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Section 1: 10-K (10-K 2018)

gty-10k_20181231.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 001-13777

 

GETTY REALTY CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Maryland

11-3412575

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. employer

identification no.)

 

 

Two Jericho Plaza, Suite 110, Jericho, New York

11753-1681

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (516) 478-5400

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

TITLE OF EACH CLASS

NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE ON WHICH REGISTERED

Common Stock, $0.01 par value

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

The aggregate market value of common stock held by non-affiliates (32,462,564 shares of common stock) of the Company was $914,470,000 as of June 30, 2018.

The registrant had outstanding 40,866,854 shares of common stock as of February 27, 2019.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

DOCUMENT

PART OF
FORM 10-K

Selected Portions of Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Proxy Statement”), which will be filed by the registrant on or prior to 120 days following the end of the registrant’s year ended December 31, 2018, pursuant to Regulation 14A.

III

 

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Item

 

Description

 

Page

 

 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

Business

 

5

1A

 

Risk Factors

 

8

1B

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

19

2

 

Properties

 

19

3

 

Legal Proceedings

 

21

4

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

25

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

26

6

 

Selected Financial Data

 

28

7

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

30

7A

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

43

8

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

44

9

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

72

9A

 

Controls and Procedures

 

72

9B

 

Other Information

 

72

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

73

11

 

Executive Compensation

 

73

12

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

73

13

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

73

14

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

73

 

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

74

16

 

Form 10-K Summary

 

74

 

 

Exhibit Index

 

93

 

 

Signatures

 

96

 

 


 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K may constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the federal securities laws, including Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Statements preceded by, followed by, or that otherwise include the words “believes,” “expects,” “seeks,” “plans,” “projects,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “predicts” and similar expressions or future or conditional verbs such as “will,” “should,” “would,” “may” and “could” are generally forward-looking in nature and are not historical facts. (All capitalized and undefined terms used in this section shall have the same meanings hereafter defined in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.)

Examples of forward-looking statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K include, but are not limited to, our network of convenience store and gasoline station properties; substantial compliance of our properties with federal, state and local provisions enacted or adopted pertaining to environmental matters; the effects of recently enacted U.S. federal tax reform and other legislative, regulatory and administrative developments; the impact of existing legislation and regulations on our competitive position; our prospective future environmental liabilities, including those resulting from preexisting unknown environmental contamination; quantifiable trends, which we believe allow us to make reasonable estimates of fair value for the future costs of environmental remediation resulting from the removal and replacement of USTs; the impact of our redevelopment efforts related to certain of our properties; the amount of revenue we expect to realize from our properties; our belief that our owned and leased properties are adequately covered by casualty and liability insurance; AFFO as a measure that best represents our core operating performance and its utility in comparing the sustainability of our core operating performance with the sustainability of the core operating performance of other REITs; the reasonableness of our estimates, judgments, projections and assumptions used regarding our accounting policies and methods; our critical accounting policies; our exposure and liability due to and our accruals, estimates and assumptions regarding our environmental liabilities and remediation costs; loan loss reserves or allowances; our belief that our accruals for environmental and litigation matters including matters related to our former Newark, New Jersey Terminal and the Lower Passaic River, our MTBE multi-district litigation cases in the states of New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland, and our lawsuit with the State of New York pertaining to a property formerly owned by us in Uniondale, New York, were appropriate based on the information then available; our claims for reimbursement of monies expended in the defense and settlement of certain MTBE cases under pollution insurance policies; compliance with federal, state and local provisions enacted or adopted pertaining to environmental matters; our beliefs about the settlement proposals we receive and the probable outcome of litigation or regulatory actions and their impact on us; our expected recoveries from UST funds; our indemnification obligations and the indemnification obligations of others; our investment strategy and its impact on our financial performance; the adequacy of our current and anticipated cash flows from operations, borrowings under our Restated Credit Agreement and available cash and cash equivalents; our continued compliance with the covenants in our Restated Credit Agreement, Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and MetLife Note Purchase Agreement; our belief that certain environmental liabilities can be allocated to others under various agreements; our belief that our real estate assets are not carried at amounts in excess of their estimated net realizable fair value amounts; our beliefs regarding our properties, including their alternative uses and our ability to sell or lease our vacant properties over time; and our ability to maintain our federal tax status as a REIT.

These forward-looking statements are based on our current beliefs and assumptions and information currently available to us, and are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors and were derived utilizing numerous important assumptions that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors and assumptions involved in the derivation of forward-looking statements, and the failure of such other assumptions to be realized as well as other factors may also cause actual results to differ materially from those projected. Most of these factors are difficult to predict accurately and are generally beyond our control. These factors and assumptions may have an impact on the continued accuracy of any forward-looking statements that we make.

Factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from our current expectations include, but are not limited to, the risks described in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as such risk factors may be updated from time to time in our public filings, and risks associated with: complying with environmental laws and regulations and the costs associated with complying with such laws and regulations; substantially all of our tenants depending on the same industry for their revenues; the creditworthiness of our tenants; our tenants’ compliance with their lease obligations; renewal of existing leases and our ability to either re-lease or sell properties; our dependence on external sources of capital; counterparty risks; the uncertainty of our estimates, judgments, projections and assumptions associated with our accounting policies and methods; our ability to successfully manage our investment strategy; potential future acquisitions and redevelopment opportunities; changes in interest rates and our ability to manage or mitigate this risk effectively; owning and leasing real estate; our business operations generating sufficient cash for distributions or debt service; adverse developments in general business, economic or political conditions; adverse effect of inflation; federal tax reform; property taxes; potential exposure related to pending lawsuits and claims; owning real estate primarily concentrated in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States; competition in our industry; the adequacy of our insurance coverage and that of our tenants; failure to qualify as a REIT; dilution as a result of future issuances of equity securities; our dividend policy, ability to pay dividends and changes to our dividend policy; changes in market conditions; provisions in our corporate charter and by-laws; Maryland law discouraging a third-party takeover; the loss of a member or members of our management team or Board of Directors; changes in accounting standards; future impairment

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charges; terrorist attacks and other acts of violence and war; our information systems; failure to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting; and changes in LIBOR reporting practices or the method in which LIBOR is calculated.

As a result of these and other factors, we may experience material fluctuations in future operating results on a quarterly or annual basis, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results, ability to pay dividends or stock price. An investment in our stock involves various risks, including those mentioned above and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and those that are described from time to time in our other filings with the SEC.

You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which reflect our view only as of the date hereof. Except for our ongoing obligations to disclose material information under the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements, to report events or to report the occurrence of unanticipated events, unless required by law. For any forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K or in any other document, we claim the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

 

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PART I

Item 1.    Business

Company Profile

Getty Realty Corp., a Maryland corporation, is the leading publicly-traded real estate investment trust (“REIT”) in the United States specializing in the ownership, leasing and financing of convenience store and gasoline station properties. Our 933 properties are located in 30 states across the United States and Washington, D.C. Our properties are operated under a variety of nationally recognized brands including, among others, 76, BP, Citgo, Conoco, Exxon, Getty, Gulf, Mobil, Shell, Sunoco and Valero. We own the Getty® trademark and trade name in connection with our real estate and the petroleum marketing business in the United States.

We are self-administered and self-managed by our management team, which has extensive experience in owning, leasing and managing convenience store and gasoline station properties. We have invested, and will continue to invest, in real estate and real estate related investments when appropriate opportunities arise. Our company is headquartered in Jericho, New York and as of February 27, 2019, we had 29 employees.

Company Operations

As of December 31, 2018, we owned 859 properties and leased 74 properties from third-party landlords. Our typical property is used as a convenience store and gasoline station, and is located on between one-half and one acre of land in a metropolitan area. In addition, many of our properties are located at highly trafficked urban intersections or conveniently close to highway entrances or exit ramps. We have a national portfolio of properties with a concentration in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. We believe our network of convenience store and gasoline station properties across the Northeast and the Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States is unique and that comparable networks of properties are not readily available for purchase or lease from other owners or landlords.

Substantially all of our properties are leased on a triple-net basis primarily to petroleum distributors, convenience store retailers and, to a lesser extent, individual operators. Generally, our tenants supply fuel and either operate our properties directly or sublet our properties to operators who operate their convenience stores, gasoline stations, automotive repair service facilities or other businesses at our properties. Our triple-net tenants are responsible for the payment of all taxes, maintenance, repairs, insurance and other operating expenses relating to our properties, and are also responsible for environmental contamination occurring during the terms of their leases and in certain cases also for environmental contamination that existed before their leases commenced. For additional information regarding our environmental obligations, see Note 5 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

Convenience store and gasoline station properties are an integral component of the transportation infrastructure supported by highly inelastic demand for refined petroleum products, day-to-day consumer goods and convenience foods. Substantially all of our tenants’ financial results depend on the sale of refined petroleum products, convenience store sales or rental income from their subtenants. As a result, our tenants’ financial results are highly dependent on the performance of the petroleum marketing industry, which is highly competitive and subject to volatility. During the terms of our leases, we monitor the credit quality of our triple-net tenants by reviewing their published credit rating, if available, reviewing publicly available financial statements, or reviewing financial or other operating statements which are delivered to us pursuant to applicable lease agreements, monitoring news reports regarding our tenants and their respective businesses, and monitoring the timeliness of lease payments and the performance of other financial covenants under their leases.

Our Properties

Net Lease. As of December 31, 2018, we leased 918 of our properties to tenants under triple-net leases.

Our net lease properties include 814 properties leased under 26 separate unitary or master triple-net leases and 104 properties leased under single unit triple-net leases. These leases generally provide for an initial term of 15 or 20 years with options for successive renewal terms of up to 20 years and periodic rent escalations. As of December 31, 2018, our contractual rent weighted average lease term, excluding renewal options, was approximately 10 years.

Several of our leases provide for additional rent based on the aggregate volume of fuel sold. For the year ended December 31, 2018, additional rent based on the aggregate volume of fuel sold was not material to our financial results. In addition, certain of our leases require the tenants to invest capital in our properties, substantially all of which are related to the replacement of underground storage tanks (“UST” or “USTs”) that are owned by our tenants. As of December 31, 2018, we have a remaining commitment to fund up to $7.6 million in the aggregate with our tenants for our portion of such capital improvements. For additional information regarding our leases, see Note 2 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

Redevelopment. As of December 31, 2018, we were actively redeveloping six of our properties either as a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses. For additional information regarding our redevelopment properties, see “Redevelopment Strategy and Activity” below.

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Vacancies. As of December 31, 2018, nine of our properties were vacant. We expect that we will either sell or enter into new leases on these properties over time.

Investment Strategy and Activity

As part of our overall growth strategy, we regularly review acquisition and financing opportunities to invest in additional convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related properties, and we expect to continue to pursue investments that we believe will benefit our financial performance. In addition to sale/leaseback and other real estate acquisitions, our investment activities include purchase money financing with respect to properties we sell, and real property loans relating to our leasehold portfolios. Our investment strategy seeks to generate current income and benefit from long-term appreciation in the underlying value of our real estate. To achieve that goal, we seek to invest in high quality individual properties and real estate portfolios that are in strong primary markets that serve high density population centers. A key element of our investment strategy is to invest in properties that will promote our geographic and tenant diversity.

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we acquired fee simple interests in 41 convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related properties for an aggregate purchase price of $78.0 million. During the year ended December 31, 2017, we acquired fee simple interests in 103 convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related properties for an aggregate purchase price of $214.0 million. For additional information regarding our property acquisitions, see Note 13 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

Over the last five years, we have acquired 238 properties, located in various states, for an aggregate purchase price of $536.5 million. These acquisitions included single property transactions and portfolio transactions.

Redevelopment Strategy and Activity

We believe that certain of our properties are located in geographic areas, which together with other factors, may make them well-suited for a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses, such as quick service restaurants, automotive parts and service stores, specialty retail stores and bank branch locations. We believe that the redeveloped properties can be leased or sold at higher values than their current use.

For the year ended December 31, 2018, rent commenced on six completed redevelopment projects that were placed back into service in our net lease portfolio. Since the inception of our redevelopment program in 2015, we have completed nine redevelopment projects.

For the year ended December 31, 2018, we spent $2.7 million of construction-in-progress costs related to our redevelopment activities. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we transferred $2.2 million of construction-in-progress to buildings and improvements on our consolidated balance sheet. In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2018, we spent $4.4 million to reimburse tenants for capital expenditures related to our redevelopment activities.

As of December 31, 2018, we were actively redeveloping six of our properties either as a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses. In addition, to the six properties currently classified as redevelopment, we are in various stages of feasibility and planning for the recapture of select properties from our net lease portfolio that are suitable for redevelopment to either a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses. As of December 31, 2018, we have signed leases on seven properties, that are currently part of our net lease portfolio, which will be recaptured and transferred to redevelopment when the appropriate entitlements, permits and approvals have been secured.

The History of Our Company

Our founders started the business in 1955 with the ownership of one gasoline service station in New York City and combined real estate ownership, leasing and management with service station operation and petroleum distribution. We held our initial public offering in 1971 under the name Power Test Corp. In 1985, we acquired from Texaco the petroleum distribution and marketing assets of Getty Oil Company in the Northeast United States along with the Getty® name and trademark in connection with our real estate and the petroleum marketing business in the United States.

Getty Petroleum Marketing, Inc. (“Marketing”), which was an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of OAO Lukoil (“Lukoil”) from December 2000 until March 2011, was our principal tenant under a long-term unitary triple-net master lease. In December 2011, Marketing filed with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The bankruptcy proceedings resulted in the termination of the master lease effective April 30, 2012, followed by the liquidation of Marketing. As of December 31, 2018, 374 of the properties we own or lease were previously leased to Marketing.

We elected to be treated as a REIT under the federal income tax laws beginning January 1, 2001. A REIT is a corporation, or a business trust that would otherwise be taxed as a corporation, which meets certain requirements of the Internal Revenue Code. The Internal Revenue Code permits a qualifying REIT to deduct dividends paid, thereby effectively eliminating corporate level federal income tax and making the REIT a pass-through vehicle for federal income tax purposes. To meet the applicable requirements of the

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Internal Revenue Code, a REIT must, among other things, invest substantially all of its assets in interests in real estate (including mortgages and other REITs) or cash and government securities, derive most of its income from rents from real property or interest on loans secured by mortgages on real property, and distribute to stockholders annually a substantial portion of its taxable income. As a REIT, we are required to distribute at least 90% of our taxable income to our stockholders each year and would be subject to corporate level federal income taxes on any taxable income that is not distributed.

