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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

CCS 2017 Form 10-K

 

Table of Contents

 





UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

__________________



FORM 10‑K

_______________________________



   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended DECember 31, 2017

OR

   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ____________to____________



Commission File No. 001-36491

__________________________



Century Communities, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

_______________  _____________________________



 

 



 

 

Delaware

 

68-0521411

(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

8390 East Crescent Parkway, Suite 650
Greenwood Village, Colorado

 

80111

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)



(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code):    (303) 770-8300



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:





 

 

Title of each Class

 

Name of each Exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

 

New York Stock Exchange



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

__________________________



Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes  No 



Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes  No 



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes  No 



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes  No 



Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   


 

 

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Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):





 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer 

Non-accelerated filer

 (Do not check if smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company



 

 

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act.) Yes  No 



The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2017 was approximately $457.7 million based on the closing price of $24.80 per share as reported on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2017. 



As of February 27, 2018, the registrant had 29,616,597 shares issued and outstanding.



DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:

Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K incorporates by reference certain portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for its 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be filed with the Commission not later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report.



 



 


 

 

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CENTURY COMMUNITIES, INC.

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

For the Fiscal Year Ended December  31,  2017



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Page No.

PART I 

Cautionary Note About Forward-Looking Statements

 

 

1

Item 1. Business

 

 

2

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

 

5

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

 

28

Item 2. Properties

 

 

28

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

 

29

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

 

29



 

 

 

PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

29

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

 

32

Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 

 

 

32

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 

 

 

54

Item 8. Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

55

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

 

55

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

 

 

55

Item 9B. Other Information 

 

 

58



 

 

 

PART III

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

 

58

Item 11. Executive Compensation 

 

 

58

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Matters

 

 

58

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

 

58

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 

 

 

58



 

 

 

PART IV

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

 

59













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CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Some of the statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K (which we refer to as this “Form 10-K”) constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws.  Forward-looking statements relate to expectations, beliefs, projections, forecasts, future plans and strategies, anticipated events or trends and similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts.  These statements are only predictions.  We caution that forward-looking statements are not guarantees.  Actual events and results of operations could differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements.  Forward-looking statements are typically identified by the use of terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “could,” “intend,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “continue,” “predict,” “potential” or the negative of such terms and other comparable terminology.  You can also identify forward-looking statements by discussions of strategy, plans or intentions.  Actual results and the timing of events may differ materially from those contained in these forward-looking statements due a number of factors.

The forward-looking statements included in this Form 10-K reflect our current views about future events and are subject to numerous known and unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions and changes in circumstances that may cause our actual results to differ significantly from those expressed in any forward-looking statement.  Statements regarding the following subjects, among others, may be forward-looking:

·

economic changes either nationally or in the markets in which we operate, including declines in employment, volatility of mortgage interest rates and inflation;

·

economic changes either nationally or in the markets in which we operate, including declines in employment, volatility of mortgage interest rates and inflation;

·

a downturn in the homebuilding industry, including a decline in real estate values or market conditions resulting in impairment of our assets;

·

changes in assumptions used to make industry forecasts;

·

continued volatility and uncertainty in the credit markets and broader financial markets;

·

our future operating results and financial condition;

·

our business operations;

·

changes in our business and investment strategy;

·

availability of land to acquire, and our ability to acquire such land on favorable terms or at all;

·

availability, terms and deployment of capital;

·

availability of mortgage financing or an increase in the number of foreclosures in the market;

·

shortages of or increased prices for labor, land or raw materials used in housing construction;

·

delays in land development or home construction resulting from adverse weather conditions or other events outside our control;

·

impact of construction defect, product liability, and/or home warranty claims, including the adequacy of accruals and the applicability and sufficiency of our insurance coverage;

·

changes in, or the failure or inability to comply with, governmental laws and regulations;

·

the timing of receipt of regulatory approvals and the opening of projects;

·

the degree and nature of our competition;

·

our leverage and debt service obligations;

·

availability of qualified personnel and our ability to retain our key personnel; and

·

changes in United States generally accepted accounting principles (which we refer to as “GAAP”).

The forward-looking statements are based on our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of future events, taking into account all information currently available to us.  Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future events or of our performance.  These beliefs, assumptions and expectations can change as a result of many possible events or factors, not all of which are known to us.  Some of these events and factors are described in “Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and in “Part I, Item 1A.  Risk Factors” in this Form 10-K, and other risks and uncertainties detailed in this and our other reports and filings with the SEC.  If a change occurs, our business, financial condition, liquidity, cash flows and results of operations may vary materially from those expressed in or implied by our forward-looking statements.  New risks and uncertainties arise over time, and it is not possible for us to predict the occurrence of those matters or the manner in which they may affect us.  Except as required by law, we are not obligated to, and do not intend to, update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.  Therefore, you should not rely on these forward-looking statements as of any date subsequent to the date of this Form 10-K.

As used in this Form 10-K, references to “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our” refer to Century Communities, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and, unless the context otherwise requires, its subsidiaries and affiliates. 



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PART I



ITEM 1.BUSINESS.

General

Century Communities, Inc., a Delaware corporation (which we refer to as “we,” “CCS,” or the “Company”), is engaged in the development, design, construction, marketing and sale of single-family attached and detached homes in metropolitan areas in the States of California, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington.  In many of our projects, in addition to building homes, we are responsible for the entitlement and development of the underlying land.  Our homebuilding operations are organized into the following four reportable segments based on the geographic regions in which we operate: West, Mountain, Texas and Southeast.   Additionally, our indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries, Inspire Home Loans Inc. and Parkway Title, LLC, which provide mortgage services and title services, respectively, to our home buyers, have been identified as our Financial Services segment.

Since the private placement of 12.1 million shares of our common stock, par value $0.01 per share, in May of 2013, we have grown rapidly through the acquisitions of other homebuilders and organic entrance into new markets, as outlined below:

Picture 8



 

 

 

 

Raised $224  million through 144A equity offering.

Acquired Jimmy Jacobs Homes in Austin and San Antonio Texas for $16 million

Acquired LVLH in Las Vegas for $165 million.

Raised $200 million through offering of senior unsecured notes.

Successfully completed IPO

Acquired Grand View Builders in Houston for $13 million.

Acquired Peachtree Communities in Atlanta for $57 million.

Raised $60 million through offering of senior unsecured notes.

Expanded unsecured line of credit to $300 million with $100 million accordion feature.

 

Entered the Salt Lake City market.

Acquired 50% of Wade Jurney Homes for $15 million.

Formed financial services companies to provide title and mortgage services.

Entered the Charlotte, NC market.

Expanded unsecured line of credit to $400 million.

Raised $525 million through offering of senior unsecured notes.

Entered West Coast and strengthened Southeast presence through the acquisition of UCP, Inc.  for $362 million, including acquired debt

Expanded Seattle through the acquisition of Sundquist Homes for $50 million.

Our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, and Current Reports on Form 8-K are available on our website at www.centurycommunities.com as soon as reasonably practicable after such materials are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (which we refer to as the “SEC”).

Description of Business



Land acquisition process



We acquire land for our homebuilding operations with the primary intent to develop and construct single family detached or attached homes for sale on the acquired land.  From time to time, we may sell land to other developers and homebuilders where we have excess land positions. We generally acquire land for cash, either through bulk acquisitions of land or through option contracts.  Option contracts are generally structured where we have the right, but not the obligation, to buy land at predetermined prices on a defined schedule.  Potential land acquisitions are identified by our local management within the markets in which we operate.  Our land acquisition process includes soil tests, independent environmental studies, other engineering work and financial analysis which include an evaluation of expected returns, projected gross margins, estimated sales paces and pricing.  All potential land acquisitions are approved by our Corporate office to ensure appropriate capital allocations taking into consideration current and projected inventory levels and risk adjusted returns. 



Homebuilding marketing and sales process



We build and sell an extensive range of home types across a variety of price points. Our emphasis is on acquiring well-located land positions and offering quality homes. The core of our business plan is to acquire and develop land strategically, based on our understanding of population growth patterns, entitlement restrictions and infrastructure development. We focus on locations within our

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markets with convenient access to metropolitan areas that are generally characterized by diverse economic and employment bases and demographics and increasing populations. We believe these conditions create strong demand for new housing, and these locations represent what we believe to be attractive opportunities for long-term growth. We also seek assets that have desirable characteristics, such as good access to major job centers, schools, shopping, recreation and transportation facilities, and we strive to offer a broad spectrum of product types in these locations. Location, product and customer service are key components of the connection we seek to establish with each individual homebuyer. Our construction expertise across an extensive product offering allows us flexibility to pursue a wide array of land acquisition opportunities and appeal to a broad range of potential homebuyers, from entry-level to first- and second-time move-up buyers and lifestyle homebuyers. Additionally, we believe our diversified product strategy enables us to adapt quickly to changing market conditions and to optimize returns while strategically reducing portfolio risk.



Our philosophy is to provide a positive experience to our homeowners by actively engaging them in the building process and by enhancing communication, knowledge and satisfaction. In many of our communities, we provide our customers with customization options to suit their lifestyle needs and have developed a number of home designs with features such as outdoor living spaces, one-story living and first floor master bedroom suites to appeal to universal design needs. We also engineer our homes for energy efficiency, which is aimed at reducing the impact on the environment and lowering energy costs to our homebuyers. As part of these efforts, we offer homebuyers environmentally friendly alternatives, such as solar power to supplement a home’s energy needs.

We engage architects, engineers and other professionals in connection with the home design process who are familiar with local market preferences, constraints, conditions and requirements. We serve as the general contractor, with all construction work typically performed by subcontractors. While we maintain long-standing relationships with many of our subcontractors and design professionals, we typically do not enter into long-term contractual commitments with them.



We sell our homes through our own sales representatives and through independent real estate brokers. Our in-house sales force typically works from sales offices located in model homes close to or in each community. Sales representatives assist potential buyers by providing them with basic floor plans, price information, development and construction timetables, tours of model homes and the selection of options. Sales personnel are trained by us and generally have had prior experience selling new homes in the local market. Our personnel, along with subcontracted marketing and design consultants, carefully design the exterior and interior of each home to coincide with the lifestyles of targeted homebuyers.

We advertise directly to potential homebuyers through the internet and in newspapers and trade publications, as well as through marketing brochures and newsletters. We may also use billboards, radio and television advertising, and our website, to market the location, price range and availability of our homes. We also attempt to operate in conspicuously located communities that permit us to take advantage of local traffic patterns. Model homes play a significant role in our marketing efforts by not only creating an attractive atmosphere, but also by displaying options and upgrades.

Customer relations, quality control and warranty programs

We pay particular attention to the product design process and carefully consider quality and choice of materials in order to attempt to eliminate building deficiencies. The quality and workmanship of the subcontractors we employ are monitored and we make regular inspections and evaluations of our subcontractors.

We maintain quality control and customer service staff whose role includes providing a positive experience for each customer throughout the pre-sale, sale, building, closing and post-closing periods. These employees are also responsible for providing after sales customer service. Our quality and service initiatives include taking customers on a comprehensive tour of their home prior to closing and using customer survey results to improve our standards of quality and customer satisfaction.

Generally, we provide each homeowner with product warranties covering workmanship and materials for one year from the time of closing, and warranties covering structural systems for eight to 10 years from the time of closing in connection with our general liability insurance policy. The subcontractors who perform most of the actual construction also provide to us customary warranties on workmanship.

Customer Financing

During the fourth quarter of 2016, our wholly owned subsidiary, Parkway Financial Group, LLC, formed Inspire Home Loans Inc. (which we refer to as “Inspire”).  Inspire offers mortgage services to our homebuyers.  In addition to Inspire, Parkway Title, LLC (which we refer to as “Parkway Title”) provides title services to select markets in which we operate.  Inspire and Parkway Title comprise our

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Financial Services segment.  We seek to assist our homebuyers in obtaining financing by arranging with mortgage lenders to offer qualified buyers a variety of financing options.

Materials

When constructing homes, we use various materials and components. It has typically taken us five to eight months or more to construct a home, during which time materials are subject to price fluctuations. Such price fluctuations are caused by several factors, among them seasonal variation in availability and increased demand for materials as a result of the improved housing market.

Seasonality

We experience seasonal variations in our quarterly operating results and capital requirements. Historically, new order activity is highest during the spring and summer months. As a result, we typically have more homes under construction, close more homes, and have greater revenues and operating income in the second half of our fiscal year.  Historical results are not necessarily indicative of current or future homebuilding activities.

