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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

csbb-10k_20191231.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM                      TO                     

Commission File Number 0-21714

 

CSB BANCORP, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its Charter)

 

 

Ohio

  

34-1687530

(State or other jurisdiction of

  

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

91 North Clay Street, Millersburg, Ohio

 

44654

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip code)

 

 

 

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (330) 674-9015

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:  None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading

Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Shares, $6.25 par value

 

CSBB

 

OTCPink

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes   No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes   No  

The aggregate market value of the voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant, based on a closing price of $40.45 per common share on June 30, 2019, was $102.7 million.

The number of shares of Registrant’s Common Stock outstanding as of March 16, 2020 was 2,742,350.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of CSB Bancorp Inc.’s 2019 Annual Report to Shareholders, which is filed as Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K, are incorporated by reference in Parts I and II of this Form 10-K.

Portions of CSB Bancorp Inc.’s Proxy Statement for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS.

General

CSB Bancorp, Inc. (“CSB”), is a registered financial holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, and was incorporated under the laws of the State of Ohio in 1991. The Commercial and Savings Bank of Millersburg, Ohio (the “Bank”), an Ohio banking corporation chartered in 1879, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of CSB. The Bank is a member of the Federal Reserve System, and its deposits are insured up to the maximum amount provided by law by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). The primary regulators of the Bank are the Federal Reserve Board and the Ohio Division of Financial Institutions. CSB Investment Services, LLC, an Ohio limited liability company (“CSB Investment”), is a wholly owned subsidiary of CSB that is licensed to engage in the business of insurance in the State of Ohio. In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, CSB and its subsidiaries are sometimes collectively referred to as the “Company.”

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information

Certain statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which are not statements of historical fact, constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “anticipate”, “estimates”, “may”, “feels”, “expects”, “believes”, “plans”, “will”, “would”, “should”, “could” and similar expressions are intended to identify these forward-looking statements but are not the exclusive means of identifying such statements. Examples of forward-looking statements include: (i) projections of income or expense, earnings per share, the payment or non-payment of dividends, capital structure, and other financial items; (ii) statements of plans and objectives of the Company and of its management or Board of Directors, including those relating to products or services; (iii) statements of future economic performance; and (iv) statements of assumptions underlying such statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, without limitation, risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in the Company’s filings with the SEC, including without limitation the risk factors disclosed in Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Other factors not currently anticipated may also materially and adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows. There can be no assurance that future results will meet expectations. While the Company believes that the forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are reasonable, the reader should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statement. In addition, these statements speak only as of the date made. The Company does not undertake, and expressly disclaims, any obligation to update or alter any statements whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise, except as may be required by applicable law.

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a “safe harbor” for forward-looking statements to encourage companies to provide prospective information so long as those statements are identified as forward-looking and are accompanied by meaningful cautionary statements identifying important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. The Company desires to take advantage of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

Business Overview and Lending Activities

CSB operates primarily through the Bank and CSB Investment, providing a wide range of banking, trust, financial, and brokerage services to corporate, institutional, and individual customers throughout northeast Ohio. The Bank provides retail and commercial banking services to its customers, including checking and savings accounts, time deposits, IRAs, safe deposit facilities, personal loans, commercial loans, real estate mortgage loans, installment loans, night depository facilities, brokerage, and trust services.

The Bank provides residential real estate, commercial real estate, commercial, and consumer loans to customers located primarily in Holmes, Stark, Tuscarawas, Wayne and portions of surrounding counties in Ohio. The Bank’s market area has historically exhibited relatively stable economic conditions. Economic activity in the Company’s market area has been increasing at a steady pace for the past ten years. Reported unemployment levels at December 2019 in the four primary counties served by the Company ranged between 2.8% and 4.4%. These levels decreased slightly from December 2018. Labor markets continued hiring at a firmer pace during the year. Wages increased modestly during 2019 for most entry level jobs and to a lesser extent for middle-skills jobs in certain sectors such as banking and construction. The local housing market continues to improve with supply still relatively tight. Elevated costs of building materials have contributed to increased construction costs. Consumer confidence in the economy has been a primary driver for housing demand and higher consumer spending.

Certain risks are involved in providing loans, including, but not limited to, the borrowers’ ability and willingness to repay the debt. Before the Bank extends a new loan or renews an existing loan to a customer, these risks are assessed through a review of the borrower’s past and current credit history, the collateral being used to secure the transaction if any, and other factors. For all commercial loan relationships greater than $300,000 the Bank’s internal credit department performs an annual risk rating review. In addition to this review, an independent, outside loan review firm is engaged to review a sample of watch list and adversely classified credits over $250,000 and a sample of commercial loan relationships greater than $250,000. The outside loan review will also assess management’s current credit grades and provide commentary with regard to assigned ratings and the need for a credit to be classified as a troubled debt restructuring, as well as assess management’s specific loan loss reserves for loans included in their sample that are considered to be impaired. In addition, any loan over $100,000 identified as a problem credit by management and/or the external loan review consultants is assigned to the Bank’s “loan watch list,” has a written action plan created specifically for the loan relationship, and is subject to ongoing review at least quarterly by the Bank’s credit department and the assigned loan officer to ensure appropriate action is taken if deterioration continues.

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Commercial loan rates are variable and fixed, and include operating lines of credit and term loans made to businesses, primarily based on their ability to repay the loan from the cash flow of the business. Business assets such as equipment, accounts receivable, and inventory typically secure such loans. When the borrower is not an individual, the Bank generally obtains the personal guarantee of the business owner. These loans typically involve larger loan balances, are generally dependent on the cash flow of the business, and thus may be subject to a greater extent to adverse conditions in the general economy or in a specific industry. Management reviews the borrower’s cash flows when deciding whether to grant the credit in order to evaluate whether estimated future cash flows will be adequate to service principal and interest of the new obligation in addition to existing obligations.

Commercial real estate loans are primarily secured by borrower-occupied business real estate and are dependent on the ability of the related business to generate adequate cash flow to service the debt. Commercial real estate loans are generally originated with a loan-to-value ratio of 80% or less. Commercial construction loans are secured by commercial real estate and in most cases the Bank also provides the permanent financing. The Bank monitors advances and the maximum loan to value ratio is typically limited to the lesser of 90% of cost or 80% of appraisal value. Management performs much of the same analysis when deciding whether to grant a commercial real estate loan as when deciding whether to grant a commercial loan.

