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Section 1: 10-Q (10-Q)

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2018

 

 

 

Commission File Number 0-15572

 

                         FIRST BANCORP                         

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

North Carolina   56-1421916
(State or Other Jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization)   Identification Number)
     
300 SW Broad St., Southern Pines, North Carolina   28387
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)
     
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)   (910)   246-2500

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding twelve months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. x YES     o NO

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). x YES      o NO

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one)

 

x Large Accelerated Filer       o Accelerated Filer       o Non-Accelerated Filer      o Smaller Reporting Company      o Emerging Growth Company

  

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). o YES      x NO

 

The number of shares of the registrant's Common Stock outstanding on October 31, 2018 was 29,729,285.

 

 

 

 

INDEX

FIRST BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

   
  Page
   
Part I.  Financial Information  
   
Item 1 - Financial Statements  
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets - September 30, 2018 and September 30, 2017  (With Comparative Amounts at December 31, 2017) 4
   
Consolidated Statements of Income -  For the Periods Ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 5
   
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income - For the Periods Ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 6
   
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity - For the Periods Ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 7
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows - For the Periods Ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 8
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 9
   
Item 2 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Consolidated Results of Operations and Financial Condition 40
   
Item 3 – Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 56
   
Item 4 – Controls and Procedures 58
   
Part II.  Other Information  
   
Item 1 – Legal Proceedings 58
   
Item 1A – Risk Factors 58
   
Item 2 – Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 59
   
Item 6 – Exhibits 59
   
Signatures 61

 

 

Page 2 

Index 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Part I of this report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, which statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements are statements that include projections, predictions, expectations or beliefs about future events or results or otherwise are not statements of historical fact. Further, forward-looking statements are intended to speak only as of the date made. Such statements are often characterized by the use of qualifying words (and their derivatives) such as “expect,” “believe,” “estimate,” “plan,” “project,” or other statements concerning our opinions or judgment about future events. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in any forward-looking statements, as they will depend on many factors about which we are unsure, including many factors which are beyond our control. Factors that could influence the accuracy of such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the financial success or changing strategies of our customers, our level of success in integrating acquisitions, actions of government regulators, the level of market interest rates, and general economic conditions. For additional information about factors that could affect the matters discussed in this paragraph, see the “Risk Factors” section of our 2017 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Page 3 

Index 

 

Part I. Financial Information

Item 1 - Financial Statements

 

First Bancorp and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

($ in thousands-unaudited)  September 30,
2018
   December 31,
2017 (audited)
   September 30,
2017
 
ASSETS               
Cash and due from banks, noninterest-bearing  $50,209    114,301    82,758 
Due from banks, interest-bearing   460,520    375,189    326,089 
     Total cash and cash equivalents   510,729    489,490    408,847 
                
Securities available for sale   353,068    343,270    198,924 
Securities held to maturity (fair values of $103,360, $118,998, and $124,878)   104,819    118,503    123,156 
                
Presold mortgages in process of settlement   6,111    12,459    17,426 
                
Loans   4,190,628    4,042,369    3,429,755 
Allowance for loan losses   (20,546)   (23,298)   (24,593)
   Net loans   4,170,082    4,019,071    3,405,162 
                
Premises and equipment   116,618    116,233    95,762 
Accrued interest receivable   14,982    14,094    11,445 
Goodwill   232,458    233,070    144,667 
Other intangible assets   22,279    24,437    15,634 
Foreclosed real estate   6,140    12,571    9,356 
Bank-owned life insurance   101,055    99,162    88,081 
Other assets   73,289    64,677    72,687 
        Total assets  $5,711,630    5,547,037    4,591,147 
                
LIABILITIES               
Deposits:   Noninterest bearing checking accounts  $1,280,408    1,196,161    1,016,947 
Interest bearing checking accounts   870,487    884,254    683,113 
Money market accounts   1,007,177    984,945    795,572 
Savings accounts   432,335    454,860    396,192 
Time deposits of $100,000 or more   669,081    593,123    517,770 
Other time deposits   268,885    293,612    241,647 
     Total deposits   4,528,373    4,406,955    3,651,241 
Borrowings   406,593    407,543    397,525 
Accrued interest payable   1,916    1,235    1,143 
Other liabilities   31,672    38,325    28,737 
     Total liabilities   4,968,554    4,854,058    4,078,646 
                
Commitments and contingencies               
                
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY               
Preferred stock, no par value per share.  Authorized: 5,000,000 shares               
     Series C, convertible, issued & outstanding:  none, none, and none   ̶    ̶     
Common stock, no par value per share.  Authorized: 40,000,000 shares               
     Issued & outstanding:  29,729,285, 29,639,374, and 24,723,929 shares   434,227    432,794    263,493 
Retained earnings   320,822    264,331    251,790 
Stock in rabbi trust assumed in acquisition   (3,224)   (3,581)   (3,571)
Rabbi trust obligation   3,224    3,581    3,571 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)   (11,973)   (4,146)   (2,782)
     Total shareholders’ equity   743,076    692,979    512,501 
          Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity  $5,711,630    5,547,037    4,591,147 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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First Bancorp and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Income

 

($ in thousands, except share data-unaudited)  Three Months Ended
September 30,
   Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
   2018   2017   2018   2017 
INTEREST INCOME                    
Interest and fees on loans  $52,407    41,549    154,028    114,908 
Interest on investment securities:                    
     Taxable interest income   2,501    1,649    7,552    4,914 
     Tax-exempt interest income   367    399    1,115    1,269 
Other, principally overnight investments   2,944    1,414    7,320    3,215 
     Total interest income   58,219    45,011    170,015    124,306 
                     
INTEREST EXPENSE                    
Savings, checking and money market accounts   1,334    685    3,445    1,892 
Time deposits of $100,000 or more   2,302    1,053    5,627    2,641 
Other time deposits   270    172    740    511 
Borrowings   2,468    1,462    6,619    3,411 
     Total interest expense   6,374    3,372    16,431    8,455 
                     
Net interest income   51,845    41,639    153,584    115,851 
Provision (reversal) for loan losses   87        (4,282)   723 
Net interest income after provision for loan losses   51,758    41,639    157,866    115,128 
                     
NONINTEREST INCOME                    
Service charges on deposit accounts   3,221    2,945    9,606    8,525 
Other service charges, commissions and fees   5,146    3,468    14,656    10,195 
Fees from presold mortgage loans   576    1,842    2,231    4,121 
Commissions from sales of insurance and financial products   2,425    1,426    6,484    3,304 
SBA consulting fees   1,287    864    3,554    3,174 
SBA loan sale gains   2,373    1,692    8,773    3,241 
Bank-owned life insurance income   641    579    1,892    1,667 
Foreclosed property gains (losses), net   (192)   (216)   (579)   (439)
Securities gains (losses), net               (235)
Other gains (losses), net   (101)   (238)   811    493 
     Total noninterest income   15,376    12,362    47,428    34,046 
                     
NONINTEREST EXPENSES                    
Salaries expense   18,771    16,550    56,615    46,799 
Employee benefits expense   4,061    3,606    12,752    11,402 
   Total personnel expense   22,832    20,156    69,367    58,201 
Occupancy expense   2,742    2,439    8,087    6,981 
Equipment related expenses   1,438    1,070    3,931    3,277 
Merger and acquisition expenses   167    1,329    3,568    4,824 
Intangibles amortization expense   1,656    902    5,073    2,509 
Other operating expenses   10,403    8,488    31,683    25,748 
     Total noninterest expenses   39,238    34,384    121,709    101,540 
                     
Income before income taxes   27,896    19,617    83,585    47,634 
Income tax expense   5,905    6,531    18,191    15,839 
                     
Net income available to common shareholders  $21,991    13,086    65,394    31,795 
                     
Earnings per common share:                    
     Basic  $0.74    0.53    2.21    1.34 
     Diluted   0.74    0.53    2.21    1.33 
                     
Dividends declared per common share  $0.10    0.08    0.30    0.24 
                     
Weighted average common shares outstanding:                    
     Basic   29,530,203    24,607,516    29,536,273    23,728,262 
     Diluted   29,621,130    24,695,295    29,639,126    23,827,011 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

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First Bancorp and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

 

 

   Three Months Ended
September 30,
   Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
($ in thousands-unaudited)  2018   2017   2018   2017 
                 
Net income  $21,991    13,086    65,394    31,795 
Other comprehensive income (loss):                    
   Unrealized gains (losses) on securities available for sale:                    
Unrealized holding gains (losses) arising during the period, pretax   (927)   186    (10,229)   3,288 
      Tax (expense) benefit   216    (69)   2,390    (1,213)
Reclassification to realized (gains) losses               235 
      Tax expense (benefit)               (87)
Postretirement Plans:                    
Amortization of unrecognized net actuarial (gain) loss   (87)   53    16    158 
       Tax expense (benefit)   20    (20)   (4)   (56)
Other comprehensive income (loss)   (778)   150    (7,827)   2,325 
 Comprehensive income  $21,213    13,236    57,567    34,120 
                     

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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Index 

 

First Bancorp and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity

 

(In thousands, except per share -
unaudited)
  Common Stock   Retained   Stock in 
 Rabbi
Trust
Assumed
in
Acquisi-
   Rabbi
Trust
   Accumulated
Other
Compre-
hensive
Income
   Total
Share-
holders’
 
   Shares   Amount   Earnings   tion   Obligation   (Loss)   Equity 
                             
Balances, January 1, 2017   20,845   $147,287    225,921            (5,107)   368,101 
                                    
Net income             31,795                   31,795 
Cash dividends declared ($0.24 per common share)             (5,926)                  (5,926)
Equity issued pursuant to acquisition   3,813    114,893         (7,688)   7,688         114,893 
Payment of deferred fees                  4,117    (4,117)         
Stock option exercises   16    287                        287 
Stock-based compensation   50    1,026                        1,026 
Other comprehensive income (loss)                            2,325    2,325 
                                    
Balances, September 30, 2017   24,724   $263,493    251,790    (3,571)   3,571    (2,782)   512,501 
                                    
                                    
Balances, January 1, 2018   29,639   $432,794    264,331    (3,581)   3,581    (4,146)   692,979 
                                    
Net income             65,394                   65,394 
Cash dividends declared ($0.30 per common share)             (8,903)                  (8,903)
Payment of deferred fees                  357    (357)         
Stock option exercises   25    324                        324 
Stock withheld for payment of taxes   (7)   (264)                       (264)
Stock-based compensation   72    1,373                        1,373 
Other comprehensive income (loss)                            (7,827)   (7,827)
                                    