Major Tenants

As of December 31, 2018, we had three significant tenants by revenue:

 

We leased 157 convenience store and gasoline station properties in three separate unitary leases and three stand-alone leases to subsidiaries of Global Partners LP (NYSE: GLP) (“Global”). In the aggregate, our leases with subsidiaries of Global represented 17% and 21% of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. All of our unitary leases with subsidiaries of Global are guaranteed by the parent company.

 

We leased 77 convenience store and gasoline station properties pursuant to three separate unitary leases to Apro, LLC (d/b/a “United Oil”). In the aggregate, our leases with United Oil represented 13% and 15% of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

We leased 76 convenience store and gasoline station properties pursuant to two separate unitary leases to subsidiaries of Chestnut Petroleum Dist., Inc. (“Chestnut”). In the aggregate, our leases with subsidiaries of Chestnut represented 11% and 13% of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The largest of these unitary leases, covering 57 of our properties, is guaranteed by the parent company, its principals and numerous Chestnut affiliates.

Our major tenants are part of larger corporate organizations and the financial distress of one subsidiary or other affiliated companies or businesses in those organizations may negatively impact the ability or willingness of our tenant to perform its obligations under its lease with us. For information regarding factors that could adversely affect us relating to our leases with these tenants, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors”.

Competition

The single-tenant net lease retail sector of the real estate industry in which we operate is highly competitive. In addition, we expect major real estate investors with significant capital will continue to compete with us for attractive acquisition opportunities. These competitors include petroleum manufacturing, distributing and marketing companies, other REITs, public and private investment funds, and other individual and institutional investors.

Trademarks

We own the Getty® name and trademark in connection with our real estate and the petroleum marketing business in the United States and we permit certain of our tenants to use the Getty® trademark at properties that they lease from us.

Regulation

Our properties are subject to numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations including matters related to the protection of the environment such as the remediation of known contamination and the retirement and decommissioning or removal of long-lived assets including buildings containing hazardous materials, USTs and other equipment. These laws include: (i) requirements to report to governmental authorities discharges of petroleum products into the environment and, under certain circumstances, to remediate soil and groundwater contamination, including pursuant to governmental order and directive, (ii) requirements to remove and replace USTs that have exceeded governmental-mandated age limitations and (iii) the requirement to provide a certificate of financial responsibility with respect to potential claims relating to UST failures. Our triple-net lease tenants are directly responsible for compliance with environmental laws and regulations with respect to their operations at our properties.

We believe that our properties are in substantial compliance with federal, state and local provisions pertaining to environmental matters. Although we are unable to predict what legislation or regulations may be adopted in the future with respect to environmental protection and waste disposal, we do not believe that existing legislation and regulations will have a material adverse effect on our competitive position. For additional information regarding pending environmental lawsuits and claims, see “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” in this Form 10-K.

For substantially all of our triple-net leases, our tenants are contractually responsible for compliance with environmental laws and regulations, removal of USTs at the end of their lease term (the cost of which in certain cases is partially borne by us) and remediation of any environmental contamination that arises during the term of their tenancy. Under the terms of our leases covering properties previously leased to Marketing (substantially all of which commenced in 2012), we have agreed to be responsible for environmental

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contamination at the premises that was known at the time the lease commenced, and for environmental contamination which existed prior to commencement of the lease and is discovered (other than as a result of a voluntary site investigation) during the first 10 years of the lease term (or a shorter period for a minority of such leases). After expiration of such 10-year (or, in certain cases, shorter) period, responsibility for all newly discovered contamination, even if it relates to periods prior to commencement of the lease, is contractually allocated to our tenant. Our tenants at properties previously leased to Marketing are in all cases responsible for the cost of any remediation of contamination that results from their use and occupancy of our properties. Under substantially all of our other triple-net leases, responsibility for remediation of all environmental contamination discovered during the term of the lease (including known and unknown contamination that existed prior to commencement of the lease) is the responsibility of our tenant.

For additional information, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and to “Liquidity and Capital Resources,” “Environmental Matters” and “Contractual Obligations” in “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and to Note 5 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

Additional Information

Our website address is www.gettyrealty.com. Information available on our website shall not be deemed to be a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act are available on our website, free of charge, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such materials with, or furnish them to, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

Our website also contains our business conduct guidelines (“Code of Ethics”), corporate governance guidelines and the charters of the Audit, Compensation and Nominating/Corporate Governance Committees of our Board of Directors. We intend to make available on our website any future amendments or waivers to our Code of Ethics within four business days after any such amendments or waivers become effective.

Item 1A.    Risk Factors

We are subject to various risks, many of which are beyond our control. As a result of these and other factors, we may experience material fluctuations in our future operating results on a quarterly or annual basis, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price. An investment in our stock involves various risks, including those mentioned below and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and those that are described from time to time in our other filings with the SEC.

We incur significant operating costs as a result of environmental laws and regulations which costs could significantly rise and reduce our profitability.

We are subject to numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations, including matters relating to the protection of the environment. Under certain environmental laws, a current or previous owner or operator of real estate may be liable for contamination resulting from the presence or discharge of hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum products at, on, or under, such property, and may be required to investigate and clean-up such contamination. Such laws typically impose liability and clean-up responsibility first on the party responsible for the contamination, but can also impose liability and clean-up responsibility on the owner and the current operator without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of or caused the presence of the contaminants, or the timing or cause of the contamination. Liability under such environmental laws has been interpreted to be joint and several unless the harm is divisible and there is a reasonable basis for allocation of responsibility and the financial resources are available to perform the remediation. For example, liability may arise as a result of the historical use of a property or from the migration of contamination from adjacent or nearby properties. Any such contamination or liability may also reduce the value of the property. In addition, the owner or operator of a property may be subject to claims by third-parties based on injury, damage and/or costs, including investigation and clean-up costs, resulting from environmental contamination present at or emanating from a property. The properties owned or controlled by us are leased primarily as convenience store and gasoline station properties, and therefore may contain, or may have contained, USTs for the storage of petroleum products and other hazardous or toxic substances, which creates a potential for the release of such products or substances. Some of our properties are subject to regulations regarding the retirement and decommissioning or removal of long-lived assets including buildings containing hazardous materials, USTs and other equipment. Some of the properties may be adjacent to or near properties that have contained or currently contain USTs used to store petroleum products or other hazardous or toxic substances. In addition, certain of the properties are on, adjacent to, or near properties upon which others have engaged or may in the future engage in activities that may release petroleum products or other hazardous or toxic substances. There may be other environmental problems associated with our properties of which we are unaware. These problems may make it more difficult for us to re-lease or sell our properties on favorable terms, or at all.

For additional information regarding pending environmental lawsuits and claims, and environmental remediation obligations and estimates, see “Item 3. Legal Proceedings”, “Environmental Matters” in “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Notes 3 and 5 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

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We enter into leases and various other agreements which contractually allocate responsibility between the parties for known and unknown environmental liabilities at or relating to the subject properties. We are contingently liable for these environmental obligations in the event that our tenant or other counterparty does not satisfy them. It is possible that our assumptions regarding the ultimate allocation method and share of responsibility that we used to allocate environmental liabilities may change, which may result in material adjustments to the amounts recorded for environmental litigation accruals and environmental remediation liabilities. We are required to accrue for environmental liabilities that we believe are allocable to others under our leases and other agreements if we determine that it is probable that our tenant or other counterparty will not meet its environmental obligations. We may ultimately be responsible to pay for environmental liabilities as the property owner if our tenant or other counterparty fails to pay them. We assess whether to accrue for environmental liabilities based upon relevant factors including our tenants’ histories of paying for such obligations, our assessment of their financial capability, and their intent to pay for such obligations. However, there can be no assurance that our assessments are correct or that our tenants who have paid their obligations in the past will continue to do so. The ultimate resolution of these matters could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

For substantially all of our triple-net leases, our tenants are contractually responsible for compliance with environmental laws and regulations, removal of USTs at the end of their lease term (the cost of which in certain cases is partially borne by us) and remediation of any environmental contamination that arises during the term of their tenancy. Under the terms of our leases covering properties previously leased to Marketing (substantially all of which commenced in 2012), we have agreed to be responsible for environmental contamination at the premises that was known at the time the lease commenced, and for environmental contamination which existed prior to commencement of the lease and is discovered (other than as a result of a voluntary site investigation) during the first 10 years of the lease term (or a shorter period for a minority of such leases). After expiration of such 10-year (or, in certain cases, shorter) period, responsibility for all newly discovered contamination, even if it relates to periods prior to commencement of the lease, is contractually allocated to our tenant. Our tenants at properties previously leased to Marketing are in all cases responsible for the cost of any remediation of contamination that results from their use and occupancy of our properties. Under substantially all of our other triple-net leases, responsibility for remediation of all environmental contamination discovered during the term of the lease (including known and unknown contamination that existed prior to commencement of the lease) is the responsibility of our tenant.

We anticipate that a majority of the USTs at properties previously leased to Marketing will be replaced over the next several years because these USTs are either at or near the end of their useful lives. For long-term, triple-net leases covering sites previously leased to Marketing, our tenants are responsible for the cost of removal and replacement of USTs and for remediation of contamination found during such UST removal and replacement, unless such contamination was found during the first 10 years of the lease term and also existed prior to commencement of the lease. In those cases, we are responsible for costs associated with the remediation of such contamination. We have also agreed to be responsible for environmental contamination that existed prior to the sale of certain properties assuming the contamination is discovered (other than as a result of a voluntary site investigation) during the first five years after the sale of the properties. For properties that are vacant, we are responsible for costs associated with UST removals and for the cost of remediation of contamination found during the removal of USTs.

In the course of certain UST removals and replacements at properties previously leased to Marketing where we retained continuing responsibility for preexisting environmental obligations, previously unknown environmental contamination was and continues to be discovered. As a result, we have developed a reasonable estimate of fair value for the prospective future environmental liability resulting from preexisting unknown environmental contamination and have accrued for these estimated costs. These estimates are based primarily upon quantifiable trends which we believe allow us to make reasonable estimates of fair value for the future costs of environmental remediation resulting from the removal and replacement of USTs. Our accrual of the additional liability represents our estimate of the fair value of cost for each component of the liability, net of estimated recoveries from state UST remediation funds considering estimated recovery rates developed from prior experience with the funds. In arriving at our accrual, we analyzed the ages of USTs at properties where we would be responsible for preexisting contamination found within 10 years after commencement of a lease (for properties subject to long-term triple-net leases) or five years from a sale (for divested properties), and projected a cost to closure for preexisting unknown environmental contamination.

We measure our environmental remediation liabilities at fair value based on expected future net cash flows, adjusted for inflation, and then discount them to present value. We adjust our environmental remediation liabilities quarterly to reflect changes in projected expenditures, changes in present value due to the passage of time and reductions in estimated liabilities as a result of actual expenditures incurred during each quarter. As of December 31, 2018, we had accrued a total of $59.8 million for our prospective environmental remediation obligations. This accrual consisted of (a) $14.5 million, which was our estimate of reasonably estimable environmental remediation liability, including obligations to remove USTs for which we are responsible, net of estimated recoveries and (b) $45.3 million for future environmental liabilities related to preexisting unknown contamination.

Environmental exposures are difficult to assess and estimate for numerous reasons, including the extent of contamination, alternative treatment methods that may be applied, location of the property which subjects it to differing local laws and regulations and their interpretations, as well as the time it takes to remediate contamination and receive regulatory approval. In developing our liability for estimated environmental remediation obligations on a property by property basis, we consider, among other things, enacted laws and regulations, assessments of contamination and surrounding geology, quality of information available, currently available technologies

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for treatment, alternative methods of remediation and prior experience. Environmental accruals are based on estimates which are subject to significant change, and are adjusted as the remediation treatment progresses, as circumstances change and as environmental contingencies become more clearly defined and reasonably estimable.

Our estimates are based upon facts that are known to us at this time and an assessment of the possible ultimate remedial action outcomes. It is possible that our assumptions, which form the basis of our estimates, regarding our ultimate environmental liabilities may change, which may result in our providing an accrual, or adjustments to the amounts recorded, for environmental remediation liabilities. Among the many uncertainties that impact the estimates are our assumptions, the necessary regulatory approvals for, and potential modifications of remediation plans, the amount of data available upon initial assessment of contamination, changes in costs associated with environmental remediation services and equipment, the availability of state UST remediation funds and the possibility of existing legal claims giving rise to additional claims, and possible changes in the environmental rules and regulations, enforcement policies, and reimbursement programs of various states. Additional environmental liabilities could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

We cannot predict what environmental legislation or regulations may be enacted in the future, or how existing laws or regulations will be administered or interpreted with respect to products or activities to which they have not previously been applied. We cannot predict if state UST fund programs will be administered and funded in the future in a manner that is consistent with past practices and if future environmental spending will continue to be eligible for reimbursement at historical recovery rates under these programs. Compliance with more stringent laws or regulations, as well as more vigorous enforcement policies of the regulatory agencies or stricter interpretation of existing laws, which may develop in the future, could have an adverse effect on our financial position, or that of our tenants, and could require substantial additional expenditures for future remediation. Accordingly, compliance with environmental laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

Substantially all of our tenants depend on the same industry for their revenues.

We derive substantially all of our revenues from leasing, primarily on a triple-net basis, and financing convenience store and gasoline station properties to tenants in the petroleum marketing industry. Accordingly, our revenues are substantially dependent on the economic success of the petroleum marketing industry, and any factors that adversely affect that industry, such as disruption in the supply of petroleum or a decrease in the demand for conventional motor fuels due to conservation, technological advancements in petroleum-fueled motor vehicles or an increase in the use of alternative fuel and battery-operated vehicles, or other “green technologies,” could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price. The success of participants in the petroleum marketing industry depends upon the sale of refined petroleum products at margins in excess of fixed and variable expenses. The petroleum marketing industry is highly competitive and volatile. Petroleum products are commodities, the prices of which depend on numerous factors that affect supply and demand. The prices paid by our tenants and other petroleum marketers for products are affected by global, national and regional factors. A large, rapid increase in wholesale petroleum prices would adversely affect the profitability and cash flows of our tenants if the increased cost of petroleum products could not be passed on to their customers or if automobile consumption of gasoline was to decline significantly. We cannot be certain as to how these factors will affect petroleum product prices or supply in the future, or how in particular they will affect our tenants.