Residential real estate loans carry both fixed and variable rates and are secured by the borrower’s residence. Such loans are made based on the borrower’s ability to make repayment from employment and other income. Management assesses the borrower’s ability and willingness to repay the debt through review of credit history and ratings, verification of employment and other income, review of debt-to-income ratios, and other measures of repayment ability. The Bank generally makes these loans in amounts of 80% or less of the value of the collateral or up to 95% of collateral value with private mortgage insurance. An appraisal from a qualified real estate appraiser or an evaluation based on comparable market values is obtained for substantially all loans secured by real estate. Residential construction loans are secured by residential real estate that generally will be occupied by the borrower upon completion. The Bank usually makes the permanent loan at the end of the construction phase. Generally, construction loans are made in amounts of 80% or less of the value of the as-completed collateral.

Home equity lines of credit are made to individuals and are secured by second or first mortgages on the borrower’s residence. Loans are based on similar credit and appraisal criteria used for residential real estate loans; however, loans up to 100% of the value of the property may be approved for borrowers with excellent credit histories. These loans typically bear interest at variable rates and require minimum monthly payments of the accrued interest.

Installment loans to individuals include unsecured loans and loans secured by recreational vehicles (“RV’s”), automobiles, and other consumer assets. Consumer loans for the purchase of new RV’s and new automobiles generally do not exceed 125% of Dealer Invoice on RV’s or 110% of the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of an automobile. Loans for used RV’s and automobiles do not exceed 120% of the “clean trade-in value” as reported in the current “NADA” used guides. Overdraft protection loans are unsecured personal lines of credit to individuals who have demonstrated good credit character with reasonably assured sources of income and satisfactory credit histories. Consumer loans generally involve more risk than residential mortgage loans because of the type and nature of collateral and, in certain types of consumer loans, absence of collateral. Since these loans are generally repaid from ordinary income of the individual or family unit, repayment may be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, ill health, or by a general decline in economic conditions. The Bank assesses the borrower’s ability and willingness to repay through a review of credit history, credit ratings, debt-to-income ratios, and other measures of repayment ability.

While CSB’s chief decision-makers monitor the revenue streams of the various financial products and services, operations are managed and financial performance is evaluated on a Company-wide basis. Accordingly, all of the Company’s banking operations are considered by management to be aggregated in one reportable operating segment. For a discussion of the Company’s financial performance for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, see the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements found in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Employees

At December 31, 2019, the Company had 187 employees, 158 of which were employed on a full-time basis. CSB has no separate employees not also employed by the Bank. No employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements. Employees are provided benefit programs, some of which are contributory. Management considers its employee relations to be good.

Competition

The financial services industry is highly competitive. In its primary market area of Holmes, Stark, Tuscarawas, Wayne and surrounding Ohio counties, the Bank competes for new deposit dollars and loans with other commercial banks, including both large regional banks and smaller community banks, as well as savings and loan associations, credit unions, finance companies, insurance companies, brokerage firms, investment companies, private lenders, and technology-based providers of financial services (sometimes referred to as “fintech” companies).

Competition within the financial service industry continues to increase as a result of mergers between, and expansion of, financial service providers within and outside of the Company’s primary market areas. In addition, securities firms and insurance companies that have elected to become financial holding companies may acquire commercial banks and other financial institutions, which can create additional competitive pressure.

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Management believes the primary factors in competing for loans and deposits are interest rates, availability of services, quality of customer service, convenience, and name recognition. Some of the Company’s competitors may have greater resources and as such, higher lending limits, or fewer regulatory constraints and lower cost structures, all of which may adversely affect the Company’s ability to compete.

Investor Relations

The Company’s website address is www.csb1.com. The Company makes available its Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports, free of charge on its website as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The Company also makes available through its website, other reports filed with the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), including its proxy statements and reports filed by officers and directors under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act, as well as the Company’s Code of Ethics. References to our website in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are provided as a convenience and do not constitute, and should not be deemed, an incorporation by reference of the information contained on, or available through, the website, and such information should not be considered part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In addition, the Company’s filings are available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company has filed the above referenced reports.

Supervision and Regulation of CSB and the Bank

CSB and the Bank are subject to extensive regulation by federal and state regulatory agencies. The regulation of financial holding companies and their subsidiaries by bank regulatory agencies is intended primarily for the protection of consumers, depositors, federal deposit insurance funds, and the banking system as a whole and not for the protection of shareholders.

CSB is a bank holding company that has registered with the Federal Reserve Board (“FRB”) as a financial holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act, as amended (the “BHC Act”). Pursuant to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (“GLBA”), a bank holding company may become a financial holding company if it meets certain capital requirements and is “well-managed” and each of its subsidiary banks is “well-capitalized” under regulatory “prompt corrective action” provisions, is “well-managed,” and has at least a “satisfactory” rating under the Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”). CSB has been a financial holding company since 2005. No prior regulatory approval is required for a financial holding company to acquire certain companies, other than banks and savings associations, that are financial in nature as determined by the FRB. The financial holding company and its subsidiaries must continue to meet the above described requirements in order to continue to engage in activities that are financial in nature without being subjected to regulatory actions or restrictions, which could include a requirement to divest of the subsidiary or subsidiaries.

GLBA defines “financial in nature” to include securities underwriting, dealing, and market making; sponsoring mutual funds and investment companies; insurance underwriting and agency activities; merchant banking activities; and activities that the FRB has determined to be closely related to banking. As a financial holding company, CSB is subject to regulation, examination, and supervision by the FRB under the BHC Act. CSB is also subject to the disclosure and regulatory requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1933, as amended, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the regulations promulgated thereunder, as administered by the SEC.

The Bank, as an Ohio state-chartered bank and member of the Federal Reserve System, is subject to regulation, supervision, and examination by the Ohio Division of Financial Institutions and the FRB. Because the FDIC insures its deposits, the Bank is also subject to certain FDIC regulations. The FDIC is an independent federal agency which insures the deposits, up to prescribed statutory limits, of federally-insured banks and savings associations, and safeguards the safety and soundness of the financial institution industry. The Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC (“DIF”) and the Bank is subject to deposit insurance assessments to maintain the DIF. In addition, the Bank is subject to regulations promulgated by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “CFPB”) established by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act enacted in July 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”).