Governmental regulation and environmental matters

We are subject to numerous local, state, federal and other statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations concerning zoning, development, building design, construction and similar matters which impose restrictive zoning and density requirements in order to limit the number of homes that can eventually be built within the boundaries of a particular area. Projects that are not entitled may be subjected to periodic delays, changes in use, less intensive development or elimination of development in certain specific areas due to government regulations. We may also be subject to periodic delays or may be precluded entirely from developing in certain communities due to building moratoriums or “slow-growth” or “no-growth” initiatives that could be implemented in the future. Local and state governments also have broad discretion regarding the imposition of development fees for projects in their jurisdiction. Projects for which we have received land use and development entitlements or approvals may still require a variety of other governmental approvals and permits during the development process and can also be impacted adversely by unforeseen health, safety and welfare issues, which can further delay these projects or prevent their development.



We are also subject to a variety of local, state, federal and other statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations concerning the environment. The particular environmental laws which apply to any given homebuilding site vary according to the site’s location, its environmental conditions, and the present and former uses of the site, as well as adjoining properties. Environmental laws and conditions may result in delays, may cause us to incur substantial compliance and other costs, and can prohibit or severely restrict homebuilding activity in environmentally sensitive regions or areas. From time to time, the Environmental Protection Agency and similar federal or state agencies review homebuilders’ compliance with environmental laws and may levy fines and penalties for failure to strictly comply with applicable environmental laws or impose additional requirements for future compliance as a result of past failures. Any such actions taken with respect to us may increase our costs. Further, we expect that increasingly stringent requirements will be imposed on homebuilders in the future. Environmental regulations can also have an adverse impact on the availability and price of certain raw materials such as lumber.

Under various environmental laws, current or former owners of real estate, as well as certain other categories of parties, may be required to investigate and clean up hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum product releases, and may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage and for investigation and cleanup costs incurred by such parties in connection with the contamination. In addition, in those cases where an endangered species is involved, environmental rules and regulations can result in the elimination of development in identified environmentally sensitive areas. To date, we have never had a significant environmental issue.

Segment and geographic area disclosures

We have broken our homebuilding operations into the following reportable segments based on the geographic markets in which we operate:

·

West (Southern California, Central Valley, Bay Area and Washington)

·

Mountain (Colorado, Nevada and Utah)

·

Texas (Houston, San Antonio and Austin)

·

Southeast (Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee)



We have also identified our Financial Services operations, which provide mortgage and title services to our homebuyers, as a fifth reportable segment.  Our Corporate operations are a nonoperating segment, as it serves to support our homebuilding operations through

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functions, such as our executive, finance, treasury, human resources, and accounting departments.  We have adjusted prior period segment information to conform to the current period presentation. 

Footnote 2 (Reporting Segments) of our Consolidated Financial Statements contains information regarding the operations of our reportable segments.  

The below table presents the approximate number of employees for each reportable segment as of December 31, 2017 and 2016.





 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Year Ended December 31,



 

2017

 

2016

West

 

 

160 

 

 

 -

Mountain

 

 

262 

 

 

265 

Texas

 

 

106 

 

 

95 

Southeast

 

 

308 

 

 

165 

Financial Services

 

 

70 

 

 

 -

Corporate

 

 

105 

 

 

40 

Total

 

 

1,011 

 

 

565 

Competition



We face competition in the homebuilding industry, which is characterized by relatively low barriers to entry. Homebuilders compete for, among other things, home buying customers, desirable land parcels, financing, raw materials and skilled labor. Increased competition may prevent us from acquiring attractive land parcels on which to build homes or make such acquisitions more expensive, hinder our market share expansion or lead to pricing pressures on our homes that may adversely impact our margins and revenues. Our competitors may independently develop land and construct housing units that are superior or substantially similar to our products, or may be significantly larger, have a longer operating history and have greater resources or lower cost of capital than us; accordingly, they may be able to compete more effectively in one or more of the markets in which we operate or plan to operate. We also compete with other homebuilders that have long-standing relationships with subcontractors and suppliers in the markets in which we operate or plan to operate and we compete for sales with individual resales of existing homes and with available rental housing.



ITEM 1A.RISK FACTORS.

Our business routinely encounters and attempts to address risks, some of which will cause our future results to differ, sometimes materially, from those originally anticipated.  Below, we have described our present view of the most significant risks facing the Company.  The risk factors set forth below are not the only risks that we may face or that could adversely affect us.  If any of the circumstances described in the risk factors discussed in this Form 10-K actually occur, our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.  If this were to occur, the trading price of our securities could decline significantly and stockholders may lose all or part of their investment.

The following discussion of risk factors contains “forward-looking statements,” which may be important to understanding any statement in this Form 10-K or in our other filings and public disclosures.  In particular, the following information should be read in conjunction with the sections in this Form 10-K entitled, “Cautionary Note about Forward-Looking Statements,” “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

Risks Related to Our Business

Adverse changes in general economic conditions could reduce the demand for homes and, as a result, could have a material adverse effect on us.

The residential homebuilding industry is cyclical and is highly sensitive to changes in local and general economic conditions that are outside our control, including:

·

consumer confidence, levels of employment, personal income growth and household debt-to-income levels of potential homebuyers;

·

the availability of financing for homebuyers, including private and federal mortgage financing programs and federal, state, and provincial regulation of lending practices;

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·

real estate taxes and federal and state income tax provisions, including provisions for the deduction of mortgage interest payments;

·

U.S. and global financial system and credit markets, including short- and long-term interest rates and inflation;

·

housing demand from population growth and demographic changes (including immigration levels and trends in urban and suburban migration);

·

competition from other real estate investors with significant capital, including other real estate operating companies and developers and institutional investment funds; and

·

the supply of new or existing homes and other housing alternatives, such as apartments and other residential rental property.

The U.S. housing market can also be negatively impacted by declining consumer confidence, restrictive mortgage standards, and relatively large supplies of foreclosures, resales and new homes, among other factors.  In the event these economic and business factors occur, we could experience declines in the market value of our inventory and demand for our homes, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

The health of the residential homebuilding industry may also be significantly affected by “shadow inventory” levels.  “Shadow inventory” refers to the number of homes with a mortgage that are in some form of distress but that have not yet been listed for sale.  Shadow inventory can occur when lenders put properties that have been foreclosed or forfeited to lenders on the market gradually, rather than all at once, or delay the foreclosure process.  They may choose to do so because of regulations and foreclosure moratoriums, because of the additional costs and resources required to process and sell foreclosed properties, or because they want to avoid depressing housing prices further by putting many distressed properties up for sale at the same time.  A significant shadow inventory in our markets could, were it to be released into our markets, adversely impact home prices and demand for our homes, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, an important segment of our customer base consists of first- and second-time move-up buyers, who often purchase homes subject to contingencies related to the sale of their existing homes.  The difficulties that these buyers face in selling their homes during periods of weak economic conditions may adversely affect our sales.  Moreover, during such periods, we may need to reduce our sales prices and offer greater incentives to buyers to compete for sales that may result in reduced margins.

Our long-term growth depends upon our ability to successfully identify and acquire desirable land parcels for residential build-out.

Our future growth depends upon our ability to successfully identify and acquire attractive land parcels for development of our homes at reasonable prices and with terms that meet our underwriting criteria.  Our ability to acquire land parcels for new homes may be adversely affected by changes in the general availability of land parcels, the willingness of land sellers to sell land parcels at reasonable prices, competition for available land parcels, availability of financing to acquire land parcels, zoning and other market conditions.  If the supply of land parcels appropriate for development of homes is limited because of these factors, or for any other reason, our ability to grow could be significantly limited, and the number of homes that we build and sell could decline.  Additionally, our ability to begin new projects could be impacted if we elect not to purchase land parcels under option contracts.  To the extent that we are unable to purchase land parcels timely or enter into new contracts for the purchase of land parcels at reasonable prices, our home sales revenue and results of operations could be negatively impacted.

Our geographic concentration could materially and adversely affect us if the homebuilding industry in our current markets should decline.

Our business strategy is focused on the design, construction and sale of single-family detached and attached homes in metropolitan areas in the States of California, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington. Because our operations are concentrated in these areas, a prolonged economic downturn in one or more of these areas could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations, and a disproportionately greater impact on us than other homebuilders with more diversified operations.

Any increase in unemployment or underemployment may lead to an increase in the number of loan delinquencies and property repossessions and have an adverse impact on us.

In the United States, the unemployment rate was 4.1% as of the end of December 2017, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.  People who are not employed, are underemployed or are concerned about the loss of their jobs are less likely to purchase new homes,

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may be forced to try to sell the homes they own and may face difficulties in making required mortgage payments.  Therefore, any increase in unemployment or underemployment may lead to an increase in the number of loan delinquencies and property repossessions and have an adverse impact on us both by reducing the demand for the homes we build and by increasing the supply of homes for sale.

If homebuyers are not able to obtain suitable financing, our results of operations may decline.

A substantial majority of our homebuyers finance their home purchases through lenders that provide mortgage financing.  First-time homebuyers are generally more affected by the availability of financing than other potential homebuyers.  These buyers are an important source of our demand.  A limited availability of home mortgage financing may adversely affect the volume of our home sales and the sales prices we achieve in the United States.

During the recent past, the mortgage lending industry in the United States has experienced significant instability, beginning with increased defaults on subprime loans and other nonconforming loans and compounded by expectations of increasing interest payment requirements and further defaults.  This in turn resulted in a decline in the market value of many mortgage loans and related securities.  In response, lenders, regulators and others questioned the adequacy of lending standards and other credit requirements for several loan products and programs offered in recent years.  Credit requirements have tightened, and investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities has declined.  The deterioration in credit quality during the downturn had caused almost all lenders to stop offering subprime mortgages and most other loan products that were not eligible for sale to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, or loans that did not conform to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, FHA or Veterans Administration (which we refer to as the “VA”) requirements.  Fewer loan products and tighter loan qualifications may continue to make it more difficult for certain buyers to finance the purchase of our homes.  These factors may reduce the pool of qualified homebuyers and make it more difficult to sell to first-time and move-up buyers who have historically made up a substantial part of our customers.  Reductions in demand adversely affected our business and financial results during the downturn.  The liquidity provided by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to the mortgage industry has been very important to the housing market.  These entities have required substantial injections of capital from the federal government and may require additional government support in the future.  Several federal government officials have proposed changing the nature of the relationship between Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the federal government and even nationalizing or eliminating these entities entirely.  If Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were dissolved or if the federal government determined to stop providing liquidity support to the mortgage market, there would be a reduction in the availability of the financing provided by these institutions.  Any such reduction would likely have an adverse effect on interest rates, mortgage availability and our sales of new homes.  The FHA insures mortgage loans that generally have lower loan payment requirements and qualification standards compared to conventional guidelines, and as a result, continue to be a particularly important source for financing the sale of our homes.  In recent years, lenders have taken a more conservative view of FHA guidelines causing significant tightening of borrower eligibility for approval.  Availability of condominium financing and minimum credit score benchmarks has reduced opportunity for those purchasers.  In the future, there may be further restrictions on FHA-insured loans, including limitations on seller-paid closing costs and concessions.  This or any other restriction may negatively affect the availability or affordability of FHA financing, which could adversely affect our potential homebuyers’ ability to secure adequate financing and, accordingly, our ability to sell homes in the United States.  In addition, changes in federal and provincial regulatory and fiscal policies aimed at aiding the home buying market (including a repeal of the home mortgage interest tax deduction) may also negatively affect potential homebuyers’ ability to purchase homes.

Decreases in the availability of credit and increases in the cost of credit adversely affect the ability of homebuyers to obtain or service mortgage debt.  Even if potential homebuyers do not themselves need mortgage financing, where potential homebuyers must sell their existing homes in order to buy a new home, increases in mortgage costs, lack of availability of mortgages and/or regulatory changes could prevent the buyers of potential homebuyers’ existing homes from obtaining a mortgage, which would result in our potential customers’ inability to buy a new home.  Similar risks apply to those buyers who are awaiting delivery of their homes and are currently in backlog.  The success of homebuilders depends on the ability of potential homebuyers to obtain mortgages for the purchase of homes.  If our customers (or potential buyers of our customers’ existing homes) cannot obtain suitable financing, our sales and results of operations could be adversely affected, and the price of our common stock may decline.

Interest rate increases or changes in federal lending programs or other regulations could lower demand for our homes, which could materially and adversely affect us.