Balances, September 30, 2018   29,729   $434,227    320,822    (3,224)   3,224    (11,973)   743,076 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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First Bancorp and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
($ in thousands-unaudited)  2018   2017 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities          
Net income  $65,394    31,795 
Reconciliation of net income to net cash (used) provided by operating activities:          
     Provision (reversal) for loan losses   (4,282)   723 
     Net security premium amortization   2,184    2,165 
     Loan discount accretion   (5,982)   (5,073)
     Purchase accounting accretion and amortization, net   (165)   (142)
     Foreclosed property (gains) losses and write-downs, net   579    439 
     Loss (gain) on securities available for sale       235 
     Other losses (gains)   (811)   (493)
     Decrease (increase) in net deferred loan fees   (1,475)   388 
     Depreciation of premises and equipment   4,420    4,023 
     Stock-based compensation expense   1,201    860 
     Amortization of intangible assets   5,073    2,509 
     Fees/gains from sale of presold mortgages and SBA loans   (11,004)   (7,362)
     Origination of presold mortgages in process of settlement   (97,081)   (169,021)
     Proceeds from sales of presold mortgages in process of settlement   105,506    165,341 
     Origination of SBA loans for sale   (162,782)   (54,714)
     Proceeds from sales of SBA loans   130,460    44,259 
     Increase in accrued interest receivable   (888)   (642)
     Increase in other assets   (893)   (13,112)
     Increase in accrued interest payable   681    340 
     Decrease in other liabilities   (6,448)   (12,377)
          Net cash provided (used) by operating activities   23,687    (9,859)
           
Cash Flows From Investing Activities          
     Purchases of securities available for sale   (48,975)   (35,034)
     Purchases of securities held to maturity       (291)
     Proceeds from maturities/issuer calls of securities available for sale   27,609    29,156 
     Proceeds from maturities/issuer calls of securities held to maturity   12,841    18,021 
     Proceeds from sales of securities available for sale       45,601 
     Purchases of Federal Reserve and Federal Home Loan Bank stock, net   (6,129)   (10,372)
     Net increase in loans   (103,091)   (206,948)
     Proceeds from sales of foreclosed real estate   6,829    6,468 
     Purchases of premises and equipment   (6,656)   (3,040)
     Proceeds from sales of premises and equipment   2,739    114 
     Net cash received in acquisition       48,636 
          Net cash used by investing activities   (114,833)   (107,689)
           
Cash Flows From Financing Activities          
     Net increase in deposits   121,719    118,752 
     Net increase (decrease) in borrowings   (1,086)   106,980 
     Cash dividends paid – common stock   (8,308)   (5,617)
     Proceeds from stock option exercises   324    287 
     Stock withheld for payment of taxes   (264)    
          Net cash provided by financing activities   112,385    220,402 
           
Increase in cash and cash equivalents   21,239    102,854 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period   489,490    305,993 
           
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period  $510,729    408,847 
           
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:          
Cash paid during the period for:          
     Interest  $15,750    8,115 
     Income taxes   17,333    15,275 
Non-cash transactions:          
     Unrealized gain (loss) on securities available for sale, net of taxes   (7,839)   2,223 
     Foreclosed loans transferred to other real estate   2,159    3,897 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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First Bancorp and Subsidiaries

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

(unaudited) For the Periods Ended September 30, 2018 and 2017  

 

Note 1 - Basis of Presentation

 

In the opinion of the Company, the accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments necessary to present fairly the consolidated financial position of the Company as of September 30, 2018 and 2017 and the consolidated results of operations and consolidated cash flows for the periods ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. All such adjustments were of a normal, recurring nature. Reference is made to the 2017 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC for a discussion of accounting policies and other relevant information with respect to the financial statements. The results of operations for the periods ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year. The Company has evaluated all subsequent events through the date the financial statements were issued.

 

Note 2 – Accounting Policies

 

Note 1 to the 2017 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC contains a description of the accounting policies followed by the Company and a discussion of recent accounting pronouncements. The following paragraphs update that information as necessary.

 

Accounting Standards Adopted in 2018

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued guidance to change the recognition of revenue from contracts with customers. The core principle of the new guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to reflect the transfer of goods and services to customers in an amount equal to the consideration the entity receives or expects to receive. The Company’s revenue is comprised of net interest income and noninterest income. The scope of the guidance explicitly excludes net interest income as well as many other revenues for financial assets and liabilities including loans, leases, securities, and derivatives. Accordingly, the majority of the Company’s revenues were not affected. The guidance was effective for the Company on January 1, 2018 and the Company adopted the guidance using the modified retrospective method. The adoption did not have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In January 2016, the FASB amended the Financial Instruments topic of the Accounting Standards Codification to address certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. This update is intended to improve the recognition and measurement of financial instruments and it requires an entity to: (i) measure equity investments at fair value through net income, with certain exceptions; (ii) present in other comprehensive income the changes in instrument-specific credit risk for financial liabilities measured using the fair value option; (iii) present financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial asset; (iv) calculate the fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes based on an exit price and; (v) assess a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets related to unrealized losses of available for sale debt securities in combination with other deferred tax assets. The guidance also provides an election to subsequently measure certain nonmarketable equity investments at cost less any impairment and adjusted for certain observable price changes and requires a qualitative impairment assessment of such equity investments and amends certain fair value disclosure requirements. The amendments were effective for the Company on January 1, 2018 and the adoption of the guidance did not have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In March 2016, the FASB amended the Liabilities topic of the Accounting Standards Codification to address the current and potential future diversity in practice related to the derecognition of a prepaid stored-value product liability. The amendments were effective for the Company on January 1, 2018 and did not have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In March 2017, the FASB amended the requirements in the Compensation—Retirement Benefits topic of the Accounting Standards Codification related to the income statement presentation of the components of net periodic benefit cost for an entity’s sponsored defined benefit pension and other postretirement plans. The amendments require that an employer report the service cost component in the same line item or items as other compensation costs arising from services rendered by pertinent employees during the period. The other components of net periodic benefit cost are required to be presented in the income statement separately from the service cost component. The amendments were effective for the Company on January 1, 2018 and did not have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

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In February 2018, the FASB issued guidance related to the Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income topic of the Accounting Standards Codification, which allows a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, which was signed into law on December 22, 2017. The guidance will be effective for all annual and interim periods beginning January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company chose to early adopt the new standard for the year ending December 31, 2017, as allowed under the new standard, and reclassified $0.7 million between Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income and Retained Earnings.

 

Accounting Standards Pending Adoption

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued new guidance on accounting for leases, which generally requires all leases to be recognized in the statement of financial position by recording an asset representing its right to use the underlying asset and recording a liability, which represents the Company’s obligation to make lease payments. The provisions of this guidance are effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018; early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect these amendments to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued guidance to change the accounting for credit losses. The guidance requires an entity to utilize a new impairment model known as the current expected credit loss ("CECL") model to estimate its lifetime "expected credit loss" and record an allowance that, when deducted from the amortized cost basis of the financial asset, presents the net amount expected to be collected on the financial asset.  The CECL model is expected to result in earlier recognition of credit losses.  The guidance also requires new disclosures for financial assets measured at amortized cost, loans and available-for-sale debt securities. The Company will apply the guidance through a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the year of adoption. While early adoption is permitted beginning in first quarter 2019, the Company does not expect to elect that option. The updated guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. The Company is continuing its implementation efforts through a cross-functional team, comprised of individuals from various functional areas including credit, finance, and information technology, among others. The Company has also engaged a third-party vendor solution to assist in the application of this guidance. The Company’s preliminary evaluation indicates the provisions of this new guidance are expected to impact the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements, in particular the level of the allowance for loan losses. The Company is continuing to evaluate the extent of the potential impact.

 

In January 2017, the FASB amended the Goodwill and Other Intangibles topic of the Accounting Standards Codification to simplify the accounting for goodwill impairment for public business entities and other entities that have goodwill reported in their financial statements and have not elected the private company alternative for the subsequent measurement of goodwill. The amendment removes Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. The amount of goodwill impairment will now be the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. The effective date and transition requirements for the technical corrections will be effective for the Company for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company does not expect this amendment to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In March 2017, the FASB amended the requirements in the Receivables—Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs topic of the Accounting Standards Codification related to the amortization period for certain purchased callable debt securities held at a premium. The amendments shorten the amortization period for the premium to the earliest call date. The amendments will be effective for the Company for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect these amendments to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB amended the Compensation—Stock Compensation Topic of the Accounting Standards Codification. The amendments expand the scope of this Topic to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. The amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that fiscal year. Early adoption is permitted, but no earlier than an entity’s adoption date of the Revenue from Contracts with Customers Topic. The Company does not expect these amendments to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

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In August 2018, the FASB amended the Fair Value Measurement Topic of the Accounting Standards Codification. The amendments remove, modify, and add certain fair value disclosure requirements based on the concepts in the FASB Concepts Statement, Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting—Chapter 8: Notes to Financial Statements. The amendments are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. An entity is permitted to early adopt any removed or modified disclosures upon issuance of this guidance and delay adoption of the additional disclosures until their effective date. The Company does not expect these amendments to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB amended the Compensation - Retirement Benefits – Defined Benefit Plans Topic of the Accounting Standards Codification to improve disclosure requirements for employers that sponsor defined benefit pension and other postretirement plans. The guidance removes disclosures that are no longer considered cost-beneficial, clarifies the specific requirements of disclosures, and adds disclosure requirements identified as relevant. The amendments are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect these amendments to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB amended the Intangibles - Goodwill and Other Topic of the Accounting Standards Codification to align the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software. The amendments will be effective for the Company for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect these amendments to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by the FASB or other standards-setting bodies are not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Note 3 – Reclassifications

 

Certain amounts reported in the period ended September 30, 2017 have been reclassified to conform to the presentation for September 30, 2018. These reclassifications had no effect on net income or shareholders’ equity for the periods presented, nor did they materially impact trends in financial information.

 

Note 4 – Acquisitions

 

Since January 1, 2017, the Company completed the acquisitions described below. The results of each acquired company are included in the Company’s results beginning on its respective acquisition date.

 

(1)On March 3, 2017, the Company completed the acquisition of Carolina Bank Holdings, Inc. (“Carolina Bank”), headquartered in Greensboro, North Carolina, pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger and Reorganization dated June 21, 2016. The results of Carolina Bank are included in First Bancorp’s results beginning on the March 3, 2017 acquisition date.

 

Carolina Bank Holdings, Inc. was the parent company of Carolina Bank, a North Carolina state-charted bank with eight bank branches located in the North Carolina cities of Greensboro, High Point, Burlington, Winston-Salem, and Asheboro, and mortgage offices in Burlington, Hillsborough, and Sanford. The acquisition complemented the Company’s expansion into several of these high-growth markets and increased its market share in others with facilities, operations and experienced staff already in place. The Company was willing to record goodwill primarily due to the reasons just noted, as well as the positive earnings of Carolina Bank. The total merger consideration consisted of $25.3 million in cash and 3,799,471 shares of the Company’s common stock, with each share of Carolina Bank common stock being exchanged for either $20.00 in cash or 1.002 shares of the Company’s stock, subject to the total consideration being 75% stock / 25% cash. The issuance of common stock was valued at $114.5 million and was based on the Company’s closing stock price on March 3, 2017 of $30.13 per share.

