impact on our results of operations, and financial condition.
The soundness of other financial institutions could adversely affect us.
Our ability to engage in routine funding transactions could be adversely affected by the actions and commercial soundness of other financial institutions. Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty and other relationships. We have exposure to many different financial institutions, and we routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial industry, including brokers and dealers, other commercial banks, investment banks, mutual and hedge funds, and other financial institutions. As a result, defaults by, or even negative rumors or questions about, one or more financial services institutions, or the financial services industry generally, could lead to market-wide liquidity problems and losses or defaults by us or by other institutions and organizations. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of default of our counterparty or client. In addition, our credit risk may be exacerbated when the collateral held by us cannot be liquidated or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the financial instrument exposure due to us. There is no assurance that any such losses would not materially and adversely affect our results of operations, and financial condition.
Our cost of funds for banking operations may increase as a result of general economic conditions, interest rates and competitive pressures.
The Bank has traditionally obtained funds principally through deposits and borrowings. As a general matter, deposits are a cheaper source of funds than borrowings, because interest rates paid for deposits are typically less than interest rates charged for borrowings. We compete with banks and other financial institutions for deposits. If, as a result of general economic conditions, market interest rates, competitive pressures, or otherwise, the amount of deposits at the Bank decreases relative to its overall banking operations, the Bank may have to rely more heavily on higher cost borrowings as a source of funds in the future or otherwise reduce its loan growth or pursue loan sales. Higher funding costs reduce our net interest margin, net interest income, and net income.
Fluctuations in interest rates may negatively impact our banking business.
The Bank’s earnings and financial condition are largely dependent on net interest income, which represents the difference between the interest income earned on interest-bearing assets (usually loans and investment securities) and the
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interest expense incurred in connection with interest-bearing liabilities (usually deposits and borrowings). The relative rates of interest we earn and pay are highly sensitive to many factors beyond our control, including general economic conditions, and changes in monetary or fiscal policies of the Federal Reserve and other governmental authorities. A narrowing of this interest rate spread and the shape of the yield curve could adversely affect the Bank’s net interest income, which also could negatively impact its earnings and financial condition. As a result, the Bank has adopted asset and liability management policies to mitigate the potential adverse effects of changes in interest rates on net interest income, primarily by altering the mix and maturity of loans, investments, funding sources, and derivatives. However, even with these policies in place, a change in interest rates can impact our results of operations, and financial condition.
An increase in interest rates could also have a negative impact on the Bank’s results of operations by reducing the ability of borrowers to repay their current floating or adjustable rate loan obligations, which could not only result in increased loan defaults, foreclosures, and charge-offs, but also necessitate increases to our allowance for loan losses.
Similarly, rising interest rates may increase the cost of deposits, which are a primary source of funding. While we actively manage against these risks through hedging and other risk management strategies, if our assumptions regarding borrower behavior are wrong or overall economic conditions are significantly different than anticipated, our risk mitigation techniques may be insufficient.
A decrease in interest rates could also have a negative impact on the Bank’s results of operations if clients refinance their loans at lower rates or prepay their loans and we are unable to lend or invest those funds at equivalent or higher rates.
Potential downgrades of U.S. government securities by one or more of the credit ratings agencies could have an adverse effect on our operations, earnings and financial condition.
A possible future downgrade of the sovereign credit ratings of the U.S. government and a decline in the perceived creditworthiness of U.S. government-related obligations could impact our ability to obtain funding that is collateralized by these affected instruments held by us, as well as affect the pricing of that funding when it is available. A downgrade may also adversely affect the market value of such instruments held by us. We cannot predict if, when or how any changes to the credit ratings or perceived creditworthiness of these organizations will affect economic conditions. Such ratings actions could result in a significant adverse impact on us. Among other things, a downgrade in the U.S. government’s credit rating could adversely impact the value of our securities portfolio and may trigger requirements that the Company post additional collateral for trades relative to these securities. A downgrade of the sovereign credit ratings of the U.S. government or the credit ratings of related institutions, agencies or instruments would significantly exacerbate the other risks to which we are subject and any related adverse effects on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Our allowance for loan losses may not be adequate to cover actual loan losses, and an increase in the allowance for loan losses will adversely affect our earnings.