Most of the purchasers of our homes finance their acquisitions with mortgage financing.  Rising interest rates, decreased availability of mortgage financing or of certain mortgage programs, higher down payment requirements or increased monthly mortgage costs may lead to reduced demand for our homes and mortgage loans.  Increased interest rates can also hinder our ability to realize our backlog because our home purchase contracts provide customers with a financing contingency.  Financing contingencies allow customers to cancel their home purchase contracts in the event that they cannot arrange for adequate financing.  As a result, rising interest rates can decrease our

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home sales and mortgage originations.  Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, the federal government plays a significant role in supporting mortgage lending through its conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, both of which purchase home mortgages and mortgage-backed securities originated by mortgage lenders, and its insurance of mortgages originated by lenders through the FHA and the VA.  The availability and affordability of mortgage loans, including consumer interest rates for such loans, could be adversely affected by a curtailment or cessation of the federal government’s mortgage-related programs or policies.  The FHA may continue to impose stricter loan qualification standards, raise minimum down payment requirements, impose higher mortgage insurance premiums and other costs, and/or limit the number of mortgages it insures.  Due to growing federal budget deficits, the U.S. Treasury may not be able to continue supporting the mortgage-related activities of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the FHA and the VA at present levels, or it may revise significantly the federal government’s participation in and support of the residential mortgage market.  Because the availability of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, FHA- and VA-backed mortgage financing is an important factor in marketing and selling many of our homes, any limitations, restrictions or changes in the availability of such government-backed financing could reduce our home sales, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

Any limitation on, or reduction or elimination of, tax benefits associated with owning a home would have an adverse effect on the demand for our home products, which could be material to our business.

Significant expenses of owning a home, including mortgage interest and real estate taxes, generally are deductible expenses for an individual’s U.S. federal, and in some cases, state income taxes, subject to various limitations under current tax law and policy.  If the U.S. federal government or a state government changes its income tax laws, as has been discussed from time to time, to eliminate, limit or substantially modify these income tax deductions, the after-tax cost of owning a new home would increase for many of our potential customers. 

On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (which we refer to as the “TCJA”) was signed into law.  The TCJA imposes certain caps and limitations for certain homeowners, such as lowering the mortgage interest deduction cap on a newly purchased home to $750,000 a year from the current $1,000,000 threshold. The resulting loss or reduction of homeowner tax deductions may adversely impact demand for and sales prices of new homes.

Increases in taxes could prevent potential customers from buying our homes and adversely affect our business or financial results.

Increases in property tax rates by local governmental authorities, as experienced in response to reduced federal and state funding, can adversely affect the ability of potential customers to obtain financing or their desire to purchase new homes.  Fees imposed on developers to fund schools, open spaces or road improvements, and/or to provide low and moderate income housing, could increase our costs and have an adverse effect on our operations.  In addition, increases in sales taxes could adversely affect our potential customers who may consider those costs in determining whether to make a new home purchase and decide, as a result, not to purchase one of our homes.

The recently passed comprehensive tax reform bill could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

On December 22, 2017, TCJA was signed into law.  The TCJA significantly reforms the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.  The TCJA, among other things, contains significant changes to corporate taxation, including reduction of the corporate tax rate from a top marginal rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21%, limitation of the tax deduction for interest expense to 30% of adjusted earnings (except for certain small businesses), limitation of the deduction for net operating losses to 80% of current year taxable income, elimination of net operating loss carrybacks, one time taxation of offshore earnings at reduced rates regardless of whether they are repatriated, immediate deductions for certain new investments instead of deductions for depreciation expense over time, and modifying or repealing many business deductions and credits. We continue to examine the impact this tax reform legislation may have on our business.  Notwithstanding the reduction in the corporate income tax rate, the overall impact of the TCJA is uncertain and our business and financial condition could be adversely affected.  Furthermore, as a result of the reduction in the corporate tax rates, we expect to have a significant reduction in the value of our deferred tax assets, but we have not yet fully determined the amount of such reduction. The impact of this tax reform on holders of our common stock is also uncertain and could be adverse. 

Changes to the population growth rates in certain of the markets in which we operate or plan to operate could affect the demand for homes in these regions.

Slower rates of population growth or population declines in the States of California, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington, or other key markets in the United States we plan to enter, especially as compared

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to the high population growth rates in prior years, could affect the demand for housing, causing home prices in these markets to fall, and adversely affect our plans for growth, business, financial condition and operating results.

Difficulty in obtaining sufficient capital could result in an inability to acquire land for our developments or increased costs and delays in the completion of development projects.

The homebuilding industry is capital-intensive and requires significant up-front expenditures to acquire land parcels and begin development.  If internally generated funds are not sufficient, we may seek additional capital in the form of equity or debt financing from a variety of potential sources, including additional bank financings and/or securities offerings.  The availability of borrowed funds, especially for land acquisition and construction financing, may be greatly reduced nationally, and the lending community may require increased amounts of equity to be invested in a project by borrowers in connection with both new loans and the extension of existing loans.  The credit and capital markets have recently experienced significant volatility.  If we are required to seek additional financing to fund our operations, continued volatility in these markets may restrict our flexibility to access such financing.  If we are not successful in obtaining sufficient capital to fund our planned capital and other expenditures, we may be unable to acquire land for our housing developments and/or to develop the housing.  Additionally, if we cannot obtain additional financing to fund the purchase of land under our option contracts or purchase contracts, we may incur contractual penalties and fees.  Any difficulty in obtaining sufficient capital for planned development expenditures could also cause project delays and any such delay could result in cost increases.  Any one or more of the foregoing events could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

We face potentially substantial risk with respect to our land and lot inventory arising from significant changes in economic or market conditions.

We intend to acquire land parcels for replacement and expansion of land inventory within our current and any new markets.  The risks inherent in purchasing and developing land parcels increase as consumer demand for housing decreases.  As a result, we may buy and develop land parcels on which homes cannot be profitably built and sold.  The market value of land parcels, building lots and housing inventories can fluctuate significantly as a result of changing market conditions, and the measures we employ to manage inventory risk may not be adequate to insulate our operations from a severe drop in inventory values.  When market conditions are such that land values are not appreciating, previously entered into option agreements may become less desirable, at which time we may elect to forego deposits and pre-acquisition costs and terminate the agreements.  In addition, inventory carrying costs can be significant and can result in losses in a poorly performing project or market.  In the event of significant changes in economic or market conditions, we may have to sell homes at significantly lower margins or at a loss, if we are able to sell them at all. 

If we are unable to develop our communities successfully or within expected timeframes, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

Before a community generates any revenues, time and material expenditures are required to acquire land, obtain development approvals and construct significant portions of project infrastructure, amenities, model homes and sales facilities.  A decline in our ability to develop and market our communities successfully and to generate positive cash flow from these operations in a timely manner could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations and on our ability to service our debt and to meet our working capital requirements.

Adverse weather and geological conditions may increase costs, cause project delays and reduce consumer demand for housing, all of which could materially and adversely affect us.

As a homebuilder, we are subject to numerous risks, many of which are beyond our management’s control, such as droughts, floods, wildfires, landslides, soil subsidence, earthquakes and other weather-related and geological events which could damage projects, cause delays in completion of projects, or reduce consumer demand for housing, and shortages in labor or materials, which could delay project completion and cause increases in the prices for labor or materials, thereby affecting our sales and profitability. Many of our core markets are in Colorado, an area which has historically experienced seasonal wildfires and soil subsidence.  Texas, a market into which we continue to expand, has historically experienced tornadoes, coastal flooding and hurricanes.  California and Nevada, markets into which we recently expanded, have historically experienced extreme temperatures, droughts and water shortages.  In addition to directly damaging our projects, earthquakes, wildfires, mudslides or other geological events could damage roads and highways providing access to those projects, thereby adversely affecting our ability to market homes in those areas and possibly increasing the costs of completion. 

There are some risks of loss for which we may be unable to purchase insurance coverage.  For example, losses associated with landslides, earthquakes and other geological events may not be insurable and other losses, such as those arising from terrorism, may not be

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economically insurable.  A sizeable uninsured loss could materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

Changes in global or regional climate conditions and governmental actions in response to such changes may adversely affect us by increasing the costs of, or restricting, our planned or future growth activities.

Projected climate change, if it occurs, may exacerbate the scarcity or presence of water and other natural resources in affected regions, which could limit, prevent or increase the costs of residential development in certain areas.  In addition, there is a variety of new legislation being enacted, or considered for enactment, at the federal, state and local level relating to energy and climate change, and as climate change concerns continue to grow, legislation and regulations of this nature are expected to continue.  This legislation relates to items such as carbon dioxide emissions control and building codes that impose energy efficiency standards.  Government mandates, standards or regulations intended to mitigate or reduce greenhouse gas emissions or projected climate change impacts could result in prohibitions or severe restrictions on land development in certain areas, increased energy and transportation costs, and increased compliance expenses and other financial obligations to meet permitting, land development, or home construction-related requirements that we may be unable to fully recover (due to market conditions or other factors), any of which could cause a reduction in our homebuilding gross margins and materially and adversely affect our consolidated financial statements. Energy-related initiatives could similarly affect a wide variety of companies throughout the United States and the world, and because our results of operations are heavily dependent on significant amounts of raw materials, these initiatives could have an indirect adverse impact on our results of operations and profitability to the extent the manufacturers and suppliers of our materials are burdened with expensive cap and trade or other climate related regulations.

As a result, climate change impacts, and laws and land development and home construction standards, and/or the manner in which they are interpreted or implemented, to address potential climate change concerns could increase our costs and have a long-term adverse impact on our business and consolidated financial statements.  This is a particular concern in the western United States, which have instituted some of the most extensive and stringent environmental laws and residential building construction standards in the country.

Failure to recruit, retain and develop highly skilled, competent personnel may have a material adverse effect on our standards of service.

Key employees, including management team members, are fundamental to our ability to obtain, generate and manage opportunities.  Key employees working in the homebuilding and construction industries are highly sought after.  Failure to attract and retain such personnel or to ensure that their experience and knowledge is not lost when they leave the business through retirement, redundancy or otherwise may adversely affect the standards of our service and may have an adverse impact on our business, financial conditions and operating results.  In addition, we do not maintain key person insurance in respect of any member of our senior management team.  The loss of any of our management members or key personnel could adversely impact our business, financial condition and operating results. 

Failure to find suitable contractors may have a material adverse effect on our standards of service.

Substantially all of our construction work is done by third-party subcontractors with us acting as the general contractor.  Accordingly, the timing and quality of our construction depend on the availability and skill of our subcontractors.  The recent increase in levels of homebuilding in the markets in which we operate has occasionally led to some difficulty in securing the services of skilled tradesmen who are currently in high demand.  While we anticipate being able to obtain sufficient materials and reliable subcontractors and believe that our relationships with subcontractors are good, we do not have long-term contractual commitments with any subcontractors, and there can be no assurance that skilled subcontractors will continue to be available at reasonable rates and in the areas in which we conduct our operations.

In the future, certain of the subcontractors engaged by us may be represented by labor unions or subject to collective bargaining arrangements.  A strike or other work stoppage involving any of our subcontractors could also make it difficult for us to retain subcontractors for our construction work.  In addition, union activity could result in higher costs to retain our subcontractors.  The inability to contract with skilled subcontractors at reasonable costs on a timely basis could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

Our reliance on contractors can expose us to various liability risks.

We rely on contractors in order to perform the construction of our homes, and in many cases, to select and obtain raw materials.  We are exposed to various risks as a result of our reliance on these contractors and their respective subcontractors and suppliers, including the possibility of defects in our homes due to improper practices or materials used by contractors, which may require us to comply with our warranty obligations and/or bring a claim under an insurance policy.  For example, despite our quality control efforts, we may

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discover that our subcontractors were engaging in improper construction practices or installing defective materials in our homes.  When we discover these issues, we repair the homes in accordance with our new home warranty and as required by law.  We establish warranty and other reserves for the homes we sell based on market practices, our historical experiences, and our judgment of the qualitative risks associated with the types of homes built.  However, the cost of satisfying our warranty and other legal obligations in these instances may be significantly higher than our warranty reserves, and we may be unable to recover the cost of repair from such subcontractors.  Regardless of the steps we take, we can in some instances be subject to fines or other penalties, and our reputation may be injured.

In addition, several other homebuilders have received inquiries from regulatory agencies concerning whether homebuilders using contractors are deemed to be employers of the employees of such contractors under certain circumstances.  Although contractors are independent of the homebuilders that contract with them under normal management practices and the terms of trade contracts and subcontracts within the homebuilding industry, if regulatory agencies reclassify the employees of contractors as employees of homebuilders, homebuilders using contractors could be responsible for wage, hour and other employment-related liabilities of their contractors, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

If we experience shortages in labor supply, increased labor costs or labor disruptions, there could be delays or increased costs in developing our communities or building homes, which could adversely affect our operating results.