Because certain of our tenants are not rated and their financial information is not available to you, it may be difficult for our investors to determine their creditworthiness.

The majority of our properties are leased to tenants who are not rated by any nationally recognized statistical rating organizations. In addition, our tenants’ financial information is not generally available to our investors. Additionally, many of our tenants are part of larger corporate organizations and we do not receive financial information for the other entities in those organizations. The financial distress of other affiliated companies or businesses in those organizations may negatively impact the ability or willingness of our tenant to perform its obligations under its lease with us. Because of the lack of financial information or credit ratings it is, therefore, difficult for our investors to assess the creditworthiness of our tenants and to determine the ability of our tenants to meet their obligations to us. It is possible that the assumptions and estimates we make after reviewing publicly and privately obtained information about our tenants are not accurate and that we may be required to increase reserves for bad debts, record allowances for deferred rent receivable or record additional expenses if our tenants are unable or unwilling to meet their obligations to us.

Our future cash flow is dependent on the performance of our tenants of their lease obligations, renewal of existing leases and either re-leasing or selling our properties.

We are subject to risks that financial distress, default or bankruptcy of our tenants may lead to vacancy at our properties or disruption in rent receipts as a result of partial payment or nonpayment of rent or that expiring leases may not be renewed. Under unfavorable general economic conditions, there can be no assurance that our tenants’ level of sales and financial performance generally will not be adversely affected, which in turn could negatively impact our rental revenues. We are subject to risks that the terms governing renewal or re-leasing of our properties (including, compliance with numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations related to the

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protection of the environment, such as the remediation of contamination and the retirement and decommissioning or removal of long-lived assets, the cost of required renovations, or replacement of USTs and related equipment) may be less favorable than current lease terms.

We are also subject to the risk that we may receive less net proceeds from the properties we sell as compared to their current carrying value or that the value of our properties may be adversely affected by unfavorable general economic conditions. Unfavorable general economic conditions may also negatively impact our ability to re-lease or sell our properties. Numerous properties compete with our properties in attracting tenants to lease space. The number of available or competitive properties in a particular area could have a material adverse effect on our ability to lease or sell our properties and on the rents we are able to charge. In addition to the risk of disruption in rent receipts, we are subject to the risk of incurring real estate taxes, maintenance, environmental and other expenses at vacant properties. The financial distress, default or bankruptcy of our tenants may also lead to protracted and expensive processes for retaking control of our properties than would otherwise be the case, including, eviction or other legal proceedings related to or resulting from the tenant’s default. These risks are greater with respect to certain of our tenants who lease multiple properties from us. If a tenant files for bankruptcy protection it is possible that we would recover substantially less than the full value of our claims against the tenant. If (i) our tenants do not perform their lease obligations, (ii) we are unable to renew existing leases and promptly recapture and re-lease or sell our properties, (iii) lease terms upon renewal or re-leasing are less favorable than current or historical lease terms, (iv) the values of properties that we sell are adversely affected by market conditions, or (v) we incur significant costs or disruption related to or resulting from tenant financial distress, default or bankruptcy, then our cash flow could be significantly adversely affected.

We are dependent on external sources of capital which may not be available on favorable terms, or at all.

We are dependent on external sources of capital to maintain our status as a REIT and must distribute to our stockholders each year at least 90% of our net taxable income, excluding any net capital gain. Because of these distribution requirements, it is not likely that we will be able to fund all future capital needs, including acquisitions, from income from operations. Therefore, we will have to continue to rely on third-party sources of capital, which may or may not be available on favorable terms, or at all. We may need to access the capital markets in order to execute future significant acquisitions. There can be no assurance that sources of capital will be available to us on favorable terms, or at all.

Our principal sources of liquidity are the cash flows from our operations, funds available under our $300.0 million senior unsecured credit agreement (as amended, the “Restated Credit Agreement”), with a group of commercial banks led by Bank of America, N.A. (the “Bank Syndicate”), proceeds from the sale of shares of our common stock through offerings, from time to time, under our at-the-market program (“ATM Program”) and available cash and cash equivalents. The Restated Credit Agreement consists of a $250.0 million unsecured revolving facility (the “Revolving Facility”), which is scheduled to mature in March 2022 and a $50.0 million unsecured term loan (the “Term Loan”), which is scheduled to mature in March 2023. Subject to the terms of the Restated Credit Agreement and our continued compliance with its provisions, we have the option to (a) extend the term of the Revolving Facility for one additional year to March 2023 and (b) request that the lenders approve an increase of up to $300.0 million in the amount of the Revolving Facility and/or Term Loan to $600.0 million in the aggregate.

On June 21, 2018, we entered into a third amended and restated note purchase and guarantee agreement (the “Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement”) amending and restating our existing senior note purchase agreement with The Prudential Insurance Company of America (“Prudential”) and certain of its affiliates. Pursuant to the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement, we agreed that our (a) 6.0% Series A Guaranteed Senior Notes due February 25, 2021, in the original aggregate principal amount of $100.0 million (the “Series A Notes”), (b) 5.35% Series B Guaranteed Senior Notes due June 2, 2023, in the original aggregate principal amount of $75.0 million (the “Series B Notes”), and (c) 4.75% Series C Guaranteed Senior Notes due February 25, 2025, in the aggregate principal amount of $50.0 million (the “Series C Notes”), that were outstanding under the existing senior note purchase agreement would continue to remain outstanding under the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and we authorized and issued our 5.47% Series D Guaranteed Senior Notes due June 21, 2028, in the aggregate principal amount of $50.0 million (the “Series D Notes” and, together with the Series A Notes, the Series B Notes and the Series C Notes, the “Notes”). The Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement does not provide for scheduled reductions in the principal balance of the Notes prior to their respective maturities.

On June 21, 2018, we entered into a note purchase and guarantee agreement (the “MetLife Note Purchase Agreement”) with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (“MetLife”) and certain of its affiliates. Pursuant to the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement, we authorized and issued our 5.47% Series E Guaranteed Senior Notes due June 21, 2028, in the aggregate principal amount of $50.0 million (the “Series E Notes”). The MetLife Note Purchase Agreement does not provide for scheduled reductions in the principal balance of the Series E Notes prior to its maturity.

On September 19, 2018, we entered into an amendment (the “Amendment”) of our Restated Credit Agreement. The Amendment modifies the Restated Credit Agreement to, among other things: (i) reflect that we had previously entered into the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement and (ii) permit borrowings under each of the Revolving Facility and the Term Loan at three different interest rates, including a rate based on the LIBOR Daily Floating Rate (as defined in the

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Amendment) plus the Applicable Rate (as defined in the Amendment) for such facility. For additional information, see “Credit Agreement” and “Senior Unsecured Notes” in Note 4 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

The Restated Credit Agreement, the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement contain customary financial covenants such as leverage, coverage ratios and minimum tangible net worth, as well as limitations on restricted payments, which may limit our ability to incur additional debt or pay dividends. The Restated Credit Agreement, the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement also contain customary events of default, including cross defaults to each other, change of control and failure to maintain REIT status (provided that the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement require a mandatory offer to prepay the Notes and the Series E Notes, respectively, upon a change in control in lieu of a change of control event of default). Our ability to meet the terms of the agreements is dependent upon our continued ability to meet certain criteria, as further described in Note 4 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K, the performance of our tenants and the other risks described in this section. If we are not in compliance with one or more of our covenants, which could result in an event of default under our Restated Credit Agreement, our Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement or our MetLife Note Purchase Agreement, there can be no assurance that our lenders would waive such non-compliance. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

Under our ATM Program, we may issue and sell shares of our common stock with an aggregate sales price of up to $125.0 million through a consortium of banks acting as agents. Sales of shares of our common stock under our ATM Program may be made from time to time in at-the-market offerings as defined in Rule 415 of the Securities Act of 1933, including by means of ordinary brokers’ transactions on the New York Stock Exchange or otherwise at market prices prevailing at the time of sale, at prices related to prevailing market prices or as otherwise agreed to with the applicable agent. Sales of shares of our common stock under our ATM Program, if any, will depend on a variety of factors to be determined by us from time to time, including among others, market conditions and the trading price of our common stock. Our agents are not required to sell any specific number or dollar amount of our common stock, but each agent will use its commercially reasonable efforts consistent with its normal trading and sales practices and applicable law and regulation to sell shares designated by us in accordance with the terms of the distribution agreement with our agents. The net proceeds we receive will be the gross proceeds received from such sales less the commissions and any other costs we may incur in issuing the shares of our common stock.

We may use a portion of the net proceeds from any of such sales to reduce our outstanding indebtedness, including borrowings under our Revolving Facility. The Revolving Credit Facility includes lenders who are affiliates of our agents. As a result, a portion of the net proceeds from any sale of shares of our common stock under our ATM Program that is used to repay amounts outstanding under our Revolving Credit Facility will be received by these affiliates. Because an affiliate may receive a portion of the net proceeds from any of these sales, each of our agents may have an interest in these sales beyond the sales commission it will receive. This could result in a conflict of interest and cause such agents to act in a manner that is not in the best interests of us or our investors in connection with any sale of shares of our common stock under our ATM Program.

Our access to third-party sources of capital depends upon a number of factors including general market conditions, the market’s perception of our growth potential, financial stability, our current and potential future earnings and cash distributions, covenants and limitations imposed under our Restated Credit Agreement, our Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and our MetLife Note Purchase Agreement and the market price of our common stock.

We are exposed to counterparty risk and there can be no assurances that we will effectively manage or mitigate this risk.

We regularly interact with counterparties in various industries. The types of counterparties most common to our transactions and agreements include, but are not limited to, landlords, tenants, vendors and lenders. We also enter into agreements to acquire and sell properties which allocate responsibility for certain costs to the counterparty. Our most significant counterparties include, but are not limited to, the members of the Bank Syndicate related to our Restated Credit Agreement, the lender that is the counterparty to the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement, the lender that is the counterparty to the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement and our major tenants from whom we derive a significant amount of rental revenue. The default, insolvency or other inability or unwillingness of a significant counterparty to perform its obligations under an agreement, including, without limitation, as a result of the rejection of an agreement in bankruptcy proceedings, is likely to have a material adverse effect on us.

As of December 31, 2018, we leased 157 convenience store and gasoline station properties in three separate unitary leases and three stand-alone leases to subsidiaries of Global. In the aggregate, our leases with subsidiaries of Global represented 17% and 21% of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. All of our unitary leases with subsidiaries of Global are guaranteed by the parent company. As of December 31, 2018, we leased 77 convenience store and gasoline station properties in three separate unitary leases to United Oil. In the aggregate, our leases with United Oil represented 13% and 15% of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. As of December 31, 2018, we leased 76 convenience store and gasoline station properties in two separate unitary leases to subsidiaries of Chestnut. In the aggregate, our leases with subsidiaries of Chestnut represented 11% and 13% of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The largest of these unitary leases, covering 57 of our properties, is guaranteed by the parent company, its principals and numerous Chestnut affiliates.

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We may also undertake additional transactions with these or other existing tenants, which would further concentrate our sources of rental revenues. Many of our tenants, including those noted above, are part of larger corporate organizations and the financial distress of one subsidiary or other affiliated companies or businesses in those organizations may negatively impact the ability or willingness of our tenant to perform its obligations under its lease with us. The failure of a major tenant or their default in their rental and other obligations to us is likely to have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

Our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our financial position and results of operations, and they require management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions about matters that are inherently uncertain.

Our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our financial position and results of operations. We have identified several accounting policies as being critical to the presentation of our financial position and results of operations because they require management to make particularly subjective or complex judgments about matters that are inherently uncertain and because of the likelihood that materially different amounts would be recorded under different conditions or using different assumptions. We cannot provide any assurance that we will not make subsequent significant adjustments to our consolidated financial statements. Estimates, judgments and assumptions underlying our consolidated financial statements include, but are not limited to, receivables and related reserves, deferred rent receivable, income under direct financing leases, asset retirement obligations (including environmental remediation obligations and future environmental liabilities for pre-existing unknown environmental contamination), real estate, depreciation and amortization, carrying value of our properties, impairment of long-lived assets, litigation, accrued liabilities, income taxes and allocation of the purchase price of properties acquired to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed. If our accounting policies, methods, judgments, assumptions, estimates and allocations prove to be incorrect, or if circumstances change, our business, financial condition, revenues, operating expense, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price may be materially adversely affected.

We may not be able to successfully implement our investment strategy.

We may not be able to successfully implement our investment strategy. We cannot assure you that our portfolio of properties will expand at all, or if it will expand at any specified rate or to any specified size. As part of our overall growth strategy, we regularly review acquisition, financing and redevelopment opportunities, and we expect to continue to pursue investments that we believe will benefit our financial performance. We cannot assure you that investment opportunities which meet our investment criteria will be available. Pursuing our investment opportunities may result in additional debt or new equity issuances, that may initially be dilutive to our net income, and such investments may not perform as we expect or produce the returns that we anticipate (including, without limitation, as a result of tenant bankruptcies, tenant concessions, our inability to collect rents and higher than anticipated operating expenses). Further, we may not be able to successfully integrate investments into our existing portfolio without operating disruptions or unanticipated costs. To the extent that our current sources of liquidity are not sufficient to fund such investments, we will require other sources of capital, which may or may not be available on favorable terms or at all. Additionally, to the extent that we increase the size of our portfolio, we may not be able to adapt our management, administrative, accounting and operational systems, or hire and retain sufficient operational staff to integrate investments into our portfolio or manage any future investments without operating disruptions or unanticipated costs. Moreover, our continued growth will require increased investment in management personnel, professional fees, other personnel, financial and management systems and controls and facilities, which will result in additional operating expenses. Under the circumstances described above, our results of operations, financial condition and growth prospects may be materially adversely affected.

We may acquire new properties and this may create risks.