We maintain an allowance for loan losses based on available information, including the quality of our loan portfolio, certain economic conditions, the historical rate of defaulted loans, the value of the underlying collateral, and the level of our nonaccruing and criticized loans. We rely on our loan quality reviews, our experience and our evaluation of economic conditions, among other factors, in determining the level required for the allowance for loan losses. If we determine that further increases in the allowance for loan losses are necessary, the increase will adversely affect our earnings. In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review the allowance for loan losses, and may require us to adjust the allowance based on their judgment about information available to them at the time of their examination. These adjustments could negatively impact our results of operations, and financial condition.
The accounting rules related to the calculation of the allowance for loan losses changed effective January 1, 2020. The prospective application of the new rules could significantly change the amount of future provision for loan loss expenses as compared to the previous rules. The change in the allowance for loan losses at the time of adoption, consistent with what is known, could result in an increase to retained earnings based on the new rules. For further information, see Part II. Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 1: Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.”
Our loan portfolio includes commercial loans, commercial real estate loans, and construction and land loans, which are generally riskier than other types of loans.
At December 31, 2019, our commercial loans, commercial real estate loans, and construction and land loans portfolios comprised 56% of total loans. These types of commercial loans generally carry larger loan balances and involve a higher risk of nonpayment or late payment than residential mortgage loans. These loans may lack standardized terms and may include a significant principal balance or “balloon” payment due on maturity. The ability of a borrower to make or refinance a balloon payment may be affected by a number of factors, including the financial condition of the borrower, prevailing economic
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conditions, interest rates, and collateral values. Repayment of these loans is generally more dependent on the economy and the successful operation of the underlying business. Because of the risks associated with commercial loans, we may experience higher rates of default than if our loan portfolio were more heavily weighted toward residential mortgage loans. Higher rates of default could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, and financial condition.
Environmental liability associated with commercial lending could result in losses.
In the course of business, the Bank may acquire, through foreclosure or other similar proceedings, properties securing loans it has originated or purchased which are in default. Particularly in commercial real estate lending, there is a risk that material environmental violations could be discovered at these properties. In this event, we or the Bank might be required to remedy these violations at the affected properties at our sole cost and expense. The cost of this remedial action could substantially exceed the value of affected properties. We may not have adequate remedies against the prior owner or other responsible parties and could find it difficult or impossible to sell the affected properties as a result of their condition. These events could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
We may be required to repurchase mortgage loans or indemnify buyers against losses in some circumstances, which could harm liquidity, results of operations, and financial condition.
When mortgage loans are sold, whether as whole loans or pursuant to a securitization, we are required to make customary representations and warranties to purchasers, guarantors and insurers, including government-sponsored entities, about the mortgage loans and the manner in which they were originated. Whole loan sale agreements require us to repurchase or substitute mortgage loans, or indemnify buyers against losses, in the event we breach these representations or warranties. In addition, we may be required to repurchase mortgage loans as a result of early payment default of the borrower on a mortgage loan. If repurchase and indemnity demands increase and such demands are valid claims and are in excess of our provision for potential losses, our liquidity, results of operations, and financial condition may be adversely affected.
Our financial statements are based in part on assumptions and estimates, which, if wrong, could cause unexpected losses in the future.
Pursuant to accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. (“GAAP”), we are required to use certain assumptions and estimates in preparing our financial statements, including in determining loan loss reserves, reserves related to litigation, if any, and the fair value of certain assets and liabilities, among other items. If assumptions or estimates underlying our financial statements are incorrect, we may experience material fluctuations in our results of operations. For additional information, see Part II. Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Critical Accounting Policies.”