We require a qualified labor force to develop our communities.  Access to qualified labor may be affected by circumstances beyond our control, including:

·

work stoppages resulting from labor disputes;

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shortages of qualified trades people, such as carpenters, roofers, electricians and plumbers, especially in our key markets in the United States;

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changes in laws relating to union organizing activity;

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changes in immigration laws and trends in labor force migration; and

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increases in subcontractor and professional services costs.

Any of these circumstances could give rise to delays in the start or completion of, or could increase the cost of, developing one or more of our communities and building homes.  We may not be able to recover these increased costs by raising our home prices because the price for each home is typically set months prior to its delivery pursuant to sales contracts with our homebuyers.  In such circumstances, our operating results could be adversely affected.  Additionally, market and competitive forces may also limit our ability to raise the sales prices of our homes.

Utility and resource shortages or rate fluctuations could have an adverse effect on our operations.

Several of the markets in which we operate and in which we may operate in the future have historically been subject to utility and resource shortages, including significant changes to the availability of electricity and water and seasonal fluctuation in the ability of certain commodities, particularly lumber.  Shortages of natural resources in our markets, particularly of water, may make it more difficult for us to obtain regulatory approval of new developments.  We have also experienced material fluctuations in utility and resource costs across our markets, and we may incur additional costs and may not be able to complete construction on a timely basis if such fluctuations arise.  In particular, as the housing market has improved and the number of new homes being constructed has increased, we have experienced increased construction costs due to additional competition for labor and materials.  Furthermore, these shortages and rate fluctuations may adversely affect the regional economies in which we operate, which may reduce demand for our homes and negatively affect our business and results of operations. 

Government regulations and legal challenges may delay the start or completion of our communities, increase our expenses or limit our homebuilding or other activities, which could have a negative impact on our results of operations.

The approval of numerous governmental authorities must be obtained in connection with our development activities, and these governmental authorities often have broad discretion in exercising their approval authority.  We incur substantial costs related to compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.  Any increase in legal and regulatory requirements may cause us to incur substantial additional costs, or in some cases cause us to determine that the property is not feasible for development.  Various local, provincial, state and federal statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations concerning building, health and safety, environment, zoning, sales and similar matters apply to and/or affect the housing industry.

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Municipalities may restrict or place moratoriums on the availability of utilities, such as water and sewer taps.  If municipalities in which we operate take such actions, it could have an adverse effect on our business by causing delays, increasing our costs or limiting our ability to operate in those municipalities.

We may become subject to various state and local “slow growth” or “no growth” initiatives and other ballot measures that could negatively impact the availability of land and building opportunities within those localities.

Governmental regulation affects not only construction activities but also sales activities, mortgage lending activities and other dealings with consumers.  In addition, it is possible that some form of expanded energy efficiency legislation may be passed by the U.S. Congress or federal agencies and certain state and provincial legislatures, which may, despite being phased in over time, significantly increase our costs of building homes and the sale price to our buyers, and adversely affect our sales volumes.  We may be required to apply for additional approvals or modify our existing approvals because of changes in local circumstances or applicable law.  Further, we may experience delays and increased expenses as a result of legal challenges to our proposed communities, whether brought by governmental authorities or private parties.

An inability to obtain additional performance, payment and completion surety bonds and letters of credit could limit our future growth.

We are often required to provide performance, payment and completion surety bonds or letters of credit to secure the completion of our construction contracts, development agreements and other arrangements.  We have obtained facilities to provide the required volume of performance, payment and completion surety bonds and letters of credit for our expected growth in the medium term; however, unexpected growth may require additional facilities.  We may also be required to renew or amend our existing facilities.  Our ability to obtain additional performance, payment and completion surety bonds and letters of credit primarily depends on our credit rating, capitalization, working capital, past performance, management expertise and certain external factors, including the capacity of the markets for such bonds.  Performance, payment and completion surety bond and letter of credit providers consider these factors in addition to our performance and claims record and provider-specific underwriting standards, which may change from time to time.

If our performance record or our providers’ requirements or policies change, if we cannot obtain the necessary consent from our lenders, or if the market’s capacity to provide performance, payment and completion bonds or letters of credit is not sufficient for any unexpected growth and we are unable to renew or amend our existing facilities on favorable terms, or at all, we could be unable to obtain additional performance, payment and completion surety bonds or letters of credit from other sources when required, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A major health and safety incident relating to our business could be costly in terms of potential liabilities and reputational damage.

Building sites are inherently dangerous, and operating in the homebuilding industry poses certain inherent health and safety risks.  Due to health and safety regulatory requirements and the number of projects we work on, health and safety performance is critical to the success of all areas of our business.  Any failure in health and safety performance may result in penalties for non-compliance with relevant regulatory requirements, and a failure that results in a major or significant health and safety incident is likely to be costly in terms of potential liabilities incurred as a result.  Such a failure could generate significant negative publicity and have a corresponding impact on our reputation, our relationships with relevant regulatory agencies or governmental authorities, and our ability to win new business, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

We are subject to environmental laws and regulations, which may increase our costs, limit the areas in which we can build homes and delay completion of our projects.

We are subject to a variety of local, state and federal statutes, rules and regulations concerning land use and the protection of health and the environment, including those governing discharge of pollutants to water and air, including asbestos, the handling of hazardous materials and the cleanup of contaminated sites.  We may be liable for the costs of removal, investigation or remediation of hazardous or toxic substances located on, under, from or in a property currently or formerly owned, leased or occupied by us, whether or not we caused or knew of the pollution.  The costs of any required removal, investigation or remediation of such substances or the costs of defending against environmental claims may be substantial.  The presence of such substances, or the failure to remediate such substances properly, may also adversely affect our ability to sell the land or to borrow using the land as security.  Environmental impacts from historical activities have been identified at some of the projects we have developed in the past and additional projects may be located on land that may have been contaminated by previous use.  Although we are not aware of any projects requiring material remediation activities by us as a result of historical contamination, no assurances can be given that material claims or liabilities relating to such developments will not arise in the future.

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The particular impact and requirements of environmental laws that apply to any given community vary greatly according to the community site, the site’s environmental conditions and the present and former use of the site.  From time to time, the United States Environmental Protection Agency and other federal or state agencies review homebuilders’ compliance with environmental laws and may levy fines and penalties for failure to comply with applicable environmental laws or impose additional requirements for future compliance as a result of past failures.  Any such actions taken with respect to us may increase our costs.  We expect that increasingly stringent requirements may be imposed on homebuilders in the future.  Environmental laws may result in delays, cause us to implement time consuming and expensive compliance programs and prohibit or severely restrict development in certain environmentally sensitive regions or areas, such as wetlands.  We also may not identify all of these concerns during any pre-development review of project sites.  Environmental regulations can also have an adverse impact on the availability and price of certain raw materials, such as lumber.  Furthermore, we could incur substantial costs, including cleanup costs, fines, penalties and other sanctions and damages from third-party claims for property damage or personal injury, as a result of our failure to comply with, or liabilities under, applicable environmental laws and regulations.  In addition, we are subject to third-party challenges, such as by environmental groups, under environmental laws and regulations to the permits and other approvals required for our projects and operations.  These matters could adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

We may be liable for claims for damages as a result of use of hazardous materials.

As a homebuilding business with a wide variety of historic homebuilding and construction activities, we could be liable for future claims for damages as a result of the past or present use of hazardous materials, including building materials which in the future become known or are suspected to be hazardous.  Any such claims may adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.  Insurance coverage for such claims may be limited or non-existent.

Our properties may contain or develop harmful mold, which could lead to liability for adverse health effects and costs of remediating the problem.

Litigation and concern about indoor exposure to certain types of toxic molds have been increasing as the public becomes increasingly aware that exposure to mold can cause a variety of health effects and symptoms, including allergic reactions.  Toxic molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any organic substance, as long as moisture and oxygen are present.  There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, foods and insulation.  When excessive moisture accumulates in buildings or on building materials, mold growth will often occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains undiscovered or unaddressed.  It is impossible to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment.  If mold or other airborne contaminants exist or appear at our properties, we may have to undertake a costly remediation program to contain or remove the contaminants or increase indoor ventilation.  If indoor air quality were impaired, we could be liable to our homebuyers or others for property damage or personal injury. 

We may not be able to compete effectively against competitors in the homebuilding industry, especially in the new markets we plan to enter.

Competition in the homebuilding industry is intense, and there are relatively low barriers to entry into our business. Homebuilders compete for, among other things, home buying customers, desirable land parcels, financing, raw materials and skilled labor. Increased competition could hurt our business, as it could prevent us from acquiring attractive land parcels on which to build homes or make such acquisitions more expensive, hinder our market share expansion and lead to pricing pressures on our homes that may adversely impact our margins and revenues. If we are unable to successfully compete, our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. We compete with large national and regional homebuilding companies and with smaller local homebuilders for land, financing, raw materials and skilled management and labor resources. Furthermore, a number of our primary competitors are significantly larger, have a longer operating history and may have greater resources or lower cost of capital than ours; accordingly, they may be able to compete more effectively in one or more of the markets in which we operate. Many of these competitors also have long-standing relationships with subcontractors and suppliers in the markets in which we operate. As we expand our operations into California, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, and other markets, we face new competition from many established homebuilders in those markets, and we will not have the benefit of the extensive relationships and strong reputations with subcontractors, suppliers and homebuyers that we enjoy in our Colorado markets.

Raw materials and building supply shortages and price fluctuations could delay or increase the cost of home construction and adversely affect our operating results.

The homebuilding industry has, from time to time, experienced raw material shortages and been adversely affected by volatility in global commodity prices.  In particular, shortages and fluctuations in the price of concrete, drywall, lumber or other important raw materials could result in delays in the start or completion of, or increase the cost of, developing one or more of our residential communities.  These

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shortages can be more severe during periods of strong demand for housing or during periods following natural disasters that have a significant impact on existing residential and commercial structures.  The cost of raw materials may also be materially and adversely affected during periods of shortages or high inflation.  Shortages and price increases could cause delays in and increase our costs of home construction.  We generally are unable to pass on increases in construction costs to customers who have already entered into home purchase contracts.  Sustained increases in construction costs may adversely affect our gross margins, which in turn could materially and adversely affect our business, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, the cost of petroleum products, which are used both to deliver our materials and to transport workers to our job sites, fluctuates and may be subject to increased volatility as a result of geopolitical events or accidents.  Changes in such costs could also result in higher prices for any product utilizing petrochemicals.  These cost increases may have an adverse effect on our operating margin and results of operations and may result in a decline in the price of our common stock.  Furthermore, any such cost increase may adversely affect the regional economies in which we operate and reduce demand for our homes.

Increases in our cancellation rate could have a negative impact on our home sales revenue and homebuilding margins.

Our backlog reflects sales contracts with our homebuyers for homes that have not yet been delivered.  We have received a deposit from a homebuyer for each home reflected in our backlog, and generally we have the right to retain the deposit if the homebuyer fails to comply with his or her obligations under the sales contract, subject to certain exceptions, including as a result of state and local law, the homebuyer’s inability to sell his or her current home or, in certain circumstances, the homebuyer’s inability to obtain suitable financing.  Home order cancellations negatively impact the number of closed homes, net new home orders, home sales revenue and results of operations, as well as the number of homes in backlog.  Home order cancellations can result from a number of factors, including declines or slow appreciation in the market value of homes, increases in the supply of homes available to be purchased, increased competition, higher mortgage interest rates, homebuyers’ inability to sell their existing homes, homebuyers’ inability to obtain suitable financing, including providing sufficient down payments, and adverse changes in economic conditions.  An increase in the level of our home order cancellations could have a negative impact on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

Homebuilding is subject to product liability and warranty claims arising in the ordinary course of business that can be significant.

As a homebuilder, we are subject to home warranty and construction defect claims arising in the ordinary course of business.  There can be no assurance that any developments we undertake will be free from defects once completed.  Construction defects may occur on projects and developments and may arise during a significant period of time after completion.  Defects arising on a development attributable to us may lead to significant contractual or other liabilities.

As a consequence, we maintain products and completed operations excess liability insurance, obtain indemnities and certificates of insurance from subcontractors generally covering claims related to damages resulting from faulty workmanship and materials, and create warranty and other reserves for the homes we sell based on historical experience in our markets and our judgment of the risks associated with the types of homes built.  Although we actively monitor our insurance reserves and coverage, because of the uncertainties inherent to these matters, we cannot provide assurance that our insurance coverage, our subcontractor arrangements and our reserves will be adequate to address all of our warranty and construction defect claims in the future.  In addition, contractual indemnities can be difficult to enforce.  We may also be responsible for applicable self-insured retentions, and some types of claims may not be covered by insurance or may exceed applicable coverage limits.  Additionally, the coverage offered by and the availability of products and completed operations excess liability insurance for construction defects is currently limited and costly.  This coverage may be further restricted or become more costly in the future.