The earnings, dividends, and other aspects of the operations and activities of CSB and the Bank are affected by state and federal laws and regulations, and by policies of various regulatory authorities. These policies include, for example, statutory maximum lending rates, requirements on maintenance of reserves against deposits, domestic monetary policies of the FRB, United States fiscal and economic policies, international currency regulations, and monetary policies, certain restrictions on relationships with many phases of the securities business, and capital adequacy, and liquidity restraints.

The following information describes selected federal and state statutory and regulatory provisions that have, or could have, a material impact on the Company’s business. This discussion is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of the particular statutory or regulatory provisions. These statutes and regulations are continually under review by the United States Congress and state legislatures, and state and federal regulatory agencies. A change in statutes, regulations, or regulatory policies applicable to CSB and its subsidiaries could have a material effect on their respective businesses.

Regulation of Bank Holding Companies

As a financial holding company under GLBA, CSB’s activities are subject to extensive regulation by the FRB. CSB is required to file reports with the FRB and provide such additional information as the FRB may require, and is subject to regular examination and inspection by the FRB.

The FRB has extensive enforcement authority over bank holding companies, including the ability to assess civil money penalties, issue cease and desist orders, and require that a bank holding company divest subsidiaries (including subsidiary banks). The FRB may initiate enforcement actions for violations of laws and regulations, and for unsafe and unsound practices. Under FRB policies, a bank holding company is expected

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to act as a “source of strength” to its subsidiary banks and to commit resources to support those subsidiary banks. Under this policy, the FRB may require a bank holding company to contribute additional capital to an undercapitalized subsidiary bank.

The BHC Act requires the prior approval of the FRB in cases where a bank holding company proposes to acquire direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of the voting shares of any bank that is not already majority-owned by it, acquire all or substantially all of the assets of another bank or another financial or bank holding company, or merge or consolidate with any other financial or bank holding company.

The FRB also regulates and provides limitations on transactions between affiliates of a bank holding company, loans to directors and officers of bank affiliates, securities transactions, and liability for losses incurred by commonly controlled banks in certain circumstances.

Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act

On May 25, 2018, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (the “Regulatory Relief Act”) was signed into law. The Regulatory Relief Act repealed or modified certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, as amended (“Dodd-Frank Act”), and eased regulations on all but the largest banks (those with consolidated assets in excess of $250 billion). Bank holding companies with consolidated assets of less than $100 billion, including CSB, are no longer subject to enhanced prudential standards. The Regulatory Relief Act also relieves bank holding companies and banks with consolidated assets of less than $100 billion, including CSB, from certain record-keeping, reporting and disclosure requirements. Certain other regulatory requirements applied only to banks with assets in excess of $50 billion and so did not apply to the Company even before the enactment of the Regulatory Relief Act.

 

Current Expected Credit Loss Model

In December 2018, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), the Federal Reserve Board, and the FDIC issued a final rule to address regulatory treatment of credit loss allowances under the current expected credit loss (“CECL”) model (accounting standard).  The rule revised the federal banking agencies’ regulatory capital rules to identify which credit loss allowances under the CECL model are eligible for inclusion in regulatory capital and to provide banking organizations the option to phase in over three years the day one adverse effects on regulatory capital that may result from the adoption of the CECL model.

Regulatory Capital

The FRB adopted risk-based capital guidelines for bank holding companies and state member banks, designed to absorb losses. The guidelines provide a systematic analytical framework, which makes regulatory capital requirements sensitive to differences in risk profiles among banking organizations, takes off-balance sheet exposures expressly into account in evaluating capital adequacy and incentivizes holding liquid, low-risk assets. Capital levels as measured by these standards are also used to categorize financial institutions for purposes of certain Prompt Corrective Action regulatory provisions.

Basel III Capital Rules (“Basel III”) became effective on January 1, 2015, and contain a new capital conservation buffer and deductions from common equity capital that phased in from January 1, 2016, through January 1, 2019, and deductions from common equity tier 1 capital that have mostly phased in as of January 1, 2019.

The rules include (a) a new common equity tier 1 capital ratio of at least 4.5%, (b) a minimum tier 1 capital ratio of 6.0%, (c) a minimum capital to risk-weighted assets ratio of 8.0%, and (d) a minimum leverage ratio of 4%.

Common equity for the common equity tier 1 capital ratio includes common stock (plus related surplus) and retained earnings, plus limited amounts of minority interests in the form of common stock, less the majority of certain regulatory deductions.

Tier 1 capital includes common equity as defined for the common equity tier 1 capital ratio, plus certain non-cumulative preferred stock and related surplus, cumulative preferred stock and related surplus, and trust preferred securities that have been grandfathered (but which are not permitted going forward), and limited amounts of minority interests in the form of additional tier 1 capital instruments, less certain deductions.

Tier 2 capital, which can be included in the total capital ratio, includes certain capital instruments (such as subordinated debt) and limited amounts of the allowance for loan and lease losses, subject to new eligibility criteria, less applicable deductions.

The deductions from common equity tier 1 capital include goodwill and other intangibles, certain deferred tax assets, mortgage-servicing assets above certain levels, gains on sale in connection with a securitization, investments in a banking organization’s own capital instruments, and investments in the capital of unconsolidated financial institutions (above certain levels).

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Under the guidelines, capital is compared to the relative risk related to the balance sheet. To derive the risk included in the balance sheet, one of several risk weights is applied to different balance sheet and off-balance sheet assets, primarily based on the relative credit risk of the counterparty. The capital amounts and classification are also subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings, and other factors.

Basel III places restrictions on the payment of capital distributions, including dividends, and certain discretionary bonus payments to executive officers if the Company does not hold a capital conservation buffer of greater than 2.5% composed of common equity tier 1 capital above its minimum risk-based capital requirements, or if its eligible retained income is negative in that quarter and its capital conservation buffer ratio was less than 2.5% at the beginning of the quarter. The capital conservation buffer phased in beginning January 1, 2016 at 0.625% and was fully implemented at 2.50% effective January 1, 2019. Pursuant to the FRB’s Small Bank Holding Company Policy statement (“SBHC Policy”), a bank holding company with assets of less than $1 billion and meeting certain other requirements is not required to comply with the consolidated capital requirements until such company exceeds $1 billion in assets or is otherwise determined by the FRB not to qualify as a small bank holding company. At December 31, 2019, CSB was deemed to be a small bank holding company under the SBHC Policy and was not required to comply with the FRB’s regulatory capital requirements. The Bank, however, must comply with the new capital requirements.