Changes in accounting standards can be difficult to predict and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations.
Our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our results of operations and financial condition. From time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or “FASB,” changes the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can be hard to anticipate and difficult and costly to implement and can materially impact how we record and report our results of operations, and financial condition. In some cases, we could be required to retroactively apply a new or revised standard, resulting in changes to previously reported financial results. For example, in June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments ("ASU 2016-13") that, effective January 1, 2020, substantially changed the accounting for credit losses on loans and other financial assets held by banks, financial institutions, and other organizations. The standard removed the existing “probable” threshold in GAAP for recognizing credit losses and instead requires companies to reflect their estimate of credit losses over the life of the financial assets. Companies must consider all relevant information when estimating expected credit losses, including details about past events, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. The ongoing impact to earnings is expected to be more volatile and could adversely impact our reported earnings and lending activity.
Goodwill and other intangible asset impairment would negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition.
Generally, the acquirer in a business combination is willing to pay more for a business than the sum of the fair values of the individual assets and liabilities because of other inherent value associated with an assembled business. The resulting excess of the consideration paid over the net fair value of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the date of acquisition, is recognized as goodwill. An essential part of the acquisition method of accounting is the recognition and measurement of identifiable intangible assets, separate from goodwill, at fair value. At December 31, 2019, our goodwill and net intangible assets totaled $68.0 million.
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Under current accounting standards, goodwill acquired in a business combination is recognized as an asset and not amortized. Instead, goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if there is a triggering event that may indicate the possibility of impairment. Indefinite-lived intangible assets are amortized and are tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset or asset group may not be recoverable.
If we determine goodwill or intangible assets are impaired, we will be required to write-down the value of these assets. We have had to take such impairment charges in the past, and we cannot assure you that we will not be required to take further impairment charges in the future. Any impairment charge would have a negative effect on our results of operations, and financial condition.
Changes in tax law and differences in interpretation of tax laws and regulations may adversely impact our financial statements.
From time to time, local, state or federal tax authorities change tax laws and regulations, which may result in a decrease or increase to our net deferred tax assets. At December 31, 2019, our net deferred tax assets were $11.4 million. We assess the likelihood that our net deferred tax assets will be realizable based primarily on future taxable income and, if necessary, establish a valuation allowance for those deferred tax assets determined to not likely be realizable. Management judgment is required in determining the appropriate recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities, including projections of future taxable income, as well as the character of that income.
Local, state or federal tax authorities may interpret tax laws and regulations differently than we do and challenge tax positions that we have taken on tax returns. This may result in differences in the treatment of revenues, deductions, credits and/or differences in the timing of these items. The differences in treatment may result in payment of additional taxes, interest or penalties that could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
We are a holding company and depend on our subsidiaries for dividends.
We are a legal entity that is separate and distinct from the Bank and DGHM, and we depend on dividends from the Bank and, to a lesser extent, DGHM, to fund dividend payments on our common stock and payments on our other obligations. Our right, and consequently the right of our shareholders, to participate in any distribution of the assets or earnings of the Bank and DGHM through the payment of such dividends or otherwise is necessarily subject to the prior claims of creditors of the Bank (including depositors) and DGHM, except to the extent that certain claims of ours in a creditor capacity may be recognized. A reduction or elimination of dividends could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
Holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends only when, as, and if declared by our Board of Directors. Although we have historically declared cash dividends on our common stock, we are not required to do so. Our Board of Directors may reduce or eliminate our common stock dividend in the future. The Federal Reserve has authority to prohibit us and the Bank from paying dividends if such payment, in its opinion, would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice. In addition, we are required to inform and consult with the Federal Reserve in advance of declaring a dividend that exceeds earnings for the period for which the dividend is being paid. See Part I. Item 1. “Business - Supervision and Regulation - Dividend Restrictions” and “Business - Supervision and Regulation - Regulatory Capital Requirements.”