Unexpected expenditures attributable to defects or previously unknown sub-surface conditions arising on a development project may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.  In addition, severe or widespread incidents of defects giving rise to unexpected levels of expenditure, to the extent not covered by insurance or redress against subcontractors, may adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

We may suffer uninsured losses or suffer material losses in excess of insurance limits.

We could suffer physical damage to property and liabilities resulting in losses that may not be fully compensated by insurance.  In addition, certain types of risks, such as personal injury claims, may be, or may become in the future, either uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may not be currently or in the future covered by our insurance policies.  Should an uninsured loss or a loss in excess of insured limits occur, we could sustain financial loss or lose capital invested in the affected property as well as anticipated future income from that property.  In addition, we could be liable to repair damage or meet liabilities caused by uninsured risks.  We

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may be liable for any debt or other financial obligations related to affected property.  Material losses or liabilities in excess of insurance proceeds may occur in the future.

In the United States, the coverage offered and the availability of general liability insurance for construction defects is currently limited and is costly.  As a result, an increasing number of our subcontractors in the United States may be unable to obtain insurance.  If we cannot effectively recover construction defect liabilities and costs of defense from our subcontractors or their insurers, or if we have self-insured, we may suffer losses.  Coverage may be further restricted and become even more costly.  Such circumstances could adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

Our operating performance is subject to risks associated with the real estate industry.

Real estate investments are subject to various risks and fluctuations and cycles in value and demand, many of which are beyond our control.  Certain events may decrease cash available for operations, as well as the value of our real estate assets.  These events include, but are not limited to:

·

adverse changes in financial conditions of buyers and sellers of properties, particularly residential homes and land suitable for development of residential homes;

·

adverse changes in international, national or local economic and demographic conditions;

·

competition from other real estate investors with significant capital, including other real estate operating companies and developers and institutional investment funds;

·

reductions in the level of demand for and increases in the supply of land suitable for development;

·

fluctuations in interest rates, which could adversely affect our ability, or the ability of homebuyers, to obtain financing on favorable terms, or at all;

·

unanticipated increases in expenses, including, without limitation, insurance costs, development costs, real estate assessments and other taxes and costs of compliance with laws, regulations and governmental policies; and

·

changes in enforcement of laws, regulations and governmental policies, including, without limitation, health, safety, environmental, zoning and tax laws, governmental fiscal policies and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

In addition, periods of economic slowdown or recession, rising interest rates or declining demand for real estate, or the public perception that any of these events may occur, could result in a general decline in the purchase of homes or an increased incidence of home order cancellations.  If we cannot successfully implement our business strategy, our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected.

Because real estate investments are relatively illiquid, our ability to promptly sell one or more properties for reasonable prices in response to changing economic, financial and investment conditions may be limited and we may be forced to hold non-income producing properties for extended periods of time.

Real estate investments are relatively difficult to sell quickly.  As a result, our ability to promptly sell one or more properties in response to changing economic, financial and investment conditions is limited and we may be forced to hold non-income producing assets for an extended period of time.  We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any property for the price or on the terms that we set or whether any price or other terms offered by a prospective purchaser would be acceptable to us.  We also cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a property.

If the market value of our land inventory decreases, our results of operations could be adversely affected by impairments and write-downs.

The market value of our land and housing inventories depends on market conditions.  We acquire land for expansion into new markets and for replacement of land inventory and expansion within our current markets.  There is an inherent risk that the value of the land owned by us may decline after purchase.  The valuation of property is inherently subjective and based on the individual characteristics of each property.  We may have acquired options on or bought and developed land at a cost we will not be able to recover fully or on which we cannot build and sell homes profitably.  In addition, our deposits for lots controlled under option or similar contracts may be put at risk.

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Factors, such as changes in regulatory requirements and applicable laws (including in relation to building regulations, taxation and planning), political conditions, the condition of financial markets, both local and national economic conditions, the financial condition of customers, potentially adverse tax consequences, and interest and inflation rate fluctuations, subject land valuations to uncertainty.  Moreover, all valuations are made on the basis of assumptions that may not prove to reflect economic or demographic reality.  If housing demand decreases below what we anticipated when we acquired our inventory, our profitability may be adversely affected and we may not be able to recover our costs when we sell and build houses.

We regularly review the value of our land holdings and continue to review our holdings on a periodic basis.  If material write-downs and impairments in the value of our inventory are required in the future, we may have to sell land or homes at a loss, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Inflation could adversely affect our business and financial results.

Inflation could adversely affect us by increasing the costs of land, materials and labor needed to operate our business.  In the event of an increase in inflation, we may seek to increase the sales prices of homes in order to maintain satisfactory margins.  However, an oversupply of homes relative to demand and home prices being set several months before homes are delivered may make any such increase difficult or impossible.  In addition, inflation is often accompanied by higher interest rates, which historically have had a negative impact on housing demand.  In such an environment, we may not be able to raise home prices sufficiently to keep up with the rate of inflation and our margins could decrease.  Moreover, the cost of capital increases as a result of inflation and the purchasing power of our cash resources declines.  Current or future efforts by the government to stimulate the economy may increase the risk of significant inflation and its adverse impact on our business or financial results. 

Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate because of the seasonal nature of our business and other factors.

Our quarterly operating results generally fluctuate by season.  Historically, we have entered into a larger percentage of contracts for the sale of our homes during the spring and summer months.  Weather-related problems, typically in the fall, late winter and early spring, may delay starts or closings and increase costs and thus reduce profitability.  Seasonal natural disasters such as floods and fires could cause delays in the completion of, or increase the cost of, developing one or more of our communities, causing an adverse effect on our sales and revenues.

In many cases, we may not be able to recapture increased costs by raising prices.  In addition, deliveries may be staggered over different periods of the year and may be concentrated in particular quarters.  Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate because of these and other factors.

We are subject to financial reporting and other requirements as a public company for which our accounting and other management systems and resources may not be adequately prepared.

As a public company with listed equity securities, we are required to comply with certain laws, regulations and requirements, including the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (which we refer to as the “Exchange Act”), certain corporate governance provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (which we refer to as the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), related regulations of the SEC, and requirements of the New York Stock Exchange.  The Exchange Act requires that we file annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition.  The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective internal controls and procedures for financial reporting.   Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires our management and independent auditors to report annually on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. 

We have completed the process of compiling the systems necessary to perform the evaluations needed to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.  These reporting and other obligations place significant demands on our management, administrative, operational, and accounting resources and will cause us to incur significant expenses.  We may in the future need to upgrade our systems or create new systems, implement additional financial and management controls, reporting systems and procedures, create or outsource an internal audit function, and hire additional accounting and finance staff.  If we are unable to accomplish these objectives in a timely and effective fashion, our ability to comply with the financial reporting requirements and other rules that apply to reporting companies could be impaired.  Any failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations. 

As a public company, we are obligated to maintain proper and effective internal controls over financial reporting.  These internal controls may not be determined to be effective, which may adversely affect investor confidence in the Company.

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We are required, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, to furnish a report by management on, among other things, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of our fiscal year 2017. This assessment includes disclosure of any material weaknesses identified by our management in our internal control over financial reporting.

We are also required to disclose changes made in our internal control and procedures on a quarterly basis.  However, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is adverse in the event it is not satisfied with the level at which our controls are documented, designed or operating. In order to  continue to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may need to undertake various actions, such as implementing new internal controls and procedures and hiring accounting or internal audit staff.

Acts of war or terrorism may seriously harm our business.

Acts of war, any outbreak or escalation of hostilities between the United States and any foreign power or acts of terrorism may cause disruption to the U.S. economy, or the local economies of the markets in which we operate, cause shortages of building materials, increase costs associated with obtaining building materials, result in building code changes that could increase costs of construction, affect job growth and consumer confidence or cause economic changes that we cannot anticipate, all of which could reduce demand for our homes and adversely impact our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

Negative publicity may affect our business performance and could affect the value of our securities.

Unfavorable media related to the Company, our industry, or Company brands, marketing, personnel, operations, business performance or prospects may affect the value of our securities and the performance of our business, regardless of its accuracy or inaccuracy.  Our success in maintaining, extending and expanding our brand image depends on our ability to adapt to a rapidly changing media environment.  Adverse publicity or negative commentary on social media outlets, such as blogs, websites or newsletters, could hurt operating results, as consumers might avoid brands that receive bad press or negative reviews.  Negative publicity may result in a decrease in operating results that could lead to a decline in the value of our securities.

Poor relations with the residents of our communities could negatively impact sales, which could cause our revenues or results of operations to decline.

Residents of communities we develop rely on us to resolve issues or disputes that may arise in connection with the operation or development of their communities. Efforts made by us to resolve these issues or disputes could be deemed unsatisfactory by the affected residents and subsequent actions by these residents could adversely affect sales or our reputation. In addition, we could be required to make material expenditures related to the settlement of such issues or disputes or to modify our community development plans, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Failure to manage land acquisitions and development and construction processes could result in significant cost overruns or errors in valuing sites.

We own and purchase a large number of sites each year and are therefore dependent on our ability to process a very large number of transactions (which include, among other things, evaluating the site purchase, designing the layout of the development, sourcing materials and subcontractors and managing contractual commitments) efficiently and accurately.  Errors by employees, failure to comply with regulatory requirements and conduct of business rules, failings or inadequacies in internal control processes, inabilities to obtain desired approvals and entitlements, cost overruns, equipment failures, natural disasters or the failure of external systems, including those of our suppliers or counterparties, could result in operational losses that could adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results and our relationships with our customers.



We may incur a variety of costs to engage in future growth or expansion of our operations or acquisitions or disposals of businesses, and the anticipated benefits may never be realized.

As a part of our business strategy, we may make acquisitions, or significant investments in, and/or disposals of businesses.  Any future acquisitions, investments and/or disposals would be accompanied by risks such as:

·

difficulties in assimilating the operations and personnel of acquired companies or businesses;

·

diversion of our management’s attention from ongoing business concerns;

·

our potential inability to maximize our financial and strategic position through the successful incorporation or disposition of operations;

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·

maintenance of uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies; and

·

impairment of existing relationships with employees, contractors, suppliers and customers as a result of the integration of new management personnel and cost-saving initiatives.

We cannot guarantee that we will be able to successfully integrate any company or business that we might acquire in the future, and our failure to do so could harm our current business.

In addition, we may not realize the anticipated benefits of these transactions and there may be other unanticipated or unidentified effects.  While we would seek protection, for example, through warranties and indemnities in the case of acquisitions, significant liabilities may not be identified in due diligence or come to light after the expiry of warranty or indemnity periods.  Additionally, while we would seek to limit our ongoing exposure, for example, through liability caps and period limits on warranties and indemnities in the case of disposals, some warranties and indemnities may give rise to unexpected and significant liabilities.  Any claims arising in the future may adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

Our acquisitions of the assets of Jimmy Jacobs Homes L.P. in September 2013, Las Vegas Land Holdings, LLC in April 2014, Grand View Builders in August 2014, Peachtree Communities Group, Inc. in November 2014, UCP in August 2017, and Sundquist Homes in October 2017 were accounted for as business combinations in accordance with our accounting policies and GAAP with the acquired assets and assumed liabilities recorded at their estimated fair values as of the acquisition date. Based upon estimates of the fair value of the assets to be acquired and the liabilities to be assumed, we have recorded a step-up to the historical basis of an acquired home under construction inventory. As homes are delivered in future periods, this step-up will initially result in gross margins from home sales revenues that are commensurate with the stage of completion of the acquired inventory and the related risk assumed by us for its completion. The ultimate gross margins from home sales revenues that we will be able to achieve from our acquired businesses will be impacted by (1) our ability to construct homes at prices consistent with our forecasted budgets, and (2) future pricing increases or decreases based on market demand.

We may be unable to successfully integrate our and UCP’s businesses or realize the anticipated benefits of the UCP Merger.

The UCP Merger involved the combination of two companies that previously operated as independent public companies. We are currently devoting significant management attention and resources to integrate our and UCP’s business practices and operations. Potential difficulties that we may encounter as part of the integration process include the following:

 

 

 

the inability to successfully combine our and UCP’s businesses in a manner that permits us to achieve, on a timely basis, or at all, the enhanced revenue opportunities and cost savings and other benefits anticipated to result from the UCP Merger;

 

 

 

complexities associated with managing the combined businesses, including difficulty addressing possible differences in corporate cultures and management philosophies and the challenge of integrating complex systems, technology, networks and other assets of each of the companies in a seamless manner that minimizes any adverse impact on homebuying customers, suppliers, employees and other constituencies; and

 

 

 

potential unknown liabilities associated with the UCP Merger.