The implementation of Basel III did not have a material impact on CSB’s or the Bank’s capital ratios.

Prompt Corrective Action

The federal banking agencies have established a system of “prompt corrective action” to resolve certain of the problems of undercapitalized institutions. This system is based on five capital level categories for insured depository institutions: “well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized”, and “critically undercapitalized.”

The federal banking agencies may (or in some cases must) take certain supervisory actions depending upon a bank’s capital level. For example, the banking agencies must appoint a receiver or conservator for a bank within 90 days after it becomes “critically undercapitalized” unless the bank’s primary regulator determines, with the concurrence of the FDIC, that other action would better achieve regulatory purposes. Banking operations otherwise may be significantly affected depending on a bank’s capital category. For example, a bank that is not “well capitalized” generally is prohibited from accepting brokered deposits and offering interest rates on deposits higher than the prevailing rate in its market, and the holding company of any undercapitalized depository institution must guarantee, in part, specific aspects of the bank’s capital plan for the plan to be acceptable.

In order to be “well-capitalized,” a bank must have a minimum common equity tier 1 capital ratio of 6.5%, a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 10%, a tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 8%, and a leverage ratio of at least 5%, and the bank must not be subject to any written agreement, order, capital directive, or prompt corrective action directive to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure.

As of December 31, 2019, the Bank met the ratio requirements in effect at that date to be deemed “well-capitalized.” See Note 13 – Regulatory Matters of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements located on page 50 of CSB’s 2019 Annual Report, which is incorporated herein by reference. Management of the Company believes the Bank also meets the capital requirements to be deemed “well-capitalized” under the new guidelines.

Deposit Insurance

Substantially all of the deposits of the Bank are insured up to applicable limits by the DIF, and the Bank is assessed quarterly deposit insurance premiums to maintain the DIF. Insurance premiums for each insured institution are determined based upon the institution’s capital level and supervisory rating provided to the FDIC by the institution’s primary federal regulator and other information deemed by the FDIC to be relevant to the risk posed to the Deposit Insurance Fund by the institution. The assessment rate is then applied to the amount of the institution’s assessment base to determine the institution’s insurance premium. The deposit insurance assessment base is calculated on average assets less average tangible equity.

The FDIC assesses a quarterly deposit insurance premium on each insured institution based on risk characteristics of the institution and may also impose special assessments in emergency situations. The premiums fund the DIF. Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, the FDIC has established 2.0% as the designated reserve ratio (“DRR”), which is the amount in the DIF as a percentage of all DIF insured deposits. In March 2016, the FDIC adopted final rules designed to meet the statutory minimum DRR of 1.35% by September 30, 2020, the deadline imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act. The Dodd-Frank Act requires the FDIC to offset the effect on institutions with assets of less than $10 billion of the increase in the statutory minimum DRR to 1.35% from the former statutory minimum of 1.15%. Although the FDIC’s new rules reduced assessment rates on all banks, they imposed a surcharge on banks with assets of $10 billion or more to be paid until the DRR reaches 1.35%. The DRR reached 1.35% at September 30, 2018. The rules also provide assessment credits to banks with assets of less than $10 billion for the portion of their assessments that contribute to the increase of the DRR to 1.35%. Such credits will be applied when the reserve ratio is at least 1.38%. The rules further changed the method of determining risk-based assessment rates for established banks with less than $10 billion in assets to better ensure that banks taking on greater risks pay more for deposit insurance than banks that take on less risk.

In addition, all FDIC-insured institutions have been required to pay assessments to fund interest payments on bonds issued by the Financing Corporation, which was established by the government to recapitalize a predecessor to the DIF. These assessments continued until the Financing Corporation bonds matured in September of 2019. The final assessment was collected on the March 29, 2019, FDIC invoice.

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As insurer, the FDIC is authorized to conduct examinations of, and to require reporting by, federally-insured institutions. It also may prohibit any federally-insured institution from engaging in any activity the FDIC determines by regulation or order to pose a serious threat to the Deposit Insurance Fund. The FDIC also has the authority to take enforcement actions against insured institutions. Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the FDIC upon a finding that the institution has engaged or is engaging in unsafe and unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations, or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order, or condition imposed by the FDIC or written agreement entered into with the FDIC.

The management of the Bank does not know of any practice, condition, or violation that might lead to termination of deposit insurance.

Fiscal and Monetary Policies

The business and earnings of the Company are affected significantly by the fiscal and monetary policies of the United States Government and its agencies. These policies are used in varying degrees and combinations to directly affect the availability of bank loans and deposits, as well as the interest rates charged on loans and paid on deposits. CSB is particularly affected by the policies of the FRB, which has regulatory authority over the supply of money and credit in the United States.

The monetary policies of the FRB have had a significant effect on the operating results of financial institutions in the past and are expected to continue to have significant effects in the future. In view of the changing conditions in the economy, the money markets, and the activities of monetary and fiscal authorities, the Company can make no definitive predictions as to future changes in interest rates, credit availability, or deposit levels.

Limits on Dividends and Other Payments

There are various legal limitations on the extent to which subsidiary banks may finance or otherwise supply funds to their parent holding companies. Under applicable federal and state laws, subsidiary banks may not, subject to certain limited exceptions, make loans or extensions of credit to, or investments in the securities of, their bank holding companies. Subsidiary banks are also subject to collateral security requirements for any loan or extension of credit permitted by such exceptions.

Payments of dividends by the Bank are limited by applicable state and federal laws and regulations. The ability of CSB to obtain funds for the payment of dividends and for other cash requirements is largely dependent on the amount of dividends that may be declared by the Bank. However, the FRB expects CSB to serve as a source of strength for the Bank and may require CSB to retain capital for further investment in the Bank, rather than pay dividends to CSB shareholders. Payment of dividends by the Bank may be restricted at any time at the discretion of its applicable regulatory authorities, if they deem such dividends to constitute an unsafe or unsound banking practice. These provisions could have the effect of limiting CSB’s ability to pay dividends on its common shares.