 

This acquisition was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting for business combinations, and accordingly, the assets and liabilities of Carolina Bank were recorded based on estimates of fair values as of March 3, 2017. The Company was able to change its valuations of acquired Carolina Bank assets and liabilities for up to one year after the acquisition date. The table below is a condensed balance sheet disclosing the amount assigned to each major asset and liability category of Carolina Bank on March 3, 2017, and the related fair value adjustments recorded by the Company to reflect the acquisition. The $65.1 million in goodwill that resulted from this transaction is non-deductible for tax purposes.

 

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($ in thousands)

 

  As
Recorded by
Carolina Bank
   Initial Fair
Value
Adjustments
   Measurement
Period
Adjustments
   As
Recorded by
First Bancorp
 
Assets                    
Cash and cash equivalents  $81,466    (2) (a)       81,464 
Securities   49,629    (261) (b)       49,368 
Loans, gross   505,560    (5,469) (c)   146  (l)   497,522 
         (2,715) (d)         
Allowance for loan losses   (5,746)   5,746  (e)       ̶   
Premises and equipment   17,967    4,251  (f)   (319) (m)   21,899 
Core deposit intangible       8,790  (g)       8,790 
Other   34,976    (4,804) (h)   2,225  (n)   32,397 
   Total   683,852    5,536    2,052    691,440 
                     
Liabilities                    
Deposits  $584,950    431  (i)       585,381 
Borrowings   21,855    (2,855) (j)   (262) (o)   18,738 
Other   12,855    225  (k)   (444) (p)   12,636 
   Total   619,660    (2,199)   (706)   616,755 
                     
Net identifiable assets acquired                  74,685 
                     
Total cost of acquisition                    
   Value of stock issued       $114,478           
   Cash paid in the acquisition        25,279           
       Total cost of acquisition                  139,757 
                     
Goodwill recorded related to acquisition of Carolina Bank         $65,072 
                     

 

Explanation of Fair Value Adjustments

(a)This adjustment was recorded to a short-term investment to its estimated fair value.
(b)This fair value adjustment was recorded to adjust the securities portfolio to its estimated fair value.
(c)This fair value adjustment represents the amount necessary to reduce performing loans to their fair value due to interest rate factors and credit factors. Assuming the loans continue to perform, this amount will be amortized to increase interest income over the remaining lives of the related loans.
(d)This fair value adjustment was recorded to write-down purchased credit impaired loans assumed in the acquisition to their estimated fair market value.
(e)This fair value adjustment reduced the allowance for loan losses to zero as required by relevant accounting guidance.
(f)This adjustment represents the amount necessary to increase premises and equipment from its book value on the date of acquisition to its estimated fair market value.
(g)This fair value adjustment represents the value of the core deposit base assumed in the acquisition based on a study performed by an independent consulting firm. This amount was recorded by the Company as an identifiable intangible asset and will be amortized as expense on an accelerated basis over seven years.
(h)This fair value adjustment primarily represents the net deferred tax liability associated with the other fair value adjustments made to record the transaction.
(i)This fair value adjustment was recorded because the weighted average interest rate of Carolina Bank’s time deposits exceeded the cost of similar wholesale funding at the time of the acquisition. This amount is being amortized to reduce interest expense on an accelerated basis over the deposits’ remaining five year life.
(j)This fair value adjustment was primarily recorded because the interest rate of Carolina Bank’s trust preferred securities was less than the current interest rate on similar instruments. This amount is being amortized on approximately a straight-line basis to increase interest expense over the remaining life of the related borrowing, which is 18 years.
(k)This fair value adjustment represents miscellaneous adjustments needed to record assets and liabilities at their fair value.
(l)This fair value adjustment was a miscellaneous adjustment to increase the initial fair value of gross loans.

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(m)This fair value adjustment relates to miscellaneous adjustment to decrease the initial fair value of premises and equipment.
(n)This fair value adjustment relates to changes in the estimate of deferred tax assets/liabilities associated with the acquisition and adjustments to decrease the initial fair value of the foreclosed real estate acquired in the transaction based on newly obtained valuations.
(o)This fair value adjustment relates to miscellaneous adjustments to decrease the initial fair value of borrowings.
(p)This fair value adjustment relates to a change in the estimate of a contingent liability.

 

The following unaudited pro forma financial information presents the combined results of the Company and Carolina Bank as if the acquisition had occurred as of January 1, 2016, after giving effect to certain adjustments, including amortization of the core deposit intangible, and related income tax effects. The pro forma financial information does not necessarily reflect the results of operations that would have occurred had the Company and Carolina Bank constituted a single entity during such period.

 

($ in thousands, except share data)  Pro Forma Combined
Nine Months Ended
September 30, 2017
 
Net interest income  $119,899 
Noninterest income   35,236 
Total revenue   155,135 
      
Net income available to common shareholders   35,176 
      
Earnings per common share     
     Basic  $1.43 
     Diluted   1.43 

 

The above pro forma results for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 include merger-related expenses and charges recorded by Carolina Bank prior to the acquisition that are nonrecurring in nature and amounted to $4.6 million pretax, or $3.1 million after-tax ($0.12 per basic and diluted share).

 

(2)On September 1, 2017, First Bank Insurance completed the acquisition of Bear Insurance Service (“Bear Insurance”). The results of Bear Insurance are included the Company’s results beginning on the September 1, 2017 acquisition date.

 

Bear Insurance, an insurance agency based in Albemarle, North Carolina, with four locations in Stanly, Cabarrus, and Montgomery counties and annual commission income of approximately $4 million, represented an opportunity to complement the Company’s insurance agency operations in these markets and the surrounding areas. Also, this acquisition provided the Company with a larger platform for leveraging insurance services throughout the Company’s bank branch network. The transaction value was $9.8 million, with the Company paying $7.9 million in cash and issuing 13,374 shares of its common stock, which had a value of approximately $0.4 million. Per the terms of the agreement, the Company also recorded an earn-out liability valued at $1.2 million, which will be paid as a cash distribution after a four-year period if pre-determined goals are met for the periods.

 

This acquisition was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting for business combinations, and accordingly, the assets and liabilities of Bear Insurance were recorded based on estimates of fair values as of September 1, 2017. In connection with this acquisition, the Company recorded $5.3 million in goodwill, which is deductible for tax purposes, and $3.9 million in other amortizable intangible assets, which are also deductible for tax purposes.

 

(3)On October 1, 2017, the Company completed the acquisition of ASB Bancorp, Inc. (“Asheville Savings Bank”), headquartered in Asheville, North Carolina, pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger and Reorganization dated May 1, 2017. The results of Asheville Savings Bank are included in First Bancorp’s results beginning on the October 1, 2017 acquisition date.

 

ASB Bancorp, Inc. was the parent company of Asheville Savings Bank, a North Carolina state-chartered savings bank with eight bank branches located in Buncombe County, North Carolina and five bank branches located in the counties of Henderson, Madison, McDowell and Transylvania, all in North Carolina. The acquisition complemented the Company’s existing presence in the Asheville and surrounding markets, which are high-growth and highly desired markets. The Company was willing to record goodwill primarily due to the reasons just noted, as well as the positive earnings of Asheville Savings Bank. The total merger consideration consisted of $17.9 million in cash and 4,920,061 shares of the Company’s common stock, with each share of Asheville Savings Bank common stock being exchanged for either $41.90 in cash or 1.44 shares of the Company’s stock, subject to the total consideration being 90% stock / 10% cash. The issuance of common stock was valued at $169.3 million and was based on the Company’s closing stock price on September 30, 2017 of $34.41 per share.

 

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Index 

This acquisition was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting for business combinations, and accordingly, the assets and liabilities of Asheville Savings Bank were recorded based on estimates of fair values as of October 1, 2017. The Company may change its valuations of acquired Asheville Savings Bank assets and liabilities for up to one year after the acquisition date. The table below is a condensed balance sheet disclosing the amount assigned to each major asset and liability category of Asheville Savings Bank on October 1, 2017, and the related fair value adjustments recorded by the Company to reflect the acquisition. The $88.2 million in goodwill that resulted from this acquisition is non-deductible for tax purposes.

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

  As Recorded by
Asheville Savings
Bank
   Initial Fair
Value
Adjustments
   Measurement
Period
Adjustments
   As
Recorded by
First Bancorp
 
Assets                    
Cash and cash equivalents  $41,824            41,824 
Securities   95,020            95,020 
Loans, gross   617,159    (9,631) (a)       606,180 
         (1,348) (b)         
Allowance for loan losses   (6,685)   6,685  (c)        
Presold mortgages   3,785            3,785 
Premises and equipment   10,697    9,857  (d)       20,554 
Core deposit intangible       9,760  (e)   120  (i)   9,880 
Other   35,944    (5,851) (f)   (777) (j)   29,316 
   Total   797,744    9,472    (657)   806,559 
                     
Liabilities                    
Deposits  $678,707    430  (g)       679,137 
Borrowings   20,000            20,000 
Other   8,943    298  (h)   (822) (k)   8,419 
   Total   707,650    728    (822)   707,556 
                     
Net identifiable assets acquired                  99,003 
                     
Total cost of acquisition                    
   Value of stock issued       $169,299           
   Cash paid in the acquisition        17,939           
       Total cost of acquisition                  187,238 
                     
Goodwill recorded related to acquisition of Asheville Savings Bank       $88,235 

 

Explanation of Fair Value Adjustments

(a)This fair value adjustment represents the amount necessary to reduce performing loans to their fair value due to interest rate factors and credit factors. Assuming the loans continue to perform, this amount will be amortized to increase interest income over the remaining lives of the related loans.
(b)This fair value adjustment was recorded to write-down purchased credit impaired loans assumed in the acquisition to their estimated fair market value.
(c)This fair value adjustment reduced the allowance for loan losses to zero as required by relevant accounting guidance.
(d)This adjustment represents the amount necessary to increase premises and equipment from its book value on the date of acquisition to its estimated fair market value.
(e)This fair value adjustment represents the value of the core deposit base assumed in the acquisition based on a study performed by an independent consulting firm. This amount was recorded by the Company as an identifiable intangible asset and is being amortized as expense on an accelerated basis over seven years.
(f)This fair value adjustment primarily represents the net deferred tax liability associated with the other fair value adjustments made to record the transaction.

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(g)This fair value adjustment was recorded because the weighted average interest rate of Asheville Savings Bank’s time deposits exceeded the cost of similar wholesale funding at the time of the acquisition. This amount is being amortized to reduce interest expense on an accelerated basis over their remaining five year life.
(h)This fair value adjustment represents miscellaneous adjustments needed to record assets and liabilities at their fair value.
(i)This fair value adjustment relates to a change in the final amount of the core deposit intangible asset from the amount originally estimated.
(j)This fair value adjustment relates to the write-down of a foreclosed property based on an updated appraisal and the related deferred tax asset adjustment.
(k)This fair value adjustment was recorded to adjust the tax liability assumed on the acquisition date based on updated information.