We are subject to liquidity risk, which could negatively affect our funding levels.
Market conditions or other events could negatively affect our access to or the cost of funding, affecting our ongoing ability to accommodate liability maturities and deposit withdrawals, meet contractual obligations, or fund asset growth and new business initiatives at a reasonable cost, in a timely manner and without adverse consequences.
Although we maintain a liquid asset portfolio and have implemented strategies to maintain sufficient and diverse sources of funding to accommodate planned, as well as unanticipated changes in assets, liabilities, and off-balance sheet commitments under various economic conditions, a substantial, unexpected, or prolonged change in the level or cost of liquidity could have a material adverse effect on us. If the cost effectiveness or the availability of supply in these credit markets is reduced for a prolonged period of time, our funding needs may require us to access funding and manage liquidity by other means. These alternatives may include generating client deposits, securitizing or selling loans, extending the maturity of wholesale borrowings, borrowing under certain secured borrowing arrangements, using relationships developed with a variety of fixed income investors, and further managing loan growth and investment opportunities. These alternative means of funding may result in an increase to the overall cost of funds and may not be available under stressed conditions, which would cause us to liquidate a portion of our liquid asset portfolio to meet any funding needs.
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Uncertainty about the future of London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") may adversely affect our business.
LIBOR is used extensively in the US as a benchmark for various commercial and financial contracts, including funding sources, adjustable rate mortgages, corporate debt, interest rate swaps and other derivatives. LIBOR is set based on interest rate information reported by certain banks, which will stop reporting such information after 2021. It is uncertain at this time whether LIBOR will change or cease to exist or the extent to which those entering into financial contracts will transition to any other particular benchmark. Other benchmarks may perform differently than LIBOR or may have other consequences that cannot currently be anticipated. It is also uncertain what will happen with instruments that rely on LIBOR for future interest rate adjustments and which of those instruments may remain outstanding or be renegotiated if LIBOR ceases to exist. The uncertainty regarding the future of LIBOR as well as the transition from LIBOR to another benchmark rate or rates could have adverse impacts on our funding costs or net interest margins, as well as any floating-rate obligations, loans, deposits, derivatives, and other financial instruments that currently use LIBOR as a benchmark rate and, ultimately, adversely affect our results of operations, and financial condition.
We are subject to capital and liquidity standards that require banks and bank holding companies to maintain more and higher quality capital and greater liquidity than has historically been the case.
We became subject to new capital requirements in 2015. These new standards, which are now fully phased-in, require bank holding companies and their bank subsidiaries to maintain substantially higher levels of capital as a percentage of their assets, with a greater emphasis on common equity as opposed to other components of capital. The need to maintain more and higher quality capital, as well as greater liquidity, and generally increased regulatory scrutiny with respect to capital levels, may at some point limit our business activities, including lending, and our ability to grow our business. It could also result in our being required to take steps to increase our regulatory capital and may dilute shareholder value or limit our ability to pay dividends or otherwise return capital to our investors through stock repurchases.
Future capital offerings may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
In the future, we may attempt to increase our capital resources or, if our or the Bank’s capital ratios fall below required minimums, we or the Bank could be required to raise additional capital by making additional offerings of debt, common or preferred stock, or senior or subordinated notes. Upon liquidation, holders of our debt securities and any shares of preferred stock and lenders with respect to other borrowings will receive distributions of our available assets prior to the holders of our common stock.
Additional future equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing shareholders or reduce the market price of our common stock, or both. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings.
We cannot assure you that such capital will be available to us on acceptable terms or at all. Our inability to raise sufficient additional capital on acceptable terms when needed could adversely affect our businesses, results of operations, and financial condition.
The market price and trading volume of our common stock may be volatile.