FRB policy requires CSB to provide notice to the FRB in advance of the payment of a dividend to CSB’s shareholders under certain circumstances and states that insured banks and bank holding companies should generally only pay dividends out of current operating earnings. The FRB may disapprove of a dividend payment if the FRB determines that the payment would be an unsafe or unsound practice.

Consumer Protection Laws and Regulations

Banks are subject to regular examination to ensure compliance with federal statutes and regulations applicable to their business, including consumer protection statutes and implementing regulations. Potential penalties under these laws include, but are not limited to, fines. The Dodd-Frank Act established the CFPB, which has extensive regulatory and enforcement powers over consumer financial products and services. The CFPB has adopted numerous rules with respect to consumer protection laws, amending some existing regulations and adopting new ones, and has commenced enforcement actions. The following are just some of the consumer protection laws applicable to the Bank:

 

 

Community Reinvestment Act of 1977: imposes a continuing and affirmative obligation to fulfill the credit needs of its entire community, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods.

 

Equal Credit Opportunity Act: prohibits discrimination in any credit transaction on the basis of any of various criteria.

 

Truth in Lending Act: requires that credit terms are disclosed in a manner that permits a consumer to understand and compare credit terms more readily and knowledgeably.

 

Fair Housing Act: makes it unlawful for a lender to discriminate in its housing-related lending activities against any person on the basis of any of certain criteria.

 

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act: requires financial institutions to collect data that enables regulatory agencies to determine whether the financial institutions are serving the housing credit needs of the communities in which they are located.

 

Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act: requires that lenders provide borrowers with disclosures regarding the nature and cost of real estate settlements and prohibits abusive practices that increase borrowers’ costs.

 

Privacy provisions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act: requires financial institutions to establish policies and procedures to restrict the sharing of non-public customer data with non-affiliated parties and to protect customer information from unauthorized access.

The banking regulators also use their authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act to take supervisory or enforcement action with respect to unfair or deceptive acts or practices by banks that may not necessarily fall within the scope of specific banking or consumer finance law.

7


 

In October 2017, the CFPB issued a final rule (the “Payday Rule”) to establish regulations for payday loans, vehicle title loans, and certain high-cost installment loans. The Payday Rule addressed two discrete topics. First, it contained a set of provisions with respect to the underwriting of certain covered loans and related reporting and recordkeeping requirements (the “Mandatory Underwriting Provisions”). Second, it contained a set of provisions establishing certain requirements and limitations with respect to attempts to withdraw payments from consumers’ checking or other accounts and related recordkeeping requirements (the “Payment Provisions”). The Payday Rule became effective on January 16, 2018. However, most provisions had a compliance date of August 19, 2019.

On February 6, 2019, the CFPB proposed delaying the August 19, 2019, compliance date for the Mandatory Underwriting Provisions to November 19, 2020. The CFPB proposed in a separate notice to rescind the Mandatory Underwriting Provisions.

On June 6, 2019, the CFPB issued a final rule delaying the compliance date for most Mandatory Underwriting Provisions until November 19, 2020. However, the final rule did not delay the compliance date for the Payment Provisions. The Company does not currently expect the Payday Rule to have a material effect on its financial condition or results of operations on a consolidated basis.

Customer Privacy

Under the GLBA, federal banking agencies have adopted rules that limit the ability of banks and other financial institutions to disclose non-public information about consumers to nonaffiliated third parties. These limitations require distribution of privacy policies to consumers and, in some circumstances, allow consumers to prevent disclosure of certain personal information to nonaffiliated third parties.

USA Patriot Act

The Uniting and Strengthening of America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorist Act of 2001, as amended (the “Patriot Act”), and related regulations require regulated financial institutions to establish a program specifying procedures for obtaining identifying information from customers seeking to open new accounts and establish enhanced due diligence policies, procedures and controls designed to detect and report suspicious activity.  

The Bank has established policies and procedures to be compliant with the requirements of the Patriot Act.

 

Office of Foreign Assets Control Regulation

 

The United States Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) administers and enforces economic and trade sanctions against targeted foreign countries and regimes, under authority of various laws, including designated foreign countries, nationals and others. OFAC publishes lists of specially designated targets and countries. CSB is responsible for, among other things, blocking accounts of, and transactions with, such targets and countries, prohibiting unlicensed trade and financial transactions with them and reporting blocked transactions after their occurrence. Failure to comply with these sanctions could have serious financial, legal and reputational consequences, including causing applicable bank regulatory authorities not to approve merger or acquisition transactions when regulatory approval is required or to prohibit such transactions even if approval is not required. Regulatory authorities have imposed cease and desist orders and civil money penalties against institutions found to be violating these obligations.

 

Cybersecurity

 

In March 2015, federal regulators issued two related statements regarding cybersecurity. One statement indicates that financial institutions should design multiple layers of security controls to establish several lines of defense and to ensure that their risk management processes also address the risk posed by compromised customer credentials, including security measures to reliably authenticate customers accessing Internet-based services of the financial institution. The other statement indicates that a financial institution’s management is expected to maintain sufficient business continuity planning processes to ensure the rapid recovery, resumption and maintenance of the financial institution’s operations after a cyber-attack involving destructive malware. A financial institution is also expected to develop appropriate processes to enable recovery of data and business operations and address rebuilding network capabilities and restoring data if the financial institution or its critical service providers fall victim to this type of cyber-attack. If CSB fails to observe the regulatory guidance, it could be subject to various regulatory sanctions, including financial penalties.

 

In February 2018, the SEC published interpretive guidance to assist public companies in preparing disclosures about cybersecurity risks and incidents. These SEC guidelines, and any other regulatory guidance, are in addition to notification and disclosure requirements under state and federal banking law and regulations.

 

State regulators have also been increasingly active in implementing privacy and cybersecurity standards and regulations. Recently, several states have adopted regulations requiring certain financial institutions to implement cybersecurity programs and providing detailed requirements with respect to these programs, including data encryption requirements. Many states have also recently implemented or modified their data breach notification and data privacy requirements. CSB expects this trend of state-level activity in those areas to continue and is continually monitoring developments in the states in which our customers are located.