 

Note 5 – Stock-Based Compensation Plans

 

The Company recorded total stock-based compensation expense of $374,000 and $204,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $1,201,000 and $860,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Of the $1,201,000 in expense that was recorded in 2018, approximately $352,000 related to the June 1, 2018 director equity grants, which are classified as “other operating expenses” in the Consolidated Statements of Income. The remaining $849,000 in expense relates to the employee equity grants discussed below and is recorded as “salaries expense.” Stock based compensation is reflected as an adjustment to cash flows from operating activities on the Company’s consolidated statement of cash flows. The Company recognized $281,000 and $318,000 of income tax benefits related to stock based compensation expense in its consolidated income statement for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

At September 30, 2018, the Company had two stock-based compensation plans – 1) the First Bancorp 2014 Equity Plan and 2) the First Bancorp 2007 Equity Plan. The Company’s shareholders approved each plan. The First Bancorp 2014 Equity Plan became effective upon the approval of shareholders on May 8, 2014. As of September 30, 2018, the First Bancorp 2014 Equity Plan was the only plan that had shares available for future grants, and there were 745,104 shares remaining available for grant.

 

The First Bancorp 2014 Equity Plan is intended to serve as a means to attract, retain and motivate key employees and directors and to associate the interests of the Plan’s participants with those of the Company and its shareholders. The First Bancorp 2014 Equity Plan allows for both grants of stock options and other types of equity-based compensation, including stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted performance stock, unrestricted stock, and performance units.

 

Recent equity grants have had service vesting conditions. Compensation expense for these grants is recorded over the requisite service periods. No compensation cost is recognized for grants that do not vest and any previously recognized compensation cost is reversed at forfeiture. The Company issues new shares of common stock when options are exercised.

 

Certain of the Company’s equity grants contain terms that provide for a graded vesting schedule whereby portions of the award vest in increments over the requisite service period. The Company recognizes compensation expense for awards with graded vesting schedules on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for each incremental award. Over the past five years, there have only been minimal amounts of forfeitures, and therefore the Company assumes that all awards granted with service conditions only will vest.

 

As it relates to director equity grants, the Company grants common shares, valued at approximately $32,000, to each non-employee director (currently 11 in total) in June of each year. Compensation expense associated with these director grants is recognized on the date of grant since there are no vesting conditions. On June 1, 2018, the Company granted 8,393 shares of common stock to non-employee directors (763 shares per director), at a fair market value of $41.93 per share, which was the closing price of the Company’s common stock on that date and which resulted in $352,000 in expense. On June 1, 2017, the Company granted 11,190 shares of common stock to non-employee directors (1,119 shares per director), at a fair market value of $28.59 per share, which was the closing price of the Company’s common stock on that date and which resulted in $320,000 in expense.

 

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The Company’s senior officers receive their annual bonuses earned under the Company’s annual incentive plan in a mix of 50% cash and 50% stock, with the stock being subject to a three year vesting term. In the last three years, a total of 54,529 shares of restricted stock have been granted related to performance in the preceding fiscal years (net of an immaterial amount of forfeitures). Total compensation expense associated with those grants was $1.4 million and is being recognized over the respective vesting periods. For the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, total compensation expense related to these grants was $73,000 and $66,000, respectively, and for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, total compensation expense was $220,000 and $216,000, respectively. The Company expects to record $73,000 in compensation expense during the remaining quarter of 2018.

 

In the last three years, the Compensation Committee also granted 135,189 shares of stock to various employees of the Company to promote retention (net of an immaterial amount of forfeitures). The total value associated with these grants amounted to $3.9 million, which is being recorded as an expense over their three year vesting periods. For the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, total compensation expense related to these grants was $301,000 and $138,000, respectively, and for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, total compensation expense was $629,000 and $324,000, respectively. The Company expects to record $305,000 in compensation expense during the remaining quarter of 2018. All grants were issued based on the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of the grant.

 

The following table presents information regarding the activity the first nine months of 2018 related to the Company’s outstanding restricted stock grants:

 

   Long-Term Restricted Stock 
   Number of Units   Weighted-Average
Grant-Date Fair Value
 
         
Nonvested at January 1, 2018    103,063   $ 24.08 
           
Granted during the period   66,060    40.04 
Vested during the period   (16,533)   17.31 
Forfeited or expired during the period   (2,977)   25.21 
           
Nonvested at September 30, 2018   149,613   $31.85 

 

In years prior to 2009, stock options were the primary form of equity grant utilized by the Company. The stock options had a term of ten years. Upon a change in control (as defined in the plans), unless the awards remain outstanding or substitute equivalent awards are provided, the awards become immediately vested.

 

At September 30, 2018, there were 9,000 stock options outstanding related to the Company’s two equity-based plans, all with an exercise price of $14.35.

 

The following table presents information regarding the activity for the first nine months of 2018 under the Company’s stock options outstanding:

 

   Options Outstanding 
   Number of
Shares
   Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
   Weighted-
Average
Contractual
Term (years)
   Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
                 
Balance at January 1, 2018   38,689   $16.09           
                     
   Granted                  
   Exercised   (29,689)   16.61        $659,743 
   Forfeited                  
   Expired                  
                     
Outstanding at September 30, 2018   9,000   $14.35    0.7   $235,440 
                     
Exercisable at September 30, 2018   9,000   $14.35    0.7   $235,440 

 

During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, the Company received $0 and $324,000, respectively, as a result of stock option exercises. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, the Company received $0 and $287,000, respectively, as a result of stock option exercises.

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Note 6 – Earnings Per Common Share

 

Basic Earnings Per Common Share is calculated by dividing net income available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, excluding unvested shares of restricted stock. Diluted Earnings Per Common Share is computed by assuming the issuance of common shares for all potentially dilutive common shares outstanding during the reporting period. For the periods presented, the Company’s potentially dilutive common stock issuances related to unvested shares of restricted stock and stock option grants under the Company’s equity-based plans.

 

In computing Diluted Earnings Per Common Share, adjustments are made to the computation of Basic Earnings Per Common shares, as follows. As it relates to unvested shares of restricted stock, the number of shares added to the denominator is equal to the number of unvested shares less the assumed number of shares bought back by the Company in the open market at the average market price with the amount of proceeds being equal to the average deferred compensation for the reporting period. As it relates to stock options, it is assumed that all dilutive stock options are exercised during the reporting period at their respective exercise prices, with the proceeds from the exercises used by the Company to buy back stock in the open market at the average market price in effect during the reporting period. The difference between the number of shares assumed to be exercised and the number of shares bought back is included in the calculation of dilutive securities.

 

If any of the potentially dilutive common stock issuances have an anti-dilutive effect, the potentially dilutive common stock issuance is disregarded.

 

The following is a reconciliation of the numerators and denominators used in computing Basic and Diluted Earnings Per Common Share:

 

   For the Three Months Ended September 30, 
   2018   2017 

 

($ in thousands except per

share amounts)

  Income
(Numer-
ator)
   Shares
(Denom-
inator)
   Per Share
Amount
   Income
(Numer-
ator)
   Shares
(Denom-
inator)
   Per Share
Amount
 
                         
Basic EPS                              
Net income available to common shareholders  $21,991    29,530,203   $0.74   $13,086    24,607,516   $0.53 
                               
Effect of Dilutive Securities       90,927             87,779      
                               
Diluted EPS per common share  $21,991    29,621,130   $0.74   $13,086    24,695,295   $0.53 


 

 

   For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 
   2018   2017 

 

($ in thousands except per

share amounts)

  Income
(Numer-
ator)
   Shares
(Denom-
inator)
   Per Share
Amount
   Income
(Numer-
ator)
   Shares
(Denom-
inator)
   Per Share
Amount
 
                         
Basic EPS                              
Net income available to common shareholders  $65,394    29,536,273   $2.21   $31,795    23,728,262   $1.34 
                               
Effect of Dilutive Securities       102,853             98,749      
                               
Diluted EPS per common share  $65,394    29,639,126   $2.21   $31,795    23,827,011   $1.33 

 

For both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, there were no options that were antidilutive.

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Note 7 – Securities

 

The book values and approximate fair values of investment securities at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 are summarized as follows:

 

   September 30, 2018   December 31, 2017 
   Amortized   Fair   Unrealized   Amortized   Fair   Unrealized 
($ in thousands)  Cost   Value   Gains   (Losses)   Cost   Value   Gains   (Losses) 
                                 
Securities available for sale:                                        
  Government-sponsored enterprise securities  $44,000    43,422        (578)   14,000    13,867        (133)
  Mortgage-backed securities   287,746    276,474    42    (11,314)   297,690    295,213    246    (2,722)
  Corporate bonds   33,761    33,172    1    (591)   33,792    34,190    512    (114)
Total available for sale  $365,507    353,068    43    (12,483)   345,482    343,270    758    (2,969)
                                         
Securities held to maturity:                                        
  Mortgage-backed securities  $54,512    52,560        (1,952)   63,829    63,092        (737)
  State and local governments   50,307    50,800    584    (91)   54,674    55,906    1,280    (48)
Total held to maturity  $104,819    103,360    584    (2,043)   118,503    118,998    1,280    (785)

 

All of the Company’s mortgage-backed securities, including commercial mortgage-backed obligations, were issued by government-sponsored corporations, except for two private mortgage-backed securities with a fair value of $1.0 million as of September 30, 2018.

 

The following table presents information regarding securities with unrealized losses at September 30, 2018:

 

($ in thousands)  Securities in an Unrealized
Loss Position for
Less than 12 Months
   Securities in an Unrealized
Loss Position for
More than 12 Months
   Total 
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
 
  Government-sponsored enterprise securities  $9,687    313    8,735    265    18,422    578 
  Mortgage-backed securities   211,002    8,222    115,439    5,044    326,441    13,266 
  Corporate bonds   31,235    521    930    70    32,165    591 
  State and local governments   10,357    91            10,357    91 
      Total temporarily impaired securities  $262,281    9,147    125,104    5,379    387,385    14,526 

 

The following table presents information regarding securities with unrealized losses at December 31, 2017:

 

($ in thousands)  Securities in an Unrealized
Loss Position for
Less than 12 Months
   Securities in an Unrealized
Loss Position for
More than 12 Months
   Total 
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
 
  Government-sponsored enterprise securities  $10,897    103    2,970    30    13,867    133 
  Mortgage-backed securities   192,702    1,582    125,060    1,877    317,762    3,459 
  Corporate bonds   2,500    49    935    65    3,435    114 
  State and local governments   7,928    48            7,928    48 
      Total temporarily impaired securities  $214,027    1,782    128,965    1,972    342,992    3,754 
                               

 

In the above tables, all of the securities that were in an unrealized loss position at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 were bonds that the Company has determined were in a loss position due primarily to interest rate factors and not credit quality concerns. The Company evaluated the collectability of each of these bonds and concluded that there was no other-than-temporary impairment. The Company does not intend to sell these securities, and it is more likely than not that the Company will not be required to sell these securities before recovery of the amortized cost.