We may acquire properties when we believe that an acquisition matches our business and investment strategies. These properties may have characteristics or deficiencies currently unknown to us that affect their value or revenue potential. It is possible that the operating performance of these properties may decline after we acquire them, or that they may not perform as expected. Further, if financed by additional debt or new equity issuances, our acquisition of properties may result in stockholder dilution. Our acquisition of properties will expose us to the liabilities of those properties, some of which we may not be aware of at the time of such acquisitions. We face competition in pursuing these acquisitions and we may not succeed in leasing acquired properties at rents sufficient to cover the costs of their acquisition and operations.

Newly acquired properties may require significant management attention that would otherwise be devoted to our ongoing business. We may not succeed in consummating desired acquisitions. Consequences arising from or in connection with any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

We are pursuing redevelopment opportunities and this creates risks to our Company.

We have commenced a program to redevelop certain of our properties, and to recapture select properties from our net lease portfolio in order to redevelop such properties, to either a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses. The success at each stage of our redevelopment program is dependent on numerous factors and risks, including our ability

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to identify and extract qualified sites from our portfolio and successfully prepare and market them for alternative uses, and project development issues, including those relating to planning, zoning, licensing, permitting, third party and governmental authorizations, changes in local market conditions, increases in construction costs, the availability and cost of financing, and issues arising from possible discovery of new environmental contamination and the need to conduct environmental remediation. Occupancy rates and rents at any particular redeveloped property may fail to meet our original expectations for reasons beyond our control, including changes in market and economic conditions and the development by competitors of competing properties. We could experience increased and unexpected costs or significant delays or abandonment of some or all of these redevelopment opportunities. For any of the above-described reasons, and others, we may determine to abandon opportunities that we have already begun to explore or with respect to which we have commenced redevelopment efforts and, as a result, we may fail to recover expenses already incurred. We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully redevelop and lease any of our identified opportunities or that our overall redevelopment program will be successful. Consequences arising from or in connection with any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

We are exposed to interest rate risk and there can be no assurances that we will manage or mitigate this risk effectively.

We are exposed to interest rate risk, primarily as a result of our Restated Credit Agreement. Borrowings under our Restated Credit Agreement bear interest at a floating rate. Accordingly, an increase in interest rates will increase the amount of interest we must pay under our Restated Credit Agreement. Our interest rate risk may materially change in the future if we increase our borrowings under the Restated Credit Agreement or amend our Restated Credit Agreement, our Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement or our MetLife Note Purchase Agreement, seek other sources of debt or equity capital or refinance our outstanding indebtedness. A significant increase in interest rates could also make it more difficult to find alternative financing on desirable terms. For additional information with respect to interest rate risk, see “Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” in this Form 10-K.

We are subject to risks inherent in owning and leasing real estate.

We are subject to varying degrees of risk generally related to leasing and owning real estate, many of which are beyond our control. In addition to general risks applicable to us, our risks include, among others: our liability as a lessee for long-term lease obligations regardless of our revenues; deterioration in national, regional and local economic and real estate market conditions; potential changes in supply of, or demand for, rental properties similar to ours; competition for tenants and declining rental rates; difficulty in selling or re-leasing properties on favorable terms or at all; impairments in our ability to collect rent or other payments due to us when they are due; increases in interest rates and adverse changes in the availability, cost and terms of financing; uninsured property liability; the impact of present or future environmental legislation and compliance with environmental laws; adverse changes in zoning laws and other regulations; acts of terrorism and war; acts of God; the unforeseen impacts of climate change, compliance with any future laws or regulations designed to prevent or mitigate the impacts of climate change, and any material costs related thereto; the potential risk of functional obsolescence of properties over time the need to periodically renovate and repair our properties; and physical or weather-related damage to our properties. Certain significant expenditures generally do not change in response to economic or other conditions, including: (i) debt service, (ii) real estate taxes, (iii) environmental remediation costs and (iv) operating and maintenance costs. The combination of variable revenue and relatively fixed expenditures may result, under certain market conditions, in reduced earnings and could have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

Each of the factors listed above could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price. In addition, real estate investments are relatively illiquid, which means that our ability to vary our portfolio of properties in response to changes in economic and other conditions may be limited.

Our business operations may not generate sufficient cash for distributions or debt service.

There is no assurance that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay dividends on our common stock, to pay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs. We may not be able to repay or refinance existing indebtedness on favorable terms, which could force us to dispose of properties on disadvantageous terms (which may also result in losses) or accept financing on unfavorable terms.

Adverse developments in general business, economic or political conditions could have a material adverse effect on us.

Adverse developments in general business and economic conditions, including through recession, downturn or otherwise, either in the economy generally or in those regions in which a large portion of our business is conducted, could have a material adverse effect on us and significantly increase certain of the risks we are subject to. Among other effects, adverse economic conditions could depress real estate values, impact our ability to re-lease or sell our properties and have an adverse effect on our tenants’ level of sales and financial performance generally. As our revenues are substantially dependent on the economic success of our tenants, any factors that adversely impact our tenants could also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

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Inflation may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Although inflation has not materially impacted our results of operations in the recent past, increased inflation could have a more pronounced negative impact on any variable rate debt we incur in the future and on our results of operations. During times when inflation is greater than increases in rent, as provided for in our leases, rent increases may not keep up with the rate of inflation. Likewise, even though our triple-net leases reduce our exposure to rising property expenses due to inflation, substantial inflationary pressures and increased costs may have an adverse impact on our tenants if increases in their operating expenses exceed increases in revenue, which may adversely affect our tenants’ ability to pay rent.

Recently enacted U.S. federal tax reform legislation could affect REITs generally, our tenants, the markets in which we operate, the price of our common stock and our results of operations, in ways, both positively and negatively, that are difficult to predict.

On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “2017 Act”) was enacted. The 2017 Act includes significant changes to corporate and individual tax rates and the calculation of taxes. As a REIT, we are generally not required to pay federal taxes otherwise applicable to regular corporations if we distribute all of our income and comply with the various tax rules governing REITs. Stockholders, however, are generally required to pay taxes on REIT dividends. The 2017 Act changes the way in which dividends paid on our stock are taxed by the holder of that stock and could impact the price of our common stock or how stockholders and potential investors view an investment in REITs. In addition, while certain elements of the 2017 Act do not appear to impact us directly as a REIT, they could impact our tenants and the markets in which we operate in ways, both positive and negative, that are difficult to predict. Prospective stockholders are urged to consult with their tax advisors with respect to the 2017 Act and any other regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and the potential effects thereof on an investment in our common stock.

Property taxes on our properties may increase without notice.

Each of the properties we own or lease is subject to real property taxes. The leases for certain of the properties that we lease from third-parties obligate us to pay real property taxes with regard to those properties. The real property taxes on our properties and any other properties that we acquire or lease in the future may increase as property tax rates change and as those properties are assessed or reassessed by tax authorities. To the extent that our tenants are unable or unwilling to pay such increase in accordance with their leases, our net operating expenses may increase.

We are defending pending lawsuits and claims and are subject to material losses.

We are subject to various lawsuits and claims, including litigation related to environmental matters, such as those arising from leaking USTs, contamination of groundwater with methyl tertiary butyl ether (a fuel derived from methanol, commonly referred to as “MTBE”) and releases of motor fuel into the environment, and toxic tort claims. The ultimate resolution of certain matters cannot be predicted because considerable uncertainty exists both in terms of the probability of loss and the estimate of such loss. Our ultimate liabilities resulting from the lawsuits and claims we face could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price. For additional information with respect to certain pending lawsuits and claims, see “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” and Note 3 in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Form 10-K.

A significant portion of our properties are concentrated in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States, and adverse conditions in those regions, in particular, could negatively impact our operations.

A significant portion of the properties we own and lease are located in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States and, as of December 31, 2018, 47.5% of our properties are concentrated in three states (New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut). Because of the concentration of our properties in those regions, in the event of adverse economic conditions in those regions, we would likely experience higher risk of default on payment of rent to us than if our properties were more geographically diversified. Additionally, the rents on our properties may be subject to a greater risk of default than other properties in the event of adverse economic, political or business developments, natural disasters or severe weather that may affect the Northeast or Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States and the ability of our lessees to make rent payments. This lack of geographical diversification could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

We are in a competitive business.

The real estate industry is highly competitive. Where we own properties, we compete for tenants with a large number of real estate property owners and other companies that sublet properties. Our principal means of competition are rents we are able to charge in relation to the income producing potential of the location. In addition, we expect other major real estate investors, some with much greater financial resources or more experienced personnel than we have, will compete with us for attractive acquisition opportunities. These competitors include petroleum manufacturing, distributing and marketing companies, convenience store retailers, other REITs, public and private investment funds, and other individual and institutional investors. This competition has increased prices for properties we seek to acquire and may impair our ability to make suitable property acquisitions on favorable terms in the future.

15


 

We are subject to losses that may not be covered by insurance.

We and our tenants carry insurance against certain risks and in such amounts as we believe are customary for businesses of our kind. However, as the costs and availability of insurance change, we may decide not to be covered against certain losses (such as certain environmental liabilities, earthquakes, hurricanes, floods and civil disorder) where, in the judgment of management, the insurance is not warranted due to cost or availability of coverage or the remoteness of perceived risk. Furthermore, there are certain types of losses, such as losses resulting from wars, terrorism or certain acts of God, that generally are not insured because they are either uninsurable or not economically insurable. There is no assurance that the existing insurance coverages are or will be sufficient to cover actual losses incurred. The destruction of, or significant damage to, or significant liabilities arising out of conditions at, our properties due to an uninsured loss would result in an economic loss and could result in us losing both our investment in, and anticipated profits from, such properties. When a loss is insured, the coverage may be insufficient in amount or duration, or a lessee’s customers may be lost, such that the lessee cannot resume its business after the loss at prior levels or at all, resulting in reduced rent or a default under its lease. Any such loss relating to a large number of properties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

Failure to qualify as a REIT under the federal income tax laws would have adverse consequences to our stockholders. Uncertain tax matters may have a significant impact on the results of operations for any single fiscal year or interim period or may cause us to fail to qualify as a REIT.

We elected to be treated as a REIT under the federal income tax laws beginning January 1, 2001. To qualify for taxation as a REIT, we must, among other requirements such as those related to the composition of our assets and gross income, distribute annually to our stockholders at least 90% of our taxable income, including taxable income that is accrued by us without a corresponding receipt of cash. Accordingly, we generally will not be subject to federal income tax on qualifying REIT income, provided that distributions to our stockholders equal at least the amount of our taxable income as defined under the Internal Revenue Code. But, we may have to borrow money or sell assets to satisfy such distribution requirements even if the then prevailing market conditions are not favorable for these borrowings. Many of the REIT requirements are highly technical and complex. If we were to fail to meet the requirements, we may be subject to federal income tax, excise taxes, penalties and interest or we may have to pay a deficiency dividend. We may have to borrow money or sell assets to pay such a deficiency dividend.

We cannot guarantee that we will continue to qualify in the future as a REIT. We cannot give any assurance that new legislation, regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions will not significantly change the requirements relating to our qualification. If we fail to qualify as a REIT, we would not be allowed a deduction for distributions to stockholders in computing our taxable income and will again be subject to federal income tax at regular corporate rates, we could be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax for taxable years beginning before 2018, we could be required to pay significant income taxes and we would have less money available for our operations and distributions to stockholders. This would likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of our securities. We could also be precluded from treatment as a REIT for four taxable years following the year in which we lost the qualification, and all distributions to stockholders would be taxable as regular corporate dividends to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits. Loss of our REIT status could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

Future issuances of equity securities could dilute the interest of holders of our equity securities.

Our future growth depends upon our ability to raise additional capital. If we were to raise additional capital through the issuance of equity securities, such issuance, the receipt of the net proceeds thereof and the use of such proceeds may have a dilutive effect on our expected earnings per share, funds from operations per share and adjusted funds from operations per share. The actual amount of such dilution cannot be determined at this time and will be based on numerous factors. Additionally, we are not restricted from issuing additional shares of our common stock or preferred stock, including any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock or preferred stock or any substantially similar securities in the future. The market price of our common stock could decline as a result of sales of a large number of shares of our common stock in the market after an offering or the perception that such sales could occur.

We may change our dividend policy and the dividends we pay may be subject to significant volatility.

The decision to declare and pay dividends on our common stock in the future, as well as the timing, amount and composition of any such future dividends, will be at the sole discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon such factors as the Board of Directors deems relevant and the dividend paid may vary from expected amounts. Any change in our dividend policy could adversely affect our business and the market price of our common stock. In addition, each of the Restated Credit Agreement, the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement prohibit the payments of dividends during certain events of default. No assurance can be given that our financial performance in the future will permit our payment of any dividends or that the amount of dividends we pay, if any, will not fluctuate significantly. Under the Maryland General Corporation Law, our ability to pay dividends would be restricted if, after payment of the dividend, (i) we would not be able to pay indebtedness as it becomes due

16


 

in the usual course of business or (ii) our total assets would be less than the sum of our liabilities plus the amount that would be needed, if we were to be dissolved, to satisfy the rights of any stockholders with liquidation preferences. There currently are no stockholders with liquidation preferences.

No assurance can be given that our financial performance in the future will permit our payment of any dividends. Each of the Restated Credit Agreement, the Third Restated Prudential Note Purchase Agreement and the MetLife Note Purchase Agreement contain customary financial covenants such as availability, leverage and coverage ratios and minimum tangible net worth, as well as limitations on restricted payments, which may limit our ability to incur additional debt or pay dividends. As a result of the factors described above, we may experience material fluctuations in future operating results on a quarterly or annual basis, which could materially and adversely affect our business, stock price and ability to pay dividends.

Changes in market conditions could adversely affect the market price of our publicly traded common stock.

As with other publicly traded securities, the market price of our publicly traded common stock depends on various market conditions, which may change from time-to-time. Among the market conditions that may affect the market price of our publicly traded common stock are the following: our financial condition and performance and that of our significant tenants; the market’s perception of our growth potential and potential future earnings; the reputation of REITs generally and the reputation of REITs with portfolios similar to us; the attractiveness of the securities of REITs in comparison to securities issued by other entities (including securities issued by other real estate companies); an increase in market interest rates, which may lead prospective investors to demand a higher distribution rate in relation to the price paid for publicly traded securities; the extent of institutional investor interest in us; and general economic and financial market conditions.