The market price of our common stock may be volatile. In addition, the trading volume in our common stock may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. We cannot assure you that the market price of our common stock will not fluctuate or decline significantly in the future. Some of the factors that could negatively affect our share price or result in fluctuations in the price or trading volume of our common stock include:
quarterly variations in our operating results or the quality of our assets;
operating results that vary from the expectations of management, securities analysts, or investors;
changes in expectations as to our future financial performance;
announcements of innovations, new products, strategic developments, significant contracts, litigation, acquisitions, divestitures, reorganizations, restructurings and other material events by us or our competitors;
the operating and securities price performance of other companies that investors believe are comparable to us;
our past and future dividend and share repurchase practices;
regulatory developments and actions;
future sales of our equity or equity-related securities; and
changes in global financial markets and global economies and general market conditions, such as interest rates, stock, commodity or real estate valuations or volatility.
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Anti-takeover provisions could negatively impact our shareholders.
Provisions of Massachusetts law, the BHCA, and provisions of our articles of organization and by-laws could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us or have the effect of discouraging a third party from attempting to acquire control of us. Our articles of organization authorize our Board of Directors to issue preferred stock without shareholder approval and such preferred stock could be issued as a defensive measure in response to a takeover proposal. These and other provisions could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us, even if an acquisition might be in the best interest of our shareholders.

ITEM 1B.UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
The Company and its subsidiaries primarily conduct operations in leased premises; however, the Bank owns the building in which one of its offices is located. The Bank leases the land upon which this building is located. The Company’s headquarters is located at Ten Post Office Square, Boston, Massachusetts. See “Private Banking” and “Wealth Management and Trust” in Part I. Item 1. “Business - General” for further detail.
Generally, the initial terms of the leases for our leased properties range from five to fifteen years. Most of the leases also include options to renew at fair market value for periods of five to ten years. In addition to minimum rentals, certain leases include escalation clauses based upon various price indices and include provisions for additional payments to cover real estate taxes.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
The Company is involved in routine legal proceedings occurring in the ordinary course of business. In the opinion of management, final disposition of these proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on the Consolidated Balance Sheets or Consolidated Statements of Operations of the Company. For further information, see Part II. Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 25: Litigation and Contingencies.”
ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.
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PART II

ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
I. Market for Common Stock
The Company’s common stock, par value $1.00 per share, is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market (“NASDAQ”) under the symbol “BPFH.” At February 21, 2020, there were 83,363,841 shares of common stock outstanding. The number of holders of record of the Company’s common stock as of February 21, 2020 was 786. The closing price of the Company’s common stock on February 21, 2020 was $11.56.
II. Dividends
Payment of dividends by the Company on its common stock is subject to various factors, including regulatory restrictions and guidelines. See Part I. Item 1. “Business - Supervision and Regulation - Dividend Restrictions” for further detail.
III.  Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
Information regarding securities authorized for issuance under our equity compensation plans will be included in the definitive Proxy Statement (the “Proxy Statement”) for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on April 23, 2020 and is incorporated herein by reference.
IV.  Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
There were no unregistered sales of equity securities of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2019.
V. Issuer Repurchases
The following table summarizes repurchases of the Company’s outstanding common shares for the three months ended December 31, 2019:
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Period
(a) Total number
of shares
purchased
(b) Average
price paid
per share
(c) Total number
of shares
purchased as
part of publicly
announced plans
(d) Maximum
approximate dollar
value of shares that
may yet be purchased
under the plans
October 1 - 31, 2019—  $—  —  $12,807,043  
November 1 - 30, 2019—  —  —  12,807,043  
December 1 - 31, 2019—  —  —  12,807,043  
Total—  $—  —  $12,807,043  
On August 13, 2019, the Company received a notice of non-objection from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston for a share repurchase program of up to $20.0 million of the Company’s outstanding common shares. Under the program, shares may be repurchased from time to time in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions in amounts and at prices the Company deems appropriate, subject to market conditions and other considerations, for a one-year period. The program does not obligate the Company to purchase any shares. The repurchases will be funded from cash on hand, available borrowings or proceeds from potential debt or other capital markets sources. The share repurchase program may be suspended or discontinued at any time by the Company without prior notice. The Company’s Board of Directors approved the program, subject to regulatory non-objection, on August 7, 2019.