 

Page 18 

Index 

The book values and approximate fair values of investment securities at September 30, 2018, by contractual maturity, are summarized in the table below. Expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities because issuers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.

 

   Securities Available for Sale   Securities Held to Maturity 
   Amortized   Fair   Amortized   Fair 
($ in thousands)  Cost   Value   Cost   Value 
                 
Securities                    
Due within one year  $        3,240    3,254 
Due after one year but within five years   70,218    69,160    28,532    28,838 
Due after five years but within ten years   2,543    2,523    16,790    16,978 
Due after ten years   5,000    4,911    1,745    1,730 
Mortgage-backed securities   287,746    276,474    54,512    52,560 
Total securities  $365,507    353,068    104,819    103,360 

 

At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, investment securities with carrying values of $225,467,000 and $176,813,000, respectively, were pledged as collateral for public deposits.

 

In the first nine months of 2017, the Company received proceeds from sales of securities of $45,601,000 and recorded losses of $235,000 from the sales. There were no securities sales in the first nine months of 2018.

 

Included in “other assets” in the consolidated balance sheets are cost method investments in Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) stock and Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond (“FRB”) stock totaling $37,468,000 and $31,338,000 at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. The FHLB stock had a cost and fair value of $20,036,000 and $19,647,000 at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, and serves as part of the collateral for the Company’s line of credit with the FHLB and is also a requirement for membership in the FHLB system. The FRB stock had a cost and fair value of $17,432,000 and $11,691,000 at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, and is a requirement for FRB member bank qualification. Periodically, both the FHLB and FRB recalculate the Company’s required level of holdings, and the Company either buys more stock or redeems a portion of the stock at cost. The Company determined that neither stock was impaired at either period end.

 

Page 19 

Index 

Note 8 – Loans and Asset Quality Information

 

On March 3, 2017, the Company acquired Carolina Bank (see Note 4 for more information). As a result of this acquisition, the Company recorded loans with a fair value of $497.5 million. Of those loans, $19.3 million were considered to be purchased credit impaired (“PCI”) loans, which are loans for which it is probable at acquisition date that all contractually required payments will not be collected. The remaining loans are considered to be purchased non-impaired loans and their related fair value discount or premium is being recognized as an adjustment to yield over the remaining life of each loan.

 

The following table relates to Carolina Bank PCI loans and summarizes the contractually required payments, which includes principal and interest, expected cash flows to be collected, and the fair value of acquired PCI loans at the acquisition date.

 

($ in thousands)

 

  Carolina Bank Acquisition
on March 3, 2017
 
Contractually required payments  $27,108 
Nonaccretable difference   (4,237)
Cash flows expected to be collected at acquisition   22,871 
Accretable yield   (3,617)
Fair value of PCI loans at acquisition date  $19,254 

 

The following table relates to acquired Carolina Bank purchased non-impaired loans and provides the contractually required payments, fair value, and estimate of contractual cash flows not expected to be collected at the acquisition date.

 

($ in thousands)

 

  Carolina Bank Acquisition
on March 3, 2017
 
Contractually required payments  $569,980 
Fair value of acquired loans at acquisition date   478,515 
Contractual cash flows not expected to be collected   3,650 

 

On October 1, 2017, the Company acquired Asheville Savings Bank (see Note 4 for more information). As a result of this acquisition, the Company recorded loans with a fair value of $606.2 million. Of those loans, $9.9 million were considered to be PCI loans. The remaining loans were considered to be purchased non-impaired loans and their related fair value discount or premium is being recognized as an adjustment to yield over the remaining life of each loan.

 

The following table relates to acquired Asheville Savings Bank PCI loans and summarizes the contractually required payments, which includes principal and interest, expected cash flows to be collected, and the fair value of acquired PCI loans at the acquisition date.

 

($ in thousands)  Asheville Savings Bank
Acquisition on
October 1, 2017
 
Contractually required payments  $13,424 
Nonaccretable difference   (1,734)
Cash flows expected to be collected at acquisition   11,690 
Accretable yield   (1,804)
Fair value of PCI loans at acquisition date  $9,886 

 

The following table relates to acquired Asheville Savings Bank purchased non-impaired loans and provides the contractually required payments, fair value, and estimate of contractual cash flows not expected to be collected at the acquisition date.

 

($ in thousands)

 

  Asheville Savings Bank
Acquisition on
October 1, 2017
 
Contractually required payments  $727,706 
Fair value of acquired loans at acquisition date   595,167 
Contractual cash flows not expected to be collected   7,000 

Page 20 

Index 

The following is a summary of the major categories of total loans outstanding:

 

($ in thousands)  September 30, 2018   December 31, 2017   September 30, 2017 
   Amount   Percentage   Amount   Percentage   Amount   Percentage 
All  loans:                              
                               
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $435,730    10%   $381,130    10%   $376,940    11% 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   559,450    13%    539,020    13%    450,746    13% 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   1,038,436    25%    972,772    24%    796,222    23% 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit   362,829    9%    379,978    9%    315,322    10% 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   1,723,598    41%    1,696,107    42%    1,431,934    41% 
Installment loans to individuals   70,096    2%    74,348    2%    59,028    2% 
    Subtotal   4,190,139    100%    4,043,355    100%    3,430,192    100% 
Unamortized net deferred loan costs (fees)   489         (986)        (437)     
    Total loans  $4,190,628        $4,042,369        $3,429,755      

 

The following table presents changes in the carrying value of PCI loans.

 

($ in thousands)

 

 

 

Purchased Credit Impaired Loans

  For the Nine
Months Ended
September 30,
2018
   For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2017
 
Balance at beginning of period  $23,165    514 
Additions due to acquisition of Carolina Bank       19,254 
Additions due to acquisition of Asheville Savings Bank       9,886 
Change due to payments received and accretion   (2,994)   (6,016)
Change due to loan charge-offs   (10)   (12)
Transfers to foreclosed real estate       (69)
Other   28    (392)
Balance at end of period  $20,189    23,165 

 

The following table presents changes in the accretable yield for PCI loans.

 

($ in thousands)

 

 

 

Accretable Yield for PCI loans

  For the Nine
Months Ended
September 30,
2018
   For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2017
 
Balance at beginning of period  $4,688     
Additions due to acquisition of Carolina Bank       3,617 
Additions due to acquisition of Asheville Savings Bank       1,804 
Accretion   (1,169)   (1,846)
Reclassification from (to) nonaccretable difference   712    423 
Other, net   831    690 
Balance at end of period  $5,062    4,688 

 

During the first nine months of 2018, the Company received $225,000 in payments that exceeded the carrying amount of the related PCI loans, of which $184,000 was recognized as loan discount accretion income and $41,000 was recorded as additional loan interest income. During the first nine months of 2017, the Company received $848,000 in payments that exceeded the carrying amount of the related PCI loans, of which $775,000 was recognized as loan discount accretion income and $73,000 was recorded as additional loan interest income.

Page 21 

Index 

Nonperforming assets are defined as nonaccrual loans, restructured loans, loans past due 90 or more days and still accruing interest, and foreclosed real estate. Nonperforming assets are summarized as follows.

 

($ in thousands)  September 30,
2018
   December 31,
2017
   September 30,
2017
 
             
Nonperforming assets               
Nonaccrual loans  $18,267    20,968    23,350 
Restructured loans - accruing   16,657    19,834    20,330 
Accruing loans > 90 days past due            
     Total nonperforming loans   34,924    40,802    43,680 
Foreclosed real estate   6,140    12,571    9,356 
Total nonperforming assets  $41,064    53,373    53,036 
                
       Purchased credit impaired loans not included above (1)  $20,189    23,165    15,034 

 

(1) In the March 3, 2017 acquisition of Carolina Bank, and the October 1, 2017 acquisition of Asheville Savings Bank, the Company acquired $19.3 million and $9.9 million, respectively, in PCI loans in accordance with ASC 310-30 accounting guidance. These loans are excluded from nonperforming loans, including $0.6 million, $0.6 million, and $0.4 million in PCI loans at September 30, 2018, December 31, 2017, and September 30, 2017, respectively, that were contractually past due 90 days or more.

 

At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company had $1.4 million and $0.8 million in residential mortgage loans in process of foreclosure, respectively.

 

The following is a summary of the Company’s nonaccrual loans by major categories.

 

($ in thousands)  September 30,
2018
   December 31,
2017
 
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $2,092    1,001 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   651    1,822 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   8,807    12,201 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit   1,419    2,524 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   5,178    3,345 
Installment loans to individuals   120    75 
  Total  $18,267    20,968 
           

 

The following table presents an analysis of the payment status of the Company’s loans as of September 30, 2018.

 

($ in thousands)  Accruing
30-59
Days Past
Due
   Accruing
60-89 Days
Past Due
   Accruing
90 Days or
More Past
Due
   Nonaccrual
Loans
   Accruing
Current
   Total Loans
Receivable
 
                         
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $2,302    278        2,092    430,794    435,466 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   1,948    738        651    555,588    558,925 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   6,160    398        8,807    1,016,896    1,032,261 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit   1,056    270        1,419    359,739    362,484 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   3,196    573        5,178    1,702,063    1,711,010 
Installment loans to individuals   360    139        120    69,185    69,804 
Purchased credit impaired   132    304    627        19,126    20,189 
  Total  $15,154    2,700    627    18,267    4,153,391    4,190,139 
Unamortized net deferred loan costs                            489 
           Total loans                           $4,190,628 

 

Page 22 

Index 

The following table presents an analysis of the payment status of the Company’s loans as of December 31, 2017.

 

($ in thousands)  Accruing
30-59
Days Past
Due
   Accruing
60-89
Days Past
Due
   Accruing
90 Days or
More Past
Due
   Nonaccrual
Loans
   Accruing
Current
   Total Loans
Receivable
 
                         
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $89    151        1,001    379,241    380,482 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   1,154    214        1,822    535,423    538,613 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   6,777    1,370        12,201    943,565    963,913 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit   1,347    10        2,524    375,814    379,695 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   1,270    451        3,345    1,678,529    1,683,595 
Installment loans to individuals   445    95        75    73,277    73,892 
Purchased credit impaired   821    77    601        21,666    23,165 
  Total  $11,903    2,368    601    20,968    4,007,515    4,043,355 
Unamortized net deferred loan fees                            (986)
           Total loans                           $4,042,369 

 

 

Page 23 

Index 

The following table presents the activity in the allowance for loan losses for all loans for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018.