In order to preserve our REIT status, our charter limits the number of shares a person may own, which may discourage a takeover that could result in a premium price for our common stock or otherwise benefit our stockholders.

Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our Board of Directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Unless exempted by our Board of Directors, no person may (i) own, or be deemed to own by virtue of certain constructive ownership provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, in excess of 5.0% (in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive) of the aggregate of the outstanding shares of our common stock or (ii) own, or be deemed to own by virtue of certain other constructive ownership provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, in excess of 9.9% (by value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive) of the outstanding shares of our common stock, which may discourage large investors from purchasing our stock. This restriction may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price for our common stock or otherwise be in the best interest of our stockholders.

Maryland law may discourage a third-party from acquiring us.

We are subject to the provisions of the Maryland Business Combination Act (the “Business Combination Act”) which prohibits transactions between a Maryland corporation and an interested stockholder or an affiliate of an interested stockholder for five years after the most recent date on which the interested stockholder becomes an interested stockholder. Generally, pursuant to the Business Combination Act, an “interested stockholder” is a person who, together with affiliates and associates, beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, 10% or more of a Maryland corporation’s voting stock. These provisions could have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change in control of our Company or reducing the price that certain investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our capital stock. Additionally, the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act may deny voting rights to shares involved in an acquisition of one-tenth or more of the voting stock of a Maryland corporation. In our charter and bylaws, we have elected not to have the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act apply to any acquisition by any person of shares of stock of our Company. However, in the case of the control share acquisition statute, our Board of Directors may opt to make this statute applicable to us at any time by amending our bylaws, and may do so on a retroactive basis. Finally, the “unsolicited takeovers” provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law permit our Board of Directors, without stockholder approval and regardless of what is currently provided in our charter or bylaws, to implement certain provisions that may have the effect of inhibiting a third-party from making an acquisition proposal for our Company or of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of our Company under circumstances that otherwise could provide the holders of our common stock with the opportunity to realize a premium over the then current market price or that stockholders may otherwise believe is in their best interests.

The loss of certain members of our management team or Board of Directors could adversely affect our business or the market price of our common stock.

Our future success and ability to implement our business and investment strategy depends, in part, on our ability to attract and retain key management personnel and directors, and on the continued contributions of such persons, each of whom may be difficult to replace. As a REIT, we employ only 29 employees and have a cost-effective management structure. We do not have any employment agreements with any of our executives. In the event of the loss of key management personnel or directors, or upon unexpected death,

17


 

disability or retirement, we may not be able to find replacements with comparable skill, ability and industry expertise, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price. Additionally, certain of our directors beneficially own more than 5% of the outstanding shares of our common stock. If any of these directors cease to be a director of the Company and they or their estate sell a significant portion of such holdings into the public market, it could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Amendments to the Accounting Standards Codification made by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) or changes in accounting standards issued by other standard-setting bodies may adversely affect our reported revenues, profitability or financial position.

Our consolidated financial statements are subject to the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) in accordance with the Accounting Standards Codification, which is periodically amended by the FASB. The application of GAAP is also subject to varying interpretations over time. Accordingly, we are required to adopt amendments to the Accounting Standards Codification or comply with revised interpretations that are issued from time-to-time by recognized authoritative bodies, including the FASB and the SEC. Those changes could adversely affect our reported revenues, profitability or financial position.

Our assets may be subject to impairment charges.

We periodically evaluate our real estate investments and other assets for impairment indicators. The judgment regarding the existence of impairment indicators is based on GAAP, and includes a variety of factors such as market conditions, the accumulation of asset retirement costs due to changes in estimates associated with our estimated environmental liabilities, the status of significant leases, the financial condition of major tenants and other assumptions and factors that could affect the cash flow from or fair value of our properties. During the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, we incurred $6.2 million and $9.3 million, respectively, of impairment charges. We may be required to take similar impairment charges, which could affect the implementation of our current business strategy and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may affect the market on which our common stock trades, the markets in which we operate, our operations and our results of operations.

Terrorist attacks or other acts of violence or war could affect our business or the businesses of our tenants. The consequences of armed conflicts are unpredictable, and we may not be able to foresee events that could have a material adverse effect on us. More generally, any of these events could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility in the United States and worldwide financial markets and economy. Terrorist attacks also could be a factor resulting in, or which could exacerbate, an economic recession in the United States or abroad. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

We rely on information technology in our operations, and any material failure, inadequacy, interruption or security failure of that technology could harm our business.

We rely on information technology networks and systems, including the Internet, to process, transmit and store electronic information and to manage or support a variety of our business processes, including financial transactions and maintenance of records, which may include personal identifying information of tenants and lease data. We rely on commercially available systems, software, tools and monitoring to provide security for processing, transmitting and storing confidential tenant information, such as individually identifiable information relating to financial accounts. Although we have taken steps to protect the security of the data maintained in our information systems, it is possible that our security measures will not be able to prevent the systems’ improper functioning, or the improper disclosure of personally identifiable information such as in the event of cyberattacks. Security breaches, including physical or electronic break-ins, computer viruses, attacks by hackers and similar breaches, can create system disruptions, shutdowns or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. Any failure to maintain proper function, security and availability of our information systems could interrupt our operations, damage our reputation, subject us to liability claims or regulatory penalties and could materially and adversely affect us.

If we fail to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately and timely report our financial results.

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports, effectively prevent fraud and operate successfully as a public company. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our reputation and operating results would be harmed. We are required to perform system and process evaluation and testing of our internal control over financial reporting to allow management to report on, and our independent registered public accounting firm to attest to, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

As a result of material weaknesses or significant deficiencies that may be identified in our internal control over financial reporting in the future, we may also identify certain deficiencies in some of our disclosure controls and procedures that we believe require

18


 

remediation. If we or our independent registered public accounting firm discover any such weaknesses or deficiencies, we will make efforts to further improve our internal control over financial reporting controls. However, there is no assurance that we will be successful. Any failure to maintain effective controls or timely effect any necessary improvement of our internal control over financial reporting controls could harm operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations, which could affect the listing of our common stock on the NYSE. Ineffective internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which would likely have a negative effect on the per share trading price of our common stock.

We may be adversely affected by changes in LIBOR reporting practices or the method in which LIBOR is calculated.

On July 27, 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that it intends to phase out LIBOR by the end of 2021. It is unclear whether new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2021. The U.S. Federal Reserve, in conjunction with the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, a steering committee comprised of large U.S. financial institutions, is considering replacing U.S. dollar LIBOR with a newly-created index, calculated by reference to short-term repurchase agreements backed by U.S. Treasury securities, called the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”). The first publication of SOFR was released by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in April 2018. Whether SOFR will become a widely-accepted benchmark in place of LIBOR, however, remains in question. As such, the future of LIBOR and potential alternatives thereto are uncertain at this time. If LIBOR ceases to exist, we may need to renegotiate our Restated Credit Agreement, which extends beyond 2021, to replace LIBOR with the new standard that is established. The potential effects of the foregoing on our cost of capital cannot yet be determined.

Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

Item 2.    Properties

Substantially all of our properties are leased on a triple-net basis primarily to petroleum distributors, convenience store retailers and, to a lesser extent, individual operators, engaged in the sale of refined petroleum products, day-to-day consumer goods and convenience foods, who are responsible for the operations conducted at our properties and for the payment of all taxes, maintenance, repair, insurance and other operating expenses relating to our properties. In those instances where we determine that the best use for a property is no longer its existing use and the property is not subject to a lease, we will either redevelop the property or seek an alternative tenant or buyer for the property. We manage and evaluate our operations as a single segment.

We believe that most of our owned and leased properties are adequately covered by casualty and liability insurance. In addition, in almost all cases we require our tenants to provide insurance for properties they lease from us, including casualty, liability, pollution legal liability, fire and extended coverage in amounts and on other terms satisfactory to us.

19


 

The following table summarizes the geographic distribution of our properties as of December 31, 2018. The table also identifies the number and location of properties we lease from third-parties. In addition, we lease approximately 8,900 square feet of office space at Two Jericho Plaza, Jericho, New York, which is used for our corporate headquarters, which we believe will remain suitable and adequate for such purposes for the immediate future.

 

 

 

Owned by

Getty Realty

 

 

Leased by

Getty Realty

 

 

Total

Properties

by State

 

 

Percent

of Total

Properties

 

New York

 

 

207

 

 

 

44

 

 

 

251

 

 

 

26.9

%

Massachusetts

 

 

100

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

111

 

 

 

11.9

 

Connecticut

 

 

72

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

81

 

 

 

8.7

 

New Jersey

 

 

47

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

52

 

 

 

5.6

 

Texas

 

 

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

49

 

 

 

5.3

 

Virginia

 

 

45

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

46

 

 

 

4.9

 

New Hampshire

 

 

45

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

46

 

 

 

4.9

 

South Carolina

 

 

45

 

 

 

 

 

 

45

 

 

 

4.8

 

Maryland

 

 

40

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

4.5

 

Washington State

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

3.3

 

California

 

 

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

3.1

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

2.5

 

Colorado

 

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

2.5

 

Arizona

 

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

2.5

 

Oregon

 

 

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

1.4

 

Arkansas

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

1.1

 

Hawaii

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

1.1

 

Maine

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

0.8

 

Ohio

 

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

0.6

 

New Mexico

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

0.5

 

North Carolina

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

0.5

 

Rhode Island

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

0.5

 

Florida

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

0.5

 

Louisiana

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

0.4

 

Oklahoma

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

0.3

 

Georgia

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

0.2

 

Nevada

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

0.2

 

Washington, D.C.

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

0.2

 

Delaware

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

0.1

 

Illinois

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

0.1

 

North Dakota

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

0.1

 

Total

 

 

859

 

 

 

74

 

 

 

933

 

 

 

100

%

 

The properties that we lease from third-parties have a remaining lease term, including renewal and extension option terms, averaging approximately nine years. The following table sets forth information regarding lease expirations, including renewal and extension option terms, for properties that we lease from third-parties:

 

CALENDAR YEAR

 

Number of

Leases

Expiring

 

 

Percent of

Total Leased

Properties

 

 

Percent

of Total

Properties

 

2019

 

 

7

 

 

 

9.5

%

 

 

0.8

%

2020

 

 

6

 

 

 

8.1

 

 

 

0.6

 

2021

 

 

8

 

 

 

10.8

 

 

 

0.9

 

2022

 

 

4

 

 

 

5.4

 

 

 

0.4

 

2023

 

 

2

 

 

 

2.7

 

 

 

0.2

 

Subtotal

 

 

27

 

 

 

36.5

 

 

 

2.9

 

Thereafter

 

 

47

 

 

 

63.5

 

 

 

5.0

 

Total

 

 

74

 

 

 

100

%

 

 

7.9

%

 

20


 

Revenues from rental properties and tenant reimbursements for the year ended December 31, 2018, were $133.0 million with respect to 926 average rental properties held during the year for an average revenue per rental property of approximately $143,600. Revenues from rental properties and tenant reimbursements for the year ended December 31, 2017, were $117.2 million with respect to 857 average rental properties held during the year for an average revenue per rental property of approximately $136,700.

Rental property lease expirations and annualized contractual rent as of December 31, 2018, are as follows (in thousands, except for number of properties):

 

CALENDAR YEAR

 

Number of

Rental

Properties (a)

 

 

Annualized

Contractual

Rent (b)

 

 

Percentage

of Total

Annualized Rent

 

Redevelopment

 

 

6

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

Vacant

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019

 

 

34

 

 

 

3,360

 

 

 

2.9

%

2020

 

 

37

 

 

 

4,700

 

 

 

4.0

 

2021

 

 

24

 

 

 

2,458

 

 

 

2.1

 

2022

 

 

36

 

 

 

3,046

 

 

 

2.6

 

2023

 

 

23

 

 

 

3,102

 

 

 

2.7

 

2024

 

 

22

 

 

 

2,576

 

 

 

2.2

 

2025

 

 

13

 

 

 

2,696

 

 

 

2.3

 

2026

 

 

77

 

 

 

12,912

 

 

 

11.0

 

2027

 

 

250

 

 

 

18,437

 

 

 

15.8

 

2028

 

 

44

 

 

 

7,017

 

 

 

6.0

 

Thereafter

 

 

358

 

 

 

56,524

 

 

 

48.4

 

Total

 

 

933

 

 

$

116,828

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

(a)

With respect to a unitary master lease that includes properties that we lease from third-parties, the expiration dates refer to the dates that the leases with the third-parties expire and upon which date our tenant must vacate those properties, not the expiration date of the unitary master lease itself.

(b)

Represents the monthly contractual rent due from tenants under existing leases as of December 31, 2018, multiplied by 12.