 

In the ordinary course of business, CSB relies on electronic communications and information systems to conduct its operations and to store sensitive data. CSB employs an in-depth, layered, defensive approach that leverages people, processes and technology to manage and maintain cybersecurity controls. CSB employs a variety of preventative and detective tools to monitor, block, and provide alerts regarding suspicious activity, as well as to report on any suspected advanced persistent threats. Notwithstanding the strength of CSB’s defensive measures, the threat from cyber-attacks is severe, attacks are sophisticated and increasing in volume, and attackers respond rapidly to changes in defensive measures. While to date, CSB has not detected a significant compromise, significant data loss or any material financial losses related to cybersecurity attacks, CSB’s systems and those of its customers and third-party service providers are under constant threat and it is possible that CSB could experience a significant event in the future. Risks and exposures related to cybersecurity attacks are expected to remain high for the foreseeable

8


 

future due to the rapidly evolving nature and sophistication of these threats, as well as due to the expanding use of Internet banking, mobile banking and other technology-based products and services by us and our customers.

 

Effect of Environmental Regulation

Compliance with federal, state, and local provisions regulating the discharge of materials into the environment, or otherwise relating to the protection of the environment, has not had a material effect upon the capital expenditures, earnings, or competitive position of CSB or its subsidiaries. CSB believes the nature of the operations of its subsidiaries has little, if any, environmental impact. CSB, therefore, anticipates no material capital expenditures for environmental control facilities for its current fiscal year or for the foreseeable future.

CSB believes its primary exposure to environmental risk is through the lending activities of the Bank. In cases where management believes environmental risk potentially exists, the Bank mitigates environmental risk exposure by requiring environmental site assessments at the time of loan origination to confirm collateral quality as to commercial real estate parcels posing higher than normal potential for environmental impact, as determined by reference to present and past uses of the subject property and adjacent sites.

Executive and Incentive Compensation

In June 2010, the federal banking agencies issued joint interagency guidance on incentive compensation policies (the “Joint Guidance”) intended to ensure that the incentive compensation policies of banking organizations do not undermine the safety and soundness of such organizations by encouraging excessive risk-taking. This principles-based guidance, which covers all employees that have the ability to materially affect the risk profile of an organization, either individually or as part of a group, is based upon the key principles that a banking organization’s incentive compensation arrangements should: (i) provide incentives that do not encourage risk-taking beyond the organization’s ability to effectively identify and manage risks; (ii) be compatible with effective internal controls and risk management; and (iii) be supported by strong corporate governance, including active and effective oversight by the organization’s board of directors.

Pursuant to the Joint Guidance, the FRB will review as part of a regular, risk-focused examination process, the incentive compensation arrangements of financial institutions such as the Company. Such review will be tailored to each organization based on the scope and complexity of the organization’s activities and the prevalence of incentive compensation arrangements. The findings of the supervisory initiatives will be included in reports of examination and deficiencies will be incorporated into the institution’s supervisory ratings, which can affect the institution’s ability to make acquisitions and take other actions. Enforcement actions may be taken against an institution if its incentive compensation arrangements, or related risk-management control or governance processes, pose a risk to the organization’s safety and soundness and prompt and effective measures are not being taken to correct the deficiencies.

The Company’s board and management believe its policies and procedures related to Executive and Incentive Compensation are compliant with the Joint Guidance.

Future Legislation

Various and significant legislation affecting financial institutions and the financial industry is from time to time adopted by the U.S. Congress and state legislatures, and regulatory agencies frequently adopt or amend regulations. Such legislation and regulation may continue to change banking laws and regulations and the operating environment of CSB and its subsidiaries in substantial and unpredictable ways, and could significantly increase or decrease costs of doing business, limit or expand permissible activities, or affect the competitive balance among financial institutions. The nature and extent of future legislative and regulatory changes affecting financial institutions remains very unpredictable.

Statistical Disclosures

The following schedules present, for the periods indicated, certain financial and statistical information of the Company as required under the SEC’s Industry Guide 3 “Statistical Disclosures by Bank Holding Companies,” or a specific reference as to the location of required disclosures in CSB’s 2019 Annual Report.

Distribution of Assets, Liabilities, and Stockholders’ Equity; Interest Rates and Interest Differential

The information set forth under the heading, “Average Balance Sheets and Net Interest Margin Analysis” located on page 10 of CSB’s 2019 Annual Report is incorporated by reference herein.

The information set forth under the heading, “Rate/Volume Analysis of Changes in Income and Expense” located on page 11 of CSB’s 2019 Annual Report is incorporated by reference herein.

9


 

Investment Portfolio

The following is a schedule of the fair value of securities at December 31:

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities available-for-sale, at fair value

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

U.S. Treasury security

 

$

999

 

 

$

996

 

 

$

998

 

U.S. Government agencies

 

 

5,496

 

 

 

7,170

 

 

 

8,229

 

Mortgage-backed securities of government agencies

 

 

75,857

 

 

 

44,901

 

 

 

49,701

 

Other mortgage-backed securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset-backed securities of government agencies

 

 

917

 

 

 

1,024

 

 

 

1,169

 

State and political subdivisions

 

 

21,511

 

 

 

23,125

 

 

 

27,141

 

Corporate bonds

 

 

7,366

 

 

 

8,312

 

 

 

10,425

 

Total available-for-sale

 

$

112,146

 

 

$

85,528

 

 

$

97,663

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities held-to-maturity, at fair value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Government agencies

 

$

4,993

 

 

$

9,098

 

 

$

9,265

 

Mortgage-backed securities of government agencies

 

 

8,957

 

 

 

11,020

 

 

 

11,531

 

State and political subdivisions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,695

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total held-to-maturity

 

$

13,950

 

 

$

20,118

 

 

$

25,491

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity securities

 

$

92

 

 

$

83

 

 

$

89

 

 

The following is a schedule of maturities for each category of debt securities and the related weighted average yield of such securities as of December 31, 2019:

 

 

 

One Year or Less

 

 

After One Year

Through Five

Years

 

 

Maturing

After Five Years

Through Ten

Years

 

 

After Ten Years

 

 

Total

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Yield

 

 

Available-for-sale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Treasury

 

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

998

 

 

 

1.60

 

%

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

998

 

 

 

1.60

 

%

U.S. Government agencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,500

 

 

 

1.76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,500

 

 