In addition, it is possible that the integration process could result in:

 

 

 

diversion of the attention of each company’s management; and

 

 

 

the disruption of, or the loss of momentum in, our ongoing business.

Any of these issues could adversely affect our business and financial results.



We may be unable to realize anticipated cost synergies and expects to incur substantial expenses related to the UCP Merger, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Following the consummation of the UCP Merger, we expect to realize annualized cost synergies of approximately $10.0 million beginning in 2018.

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While we believe these cost synergies are achievable, our ability to achieve such estimated cost synergies in the timeframe described, or at all, is subject to various assumptions by our management, which may or may not be realized, as well as the incurrence of other costs in our operations that offset all or a portion of such cost synergies. As a consequence, we may not be able to realize all of these cost synergies within the timeframe expected or at all. In addition, we may incur additional and/or unexpected costs in order to realize these cost synergies. Failure to achieve the expected cost synergies could significantly reduce the expected benefits associated with the UCP Merger and adversely affect us.

We expect to continue to incur non-recurring costs associated with consummating the UCP Merger, combining the operations of the two companies, and achieving the desired cost synergies. These fees and costs have been, and will continue to be, substantial. The substantial majority of non-recurring expenses will consist of transaction costs related to the UCP Merger and include, among others, fees paid to legal, accounting and financial advisors, employee benefit costs, and filing and printing fees.

These costs described above, as well as other unanticipated costs and expenses, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results.

We are expected to incur substantial expenses in connection with the integration process related to the UCP Merger.

We are expected to incur substantial expenses in connection with the integration process related to the UCP Merger. There are a large number of processes, policies, procedures, operations, technologies and systems that may need to be integrated, including purchasing, accounting and finance, sales, payroll, pricing and benefits. While we have assumed that a certain level of expenses will be incurred, there are many factors beyond our control that could affect the total amount or the timing of the integration expenses. Moreover, many of the expenses that will be incurred are, by their nature, difficult to estimate accurately. These expenses could, particularly in the near term, exceed the savings that we expect to achieve from the elimination of duplicative expenses and the realization of economies of scale and cost savings. These integration expenses likely will result in us taking significant charges against earnings, and the amount and timing of such charges are uncertain at present.

Our future results will suffer if we do not effectively manage our expanded operations.

As a result of the UCP Merger, the size of our business has increased significantly. Our future success will depend, in part, upon our ability to manage this expanded business, which will pose substantial challenges for management, including challenges related to the management and monitoring of new operations and associated increased costs and complexity. There can be no assurances that we will be successful or that we will realize the expected operating efficiencies, cost savings, revenue enhancements or other benefits from the UCP Merger.

We may not be able to continue to grow through acquisitions.

In the past, we have sought growth through acquisitions of, or significant investments in, businesses that offer complementary products and services or otherwise support our growth objectives. However, we cannot assure you that we will continue to identify attractive acquisition targets and consummate acquisitions. As a result of the UCP Merger and the incurrence of debt in connection therewith, the amount of our indebtedness is significantly higher than prior to the consummation of the UCP Merger. As a result, we cannot assure you that we will be able to arrange financing for future acquisitions on terms acceptable to us. In addition, the combined company is substantially larger than we have been in the past, and we may face additional scrutiny in connection with federal and state governmental approvals in connection with any future acquisitions of attractive targets or may not be able to obtain such approvals at all. The realization of any of these risks could adversely affect our business.

We may be subject to various risks relating to our plan to vertically integrate mortgage lending into our business.

We are in the process of vertically integrating mortgage lending into our business, which will enable us to provide financing to our homebuyers. There are risks involved with engaging in the mortgage lending business, including establishing sufficient stringent underwriting standards, so as to limit the level of foreclosures experienced on mortgages originated by us. We may hold some of the loans we originate to maturity; however, in order to finance our planned mortgage business, we will most likely sell the loans we originate, either as whole loans or pursuant to a securitization. It is customary in connection with such transactions for the originator, such as we would be, to make representations and warranties to the purchasers, guarantors and insurers about the mortgage loans and the manner in which they were originated and to offer certain indemnities and guaranties to the purchasers, guarantors and insurers. In the event of defaults on the loans we originate, we may be required to repurchase or substitute mortgage loans, or indemnify buyers, guarantors or insurers of our loans. Because we have limited experience in originating and underwriting home loans, our underwriting standards may not be as stringent as a more traditional lender, and accordingly, we may experience a higher rate of default than lenders who have engaged in the mortgage lending industry for a longer period of time. Moreover, the loans we originate will be limited primarily to buyers of our homes, so our pool of borrowers will be less diverse than as would be the case with a traditional lender, and thus there could be a higher correlation in the default rate with our borrowers. In addition, because we would be originating loans to buyers of our homes, there is the risk that we may be more incentivized, compared to more traditional lenders, to lower our underwriting

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standards in order to close home sales. Should our underwriting standards not adequately screen quality applicants, the default rate on the loans we originate may be higher, which could have an adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition, either because the loans we own are no longer performing or because we are required to repurchase or otherwise indemnify purchasers, guarantors or insurers of the loans we sell or securitize.



Risk Related to Conflicts of Interest

As a result of Dale Francescon’s and Robert Francescon’s relationship with the Company, conflicts of interest may arise with respect to any transactions involving or with Dale Francescon, Robert Francescon, or their affiliates, and their interests may not be aligned with yours.

Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon are our Co-Chief Executive Officers, sit on our board of directors, and collectively beneficially own 3,894,572 shares of our common stock, which represents 13.2% of our common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2017.  For so long as Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon continue to beneficially own a significant stake in us, they will have significant influence over the power to:

·

elect our directors and exercise overall control over the Company;

·

agree to sell or otherwise transfer a controlling stake in the Company; and

·

determine the outcome of substantially all actions requiring the majority approval of our stockholders, including transactions with related parties, corporate reorganizations, mergers, acquisitions and dispositions of assets. 

The interests of Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon may not be fully aligned with yours, and this could lead to a strategy that is not in your best interests.  In addition, their significant ownership in us and resulting ability to effectively control us will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and may discourage someone from making a significant equity investment in us, or could discourage transactions involving a change in control.

In addition, there may be transactions between us and Dale Francescon, Robert Francescon, or their affiliates that could present an actual or perceived conflict of interest.  These conflicts of interest may lead Dale and/or Robert Francescon to recuse himself or themselves from actions of our board of directors with respect to any transactions involving or with Dale or Robert Francescon or their affiliates.  For example, we have entered into employment agreements with Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon, our Co-Chief Executive Officers, in their capacities as officers, pursuant to which they are required to devote substantially full-time attention to our affairs.  These employment agreements were not negotiated on an arm’s-length basis.  We may choose not to enforce, or to enforce less vigorously, our rights under these agreements because of our desire to maintain our ongoing relationship with Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon.

Risks Related to Our Indebtedness

We use and expect to continue to use leverage in executing our business strategy, which may adversely affect the return on our assets.

We may incur a substantial amount of debt in the future.  As of December 31, 2017, we had approximately $824.6 million in outstanding indebtedness, consisting of $379.2 million outstanding on our 6.875% Senior Notes due 2022 (which we refer to as our “Existing 6.875% Notes”), $394.7 million outstanding on our 5.875% Senior Notes due 2025 (which we refer to as our “Existing 5.875% Notes”), $48.3 million outstanding on our mortgage repurchase facilities, and $2.3 million outstanding on other financing obligations.



As of December 31, 2017, we had $400 million of available borrowing capacity, with no borrowings outstanding, under our revolving credit facility. Our board of directors will consider a number of factors when evaluating our level of indebtedness and when making decisions regarding the incurrence of new indebtedness, including the purchase price of assets to be acquired with debt financing, the estimated market value of our assets and the ability of particular assets, and the Company as a whole, to generate cash flow to cover the expected debt service. Our charter does not contain a limitation on the amount of debt we may incur and our board of directors may change our target debt levels at any time without the approval of our stockholders. 

Incurring a substantial amount of debt could have important consequences for our business, including:

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·

making it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations with respect to our debt or to our trade or other creditors;

·

increasing our vulnerability to adverse economic or industry conditions;

·

limiting our ability to obtain additional financing to fund capital expenditures and acquisitions, particularly when the availability of financing in the capital markets is limited;

·

requiring a substantial portion of our cash flows from operations for the payment of interest on our debt and reducing our ability to use our cash flows to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and general corporate requirements;

·

limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate; and

·

placing us at a competitive disadvantage to less leveraged competitors.

We cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us through capital markets financings or under our credit facilities or otherwise in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness, or to fund our other liquidity needs.  We may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness, on or before its maturity.  We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance any of our indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms, or at all.  In addition, we may incur additional indebtedness in order to finance our operations or to repay existing indebtedness.  If we cannot service our indebtedness, we may have to take actions such as selling assets, seeking additional debt or equity or reducing or delaying capital expenditures, strategic acquisitions, investments and alliances.  We cannot assure you that any such actions, if necessary, could be effected on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, or on terms that would be advantageous to our stockholders or on terms that would not require us to breach the terms and conditions of our existing or future debt agreements.

Access to financing sources may not be available on favorable terms, or at all, especially in light of current market conditions, which could adversely affect our ability to maximize our returns.

We expect to employ prudent levels of leverage to finance the acquisition and development of our lots and construction of our homes.  Our access to additional third-party sources of financing will depend, in part, on:

·

general market conditions;

·

the market’s perception of our growth potential;

·

with respect to acquisition and/or development financing, the market’s perception of the value of the land parcels to be acquired and/or developed;

·

our current debt levels;

·

our current and expected future earnings;

·

our cash flow; and

·

the market price per share of our common stock.

If the capital and credit markets experience increased volatility or weakness, potential lenders may be unwilling or unable to provide us with financing that is attractive to us or may charge us prohibitively high fees in order to obtain financing.  In such a situation, investment returns on our assets and our ability to make acquisitions could be adversely affected by our inability to secure additional financing on reasonable terms, if at all.

In addition, while we have not encountered any such issues to date, if the credit rating agencies that rate our debt were to downgrade our credit ratings, it would likely increase our cost of capital and make it more difficult for us to obtain new financing and access the capital and credit markets, which could also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Depending on market conditions at the relevant time, we may have to rely more heavily on additional equity financings or on less efficient forms of debt financing that require a larger portion of our cash flow from operations, thereby reducing funds available for our

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operations, future business opportunities and other purposes.  We may not have access to such equity or debt capital on favorable terms at the desired times, or at all.  

Interest expense on debt we will incur may limit our cash available to fund our growth strategies.

As of December 31, 2017, we had approximately $824.6 million in outstanding indebtedness, consisting of $379.2 million outstanding on our Existing 6.875% Notes, $394.7 million outstanding on our Existing 5.875% Notes, $48.3 million outstanding on our mortgage repurchase facilities, and $2.3 million outstanding on other financing obligations. 



As of December 31, 2017, we had $400.0 million of available borrowing capacity, with no borrowings outstanding, under our revolving credit facility.  As part of our growth strategy, we may incur a significant amount of additional debt.  Certain of our current debt has, and any additional debt we subsequently incur may have, a floating rate of interest.  Higher interest rates could increase debt service requirements on our current floating rate debt and on any floating rate debt we subsequently incur, and could reduce funds available for operations, future business opportunities or other purposes.  If we need to repay existing debt during periods of rising interest rates, we could be required to refinance our then-existing debt on unfavorable terms or liquidate one or more of our assets to repay such debt at times which may not permit realization of the maximum return on such assets and could result in a loss.  The occurrence of either such event or both could materially and adversely affect our cash flows and results of operations.

Interest rate changes may adversely affect us.

We currently do not hedge against interest rate fluctuations.  We may obtain in the future one or more forms of interest rate protection—in the form of swap agreements, interest rate cap contracts or similar agreements—to hedge against the possible negative effects of interest rate fluctuations.  However, we cannot assure you that any hedging will adequately relieve the adverse effects of interest rate increases or that counterparties under these agreements will honor their obligations thereunder.  In addition, we may be subject to risks of default by hedging counterparties.  Adverse economic conditions could also cause the terms on which we borrow to be unfavorable.  We could be required to liquidate one or more of our assets at times which may not permit us to receive an attractive return on our assets in order to meet our debt service obligations. 

Our current financing arrangements contain, and our future financing arrangements likely will contain, restrictive covenants relating to our operations.