 

 

($ in thousands)

  Commercial,
Financial,
and
Agricultural
   Real Estate

Construction,
Land
Development
& Other Land
Loans
   Real Estate

Residential
(1-4 Family)
First Mortgages
   Real Estate
– Mortgage
– Home
Equity
Lines of
Credit
   Real Estate
– Mortgage

Commercial
and Other
   Installment
Loans to
Individuals
   Unallo
-cated
   Total 
                     
As of and for the three months ended September 30, 2018
Beginning balance  $2,268    2,692    7,059    2,250    7,295    897    837    23,298 
Charge-offs   (933)   (126)   (1,183)   (192)   (1,086)   (232)       (3,752)
Recoveries   159    181    155    51    209    158        913 
Provisions   1,221    (366)   (664)   (330)   753    79    (606)   87 
Ending balance  $2,715    2,381    5,367    1,779    7,171    902    231    20,546 
                                         
As of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2018
                                         
Beginning balance  $3,111    2,816    6,147    1,827    6,475    950    1,972    23,298 
Charge-offs   (1,542)   (158)   (1,598)   (378)   (1,398)   (494)       (5,568)
Recoveries   971    3,568    671    294    1,333    261        7,098 
Provisions   175    (3,845)   147    36    761    185    (1,741)   (4,282)
Ending balance  $2,715    2,381    5,367    1,779    7,171    902    231    20,546 
                                         
Ending balances as of September 30, 2018: Allowance for loan losses
Individually evaluated for impairment  $126        1,004        502            1,632 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $2,585    2,335    4,306    1,765    6,662    887    231    18,771 
Purchased credit impaired  $4    46    57    14    7    15        143 
                                         
Loans receivable as of September 30, 2018:
Ending balance – total  $435,730    559,450    1,038,436    362,829    1,723,598    70,096        4,190,139 
Unamortized net deferred loan costs                                      489 
Total loans                                     $4,190,628 
                                         
Ending balances as of September 30, 2018: Loans
Individually evaluated for impairment  $1,981    2,642    12,617    22    10,490            27,752 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $433,485    556,283    1,019,645    362,462    1,700,519    69,804        4,142,198 
Purchased credit impaired  $264    525    6,174    345    12,589    292        20,189 

 

 

Page 24 

Index 

The following table presents the activity in the allowance for loan losses for the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

 

($ in thousands)

  Commercial,
Financial,
and
Agricultural
   Real Estate

Construction,
Land
Development,
& Other
Land Loans
   Real Estate

Residential
(1-4 Family)
First
Mortgages
   Real Estate
– Mortgage
– Home
Equity
Lines of
Credit
   Real Estate
– Mortgage

Commercial
and Other
   Installment
Loans to
Individuals
   Unallo
-cated
   Total 
                     
As of and for the year ended December 31, 2017
Beginning balance  $3,829    2,691    7,704    2,420    5,098    1,145    894    23,781 
Charge-offs   (1,622)   (589)   (2,641)   (978)   (1,182)   (799)       (7,811)
Recoveries   1,311    2,579    1,076    333    1,027    279        6,605 
Provisions   (407)   (1,865)   8    52    1,532    325    1,078    723 
Ending balance  $3,111    2,816    6,147    1,827    6,475    950    1,972    23,298 
                                         
Ending balances as of December 31, 2017:  Allowance for loan losses
Individually evaluated for impairment  $215    18    1,099        232            1,564 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $2,896    2,798    4,831    1,788    6,226    950    1,972    21,461 
Purchased credit impaired  $        217    39    17            273 
                                         
Loans receivable as of December 31, 2017:
Ending balance – total  $381,130    539,020    972,772    379,978    1,696,107    74,348        4,043,355 
Unamortized net deferred loan fees                                      (986)
Total loans                                     $4,042,369 
                                         
Ending balances as of December 31, 2017: Loans
Individually evaluated for impairment  $579    2,975    14,800    368    8,493            27,215 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $379,903    535,638    949,113    379,327    1,675,102    73,892        3,992,975 
Purchased credit impaired  $648    407    8,859    283    12,512    456        23,165 

 

 

Page 25 

Index 

The following table presents the activity in the allowance for loan losses for all loans for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017.

 

 

($ in thousands)

  Commercial,
Financial,
and
Agricultural
   Real Estate

Construction,
Land
Development
& Other Land
Loans
   Real Estate

Residential
(1-4 Family)
First
Mortgages
   Real Estate
– Mortgage
– Home
Equity
Lines of
Credit
   Real Estate
– Mortgage

Commercial
and Other
   Installment
Loans to
Individuals
   Unallo
-cated
   Total 
                     
As of and for the three months ended September 30, 2017
Beginning balance  $3,430    2,676    7,085    2,057    6,153    1,074    1,550    24,025 
Charge-offs   (131)   (43)   (499)   (213)   (159)   (162)       (1,207)
Recoveries   330    809    170    120    275    71        1,775 
Provisions   (314)   (973)   (281)   (49)   (271)   45    1,843     
Ending balance  $3,315    2,469    6,475    1,915    5,998    1,028    3,393    24,593 
                                         
As of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2017
                                         
Beginning balance  $3,829    2,691    7,704    2,420    5,098    1,145    894    23,781 
Charge-offs   (1,335)   (312)   (1,746)   (791)   (573)   (521)       (5,278)
Recoveries   848    2,280    806    250    973    210        5,367 
Provisions   (27)   (2,190)   (289)   36    500    194    2,499    723 
Ending balance  $3,315    2,469    6,475    1,915    5,998    1,028    3,393    24,593 
                                         
Ending balances as of September 30, 2017:  Allowance for loan losses
Individually evaluated for impairment  $144    23    929        487            1,583 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $3,171    2,446    5,546    1,915    5,511    1,028    3,393    23,010 
Purchased credit impaired  $                             
                                         
Loans receivable as of September 30, 2017:
Ending balance – total  $376,940    450,746    796,222    315,322    1,431,934    59,028        3,430,192 
Unamortized net deferred loan fees                                      (437)
Total loans                                     $3,429,755 
                                         
Ending balances as of September 30, 2017: Loans
Individually evaluated for impairment  $490    3,072    14,987    52    9,443            28,044 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $376,195    446,798    777,925    314,559    1,412,666    58,971        3,387,114 
Purchased credit impaired  $255    876    3,310    711    9,825    57        15,034 

 

 

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Index 

The following table presents loans individually evaluated for impairment by class of loans, excluding PCI loans, as of September 30, 2018.

 

 

($ in thousands)

  Recorded
Investment
   Unpaid
Principal
Balance
   Related
Allowance
   Average
Recorded
Investment
 
Impaired loans with no related allowance recorded:                    
                     
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $1,693    2,117        1,119 
Real estate – mortgage – construction, land development & other land loans   2,642    2,956        2,836 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   4,740    5,072        4,849 
Real estate – mortgage –home equity loans / lines of credit   22    32        109 
Real estate – mortgage –commercial and other   4,550    5,016        3,718 
Installment loans to individuals                
Total impaired loans with no allowance  $13,647    15,193        12,631 
                     
                     
Impaired loans with an allowance recorded:                    
                     
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $288    289    126    431 
Real estate – mortgage – construction, land development & other land loans               266 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   7,877    8,017    1,004    9,263 
Real estate – mortgage –home equity loans / lines of credit               162 
Real estate – mortgage –commercial and other   5,940    6,233    502    5,877 
Installment loans to individuals               2 
Total impaired loans with allowance  $14,105    14,539    1,632    16,001 
                     

Interest income recorded on impaired loans during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 was insignificant.

 

The following table presents loans individually evaluated for impairment by class of loans, excluding PCI loans, as of December 31, 2017.

 

 

($ in thousands)

  Recorded
Investment
   Unpaid
Principal
Balance
   Related
Allowance
   Average
Recorded
Investment
 
Impaired loans with no related allowance recorded:                    
                     
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $183    425        276 
Real estate – mortgage – construction, land development & other land loans   2,743    3,941        2,846 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   5,205    5,728        7,067 
Real estate – mortgage –home equity loans / lines of credit   368    387        129 
Real estate – mortgage –commercial and other   3,066    3,321        3,143 
Installment loans to individuals                
Total impaired loans with no allowance  $11,565    13,802        13,461 
                     
                     
Impaired loans with an allowance recorded:                    
                     
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $396    396    215    214 
Real estate – mortgage – construction, land development & other land loans   232    241    18    503 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   9,595    9,829    1,099    10,077 
Real estate – mortgage –home equity loans / lines of credit               66 
Real estate – mortgage –commercial and other   5,427    5,427    232    5,369 
Installment loans to individuals                
Total impaired loans with allowance  $15,650    15,893    1,564    16,229 

 

Interest income recorded on impaired loans during the year ended December 31, 2017 was insignificant.

 

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The Company tracks credit quality based on its internal risk ratings. Upon origination, a loan is assigned an initial risk grade, which is generally based on several factors such as the borrower’s credit score, the loan-to-value ratio, the debt-to-income ratio, etc. Loans that are risk-graded as substandard during the origination process are declined. After loans are initially graded, they are monitored regularly for credit quality based on many factors, such as payment history, the borrower’s financial status, and changes in collateral value. Loans can be downgraded or upgraded depending on management’s evaluation of these factors. Internal risk-grading policies are consistent throughout each loan type.

 

The following describes the Company’s internal risk grades in ascending order of likelihood of loss:

 

  Risk Grade Description
Pass:  
  1 Loans with virtually no risk, including cash secured loans.
  2 Loans with documented significant overall financial strength.  These loans have minimum chance of loss due to the presence of multiple sources of repayment – each clearly sufficient to satisfy the obligation.
  3 Loans with documented satisfactory overall financial strength.  These loans have a low loss potential due to presence of at least two clearly identified sources of repayment – each of which is sufficient to satisfy the obligation under the present circumstances.
  4 Loans to borrowers with acceptable financial condition.  These loans could have signs of minor operational weaknesses, lack of adequate financial information, or loans supported by collateral with questionable value or marketability.  
  5 Loans that represent above average risk due to minor weaknesses and warrant closer scrutiny by management.  Collateral is generally required and felt to provide reasonable coverage with realizable liquidation values in normal circumstances.  Repayment performance is satisfactory.
 

P

(Pass)

Consumer loans (<$500,000) that are of satisfactory credit quality with borrowers who exhibit good personal credit history, average personal financial strength and moderate debt levels.  These loans generally conform to Bank policy, but may include approved mitigated exceptions to the guidelines.  
Special Mention:  
  6 Existing loans with defined weaknesses in primary source of repayment that, if not corrected, could cause a loss to the Bank.
Classified:  
  7 An existing loan inadequately protected by the current sound net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or the collateral pledged, if any.  These loans have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt.
  8 Loans that have a well-defined weakness that make the collection or liquidation in full highly questionable and improbable.  Loss appears imminent, but the exact amount and timing is uncertain.
  9 Loans that are considered uncollectible and are in the process of being charged-off.  This grade is a temporary grade assigned for administrative purposes until the charge-off is completed.
 

F

(Fail)

Consumer loans (<$500,000) with a well-defined weakness, such as exceptions of any kind with no mitigating factors, history of paying outside the terms of the note, insufficient income to support the current level of debt, etc.  

 

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Index 

The following table presents the Company’s recorded investment in loans by credit quality indicators as of September 30, 2018.