 

1.76

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities of

   government agencies

 

 

2,001

 

 

 

1.94

 

 

 

472

 

 

 

2.26

 

 

 

3,191

 

 

 

2.60

 

 

 

70,012

 

 

 

2.32

 

 

 

75,676

 

 

 

2.32

 

 

Asset-backed securities of government

   agencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

934

 

 

 

2.49

 

 

 

934

 

 

 

2.49

 

 

State and political subdivisions

 

 

1,147

 

 

 

2.14

 

 

 

7,222

 

 

 

2.45

 

 

 

12,792

 

 

 

2.25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21,161

 

 

 

2.31

 

 

Corporate bonds

 

 

1,575

 

 

 

2.87

 

 

 

2,055

 

 

 

2.79

 

 

 

3,475

 

 

 

2.79

 

 

 

500

 

 

 

1.66

 

 

 

7,605

 

 

 

2.73

 

 

Total

 

$

4,723

 

 

 

2.30

 

%

$

16,247

 

 

 

2.20

 

%

$

19,458

 

 

 

2.40

 

%

$

71,446

 

 

 

2.32

 

%

$

111,874

 

 

 

2.32

 

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Held-to-maturity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Government agencies

 

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

3,000

 

 

 

2.00

 

%

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

1,999

 

 

 

2.02

 

%

$

4,999

 

 

 

2.01

 

%

Mortgage-backed securities of

   government agencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,870

 

 

 

1.99

 

 

 

8,870

 

 

 

1.99

 

 

Total

 

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

3,000

 

 

 

2.00

 

%

$

 

 

 

 

%

$

10,869

 

 

 

1.99

 

%

$

13,869

 

 

 

2.00

 

%

 

The weighted average yields are calculated using amortized cost of investments and are based on coupon rates for securities purchased at par value, and on effective interest rates considering amortization or accretion if securities were purchased at a premium or discount. The weighted average yield on tax-exempt obligations is presented on a tax-equivalent basis based on the Company’s marginal federal income tax rate of 21%.

Loan Portfolio

Total loans on the balance sheet are comprised of the following classifications at December 31:

10


 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Commercial

 

$

137,114

 

 

$

146,875

 

 

$

140,273

 

 

$

134,268

 

 

$

123,143

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

196,748

 

 

 

183,605

 

 

 

179,663

 

 

 

159,475

 

 

 

148,775

 

Residential real estate

 

 

174,259

 

 

 

167,296

 

 

 

157,172

 

 

 

144,489

 

 

 

125,775

 

Construction and land development

 

 

23,960

 

 

 

31,227

 

 

 

22,886

 

 

 

23,428

 

 

 

15,452

 

Consumer

 

 

19,052

 

 

 

19,402

 

 

 

16,306

 

 

 

13,308

 

 

 

9,268

 

Total loans

 

$

551,133

 

 

$

548,405

 

 

$

516,300

 

 

$

474,968

 

 

$

422,413

 

 

The following is a schedule of maturities of loans based on contract terms and assuming no amortization or prepayments, excluding residential real estate mortgage and installment loans, as of December 31, 2019:

 

 

 

Maturing

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

One Year

or Less

 

 

One

Through

Five Years

 

 

After Five

Years

 

 

Total

 

Commercial

 

$

73,784

 

 

$

37,980

 

 

$

25,350

 

 

$

137,114

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

1,383

 

 

 

16,098

 

 

 

179,267

 

 

 

196,748

 

Construction and land development

 

 

1,811

 

 

 

5,522

 

 

 

16,627

 

 

 

23,960

 

Total

 

$

76,978

 

 

$

59,600

 

 

$

221,244

 

 

$

357,822

 

 

The following is a schedule of fixed rate and variable rate commercial, commercial real estate and construction and land development loans due after one year from December 31, 2019.

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Fixed Rate

 

 

Variable Rate

 

Total commercial, commercial real estate and construction and

   land development loans due after one year

 

$

47,744

 

 

$

233,100

 

 

The following schedule summarizes nonaccrual, past due and restructured loans.

 

(Dollars in thousand)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Loans accounted for on a nonaccrual basis

 

$

4,298

 

 

$

3,155

 

 

$

6,081

 

 

$

1,449

 

 

$

1,576

 

Accruing loans that are contractually past due 90 days or

   more as to interest or principal payments

 

 

241

 

 

 

174

 

 

 

441

 

 

 

235

 

 

 

105

 

Total

 

$

4,539

 

 

$

3,329

 

 

$

6,522

 

 

$

1,684

 

 

$

1,681

 

 

The policy for placing loans on nonaccrual status is to cease accruing interest on loans when management believes that collection of interest is doubtful, when commercial loans are past due as to principal and interest 90 days or more or when mortgage loans are past due as to principal and interest 120 days or more, except that in certain circumstances interest accruals are continued on loans deemed by management to be well-secured and in process of collection. In such cases, loans are individually evaluated in order to determine whether to continue income recognition after 90 days beyond the due date. When loans are placed on nonaccrual, any accrued interest is charged against interest income.

Information regarding impaired loans at December 31 is as follows:

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Total recorded investment of impaired loans

 

$

6,071

 

 

$

3,860

 

 

$

7,882

 

Less portion for which no allowance for loan loss is allocated

 

 

5,483

 

 

 

3,122

 

 

 

5,565

 

Portion of impaired loan balance for which an allowance for

   loan losses is allocated

 

 

588

 

 

 

738

 

 

 

2,317

 

Portion of allowance for loan losses allocated to the impaired

   loan balance at December 31

 

 

34

 

 

 

101

 

 

 

244

 

 

11


 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, interest income recognized on impaired loans amounted to $134 thousand, while $316 thousand would have been recognized had the loans been performing under their contractual terms. For the year ended December 31, 2018, interest income recognized on impaired loans amounted to $113 thousand, while $371 thousand would have been recognized had the loans been performing under their contractual terms. For the year ended December 31, 2017, interest income recognized on impaired loans amounted to $123 thousand while $426 thousand would have been recognized had the loans been performing under their contractual terms.

Impaired loans are comprised of commercial, commercial real estate, and residential real estate loans, and are carried at the present value of expected cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or at fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. A portion of the allowance for loan losses is allocated to impaired loans.