Our current financing arrangements contain, and the financing arrangements we enter into in the future likely will contain, covenants (financial and otherwise) affecting our ability to incur additional debt, make certain investments, reduce liquidity below certain levels, make distributions to our stockholders and otherwise affect our operating policies.  The restrictions contained in our financing arrangements could also limit our ability to plan for or react to market conditions, meet capital needs or make acquisitions or otherwise restrict our activities or business plans.  If we fail to meet or satisfy any of these covenants in our debt agreements we would be in default under these agreements, and our lenders could elect to declare outstanding amounts due and payable, terminate their commitments, require the posting of additional collateral or enforce their respective interests against existing collateral.  A default also could limit significantly our financing alternatives, which could cause us to curtail our investment activities and/or dispose of assets when we otherwise would not choose to do so.  If we default on several of our debt agreements or any single significant debt agreement, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be able to generate sufficient cash flow to meet our debt service obligations.

Our ability to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to make scheduled payments on our debt obligations will depend on our current and future financial performance, which is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.  In the future, we may fail to generate sufficient cash flow from the sales of our homes and land to meet our cash requirements.  Further, our capital requirements may vary materially from those currently planned if, for example, our revenues do not reach expected levels or we have to incur unforeseen capital expenditures and make investments to maintain our competitive position.  If we do not generate sufficient cash flow from operations to satisfy our debt obligations, including interest payments and the payment of principal at maturity, we may have to undertake alternative financing plans, such as refinancing or restructuring our debt, selling assets, reducing or delaying capital investments or seeking to raise additional capital.  We cannot provide assurance that any refinancing would be possible, that any assets could be sold, or, if sold, of the timeliness and amount of proceeds realized from those sales, that additional financing could be obtained on acceptable terms, if at all, or that additional financing would be permitted under the terms of our various debt instruments then in effect.  Furthermore, our ability to refinance would depend upon the condition of the finance and credit markets.  Our inability to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our debt obligations, or to refinance our obligations on commercially reasonable terms or on a timely basis, would materially affect our business, financial condition or results of operations and may delay or prevent the expansion of our business.

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The agreements governing our debt include provisions that may restrict our financial and business operations, but may not necessarily restrict our ability to take actions that may impair our ability to repay our debt.

The agreements governing our indebtedness, including our revolving credit facility and the indentures that govern our senior notes, contain negative covenants customary for such financings, such as limiting our ability to sell or dispose of assets, incur additional indebtedness or liens, make certain restricted payments, make certain investments, consummate mergers, consolidations or other business combinations or engage in other lines of business.  These restrictions may interfere with our ability to engage in other necessary or desirable business activities, which could materially affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Our revolving credit facility also requires us to comply with certain financial ratios and covenants, such as maximum consolidated leverage ratios, minimum consolidated interest coverage ratios and minimum tangible net worth.  Our ability to comply with these covenants depends on our financial condition and performance and also is subject to events outside our control.  Asset write-downs, other non-cash charges and other one-time events also impact our ability to comply with these covenants.  In addition, these restrictions may interfere with our ability to obtain financing or to engage in other necessary or desirable business activities, which may have a material effect on our operations.  These covenants are subject to important exceptions and qualifications.  Moreover, if we fail to comply with these covenants and are unable to obtain a waiver or amendment, an event of default would result.  Our revolving credit facility and other debt agreements, including the indentures governing our senior notes, also contain other events of default customary for such financings.  We cannot provide assurance that we would have sufficient liquidity to repay or refinance our debt if such amounts were accelerated upon an event of default.  If we are unable to service our debt, this could materially affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We may require additional capital in the future and may not be able to secure adequate funds on terms acceptable to us.

The expansion and development of our business may require significant capital, which we may be unable to obtain, to fund our capital expenditures and operating expenses, including working capital needs.  In accordance with our growth strategy, we expect to opportunistically raise additional debt capital to help fund the growth of our business, subject to market and other conditions, but such debt capital may not be available to us on a timely basis at reasonable rates, or at all.

In the future, we may fail to generate sufficient cash flow from the sales of our homes and land to meet our cash requirements.  Further, our capital requirements may vary materially from those currently planned if, for example, our revenues do not reach expected levels or we have to incur unforeseen capital expenditures and make investments to maintain our competitive position.  If this is the case, we may require additional financing sooner than anticipated or we may have to delay or abandon some or all of our development and expansion plans or otherwise forego market opportunities.

To a large extent, our cash flow generating ability is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative and regulatory factors and other factors that are beyond our control.  We cannot assure you that our business will generate cash flow from operations in an amount sufficient to enable us to fund our liquidity needs.  As a result, we may need to refinance all or a portion of our debt, on or before its maturity, or obtain additional equity or debt financing.  We cannot assure you that we will be able to do so on favorable terms, if at all.  Any inability to generate sufficient cash flow, refinance our debt or incur additional debt on favorable terms could adversely affect our financial condition and could cause us to be unable to service our debt and may delay or prevent the expansion of our business.

We are dependent upon payments from our subsidiaries to fund payments on our indebtedness and our ability to receive funds from our subsidiaries is dependent upon the profitability of our subsidiaries and restrictions imposed by law and contracts.

We are dependent on the cash flow of, and dividends and distributions to us from, our subsidiaries in order to service our existing indebtedness.  Our subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amounts due pursuant to any indebtedness of ours or to make any funds available therefor, except for those subsidiaries that have guaranteed our obligations under our outstanding indebtedness.  The ability of our subsidiaries to pay any dividends and distributions will be subject to, among other things, the terms of any debt instruments of our subsidiaries then in effect as well as among other things, the availability of profits or funds and requirements of applicable laws, including surplus, solvency and other limits imposed on the

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ability of companies to pay dividends.  There can be no assurance that our subsidiaries will generate cash flow sufficient to pay dividends or distributions to us that enable us to pay interest or principal on our existing indebtedness.

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

We depend on key personnel.

Our success depends to a significant degree upon the contributions of certain key personnel including, but not limited to, Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon, our Co-Chief Executive Officers, each of whom would be difficult to replace.  Although we have entered into employment agreements with Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon, in their capacities as officers, there is no guarantee that these executives will remain employed with us.  If any of our key personnel were to cease employment with us, our operating results could suffer.  Further, the process of attracting and retaining suitable replacements for key personnel whose services we may lose would result in transition costs and would divert the attention of other members of our senior management from our existing operations.  The loss of services from key personnel or a limitation in their availability could materially and adversely impact our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.  Further, such a loss could be negatively perceived in the capital markets.  We have not obtained and do not expect to obtain key man life insurance that would provide us with proceeds in the event of death or disability of any of our key personnel.

Termination of the employment agreements with the members of our management team could be costly and prevent a change in control of the Company.

The employment agreements we have entered into with Dale Francescon and Robert Francescon, our Co-Chief Executive Officers, in their capacities as officers, each provide that if their employment with us terminates under certain circumstances, we may be required to pay them significant amounts of severance compensation, thereby making it costly to terminate their employment.  Furthermore, these provisions could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control of the Company that might involve a premium paid for shares of our common stock or otherwise be in the best interests of our stockholders, which could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Certain anti-takeover defenses and applicable law may limit the ability of a third party to acquire control of the Company.

Our charter and bylaws and Delaware law contain provisions that may delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control of the Company that might involve a premium paid for shares of our common stock or otherwise be in the best interests of our stockholders, which could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.  Certain of these provisions are described below.

Selected provisions of our charter and bylaws.  Our charter and/or bylaws contain anti-takeover provisions that:

·

authorize our board of directors, without further action by the stockholders, to issue up to 50 million shares of preferred stock in one or more series, and with respect to each series, to fix the number of shares constituting that series, the powers, rights and preferences of the shares of that series, and the qualifications, limitations and restrictions of that series;

·

require that actions to be taken by our stockholders may be taken only at an annual or special meeting of our stockholders and not by written consent;

·

specify that special meetings of our stockholders can be called only by our board of directors, the chairman of our board of directors, our chief executive officer, or our president;

·

provide that our bylaws may be amended by our board of directors without stockholder approval;

·

provide that directors may be removed from office only by the affirmative vote of the holders of 66 2/3% of the voting power of our capital stock entitled to vote generally in the election of directors;

·

provide that vacancies on our board of directors or newly created directorships resulting from an increase in the number of our directors may be filled only by a vote of a majority of directors then in office, even though less than a quorum;

·

provide that, subject to the express rights, if any, of the holders of any series of preferred stock, any amendment, modification or repeal of, or the adoption of any new or additional provision, inconsistent with our charter provisions relating to the removal of directors, exculpation of directors, indemnification, the prohibition against stockholder action by written consent, and the

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vote of our stockholders required to amend our bylaws requires the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 66 2/3% of the voting power of our capital stock entitled to vote generally in the election of directors;

·

provide that the stockholders may amend, modify or repeal our bylaws, or adopt new or additional provisions of our bylaws, only with the affirmative vote of 66 2/3% of the voting power of our capital stock entitled to vote generally; and

·

establish advance notice procedures for stockholders to submit nominations of candidates for election to our board of directors and other proposals to be brought before a stockholders meeting.  

Selected provisions of Delaware law.  We are a Delaware corporation, and we have elected to be subject to Section 203 of the DGCL by provision of our charter.  In general, Section 203 of the DGCL prevents an “interested stockholder” (as defined in the DGCL) from engaging in a “business combination” (as defined in the DGCL) with us for three years following the date that person becomes an interested stockholder unless one or more of the following occurs:

·

Before that person became an interested stockholder, our board of directors approved the transaction in which the interested stockholder became an interested stockholder or approved the business combination;

·

Upon consummation of the transaction that resulted in the interested stockholder becoming an interested stockholder, the interested stockholder owned at least 85% of our voting stock outstanding at the time the transaction commenced, excluding for purposes of determining the voting stock outstanding (but not the outstanding voting stock owned by the interested stockholder) stock held by directors who are also officers of the Company and by employee stock plans that do not provide employees with the right to determine confidentially whether shares held under the plan will be tendered in a tender or exchange offer; or

·

Following the transaction in which that person became an interested stockholder, the business combination is approved by our board of directors and authorized at a meeting of stockholders by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 66 2/3% of our outstanding voting stock not owned by the interested stockholder.

The DGCL generally defines “interested stockholder” as any person who, together with affiliates and associates, is the owner of 15% or more of our outstanding voting stock or is our affiliate or associate and was the owner of 15% or more of our outstanding voting stock at any time within the three-year period immediately before the date of determination.

We may change our operational policies, investment guidelines and business and growth strategies without stockholder consent, which may subject us to different and more significant risks in the future.

Our board of directors determines our operational policies, investment guidelines and business and growth strategies.  Our board of directors may make changes to, or approve transactions that deviate from, those policies, guidelines and strategies without a vote of, or notice to, our stockholders.  Under any of these circumstances, we may expose ourselves to different and more significant risks in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately determine our financial results or prevent fraud.  As a result, our stockholders could lose confidence in our financial results, which could materially and adversely affect us.

Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and effectively prevent fraud.  There is no assurance that material weaknesses or significant deficiencies will not be identified in the future or that we will be successful in adequately remediating any such material weaknesses and significant deficiencies.  We may in the future discover areas of our internal controls that need improvement.  We cannot be certain that we will be successful in maintaining adequate internal control over our financial reporting and financial processes.  Furthermore, as we grow our business, our internal controls will become more complex, and we will require significantly more resources to ensure our internal controls remain effective.  Additionally, the existence of any material weakness or significant deficiency would require management to devote significant time and incur significant expense to remediate any such material weaknesses or significant deficiencies and management may not be able to remediate any such material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in a timely manner.  The existence of any material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting could also result in errors in our financial statements that could require us to restate our financial statements again, cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations and cause stockholders to lose confidence in our reported financial information, all of which could materially and adversely affect us.

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Changes in accounting rules, assumptions and/or judgments could materially and adversely affect us.

Accounting rules and interpretations for certain aspects of our operations are highly complex and involve significant assumptions and judgment.  These complexities could lead to a delay in the preparation and dissemination of our financial statements.  Furthermore, changes in accounting rules and interpretations or in our accounting assumptions and/or judgments, such as asset impairments, could significantly impact our financial statements.  In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in restating prior period financial statements.  Any of these circumstances could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

We may face substantial damages or be enjoined from pursuing important activities as a result of existing or future litigation, arbitration or other claims.

In our homebuilding activities, we are exposed to potentially significant litigation, including breach of contract, contractual disputes and disputes relating to defective title, property misdescription or construction defects, including use of defective materials.  Although we have established warranty, claim and litigation reserves that we believe are adequate, due to the uncertainty inherent in litigation, legal proceedings may result in the award of substantial damages against us beyond our reserves.  Furthermore, plaintiffs may in certain of these legal proceedings seek class action status with potential class sizes that vary from case to case.  Class action lawsuits can be costly to defend, and if we were to lose any certified class action suit, it could result in substantial liability for us.  In addition, we are subject to potential lawsuits, arbitration proceedings and other claims in connection with our business.