 

($ in thousands)    
   Pass   Special
Mention Loans
   Classified
Accruing Loans
   Classified
Nonaccrual
Loans
   Total 
                     
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $429,721    2,797    856    2,092    435,466 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   547,323    6,331    4,620    651    558,925 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   984,851    13,052    25,551    8,807    1,032,261 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit   351,575    1,697    7,793    1,419    362,484 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   1,684,024    15,075    6,733    5,178    1,711,010 
Installment loans to individuals   69,072    212    400    120    69,804 
Purchased credit impaired   9,269    5,306    5,614        20,189 
  Total  $4,075,835    44,470    51,567    18,267    4,190,139 
Unamortized net deferred loan costs                       489 
            Total loans                       4,190,628 

 

The following table presents the Company’s recorded investment in loans by credit quality indicators as of December 31, 2017.

 

($ in thousands)    
   Pass   Special
Mention Loans
   Classified
Accruing Loans
   Classified
Nonaccrual
Loans
   Total 
                     
Commercial, financial, and agricultural  $368,658    9,901    922    1,001    380,482 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   523,642    7,129    6,020    1,822    538,613 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   905,111    16,235    30,366    12,201    963,913 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit   365,982    3,784    7,405    2,524    379,695 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   1,647,725    23,335    9,190    3,345    1,683,595 
Installment loans to individuals   73,379    222    216    75    73,892 
Purchased credit impaired   6,541    12,309    4,315        23,165 
  Total  $3,891,038    72,915    58,434    20,968    4,043,355 
Unamortized net deferred loan fees                       (986)
            Total loans                       4,042,369 

 

 

Troubled Debt Restructurings

 

The restructuring of a loan is considered a “troubled debt restructuring” if both (i) the borrower is experiencing financial difficulties and (ii) the creditor has granted a concession. Concessions may include interest rate reductions or below market interest rates, principal forgiveness, restructuring amortization schedules and other actions intended to minimize potential losses.

 

The vast majority of the Company’s troubled debt restructurings modified related to interest rate reductions combined with restructured amortization schedules. The Company does not generally grant principal forgiveness.

 

All loans classified as troubled debt restructurings are considered to be impaired and are evaluated as such for determination of the allowance for loan losses. The Company’s troubled debt restructurings can be classified as either nonaccrual or accruing based on the loan’s payment status. The troubled debt restructurings that are nonaccrual are reported within the nonaccrual loan totals presented previously.

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The following table presents information related to loans modified in a troubled debt restructuring during the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017.

 

($ in thousands)  For three months ended
September 30, 2018
   For the three months ended
September 30, 2017
 
   Number of
Contracts
   Pre-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
   Post-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
   Number of
Contracts
   Pre-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
   Post-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
 
TDRs – Accruing                              
Commercial, financial, and agricultural      $   $       $   $ 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans                        
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages                        
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit                        
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other               1    570    570 
Installment loans to individuals                        
                               
TDRs – Nonaccrual                              
Commercial, financial, and agricultural                        
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans                        
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages               1    47    47 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit                        
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other                        
Installment loans to individuals                        
Total TDRs arising during period      $   $    2   $617   $617 

 

The following table presents information related to loans modified in a troubled debt restructuring during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017.

 

($ in thousands)  For nine months ended
September 30, 2018
   For the nine months ended
September 30, 2017
 
   Number of
Contracts
   Pre-
Modification
Restructured Balances
   Post-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
   Number of
Contracts
   Pre-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
   Post-
Modification
Restructured
Balances
 
TDRs – Accruing                              
Commercial, financial, and agricultural      $   $       $   $ 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans                        
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   1    18    18             
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit                        
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other               6    4,120    4,095 
Installment loans to individuals                        
                               
TDRs – Nonaccrual                              
Commercial, financial, and agricultural               1    38    25 
Real estate – construction, land development & other land loans   1    61    61    1    32    32 
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family) first mortgages   2    254    264    2    262    262 
Real estate – mortgage – home equity loans / lines of credit                        
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other                        
Installment loans to individuals                        
                               
Total TDRs arising during period   4   $333   $343    10   $4,452   $4,414 
                               

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Accruing restructured loans that were modified in the previous 12 months and that defaulted during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 are presented in the table below. The Company considers a loan to have defaulted when it becomes 90 or more days delinquent under the modified terms, has been transferred to nonaccrual status, or has been transferred to foreclosed real estate.

 

($ in thousands)  For the nine months ended
September 30, 2018
   For the nine months ended
September 30, 2017
 
   Number of
Contracts
   Recorded
Investment
   Number of
Contracts
   Recorded
Investment
 
                 
Accruing TDRs that subsequently defaulted                    
Real estate – mortgage – residential (1-4 family first mortgages)   1   $60    2    880 
Real estate – mortgage – commercial and other   3    1,333         
Total accruing TDRs that subsequently defaulted   4   $1,393    2   $880 

 

There were no accruing restructured loans that were modified in the previous 12 months and defaulted during the three months ended September 30, 2018 or 2017.

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Note 9 – Deferred Loan (Fees) Costs

 

The amount of loans shown on the consolidated balance sheets includes net deferred loan (fees) costs of approximately $489,000, ($986,000), and ($437,000) at September 30, 2018, December 31, 2017, and September 30, 2017, respectively.

 

Note 10 – Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

The following is a summary of the gross carrying amount and accumulated amortization of amortizable intangible assets as of September 30, 2018, December 31, 2017, and September 30, 2017 and the carrying amount of unamortized intangible assets as of those same dates.

 

   September 30, 2018   December 31, 2017   September 30, 2017 
($ in thousands)  Gross Carrying
Amount
   Accumulated
Amortization
   Gross Carrying
Amount
   Accumulated
Amortization
   Gross Carrying
Amount
   Accumulated
Amortization
 
Amortizable intangible assets:                              
   Customer lists  $6,013    1,459    6,013    1,090    6,013    953 
   Core deposit intangibles   28,440    15,300    28,280    11,475    18,520    10,084 
   SBA servicing asset   4,949    761    2,194    207    1,418    112 
   Other   1,303    906    1,303    581    1,303    471 
        Total  $40,705    18,426    37,790    13,353    27,254    11,620 
                               
Unamortizable intangible                              
    assets:                              
   Goodwill  $232,458         233,070         144,667      

 

Activity related to transactions during the periods includes the following:

 

(1)In connection with the Carolina Bank acquisition on March 3, 2017, the Company recorded a net increase of $65,072,000 in goodwill and $8,790,000 in a core deposit intangible.
(2)In connection with the September 1, 2017 acquisition of Bear Insurance Service, the Company recorded $5,330,000 in goodwill, $3,644,000 in a customer list intangible, and $271,000 in other amortizable intangible assets.
(3)In connection with the Asheville Savings Bank acquisition on October 1, 2017, the Company recorded a net increase of $88,235,000 in goodwill and $9,880,000 in a core deposit intangible.

 

In addition to the above acquisition related activity, the Company recorded $2,755,000 and $1,003,000 in servicing assets associated with the guaranteed portion of SBA loans originated and sold during the first nine months of 2018 and 2017, respectively. During the first nine months of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded $555,000 and $112,000, respectively, in related amortization expense. Servicing assets are recorded at fair value and amortized over the expected life of the related loans.

 

Amortization expense of all intangible assets totaled $1,656,000 and $902,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $5,073,000 and $2,509,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

The following table presents the estimated amortization expense related to amortizable intangible assets for the last quarter of calendar year 2018 and for each of the four calendar years ending December 31, 2022 and the estimated amount amortizable thereafter. These estimates are subject to change in future periods to the extent management determines it is necessary to make adjustments to the carrying value or estimated useful lives of amortized intangible assets.

 

($ in thousands)

 

  Estimated Amortization
Expense
 
October 1 to December 31, 2018  $1,589 
2019   5,570 
2020   4,481 
2021   3,492 
2022   2,411 
Thereafter   4,736 
         Total  $22,279 

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Index 

Note 11 – Pension Plans

 

The Company has historically sponsored two defined benefit pension plans – a qualified retirement plan (the “Pension Plan”) which was generally available to all employees, and a Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (the “SERP”), which was for the benefit of certain senior management executives of the Company. Effective December 31, 2012, the Company froze both plans for all participants. Although no previously accrued benefits were lost, employees no longer accrue benefits for service subsequent to 2012.

 

The Company recorded periodic pension cost (income) totaling $136,000 and ($202,000) for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The following table contains the components of the pension cost (income).

 

   For the Three Months Ended September 30, 
   2018   2017   2018   2017   2018 Total   2017 Total 
($ in thousands)  Pension Plan   Pension Plan   SERP   SERP   Both Plans   Both Plans 
Service cost  $        32    29    32    29 
Interest cost   328    361    40    57    368    418 
Expected return on plan assets   (177)   (702)           (177)   (702)
Amortization of net (gain)/loss   (93)   61    6    (8)   (87)   53 
   Net periodic pension cost (income)  $58    (280)   78    78    136    (202)

 

The Company recorded periodic pension cost (income) totaling $408,000 and ($605,000) for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The following table contains the components of the pension cost (income).

 

   For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 
   2018   2017   2018   2017   2018 Total   2017 Total 
($ in thousands)  Pension Plan   Pension Plan   SERP   SERP   Both Plans   Both Plans 
Service cost  $        94    88    94    88 
Interest cost   984    1,086    150    170    1,134    1,256 
Expected return on plan assets   (836)   (2,107)           (836)   (2,107)
Amortization of net (gain)/loss   26    183    (10)   (25)   16    158 
   Net periodic pension cost (income)  $174    (838)   234    233    408    (605)

 

The service cost component of net periodic pension cost (income) is included in salaries and benefits expense and all other components of net periodic pension cost (income) are included in other noninterest expense.

 

The Company’s contributions to the Pension Plan are based on computations by independent actuarial consultants and are intended to be deductible for income tax purposes. The Company does not expect to contribute to the Pension Plan in 2018.

 

The Company’s funding policy with respect to the SERP is to fund the related benefits from the operating cash flow of the Company.

 

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Index 

 

Note 12 – Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

Comprehensive income (loss) is defined as the change in equity during a period for non-owner transactions and is divided into net income (loss) and other comprehensive income (loss). Other comprehensive income (loss) includes revenues, expenses, gains, and losses that are excluded from earnings under current accounting standards. The components of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the Company are as follows:

 

($ in thousands)

 

  September 30,
2018
   December 31,
2017
   September 30,
2017
 
Unrealized gain (loss) on securities available for sale  $(12,440)   (2,211)   438 
     Deferred tax asset (liability)   2,907    517    (162)
Net unrealized gain (loss) on securities available for sale   (9,533)   (1,694)   276 
                
Additional pension asset (liability)   (3,184)   (3,200)   (4,854)
     Deferred tax asset (liability)   744    748    1,796 
Net additional pension asset (liability)   (2,440)   (2,452)   (3,058)
                
Total accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)  $(11,973)   (4,146)   (2,782)

 

The following table discloses the changes in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 (all amounts are net of tax).