Smaller-balance homogeneous loans are evaluated for impairment in total. Such loans include residential first-mortgage loans secured by one to four-family residences, residential construction loans, automobile loans, home equity loans, and second-mortgage loans. These consumer loans are included in nonaccrual and past due disclosures above as well as impaired loans when they become nonperforming. Commercial loans and mortgage loans secured by other properties are evaluated individually for impairment. When analysis of borrower operating results and financial condition indicates that underlying cash flows of the borrower’s business are not adequate to meet its debt service requirements, the loan is evaluated for impairment. Impaired loans or portions thereof, are charged-off when deemed uncollectible.

At December 31, 2019, no loans were identified for which management had serious doubts about the borrowers’ ability to comply with present loan repayment terms that are not included in the tables set forth above. On a monthly basis, the Company internally classifies certain loans based on various factors. At December 31, 2019, these amounts, including impaired and nonperforming loans, amounted to $21 million of substandard loans and $0 doubtful loans.

As of December 31, 2019, there were no concentrations of loans greater than 10% of total loans that were not otherwise disclosed as a category of loans in the loan portfolio table set forth above.

Summary of Loan Loss Experience

The following schedule presents an analysis of the allowance for loan losses, average loan data, and related ratios for the years ended December 31:

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

LOANS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average loans outstanding during period

 

$

552,014

 

 

$

535,506

 

 

$

497,048

 

 

$

448,941

 

 

$

412,147

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

5,907

 

 

$

5,604

 

 

$

5,291

 

 

$

4,662

 

 

$

4,381

 

 

Loans charged-off:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial

 

 

47

 

 

 

823

 

 

 

1,184

 

 

 

297

 

 

 

109

 

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

 

 

 

103

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

 

 

 

61

 

 

Residential real estate

 

 

 

 

 

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

132

 

 

Construction and land development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer

 

 

211

 

 

 

119

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

59

 

 

 

46

 

 

Total loans charged-off

 

 

258

 

 

 

1,082

 

 

 

1,204

 

 

 

418

 

 

 

348

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recoveries of loans previously charged-off:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial

 

 

175

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

361

 

 

 

214

 

 

 

199

 

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

334

 

 

 

13

 

 

Residential real estate

 

 

7

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

18

 

 

Construction and land development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer

 

 

45

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

10

 

 

Total loans recoveries

 

 

228

 

 

 

69

 

 

 

372

 

 

 

554

 

 

 

240

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loans (recovered) charged-off

 

 

30

 

 

 

1,013

 

 

 

832

 

 

 

(136

)

 

 

108

 

 

Provision charged to operating expense

 

 

1,140

 

 

 

1,316

 

 

 

1,145

 

 

 

493

 

 

 

389

 

 

Balance at end of period

 

$

7,017

 

 

$

5,907

 

 

$

5,604

 

 

$

5,291

 

 

$

4,662

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ratio of net charge-offs to average loans outstanding for

   period

 

 

0.01

 

%

 

0.19

 

%

 

0.17

 

%

 

(0.03

)

%

 

0.03

 

%

 

12


 

The allowance for loan losses balance and provision charged to expense are determined by management based on periodic reviews of the loan portfolio, past loan loss experience, economic conditions, and various other circumstances subject to change over time. In making this judgment, management reviews selected large loans, as well as impaired loans, other delinquent, nonaccrual and problem loans, and loans to industries experiencing economic difficulties. The collectability of these loans is evaluated after considering current operating results and financial position of the borrower, estimated market value of collateral, guarantees and the Company’s collateral position versus other creditors. Judgments, which are necessarily subjective, as to the probability of loss and amount of such loss are formed on these loans, as well as other loans taken together.

The following schedule is a breakdown of the allowance for loan losses allocated by type of loan and related ratios. While management’s periodic analysis of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses may allocate portions of the allowance for specific problem-loan situations, the entire allowance is available for any loan charge-offs that occur.

 

 

Allocation of the Allowance for Loan Losses

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

Allowance

Amount

 

 

Percentage

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

Allowance

Amount

 

 

Percentage

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

Allowance

Amount

 

 

Percentage

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

Allowance

Amount

 

 

Percentage

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

Allowance

Amount

 

 

Percentage

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

 

December 31, 2019

 

 

December 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

December 31, 2015

 

Commercial

 

$

2,408

 

 

 

24.88

 

%

$

2,178

 

 

 

26.78

 

%

$

1,813

 

 

 

27.17

 

%

$

2,207

 

 

 

28.27

 

%

$

1,664

 

 

 

29.15

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

2,153

 

 

 

35.70

 

 

 

1,791

 

 

 

33.48

 

 

 

1,735

 

 

 

34.80

 

 

 

1,264

 

 

 

33.58

 

 

 

1,271

 

 

 

35.22

 

Residential real estate

 

 

1,152

 

 

 

31.62

 

 

 

1,245

 

 

 

30.51

 

 

 

1,273

 

 

 

30.44

 

 

 

1,189

 

 

 

30.42

 

 

 

1,086

 

 

 

29.78

 

Construction & land development

 

 

203

 

 

 

4.35

 

 

 

258

 

 

 

5.69

 

 

 

237

 

 

 

4.43

 

 

 

178

 

 

 

4.93

 

 

 

123

 

 

 

3.66

 

Consumer

 

 

481

 

 

 

3.46

 

 

 

306

 

 

 

3.54

 

 

 

175

 

 

 

3.16

 

 

 

141

 

 

 

2.80

 

 

 

86

 

 

 

2.19

 

Unallocated

 

 

620

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

129

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

371

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

312

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

432

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

7,017

 

 

 

100

 

%

$

5,907

 

 

 

100

 

%

$

5,604

 

 

 

100

 

%

$

5,291

 

 

 

100

 

%

$

4,662

 

 

 

100

 

 

Deposits

The following is a schedule of average deposit amounts and average rates paid on each category for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Average Amounts Outstanding

Year ended December 31,

 

 

Average Rate Paid

Year ended December 31,

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Noninterest-bearing demand

 

$

187,914

 

 

$

175,439

 

 

$

169,803

 

 

NA

 

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

 

Interest-bearing demand

 

 

135,313

 

 

 

117,879

 

 

 

101,081

 

 

 

0.44

%

 

 

0.30

%

 

 

0.13

%

Savings deposits