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings

We are subject to various legal proceedings, many of which we consider to be routine and incidental to our business. Many of these legal proceedings involve claims relating to alleged discharges of petroleum into the environment at current and former gasoline stations. We routinely assess our liabilities and contingencies in connection with these matters based upon the latest available information. The following is a description of material legal proceedings, including those involving private parties and governmental authorities under federal, state and local laws regulating the discharge of hazardous substances into the environment. We are vigorously defending all of the legal proceedings against us, including each of the legal proceedings listed below. As of December 31, 2018 and 2017, we had accrued $12.2 million and $12.3 million, respectively, for certain of these matters which we believe were appropriate based on information then currently available. It is possible that losses related to these legal proceedings could exceed the amounts accrued as of December 31, 2018, and that such additional losses could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

In September 2004, the State of New York commenced an action against us, United Gas Corp., Costa Gas Station, Inc., Vincent Costa, The Ingraham Bedell Corporation, Richard Berger and Exxon Mobil Corporation in New York Supreme Court in Albany County seeking recovery for reimbursement of investigation and remediation costs claimed to have been incurred by the New York Environmental Protection and Spill Compensation Fund relating to contamination it alleges emanated from various gasoline station properties located in the same vicinity in Uniondale, New York, including a site formerly owned by us and at which a petroleum release and cleanup occurred. The complaint also seeks future costs for remediation, as well as interest and penalties. We have served an answer to the complaint denying responsibility. In 2007, the State of New York commenced action against Shell Oil Company, Shell Oil Products Company, Motiva Enterprises, LLC, and related parties, in the New York Supreme Court, Albany County seeking basically the same relief sought in the action involving us. We have also filed a third-party complaint against Hess Corporation, Sprague Operating Resources LLC (successor to RAD Energy Corp.), Service Station Installation of NY, Inc., and certain individual defendants based on alleged contribution to the contamination that is the subject of the State’s claims arising from a petroleum discharge at a gasoline station up-gradient from the site formerly owned by us. In 2016, the various actions filed by the State of New York and our third-party actions were consolidated for discovery proceedings and trial. Discovery in this case is in later stages and, as it nears completion, a schedule for trial will be established. We are unable to estimate the range of loss in excess of the amount we have accrued for this lawsuit. It is possible that losses related to this case, in excess of the amounts accrued, as of December 31, 2018, could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

21


 

In September 2008, we received a directive and notice of violation from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”) calling for a remedial investigation and cleanup, to be conducted by us and Gary and Barbara Galliker (the “Gallikers”), individually and trading as Millstone Auto Service (“Millstone”), Auto Tech and other named parties, of petroleum-related contamination found at a gasoline station property located in Millstone Township, New Jersey. We did not own or lease this property, but in 1985 we did acquire ownership of certain USTs located at the property. In 1986 we tried to remove these USTs and were refused access by the Gallikers to do so. We believe the USTs were transferred to the Gallikers by operation of law not later than 1987 and responded to the NJDEP’s directive and notice by denying liability. In November 2009, the NJDEP issued an Administrative Order and Notice of Civil Administrative Penalty Assessment (the “Order and Assessment”) to us, Marketing and the Gallikers, individually and trading as Millstone. We filed for, and were granted, a hearing to contest the allegations of the Order and Assessment. In 2014, the NJDEP issued a notice of violation directing the Gallikers and Millstone to register and remove the contents of the USTs at the property. Thereafter, the Gallikers made written demand of us to investigate and remediate all contamination at the property, which we have rejected on the basis that we are not responsible for the alleged contamination. In December 2018, we agreed with the NJDEP upon terms of settlement which require us to conduct a limited remedial investigation and limited remedial work at the property in exchange for NJDEP’s agreement to release us from any future remediation obligations at the property and to withdraw its demand against us for civil penalties and fines. The settlement agreement remains subject to public notice and final NJDEP approval.

MTBE Litigation – State of New Jersey

We are a party to a case involving a large number of gasoline station sites throughout the State of New Jersey brought by various governmental agencies of the State of New Jersey, including the NJDEP. This New Jersey case (the “New Jersey MDL Proceedings”) is among the more than one hundred cases that were transferred from various state and federal courts throughout the country and consolidated in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York for coordinated Multi-District Litigation (“MDL”) proceedings. The New Jersey MDL Proceedings allege various theories of liability due to contamination of groundwater with MTBE as the basis for claims seeking compensatory and punitive damages. New Jersey is seeking reimbursement of significant clean-up and remediation costs arising out of the alleged release of MTBE containing gasoline in the State of New Jersey and is asserting various natural resource damage claims as well as liability against the owners and operators of gasoline station properties from which the releases occurred. The New Jersey MDL Proceedings name us as a defendant along with approximately 50 petroleum refiners, manufacturers, distributors and retailers of MTBE, or gasoline containing MTBE, including Atlantic Richfield Company, BP America, Inc., BP Amoco Chemical Company, BP Products North America, Inc., Chevron Corporation, Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Citgo Petroleum Corporation, ConocoPhillips Company, Cumberland Farms, Inc., Duke Energy Merchants, LLC, ExxonMobil Corporation, ExxonMobil Oil Corporation, Getty Petroleum Marketing, Inc., Gulf Oil Limited Partnership, Hess Corporation, Lyondell Chemical Company, Lyondell-Citgo Refining, LP, Lukoil Americas Corporation, Marathon Oil Corporation, Mobil Corporation, Motiva Enterprises, LLC, Shell Oil Company, Shell Oil Products Company LLC, Sunoco, Inc., Unocal Corporation, Valero Energy Corporation, and Valero Refining & Marketing Company. The majority of the named defendants have already settled their case with the State of New Jersey. A portion of the case (“bellwether” trials) has been transferred to the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey for pre-trial proceedings and trial, although a trial date has not yet been set. We continue to engage in settlement negotiations and a dialogue with the plaintiffs’ counsel to educate them on the unique role of the Company and our business as compared to other defendants in the litigation. Although the ultimate outcome of the New Jersey MDL Proceedings cannot be ascertained at this time, we believe that it is probable that this litigation will be resolved in a manner that is unfavorable to us. We are unable to estimate the range of loss in excess of the amount accrued for the New Jersey MDL Proceedings with certainty as we do not believe that plaintiffs’ settlement proposal is realistic and there remains uncertainty as to the allegations in this case as they relate to us, our defenses to the claims, our rights to indemnification or contribution from other parties and the aggregate possible amount of damages for which we may be held liable. It is possible that losses related to the New Jersey MDL Proceedings in excess of the amounts accrued as of December 31, 2018, could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, ability to pay dividends or stock price.

MTBE Litigation – State of Pennsylvania

On July 7, 2014, our subsidiary, Getty Properties Corp., was served with a complaint filed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (the “State”) in the Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County relating to alleged statewide MTBE contamination in Pennsylvania. The named plaintiffs are the State, by and through (then) Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane (as Trustee of the waters of the State), the Pennsylvania Insurance Department (which governs and administers the Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Fund), the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (vested with the authority to protect the environment) and the Pennsylvania Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Fund. The complaint names us and more than 50 other defendants, including Exxon Mobil, various BP entities, Chevron, Citgo, Gulf, Lukoil Americas, Getty Petroleum Marketing Inc., Marathon, Hess, Shell Oil, Texaco, Valero, as well as other smaller petroleum refiners, manufacturers, distributors and retailers of MTBE or gasoline containing MTBE who are alleged to have distributed, stored and sold MTBE gasoline in Pennsylvania. The complaint seeks compensation for natural resource damages and for injuries sustained as a result of “defendants’ unfair and deceptive trade practices and act in the marketing of MTBE and gasoline containing MTBE.” The plaintiffs also seek to recover costs paid or incurred by the State to detect, treat and remediate MTBE from public and private water wells and groundwater. The plaintiffs assert causes of action against all

22


 

defendants based on multiple theories, including strict liability – defective design; strict liability – failure to warn; public nuisance; negligence; trespass; and violation of consumer protection law.

The case was filed in the Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County, but was removed by defendants to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and then transferred to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York so that it may be managed as part of the ongoing MTBE MDL. In November 2015, plaintiffs filed a second amended complaint naming additional defendants and adding factual allegations intended to bolster their claims against the defendants. We have joined with other defendants in the filing of a motion to dismiss the claims against us. This motion is pending with the Court. We intend to defend vigorously the claims made against us. Our ultimate liability, if any, in this proceeding is uncertain and subject to numerous contingencies which cannot be predicted and the outcome of which are not yet known.

MTBE Litigation – State of Maryland

On December 17, 2017, the State of Maryland, by and through the Attorney General on behalf of the Maryland Department of Environment and the Maryland Department of Health (the “State of Maryland”), filed a complaint in the Circuit Court for Baltimore City related to alleged statewide MTBE contamination in Maryland. The complaint was served upon us on January 19, 2018. The complaint names us and more than 60 other defendants, including Exxon Mobil Corporation, APEX Oil Company, Astra Oil Company, Atlantic Richfield Company, various BP, Chevron, Citgo, ConocoPhillips, Hess, Kinder Morgan, Lukoil, Marathon, Shell Oil, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero entities, Cumberland Farms, Duke Energy Merchants, El Paso Merchant Energy-Petroleum Company, Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., Equilon Enterprises, Inc., ETP Holdco Corporation, George E. Warren Corporation, Getty Petroleum Marketing, Inc., Gulf Oil Limited Partnership, Guttman Energy, Inc., Hartree Partners L.P., Holtzman Oil Corporation, Motiva Enterprises LLC, Nustar Terminals Operations Partnership LP, Phillips 66 Company, Premcor, 7-Eleven, Inc., Sheetz, Inc. , Total Petrochemicals & Refining USA, Inc., Transmontaigne Product Services, Inc., Vitol S.A., WAWA, Inc. and Western Refining, Inc. The complaint seeks compensation for natural resource damages and for injuries sustained as a result of the defendants’ unfair and deceptive trade practices in the marketing of MTBE and gasoline containing MTBE. The plaintiffs also seek to recover costs paid or incurred by the State of Maryland to detect, investigate, treat and remediate MTBE from public and private water wells and groundwater, punitive damages and the award of attorneys’ fees and litigation costs. The plaintiffs assert causes of action against all defendants based on multiple theories, including strict liability – defective design; strict liability – failure to warn; strict liability for abnormally dangerous activity; public nuisance; negligence; trespass; and violations of Titles 4, 7 and 9 of the Maryland Environmental Code.

On February 14, 2018, defendants removed the case to the United States District Court for the District of Maryland. It is unclear whether the matter will ultimately be removed to the MTBE MDL proceedings or remain in federal court in Maryland. We intend to defend vigorously the claims made against us. Our ultimate liability, if any, in this proceeding is uncertain and subject to numerous contingencies which cannot be predicted and the outcome of which are not yet known.

Matters related to our former Newark, New Jersey Terminal and the Lower Passaic River

In September 2003, we received a directive (the “Directive”) issued by the NJDEP under the New Jersey Spill Compensation and Control Act. The Directive indicated that we are one of approximately 66 potentially responsible parties for alleged natural resource damages resulting from the discharges of hazardous substances along the Lower Passaic River (the “Lower Passaic River”). Other named recipients of the Directive are 360 North Pastoria Environmental Corporation, Amerada Hess Corporation, American Modern Metals Corporation, Apollo Development and Land Corporation, Ashland Inc., AT&T Corporation, Atlantic Richfield Assessment Company, Bayer Corporation, Benjamin Moore & Company, Bristol Myers-Squibb, Chemical Land Holdings, Inc., Chevron Texaco Corporation, Diamond Alkali Company, Diamond Shamrock Chemicals Company, Diamond Shamrock Corporation, Dilorenzo Properties Company, Dilorenzo Properties, L.P., Drum Service of Newark, Inc., E.I. Dupont De Nemours and Company, Eastman Kodak Company, Elf Sanofi, S.A., Fine Organics Corporation, Franklin-Burlington Plastics, Inc., Franklin Plastics Corporation, Freedom Chemical Company, H.D. Acquisition Corporation, Hexcel Corporation, Hilton Davis Chemical Company, Kearny Industrial Associates, L.P., Lucent Technologies, Inc., Marshall Clark Manufacturing Corporation, Maxus Energy Corporation, Monsanto Company, Motor Carrier Services Corporation, Nappwood Land Corporation, Noveon Hilton Davis Inc., Occidental Chemical Corporation, Occidental Electro-Chemicals Corporation, Occidental Petroleum Corporation, Oxy-Diamond Alkali Corporation, Pitt-Consol Chemical Company, Plastics Manufacturing Corporation, PMC Global Inc., Propane Power Corporation, Public Service Electric & Gas Company, Public Service Enterprise Group, Inc., Purdue Pharma Technologies, Inc., RTC Properties, Inc., S&A Realty Corporation, Safety-Kleen Envirosystems Company, Sanofi S.A., SDI Divestiture Corporation, Sherwin Williams Company, SmithKline Beecham Corporation, Spartech Corporation, Stanley Works Corporation, Sterling Winthrop, Inc., STWB Inc., Texaco Inc., Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc., Thomasset Colors, Inc., Tierra Solution, Incorporated, Tierra Solutions, Inc., and Wilson Five Corporation.

The Directive provides, among other things, that the named recipients must conduct an assessment of the natural resources that have been injured by discharges into the Lower Passaic River and must implement interim compensatory restoration for the injured natural resources. The NJDEP alleges that our liability arises from alleged discharges originating from our former Newark, New Jersey

23


 

Terminal site (which was sold in October 2013). We responded to the Directive by asserting that we are not liable. There has been no material activity and/or communications by the NJDEP with respect to the Directive since early after its issuance.

In May 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) entered into an Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent (“AOC”) with over 70 parties to perform a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (“RI/FS”) for a 17-mile stretch of the Lower Passaic River in New Jersey. The RI/FS is intended to address the investigation and evaluation of alternative remedial actions with respect to alleged damages to the Lower Passaic River. Most of the parties to the AOC, including us, are also members of a Cooperating Parties Group (“CPG”). The CPG agreed to an interim allocation formula for purposes of allocating the costs to complete the RI/FS among its members, with the understanding that this agreed-upon allocation formula is not binding on the parties in terms of any potential liability for the costs to remediate the Lower Passaic River. The CPG submitted to the EPA its draft RI/FS in 2015. The draft RI/FS set forth various alternatives for remediating the entire 17-mile stretch of the Lower Passaic River, and provides that the cost estimate for the preferred remedial action presented therein is in the range of approximately $483 million to $725 million. The EPA has provided comments to the draft RI/FS which led to discussions between the CPG and the EPA regarding an alternative approach to completing the RI/FS, including various adaptive management scenarios focusing on source control interim remedies for the upper 9-miles of the Lower Passaic River. These discussions between the CPG and the EPA are ongoing.

In addition to the RI/FS activities, other actions relating to the investigation and/or remediation of the Lower Passaic River have proceeded as follows. First, in June 2012, certain members of the CPG entered into an Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent (“10.9 AOC”) effective June 18, 2012, to perform certain remediation activities, including removal and capping of sediments at the river mile 10.9 area and certain testing. The EPA also issued a Unilateral Order to Occidental Chemical Corporation (“Occidental”) directing Occidental to participate and contribute to the cost of the river mile 10.9 work. Concurrent with the CPG’s work on the RI/FS, on April 11, 2014, the EPA issued a draft Focused Feasibility Study (“FFS”) with proposed remedial alternatives to remediate the lower 8-miles of the 17-mile stretch of the Lower Passaic River. The FFS was subject to public comments and objections and, on March 4, 2016, the EPA issued its Record of Decision (“ROD”) for the lower 8-miles selecting a remedy that involves bank-to-bank dredging and installing an engineered cap with an estimated cost of $1.38 billion. On March 31, 2016, we and more than 100 other potentially responsible parties received from the EPA a “Notice of Potential Liability and Commencement of Negotiations for Remedial Design” (“Notice”), which informed the recipients that the EPA intends to seek an Administrative Order on Consent and Settlement Agreement with Occidental for remedial design of the remedy selected in the ROD, after which the EPA plans to begin negotiations with “major” potentially responsible parties for implementation and/or payment of the selected remedy. The Notice also stated that the EPA believes that some of the potentially responsible parties and other parties not yet identified as potentially responsible parties will be eligible for a cash out settlement with the EPA. On October 5, 2016, the EPA announced that it had entered into a settlement agreement with Occidental which requires that Occidental perform the remedial design (which is expected to take four years to complete) for the remedy selected for the lower 8-miles of the Lower Passaic River.