 

($ in thousands)

 

  Unrealized Gain
(Loss) on
Securities
Available for Sale
   Additional
Pension Asset
(Liability)
   Total 
Beginning balance at January 1, 2018  $(1,694)   (2,452)   (4,146)
     Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications   (7,839)       (7,839)
     Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income       12    12 
Net current-period other comprehensive income (loss)   (7,839)   12    (7,827)
                
Ending balance at September 30, 2018  $(9,533)   (2,440)   (11,973)

 

The following table discloses the changes in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 (all amounts are net of tax).

 

($ in thousands)

 

  Unrealized Gain
(Loss) on
Securities
Available for Sale
   Additional
Pension Asset
(Liability)
   Total 
Beginning balance at January 1, 2017  $(1,947)   (3,160)   (5,107)
     Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications   2,075        2,075 
     Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income   148    102    250 
Net current-period other comprehensive income (loss)   2,223    102    2,325 
                
Ending balance at September 30, 2017  $276    (3,058)   (2,782)

 

 

Note 13 – Fair Value

 

Relevant accounting guidance establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The guidance describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) of identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity has the ability to access as of the measurement date.

 

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Level 2: Significant other observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.

 

Level 3: Significant unobservable inputs that reflect a reporting entity’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability.

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s financial instruments that were measured at fair value on a recurring and nonrecurring basis at September 30, 2018.

 

($ in thousands)        
Description of Financial Instruments  Fair Value at
September
30, 2018
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets for
Identical Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant Other
Observable Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable Inputs
(Level 3)
 
Recurring                    
     Securities available for sale:                    
        Government-sponsored enterprise securities  $43,422        43,422     
        Mortgage-backed securities   276,474        276,474     
        Corporate bonds   33,172        33,172     
          Total available for sale securities  $353,068        353,068     
                     
Nonrecurring                    
     Impaired loans  $13,820            13,820 
     Foreclosed real estate   6,140            6,140 

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s financial instruments that were measured at fair value on a recurring and nonrecurring basis at December 31, 2017.

 

($ in thousands)        
Description of Financial Instruments  Fair Value at
December 31,
2017
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Assets (Level 1)
   Significant Other
Observable Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
 
Recurring                
Securities available for sale:                    
Government-sponsored enterprise securities  $13,867        13,867     
Mortgage-backed securities   295,213        295,213     
Corporate bonds   34,190        34,190     
Total available for sale securities  $343,270        343,270     
                     
Nonrecurring                    
     Impaired loans  $14,086            14,086 
     Foreclosed real estate   12,571            12,571 

 

 

The following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for instruments measured at fair value.

 

Securities Available for Sale — When quoted market prices are available in an active market, the securities are classified as Level 1 in the valuation hierarchy. If quoted market prices are not available, but fair values can be estimated by observing quoted prices of securities with similar characteristics, the securities are classified as Level 2 on the valuation hierarchy. Most of the fair values for the Company’s Level 2 securities are determined by our third-party bond accounting provider using matrix pricing. Matrix pricing is a mathematical technique widely used in the industry to value debt securities without relying exclusively on quoted prices for the specific securities but rather by relying on the securities’ relationship to other benchmark quoted securities. For the Company, Level 2 securities include mortgage-backed securities, collateralized mortgage obligations, government-sponsored enterprise securities, and corporate bonds. In cases where Level 1 or Level 2 inputs are not available, securities are classified within Level 3 of the hierarchy.

 

The Company reviews the pricing methodologies utilized by the bond accounting provider to ensure the fair value determination is consistent with the applicable accounting guidance and that the investments are properly classified in the fair value hierarchy. Further, the Company validates the fair values for a sample of securities in the portfolio by comparing the fair values provided by the bond accounting provider to prices from other independent sources for the same or similar securities. The Company analyzes unusual or significant variances and conducts additional research with the portfolio manager, if necessary, and takes appropriate action based on its findings.

 

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Impaired loans — Fair values for impaired loans in the above table are measured on a non-recurring basis and are based on the underlying collateral values securing the loans, adjusted for estimated selling costs, or the net present value of the cash flows expected to be received for such loans. Collateral may be in the form of real estate or business assets including equipment, inventory and accounts receivable. The vast majority of the collateral is real estate. The value of real estate collateral is determined using an income or market valuation approach based on an appraisal conducted by an independent, licensed third party appraiser (Level 3). The value of business equipment is based upon an outside appraisal if deemed significant, or the net book value on the applicable borrower’s financial statements if not considered significant. Likewise, values for inventory and accounts receivable collateral are based on borrower financial statement balances or aging reports on a discounted basis as appropriate (Level 3). Any fair value adjustments are recorded in the period incurred as provision for loan losses on the Consolidated Statements of Income.

 

Foreclosed real estate – Foreclosed real estate, consisting of properties obtained through foreclosure or in satisfaction of loans, is reported at the lower of cost or fair value. Fair value is measured on a non-recurring basis and is based upon independent market prices or current appraisals that are generally prepared using an income or market valuation approach and conducted by an independent, licensed third party appraiser, adjusted for estimated selling costs (Level 3). At the time of foreclosure, any excess of the loan balance over the fair value of the real estate held as collateral is treated as a charge against the allowance for loan losses. For any real estate valuations subsequent to foreclosure, any excess of the real estate recorded value over the fair value of the real estate is treated as a foreclosed real estate write-down on the Consolidated Statements of Income.

 

For Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring or non-recurring basis as of September 30, 2018, the significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurements were as follows:

 

($ in thousands)       
Description  Fair Value at
September
30, 2018
   Valuation
Technique
  Significant Unobservable
Inputs
  General Range
of Significant
Unobservable
Input Values
Impaired loans  $13,820   Appraised value; PV of expected cash flows  Discounts to reflect current market conditions, ultimate collectability, and estimated costs to sell  0-10%
Foreclosed real estate   6,140   Appraised value; List or contract price  Discounts to reflect current market conditions, abbreviated holding period and estimated costs to sell  0-10%

 

For Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring or non-recurring basis as of December 31, 2017, the significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurements were as follows:

 

($ in thousands)       
Description  Fair Value at
December 31,
2017
   Valuation
Technique
  Significant Unobservable
Inputs
  General Range
of Significant
Unobservable
Input Values
Impaired loans  $14,086   Appraised value; PV of expected cash flows  Discounts to reflect current market conditions, ultimate collectability, and estimated costs to sell  0-10%
Foreclosed real estate   12,571   Appraised value; List or contract price  Discounts to reflect current market conditions and estimated costs to sell  0-10%

 

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Transfers of assets or liabilities between levels within the fair value hierarchy are recognized when an event or change in circumstances occurs. There were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 for assets or liabilities measured on a recurring basis during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 or 2017.

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, the increase (decrease) in the fair value of securities available for sale was ($10,229,000) and $3,288,000, respectively, which is included in other comprehensive income (net of tax benefit (expense) of $2,390,000 and ($1,213,000), respectively). Fair value measurement methods at September 30, 2018 and 2017 are consistent with those used in prior reporting periods.

 

The carrying amounts and estimated fair values of financial instruments at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 are as follows:

 

      September 30, 2018   December 31, 2017 

 

($ in thousands)

  Level in Fair
Value
Hierarchy
  Carrying
Amount
   Estimated
Fair Value
   Carrying
Amount
   Estimated
Fair Value
 
                    
Cash and due from banks, noninterest-bearing  Level 1  $50,209    50,209    114,301    114,301 
Due from banks, interest-bearing  Level 1   460,520    460,520    375,189    375,189 
Securities available for sale  Level 2   353,068    353,068    343,270    343,270 
Securities held to maturity  Level 2   104,819    103,360    118,503    118,998 
Presold mortgages in process of settlement  Level 1   6,111    6,111    12,459    12,459 
Total loans, net of allowance  Level 3   4,170,082    4,126,000    4,019,071    4,010,551 
Accrued interest receivable  Level 1   14,982    14,982    14,094    14,094 
Bank-owned life insurance  Level 1   101,055    101,055    99,162    99,162 
                        
Deposits  Level 2   4,528,373    4,522,134    4,406,955    4,401,757 
Borrowings  Level 2   406,593    398,109    407,543    397,903 
Accrued interest payable  Level 2   1,916    1,916    1,235    1,235 

 

Fair value methods and assumptions are set forth below for the Company’s financial instruments.

 

Cash and Amounts Due from Banks, Presold Mortgages in Process of Settlement, Accrued Interest Receivable, and Accrued Interest Payable - The carrying amounts approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of these financial instruments.

 

Available for Sale and Held to Maturity Securities - Fair values are provided by a third-party and are based on quoted market prices, where available. If quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on quoted market prices of comparable instruments or matrix pricing.

 

Loans - For nonimpaired loans, fair values are determined assuming the sale of the notes to a third-party financial investor. Fair values are estimated for portfolios of loans with similar financial characteristics. Loans are segregated by type such as commercial, financial and agricultural, real estate construction, real estate mortgages and installment loans to individuals. Each loan category is further segmented into fixed and variable interest rate terms. The fair value for each category is determined by discounting scheduled future cash flows using current interest rates with a liquidity discount offered on loans with similar risk characteristics, and includes the Company’s estimate of future credit losses expected to be incurred over the life of the loan. Fair values for impaired loans are primarily based on estimated proceeds expected upon liquidation of the collateral or the present value of expected cash flows.

 

Bank-Owned Life Insurance – The carrying value of life insurance approximates fair value because this investment is carried at cash surrender value, as determined by the issuer.

 

Deposits - The fair value of deposits with no stated maturity, such as noninterest-bearing checking accounts, savings accounts, interest-bearing checking accounts, and money market accounts, is equal to the amount payable on demand as of the valuation date. The fair value of certificates of deposit is based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows. The discount rate is estimated using the rates currently offered in the marketplace for deposits of similar remaining maturities.

 

Borrowings - The fair value of borrowings is based on the discounted value of the contractual cash flows. The discount rate is estimated using the rates currently offered by the Company’s lenders for debt of similar maturities.

 

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Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. These estimates do not reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the Company’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. Because no highly liquid market exists for a significant portion of the Company’s financial instruments, fair value estimates are based on judgments regarding future expected loss experience, current economic conditions, risk characteristics of various financial instruments, and other factors. These estimates are subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could significantly affect the estimates.

 

Fair value estimates are based on existing on- and off-balance sheet financial instruments without attempting to estimate the value of anticipated future business and the value of assets and liabilities that are not considered financial instruments. Significant assets and liabilities that are not considered financial assets or liabilities include net premises and equipment, intangible and other assets such as deferred income taxes, prepaid expense accounts, income taxes currently payable and other various accrued expenses. In addition, the income tax ramifications related to the realization of the unrealized gains and losses can have a significant effect on fair value estimates and have not been considered in any of the estimates.

 

Note 14 – Revenue from Contracts with Customers

 

All of the Company’s revenues that are within the scope of the “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” accounting standard (“ASC 606”) are recognized within noninterest income. The following table