VI.  Performance Graph
The Total Return Performance Graph set forth below is a line graph comparing the yearly percentage change in the cumulative total shareholder return on the Company’s common stock, based on the market price of the Company’s common stock, with the total return on companies within the NASDAQ Composite Index and companies within the S&P Global Market Intelligence $5 billion-$10 billion Bank Index. The calculation of cumulative return assumes a $100 investment in the Company’s common stock, the NASDAQ Composite Index, and the S&P Global Market Intelligence $5 billion-$10 billion Bank Index on December 31, 2014. It also assumes that all dividends are reinvested during the relevant periods.
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403063569_bpfh-20191231_g1.jpg
___________
Source: S&P Global Market Intelligence
 Year Ending December 31,
 201420152016201720182019
BPFH$100.00  $86.74  $131.03  $125.79  $88.87  $105.53  
NASDAQ Composite Index100.00  106.96  116.45  150.96  146.67  200.49  
SNL Bank $5 billion-$10 billion100.00  113.92  163.20  162.59  147.15  182.34  

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ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following table represents selected financial data for the last five fiscal years ended December 31, 2019. The data set forth below does not purport to be complete. It should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the more detailed information appearing elsewhere herein, including the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes.
 20192018201720162015
At December 31: (In thousands, except share data) 
Total balance sheet assets$8,830,501  $8,494,625  $8,311,744  $7,970,474  $7,542,508  
Loans held for sale7,386  2,812  4,697  3,464  8,072  
Total loans (excluding loans held for sale)6,976,704  6,893,158  6,505,028  6,114,354  5,719,212  
Allowance for loan losses71,982  75,312  74,742  78,077  78,500  
Cash and investments (1)1,376,863  1,255,253  1,425,418  1,507,845  1,474,737  
Goodwill and intangible assets67,959  69,834  91,681  169,279  185,089  
Deposits7,241,476  6,781,170  6,510,246  6,085,146  6,040,437  
Borrowed funds510,590  813,435  862,213  980,192  625,902  
Total shareholders’ equity819,018  753,954  785,944  768,481  746,613  
Nonperforming assets (2)16,103  14,458  14,295  19,005  27,347  
Net loans (charged-off)/recovered234  2,768  4,334  6,512  4,217  
Assets under management and advisory (“AUM):
Wealth Management and Trust$15,224,000  $14,206,000  $14,781,000  $13,301,000  $14,242,000  
Other1,544,000  1,715,000  2,004,000  1,803,000  1,841,000  
Total AUM, excluding Anchor and BOS$16,768,000  $15,921,000  $16,785,000  $15,104,000  $16,083,000  
AUM at Anchor—  —  9,277,000  8,768,000  8,111,000  
AUM at BOS—  —  4,434,000  3,696,000  3,422,000  
LESS: Inter-company relationships—  —  (11,000) (11,000) (21,000) 
Total AUM, including Anchor and BOS$16,768,000  $15,921,000  $30,485,000  $27,557,000  $27,595,000  
For The Year Ended December 31:
Net interest income$228,076  $234,566  $224,686  $200,438  $185,770  
Provision/(credit) for loan losses(3,564) (2,198) (7,669) (6,935) (1,555) 
Net interest income after provision/(credit) for loan losses231,640  236,764  232,355  207,373  187,325  
Fees and other income101,547  149,997  153,966  158,787  161,169  
Operating expense excl. restructuring and impairment of goodwill228,560  259,527  275,035  253,408  251,457  
Restructuring expense1,646  7,828  —  2,017  3,724  
Impairment of goodwill—  —  24,901  9,528  —  
Income from continuing operations before income taxes102,981  119,406  86,385  101,207  93,313  
Income tax expense (3)22,591  37,537  46,196  30,963  30,392