On June 16, 2016, Maxus Energy Corporation and Tierra Solutions, Inc., who have contractual liability to Occidental for Occidental’s potential liability related to the Lower Passaic River, filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. In the Chapter 11 proceedings, YPF SA, Maxus and Tierra’s corporate parent, sought bankruptcy approval of a settlement under which YPF would pay $130 million to the bankruptcy estate in exchange for a release in favor of Maxus, Tierra, YPF and YPF’s affiliates of Maxus and Tierra’s contractual environmental liability to Occidental. We and the CPG filed proofs of claims for costs incurred by the CPG relating to the Lower Passaic River.

On April 19, 2017, Maxus, Tierra and certain of its affiliates (collectively, the “Debtors”), together with the Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors, of which the CPG is a member, filed an Amended Chapter 11 Plan of Liquidation (the “Chapter 11 Plan”) in the Chapter 11 proceedings, which has been confirmed by order of the bankruptcy court, having an effective date of July 14, 2017 (the “Effective Date”). The Chapter 11 Plan provides for, among other things, the creation of a Liquidating Trust to liquidate and distribute from available assets certain allowed claims pursuant to the procedures set forth therein. Under the terms of the Chapter 11 Plan, the CPG’s proof of claim, which includes past costs incurred in the performance of the RI/FS and River Mile 10.9 work, is classified as an Allowed Class 4 Claim in the approximate amount of $14.3 million. To the extent that the CPG receives any distributions from the Liquidating Trust with respect to its Allowed Class 4 Claim, we would be entitled to seek reimbursement of our pro-rata share of said distribution for past costs we incurred with respect to performance of the RI/FS and River Mile 10.9 work. The Chapter 11 Plan also provides for a Mutual Contribution Release Agreement under which claims for contribution relating to liabilities associated with the Lower Passaic River and incurred prior to the Effective Date are mutually released by and among the parties identified therein. We are one of 59 parties (the “Released Parties”) that entered into the Mutual Contribution Release Agreement, pursuant to which (i) the Debtors release the Released Parties from any contribution claim they may have, (ii) Occidental releases the Released Parties for the amounts itemized in Occidental’s Class 4 Claim, and (iii) the Released Parties release the Debtors and Occidental for the amounts itemized in the CPG’s Class 4 Claim. The Mutual Contribution Release Agreement does not reduce or affect the CPG’s right to receive distributions from the Liquidating Trust on account of the CPG’s Class 4 Claim or our pro-rata share of any such distributions, nor does it affect our right to assert any future claims against Occidental for costs that we may incur related to the remediation of the Lower Passaic River after the Effective Date.

24


 

By letter dated March 30, 2017, the EPA advised the recipients of the Notice that it would be entering into cash out settlements with 20 potentially responsible parties to resolve their alleged liability for the lower 8-mile remedial action that is the subject of the ROD. The letter also stated that the EPA would begin a process for identifying other potentially responsible parties for negotiation of cash out settlements to resolve their alleged liability for the lower 8-mile remedial action that is the subject of the ROD. We were not included in the initial group of 20 parties identified by the EPA for cash out settlements. In January 2018, the EPA published a notice of its intent to enter into a final settlement agreement with 15 of the identified 20 parties to resolve their respective alleged liability for the ROD work, each for a payment to the EPA in the amount of $280,600. The EPA has also been engaged in discussions, in which we are participating, with the remaining recipients of the Notice regarding a proposed framework for an allocation process that will lead to offers of cash-out settlements to certain additional parties and a consent decree in which parties that are not offered a cash-out settlement will agree to perform the lower 8-mile remedial action. The EPA-commenced allocation process was scheduled to conclude by mid-2019, but is likely to be extended.

On June 30, 2018, Occidental filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey seeking cost recovery and contribution under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (“CERCLA”) for its alleged expenses with respect to the investigation, design, and anticipated implementation of the remedy for the lower 8-miles of the Passaic River. The complaint lists over 120 defendants, including us, many of which were also named in the NJDEP’s 2003 Directive and the EPA’s 2016 Notice. We do not know whether this new complaint will impact the EPA’s allocation process or the ultimate outcome of the matter. We intend to defend the claims consistent with our defenses in the related proceedings.

Many uncertainties remain regarding how the EPA intends to implement the ROD. We anticipate that performance of the EPA’s selected remedy will be subject to future negotiation, potential enforcement proceedings and/or possible litigation. The RI/FS, AOC and 10.9 AOC and Notice do not obligate us to fund or perform remedial action contemplated by either the ROD or RI/FS and do not resolve liability issues for remedial work or the restoration of or compensation for alleged natural resource damages to the Lower Passaic River, which are not known at this time. Our ultimate liability, if any, in the pending and possible future proceedings pertaining to the Lower Passaic River is uncertain and subject to numerous contingencies which cannot be predicted and the outcome of which are not yet known.

We have made a demand upon Chevron/Texaco for indemnity under certain agreements between us and Chevron/Texaco that allocate environmental liabilities for the Newark Terminal site between the parties. In response, Chevron/Texaco has asserted that the proceedings and claims are still not yet developed enough to determine the extent to which indemnities apply. We have engaged in discussions with Chevron/Texaco regarding our demands for indemnification. To facilitate these discussions, in October 2009, the parties entered into a Tolling/Standstill Agreement which tolls all claims by and among Chevron/Texaco and us that relate to the various Lower Passaic River matters, until either party terminates such Tolling/Standstill Agreement.

Lukoil Americas Case

In March 2016, we filed a civil lawsuit in the New York State Supreme Court, New York County, against Lukoil Americas Corporation and certain of its current or former executives, seeking recovery of environmental remediation costs that we either have incurred, or expect to incur, at properties previously leased to Marketing pursuant to a master lease. The lawsuit alleges various theories of liability, including claims based on environmental liability statutes in effect in the states in which the properties are located, as well as a breach of contract claim seeking to pierce Marketing’s corporate veil. In August 2017, the court denied in part and granted in part a motion by Lukoil Americas Corporation to dismiss our claims. In the fall of 2018, we appealed the dismissal of our breach of contract claim, and the defendants have cross-appealed the partial denial of their motion to dismiss. Further trial court litigation is currently stayed pending completion of a court ordered mediation, which began in 2018 and in which the parties continue to participate. This case is still in an early stage of its proceedings and it is not yet possible to predict or estimate the potential outcome of this case.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures

None.

25


 

PART II

Item 5.    Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities Capital Stock

Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol: GTY). There were approximately 10,895 beneficial holders of our common stock as of December 20, 2018, of which approximately 924 were holders of record.

For a discussion of potential limitations on our ability to pay future dividends see “Item 1A. Risk Factors – We may change our dividend policy and the dividends we pay may be subject to significant volatility” and “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Liquidity and Capital Resources”.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

None.

Sales of Unregistered Securities

None.

Stock Performance Graph

Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Total Return*

 

Source: SNL Financial

 

 

12/31/2013

 

 

12/31/2014

 

 

12/31/2015

 

 

12/31/2016

 

 

12/31/2017

 

 

12/31/2018

 

Getty Realty Corp.

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

104.44

 

 

 

105.16

 

 

 

163.72

 

 

 

182.31

 

 

 

207.10

 

Standard & Poor's 500

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

113.69

 

 

 

115.26

 

 

 

129.05

 

 

 

157.22

 

 

 

150.33

 

Peer Group

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

125.75

 

 

 

135.20

 

 

 

163.84

 

 

 

169.03

 

 

 

191.04

 

 

Assumes $100 invested at the close of the last day of trading on the New York Stock Exchange on December 31, 2013, in Getty Realty Corp. common stock, Standard & Poor’s 500 and Peer Group.

 

*

Cumulative total return assumes reinvestment of dividends.

26


 

We have chosen as our Peer Group the following companies: Agree Realty Corporation, EPR Properties (formerly known as Entertainment Properties Trust), National Retail Properties, Realty Income Corporation, Spirit Realty Capital, Inc. and STORE Capital Corporation. We have chosen these companies as our Peer Group because a substantial segment of each of their businesses is owning and leasing single-tenant net lease retail properties. We cannot assure you that our stock performance will continue in the future with the same or similar trends depicted in the performance graph above. We do not make or endorse any predictions as to future stock performance.

The above performance graph and related information shall not be deemed filed for the purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act or otherwise subject to the liability of that Section and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing that we make under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act.

27


 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

GETTY REALTY CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

(in thousands, except per share amounts and number of properties)

 

 

 

For the Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2018 (a)

 

 

2017 (b)

 

 

2016

 

 

2015 (c)

 

 

2014

 

OPERATING DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenues

 

$

136,106

 

 

$

120,153

 

 

$

115,271

 

 

$

110,776

 

 

$

99,905

 

Earnings from continuing operations

 

 

48,410

 

 

 

45,048

 

 

 

39,825

 

 

 

39,478

 

 

 

19,890

 

Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 

(704

)

 

 

2,138

 

 

 

(1,414

)

 

 

(2,068

)

 

 

3,528

 

Net earnings

 

$

47,706

 

 

$

47,186

 

 

$

38,411

 

 

$

37,410

 

 

$

23,418

 

Basic and diluted per share amounts:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings from continuing operations

 

 

1.19

 

 

 

1.20

 

 

 

1.16

 

 

 

1.17

 

 

 

0.59

 

Net earnings

 

 

1.17

 

 

 

1.26

 

 

 

1.12

 

 

 

1.11

 

 

 

0.69

 

Basic weighted average common shares

   outstanding

 

 

40,171

 

 

 

36,897

 

 

 

33,806

 

 

 

33,420

 

 

 

33,409

 

Diluted weighted average common shares

   outstanding

 

 

40,191

 

 

 

36,897

 

 

 

33,806

 

 

 

33,420

 

 

 

33,409

 

Dividends declared per share (d)

 

 

1.31

 

 

 

1.16

 

 

 

1.03

 

 

 

1.15

 

 

 

0.96

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS AND ADJUSTED

   FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS (e):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

$

47,706

 

 

$

47,186

 

 

$

38,411

 

 

$

37,410

 

 

$

23,418

 

Depreciation and amortization of real estate assets

 

 

23,636

 

 

 

19,089

 

 

 

19,170

 

 

 

16,974

 

 

 

10,549

 

Gains on dispositions of real estate

 

 

(3,948

)

 

 

(1,041

)

 

 

(6,213

)

 

 

(2,611

)

 

 

(10,218

)

Impairments

 

 

6,170

 

 

 

9,321

 

 

 

12,814

 

 

 

17,361

 

 

 

21,534

 

Funds from operations

 

 

73,564

 

 

 

74,555

 

 

 

64,182

 

 

 

69,134

 

 

 

45,283

 

Revenue recognition adjustments

 

 

(2,223

)

 

 

(1,976

)

 

 

(3,417

)

 

 

(4,471

)

 

 

(5,372

)

(Recovery) allowance for deferred rent/mortgage receivables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(93

)

 

 

2,331

 

Changes in environmental estimates

 

 

(1,319

)

 

 

(6,854

)

 

 

(7,007

)

 

 

(4,639

)

 

 

(2,756

)

Accretion expense

 

 

2,409

 

 

 

3,448

 

 

 

4,107

 

 

 

4,829

 

 

 

3,046

 

Environmental litigation accruals

 

 

(45

)

 

 

1,044

 

 

 

801

 

 

 

374

 

 

 

 

Insurance reimbursements

 

 

(2,570

)

 

 

(1,804

)

 

 

(1,146

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal settlements and judgments

 

 

(147

)

 

 

(6,381

)

 

 

(514

)

 

 

(18,176

)

 

 

 

Acquisition costs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

86

 

 

 

445

 

 

 

104

 

Adjusted funds from operations

 

$

69,669

 

 

$

62,032

 

 

$

57,092

 

 

$

47,403

 

 

$

42,636

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BALANCE SHEET DATA (AT END OF YEAR):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate before accumulated depreciation and

   amortization

 

$

1,043,106

 

 

$

970,964

 

 

$

782,166

 

 

$

783,233

 

 

$

595,959

 

Total assets

 

 

1,159,175

 

 

 

1,072,754

 

 

 

877,306

 

 

 

896,918

 

 

 

686,582

 

Total debt

 

 

441,636

 

 

 

379,158

 

 

 

298,544

 

 

 

317,093

 

 

 

124,425

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

$

581,164

 

 

$

553,695

 

 

$

430,918

 

 

$

406,561

 

 

$

407,024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUMBER OF PROPERTIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

859

 

 

 

828

 

 

 

740

 

 

 

753

 

 

 

757

 

Leased

 

 

74

 

 

 

79

 

 

 

89

 

 

 

98

 

 

 

106

 

Total properties

 

 

933

 

 

 

907

 

 

 

829

 

 

 

851

 

 

 

863

 

 

(a)

Includes (from the date of the acquisition) the effect of the $52.6 million acquisition of 30 properties in the E-Z Mart transaction on April 17, 2018, and the effect of the $17.4 million acquisition of six properties in the Applegreen transaction on August 1, 2018.

(b)

Includes (from the date of the acquisition) the effect of the $123.1 million acquisition of 49 properties in the Empire transaction on September 6, 2017, and the effect of the $68.7 million acquisition of 38 properties in the Applegreen transaction on October 3, 2017.

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(c)

Includes (from the date of the acquisition) the effect of the $214.5 million acquisition of 77 properties in the United Oil transaction on June 3, 2015.

(d)

Includes special dividends of $0.22 per share and $0.14 per share for the years ended December 31, 2015, and 2014, respectively.

(e)

During the fourth quarter of 2017, we revised our definition of AFFO. AFFO for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, have been restated to conform to our revised definition. For additional information, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – General – Supplemental Non-GAAP Measures”.

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Item 7.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements”; the sections in Part I entitled “Item 1A. Risk Factors”; the selected financial data in Part II entitled “Item 6. Selected Financial Data”; and the consolidated financial statements and related notes in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”.

General

Real Estate Investment Trust

We are a real estate investment trust (“REIT”) specializing in the ownership, leasing and financing of convenience store and gasoline station properties. As of December 31, 2018, we owned 859 properties and leased 74 properties from third-party landlords. As a REIT, we are not subject to federal corporate income tax on the taxable income we distribute to our stockholders. In order to continue to qualify for taxation as a REIT, we are required, among other things, to distribute at least 90% of our ordinary taxable income to our stockholders each year.

Our Triple-Net Leases

Substantially all of our properties are leased on a triple-net basis primarily to petroleum distributors, convenience store retailers and, to a lesser extent, individual operators. Generally, our tenants supply fuel and either operate our properties directly or sublet our properties to operators who operate their convenience stores, gasoline stations, automotive repair service facilities or other businesses at our properties. Our triple-net tenants are responsible for the payment of all taxes, maintenance, repairs, insurance and other operating expenses relating to our properties, and are also responsible for environmental contamination occurring during the terms of their leases and in certain cases also for environmental contamination that existed before their leases commenced.

Substantially all of our tenants’ financial results depend on the sale of refined petroleum products, convenience store sales or rental income from their subtenants. As a result, our tenants’ financial results are highly dependent on the performance of the petroleum marketing industry, which is highly competitive and subject to volatility. During the terms of our leases, we monitor the credit quality of our triple-net tenants by reviewing their published credit rating, if available, reviewing publicly available financial statements, or reviewing financial or other operating statements which are delivered to us pursuant to applicable lease agreements, monitoring news reports regarding our tenants and their respective businesses, and monitoring the timeliness of lease payments and the performance of other financial covenants under their leases. For additional information regarding our real estate business, our properties and environmental matters, see “Item 1. Business – Company Operations”, “Item 2. Properties” and “Environmental Matters” below.

Our Properties

Net Lease. As of December 31, 2018, we leased 918 of our properties to tenants under triple-net leases.

Our net lease properties include 814 properties leased under 26 separate unitary or master triple-net leases and 104 properties leased under single unit triple-net leases. These leases generally provide for an initial term of 15 or 20 years with options for successive renewal terms of up to 20 years and periodic rent escalations. Several of our leases provide for additional rent based on the aggregate volume of fuel sold. In addition, certain of our leases require the tenants to invest capital in our properties.

Redevelopment. As of December 31, 2018, we were actively redeveloping six of our properties either as a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses.

Vacancies. As of December 31, 2018, nine of our properties were vacant. We expect that we will either sell or enter into new leases on these properties over time.

Investment Strategy and Activity

As part of our overall growth strategy, we regularly review acquisition and financing opportunities to invest in additional convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related, properties, and we expect to continue to pursue investments that we believe will benefit our financial performance. In addition to sale/leaseback and other real estate acquisitions, our investment activities include purchase money financing with respect to properties we sell, and real property loans relating to our leasehold portfolios. Our investment strategy seeks to generate current income and benefit from long-term appreciation in the underlying value of our real estate. To achieve that goal, we seek to invest in high quality individual properties and real estate portfolios that are in strong primary markets that serve high density population centers. A key element of our investment strategy is to invest in properties that will promote our geographic and tenant diversity.

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we acquired fee simple interests in 41 convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related properties for an aggregate purchase price of $78.0 million. Included in these acquisitions was our April 17, 2018, acquisition of fee simple interests in 30 convenience store and gasoline station properties from GPM Investments, LLC (“GPM”). These properties were simultaneously leased to GPM, a leading regional convenience store and gasoline station operator, under a long-

30


 

term triple-net unitary lease. The properties are located across Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. The total purchase price for the transaction was $52.6 million, which was funded with funds available under our Revolving Facility. On August 1, 2018, we acquired fee simple interests in six convenience store and gasoline station properties from a U.S. subsidiary of Applegreen PLC (“Applegreen”), the largest convenience store and gasoline station operator in the Republic of Ireland. These properties were simultaneously leased to a U.S. subsidiary of Applegreen under a long-term triple-net unitary lease. The properties are located within the metropolitan market of Columbia, SC. The total purchase price for the transaction was $17.4 million, which was funded with funds available under our Revolving Facility. In addition to the GPM and Applegreen transactions, in 2018, we acquired fee simple interests in five convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related properties in various transactions for an aggregate purchase price of $8.0 million.

During the year ended December 31, 2017, we acquired fee simple interests in 103 convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive related properties for an aggregate purchase price of $214.0 million. Included in these acquisitions was our September 6, 2017, acquisition of fee simple interests in 49 convenience store and gasoline station properties from Empire Petroleum Partners LLC (“Empire”). These properties were simultaneously leased to Empire, a leading regional convenience store and gasoline station operator, under a long-term triple-net unitary lease. The properties are located primarily within metropolitan markets in the states of Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, New Mexico and Texas. The total purchase price for the transaction was $123.1 million, which was funded with a combination of funds from our Equity Offering and funds available under our Revolving Facility. On October 3, 2017, we acquired fee simple interests in 33 convenience store and gasoline station properties and five stand-alone Burger King quick service restaurants from a U.S. subsidiary of Applegreen. These properties were simultaneously leased to a U.S. subsidiary of Applegreen under a long-term triple-net unitary lease. The properties are located within the metropolitan market of Columbia, SC. The total purchase price for the transaction was $68.7 million, which was funded with a combination of funds from our Equity Offering and funds available under our Revolving Facility. In addition to the Empire and Applegreen transactions, in 2017, we acquired fee simple interests in 16 convenience store and gasoline station, and other automotive properties in various transactions for an aggregate purchase price of $22.2 million.

Redevelopment Strategy and Activity

We believe that certain of our properties are located in geographic areas which, together with other factors, may make them well-suited for a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses, such as quick service restaurants, automotive parts and service stores, specialty retail stores and bank branch locations. We believe that the redeveloped properties can be leased or sold at higher values than their current use.

For the year ended December 31, 2018, rent commenced on six completed redevelopment projects that were placed back into service in our net lease portfolio. Since the inception of our redevelopment program in 2015, we have completed nine redevelopment projects.

For the year ended December 31, 2018, we spent $2.7 million of construction-in-progress costs related to our redevelopment activities. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we transferred $2.2 million of construction-in-progress to buildings and improvements on our consolidated balance sheet. In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2018, we spent $4.4 million to reimburse tenants for capital expenditures related to our redevelopment activities.

As of December 31, 2018, we were actively redeveloping six of our properties either as a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses. In addition, to the six properties currently classified as redevelopment, we are in various stages of feasibility and planning for the recapture of select properties from our net lease portfolio that are suitable for redevelopment to either a new convenience and gasoline use or for alternative single-tenant net lease retail uses. As of December 31, 2018, we have signed leases on seven properties, that are currently part of our net lease portfolio, which will be recaptured and transferred to redevelopment when the appropriate entitlements, permits and approvals have been secured.

Asset Impairment

We perform an impairment analysis for the carrying amounts of our properties in accordance with GAAP when indicators of impairment exist. We reduced the carrying amounts to fair value, and recorded in continuing and discontinued operations, impairment charges aggregating $6.2 million and $9.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, where the carrying amounts of the properties exceed the estimated undiscounted cash flows expected to be received during the assumed holding period which includes the estimated sales value expected to be received at disposition. The impairment charges were attributable to the effect of adding asset retirement costs due to changes in estimates associated with our environmental liabilities, which increased the carrying values of certain properties in excess of their fair values, reductions in estimated undiscounted cash flows expected to be received during the assumed holding period for certain of our properties, and reductions in estimated sales prices from third-party offers based on signed contracts, letters of intent or indicative bids for certain of our properties. The evaluation of and estimates of anticipated cash flows used to conduct our impairment analysis are highly subjective and actual results could vary significantly from our estimates.

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Supplemental Non-GAAP Measures

We manage our business to enhance the value of our real estate portfolio and, as a REIT, place particular emphasis on minimizing risk, to the extent feasible, and generating cash sufficient to make required distributions to stockholders of at least 90% of our ordinary taxable income each year. In addition to measurements defined by GAAP, we also focus on Funds From Operations (“FFO”) and Adjusted Funds From Operations (“AFFO”) to measure our performance. FFO and AFFO are generally considered by analysts and investors to be appropriate supplemental non-GAAP measures of the performance of REITs. FFO and AFFO are not in accordance with, or a substitute for, measures prepared in accordance with GAAP. In addition, FFO and AFFO are not based on any comprehensive set of accounting rules or principles. Neither FFO nor AFFO represent cash generated from operating activities calculated in accordance with GAAP and therefore these measures should not be considered an alternative for GAAP net earnings or as a measure of liquidity. These measures should only be used to evaluate our performance in conjunction with corresponding GAAP measures.

FFO is defined by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts as GAAP net earnings before depreciation and amortization of real estate assets, gains or losses on dispositions of real estate, impairment charges and cumulative effect of accounting changes. Our definition of AFFO is defined as FFO less (i) Revenue Recognition Adjustments (net of allowances), (ii) changes in environmental estimates, (iii) accretion expense, (iv) environmental litigation accruals, (v) insurance reimbursements, (vi) legal settlements and judgments, (vii) acquisition costs expensed and (viii) other unusual items that are not reflective of our core operating performance. Other REITs may use definitions of FFO and/or AFFO that are different from ours and, accordingly, may not be comparable.

Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2017, we revised our definition of AFFO to exclude three additional items – environmental litigation accruals, insurance reimbursements, and legal settlements and judgments – because we believe that these items are not indicative of our core operating performance. While we do not label excluded items as non-recurring, management believes that excluding items from our definition of AFFO that are either non-cash or not reflective of our core operating performance provides analysts and investors the ability to compare our core operating performance between periods. AFFO for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, has been restated to conform to our revised definition.

We believe that FFO and AFFO are helpful to analysts and investors in measuring our performance because both FFO and AFFO exclude various items included in GAAP net earnings that do not relate to, or are not indicative of, our core operating performance. FFO excludes various items such as depreciation and amortization of real estate assets, gains or losses on dispositions of real estate and impairment charges. In our case, however, GAAP net earnings and FFO typically include the impact of revenue recognition adjustments comprised of deferred rental revenue (straight-line rental revenue), the net amortization of above-market and below-market leases, adjustments recorded for recognition of rental income recognized from direct financing leases on revenues from rental properties and the amortization of deferred lease incentives, as offset by the impact of related collection reserves. Deferred rental revenue results primarily from fixed rental increases scheduled under certain leases with our tenants. In accordance with GAAP, the aggregate minimum rent due over the current term of these leases is recognized on a straight-line basis rather than when payment is contractually due. The present value of the difference between the fair market rent and the contractual rent for in-place leases at the time properties are acquired is amortized into revenues from rental properties over the remaining lives of the in-place leases. Income from direct financing leases is recognized over the lease terms using the effective interest method which produces a constant periodic rate of return on the net investments in the leased properties. The amortization of deferred lease incentives represents our funding commitment in certain leases, which deferred expense is recognized on a straight-line basis as a reduction of rental revenue. GAAP net earnings and FFO include non-cash changes in environmental estimates and environmental accretion expense, which do not impact our recurring cash flow. GAAP net earnings and FFO also include environmental litigation accruals, insurance reimbursements, and legal settlements and judgments, which items are not indicative of our core operating performance. GAAP net earnings and FFO from time to time may also include property acquisition costs expensed and other unusual items that are not reflective of our core operating performance. Acquisition costs are expensed, generally in the period when properties are acquired and are not reflective of our core operating performance.

We pay particular attention to AFFO, as we believe it best represents our core operating performance. In our view, AFFO provides a more accurate depiction than FFO of our core operating performance. By providing AFFO, we believe that we are presenting useful information that assists analysts and investors to better assess our core operating performance. Further, we believe that AFFO is useful in comparing the sustainability of our core operating performance with the sustainability of the core operating performance of other real estate companies. For a reconciliation of FFO and AFFO to GAAP net earnings, see “Item 6. Selected Financial Data”.

Results of Operations

Year ended December 31, 2018, compared to year ended December 31, 2017

Revenues from rental properties increased by $15.0 million to $116.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $101.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2017. The increase in revenues from rental properties was primarily due to $13.4 million of revenue from the properties acquired in 2018 and the second half of 2017. Rental income contractually due from our tenants included in revenues from rental properties in continuing operations was $114.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $99.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2017. Tenant reimbursements, which consist of real estate taxes and other

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municipal charges paid by us which are reimbursable by our tenants pursuant to the terms of triple-net lease agreements were $16.7 million and $15.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Interest income on notes and mortgages receivable was $3.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $3.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2017.

In accordance with GAAP, we recognize revenues from rental properties in amounts which vary from the amount of rent contractually due during the periods presented. As a result, revenues from rental properties include Revenue Recognition Adjustments comprised of non-cash adjustments recorded for deferred rental revenue due to the recognition of rental income on a straight-line basis over the current lease term, the net amortization of above-market and below-market leases, recognition of rental income under direct financing leases using the effective interest rate method which produces a constant periodic rate of return on the net investments in the leased properties and the amortization of deferred lease incentives. Revenues from rental properties includes Revenue Recognition Adjustments which increased rental revenue by $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, and $2.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2017.

Property costs, which are primarily comprised of rent expense, real estate taxes, state and local taxes, municipal charges, professional fees, maintenance expense and reimbursable tenant expenses, were $23.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $22.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2017. The increase in property costs for the year ended December 31, 2018, was principally due to an increase in real estate taxes and property related professional fees.

Impairment charges included in continuing operations were $4.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $8.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2017. Impairment charges are recorded when the carrying value of a property is reduced to fair value. Impairment charges in continuing operations for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, were attributable to the effect of adding asset retirement costs due to changes in estimates associated with our environmental liabilities, which increased the carrying values