With respect to certain general liability exposures, including construction defect and product liability claims, interpretation of underlying current and future trends, assessment of claims and the related liability and reserve estimation process require us to exercise significant judgment due to the complex nature of these exposures, with each exposure often exhibiting unique circumstances.  Furthermore, once claims are asserted for construction defects, it is difficult to determine the extent to which the assertion of these claims will expand geographically.  As a result, our insurance policies may not be available or adequate to cover any liability for damages, the cost of repairs, and/or the expense of litigation surrounding current claims, and future claims may arise out of events or circumstances not covered by insurance and not subject to effective indemnification agreements with our subcontractors.  Should such a situation arise, it may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

Failure by our directors, officers or employees to comply with applicable codes of conduct could materially and adversely affect us.

We have adopted a code of business conduct and ethics for our directors, officers and any employees.  Our adoption of this code and other standards of conduct is not a representation or warranty that all persons subject to this code or standards are or will be in complete compliance.  The failure of a director, officer or employee to comply with the applicable code or standards of conduct may result in termination of the relationship and/or adverse publicity, which could materially and adversely affect us.

Any joint venture investments that we make could be adversely affected by our lack of sole decision making authority, our reliance on co-venturers’ financial conditions and disputes between us and our co-venturers.

On November 1, 2016, we acquired a 50% ownership of WJH LLC (which we refer to as “WJH”), which is a successor to Wade Jurney Homes, Inc. and Wade Jurney of Florida, Inc. WJH primarily targets first-time homebuyers in the Southeastern United States.  The Company and Mr. Wade Jurney will share responsibility for all of WJH’s strategic decisions, with Mr. Wade Jurney continuing to manage the day-to-day operations under the existing operating model.

Although it is currently not a focus in our business strategy, we may in the future continue to co-invest with third parties through partnerships, joint ventures or other entities, acquiring non-controlling interests in or sharing responsibility for managing the affairs of a land acquisition and/or a development.  In this event, we would not be in a position to exercise sole decision-making authority regarding the acquisition and/or development, and our investment may be illiquid due to our lack of control.  Investments in partnerships, joint ventures, or other entities may, under certain circumstances, involve risks not present were a third party not involved, including the possibility that partners or co-venturers might become bankrupt, fail to fund their share of required capital contributions, make poor business decisions or block or delay necessary decisions.  Partners or co-venturers may have economic or other business interests or goals which are inconsistent with our business interests or goals, and may be in a position to take actions contrary to our policies or objectives.  Such investments may also have the potential risk of impasses on decisions, such as a sale, because neither we nor the partner or co-venturer would have full control over the partnership or joint venture.  Disputes between us and partners or co-venturers may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and/or directors from focusing their time and effort on our business.  In addition, we may in certain circumstances be liable for the actions of our third-party partners or co-venturers.

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An information systems interruption or breach in security could adversely affect us.

We rely on accounting, financial and operational management information systems to conduct our operations.  Any disruption in these systems could adversely affect our ability to conduct our business.  Furthermore, any security breach of information systems or data could result in a violation of applicable privacy and other laws, significant legal and financial exposure, damage to our reputation, and a loss of confidence in our security measures, which could harm our business.

Risks Related to Ownership of our Common Stock

A trading market for our common stock may not be sustained and our common stock prices could decline.

Although our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol, “CCS,” an active trading market for the shares of our common stock may not be sustained.  Accordingly, no assurance can be given as to the following:

·

the likelihood that an active trading market for shares of our common stock will be sustained;

·

the liquidity of any such market;

·

the ability of our stockholders to sell their shares of common stock; or

·

the price that our stockholders may obtain for their common stock.

In addition, our common stock has experienced price and volume volatility over the past year.  The market price and volume of our common stock may continue to experience fluctuations not only due to general stock market conditions but also due to government regulatory action, tax laws, interest rates and a change a change in sentiment in the market regarding our industry, operations or business prospects.  In addition to the other risk factors discussed in this section, the price and volume volatility of our common stock may be affected by:

·

factors influencing home purchases, such as availability of home mortgage loans and interest rates, credit criteria applicable to prospective borrowers, ability to sell existing residences, and homebuyer sentiment in general;

·

the operating and securities price performance of companies that investors consider comparable to us;

·

announcements of strategic developments, acquisitions and other material events by us or our competitors; 

·

changes in global financial markets and global economies and general market conditions, such as interest rates, commodity and equity prices and the value of financial assets;

·

additions or departures of key personnel;

·

operating results that vary from the expectations of securities analysts and investors;

·

actions by stockholders; and

·

passage of legislation or other regulatory developments that adversely affect us or the homebuilding industry.

If an active market is not maintained, or if our common stock continues to experience price and volume volatility, the market price of our common stock may decline.

Furthermore, our ability to raise funds through the issuance of equity or otherwise use our common stock as consideration is impacted by the price of our common stock.  A low stock price may adversely impact our ability to reduce our financial leverage, as measured by the ratio of total debt to total capital.  Continued high levels of leverage or significant increases may adversely affect our credit ratings and make it more difficult for us to access additional capital.  These factors may limit our ability to implement our operating and growth plans.

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If securities analysts do not publish, or cease publishing, research or reports about us, our business or our market, or if they change their recommendations regarding our stock adversely, the price of our common stock and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock could be influenced by any research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us, our business or our market.  If one or more of the analysts who covers us downgrades our common stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about us, our business or our market, the price of our common stock would likely decline.  If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our common stock could decrease, which could cause the price of our common stock and trading volume to decline.

Future offerings of debt securities, which would rank senior to our common stock upon our bankruptcy liquidation, and future offerings of equity securities that may be senior to our common stock for the purposes of dividend and liquidating distributions, may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

In the future, we may attempt to increase our capital resources by making offerings of debt securities or additional offerings of equity securities.  Upon bankruptcy or liquidation, holders of our debt securities and lenders with respect to other borrowings will receive a distribution of our available assets prior to the holders of our common stock.  Additional equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing stockholders or reduce the market price of our common stock, or both.  Our preferred stock, if issued, could have a preference on liquidating distributions or a preference on dividend payments or both that could limit our ability to pay dividends or make liquidating distributions to the holders of our common stock.  Our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control.  As a result, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings, and purchasers of our common stock bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the market price of our common stock and diluting their ownership interest in the Company.

Non-U.S. holders may be subject to United States federal income tax on gain realized on the sale or disposition of shares of our common stock.

Because of our holdings in United States real property interests, we believe we are and will remain a “United States real property holding corporation” (which we refer to as “USRPHC”) for United States federal income tax purposes.  As a USRPHC, our stock may be treated as a United States real property interest (which we refer to as “USRPI”), gains from the sale of which by non-U.S. holders would be subject to U.S. income tax and reporting obligations pursuant to the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act (which we refer to as “FIRPTA”).  Our common stock will not be treated as a USRPI if it is regularly traded on an established securities market, except in the case of a non-U.S. holder that actually or constructively holds more than five percent of such class of stock at any time during the shorter of the five-year period preceding the date of disposition or the holder’s holding period for such stock.  We anticipate that our common stock will continue to be regularly traded on the New York Stock Exchange.  However, no assurance can be given in this regard and no assurance can be given that our common stock will remain regularly traded in the future.  If our stock is treated as a USRPI, a non-U.S. holder would be subject to regular United States federal income tax with respect to any gain on such stock in the same manner as a taxable U.S. holder (subject to any applicable alternative minimum tax and a special alternative minimum tax in the case of nonresident alien individuals).  In addition, the purchaser of the stock would be required to withhold and remit to the IRS 10% of the purchase price unless an exception applies.  A non-U.S. holder also would be required to file a U.S. federal income tax return for any taxable year in which it realizes a gain from the disposition of our common stock that is subject to U.S. federal income tax.

Non-U.S. holders should consult their tax advisors concerning the consequences of disposing of shares of our common stock.





ITEM 1B.UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

 

None.



ITEM 2.PROPERTIES.

 

We lease our corporate headquarters located at 8390 East Crescent Parkway, Suite 650, Greenwood Village, Colorado. We also lease offices in the markets where we conduct business, but none of these properties are material to the operation of our business.





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ITEM  3.LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

Because of the nature of the homebuilding business, we and certain of our subsidiaries and affiliates have been named as defendants in various claims, complaints and other legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business.  In the opinion of our management, the outcome of these ordinary course matters will not have a material adverse effect upon our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.





ITEM  4.MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

 

Not applicable.

PART II



ITEM  5.MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.



Market Information



The shares of our common stock are listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol, “CCS.”  The following table sets forth high and low closing price ranges of our common stock for the periods indicated in the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, as reported by the New York Stock Exchange.



 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter Ended in 2017

 

High

 

Low

March 31,

 

$

25.40 

 

$

20.75 

June 30,

 

$

27.90 

 

$

24.35 

September 30,

 

$

26.10 

 

$

21.95 

December 31,

 

$

31.35 

 

$

25.20 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter Ended in 2016

 

High

 

Low

March 31,

 

$

17.07 

 

$

13.47 

June 30,

 

$

18.85 

 

$

16.20 

September 30,

 

$

21.51 

 

$

17.15 

December 31,

 

$

21.60 

 

$

19.20 



Holders

As of February 27, 2018, there were approximately 70 stockholders of record of our common stock.  On February 27, 2018, the last reported sale price of our common stock on the New York Stock Exchange was $31.15 per share.

Dividends

During the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, we did not declare or pay any dividends.

Stock Performance Graph

The graph below compares the cumulative total return of our common stock, the S&P 500 Index, the Dow Jones US Home Construction Index, and peer group companies for the periods from June 18, 2014, the date our common stock commenced trading on the New York Stock Exchange, to December 31, 2016.

It is assumed in the graph that $100 was invested in (1) our common stock; (2) the stocks of the companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index; (3) the stocks of the Dow Jones U.S. Home Construction Index; and (4) the stocks of the peer group companies, just prior to the commencement of the period and that all dividends received within a quarter were reinvested in that quarter.  The peer group index is composed of the following companies: AV Homes Inc., Beazer Homes USA, Inc., Inc., M/I Homes, Inc., M.D.C. Holdings, Inc., Tripointe Homes and William Lyon Homes.

The stock price performance shown on the following graph is not indicative of future price performance.

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 Comparison of Cumulative Total Return from June 18, 2014  (the Date our Common Stock Commenced Trading on the New York Stock Exchange) to December 31, 2017





Picture 1







Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The following table summarizes the number of shares of our common stock that were repurchased from certain employees of the Company during the quarter ended December 31, 2017.  Such shares were not repurchased pursuant to our stock repurchase program,

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but were repurchased to satisfy statutory minimum federal and state tax obligations associated with the vesting of restricted shares of common stock issued under our 2017 Omnibus Incentive Plan (which we refer to as our “2017 Incentive Plan”). 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Total number of shares purchased

 

Average price paid per share

 

Total number of shares purchased as part of publicly announced plans or programs

 

Maximum number of shares that may yet be purchased under the plans or programs

October

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased 10/1 through 10/31

 

14,459 

 

$

25.25 

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

November

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased 11/1 through 11/30

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

December

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased 12/1 through 12/31

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

Total

 

14,459 

 

$

25.25 

 

 

 

 

 













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ITEM 6.SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.



The data in this table should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto, which are included in “Item 8. Consolidated Financial Statements.”







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

Year Ended December 31,



 

2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

Consolidated Statements of Operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenues

 

$

1,423,799 

 

$

994,440 

 

$

734,489 

 

$

362,392 

 

$

171,133 

Income before income tax expense

 

$

84,164 

 

$

73,149 

 

$

60,305 

 

$

30,959 

 

$

18,073 

Net income

 

$

50,295 

 

$

49,540 

 

$

39,890 

 

$

20,022 

 

$

12,431 

Basic earnings per share

 

$

2.06 

 

 

2.34 

 

 

1.88 

 

 

1.03 

 

 

0.95 

Diluted earnings per share

 

$

2.03 

 

 

2.33 

 

 

1.88 

 

 

1.03 

 

 

0.95 

Balance Sheet Data (end of period):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

88,832 

 

$

29,450 

 

$

29,287 

 

$

33,462 

 

$

109,998 

Inventories

 

$

1,390,354 

 

$

857,885 

 

$

810,137 

 

$

556,323 

 

$

184,072 

Total assets

 

$

1,735,022 

 

$

1,007,528 

 

$

917,741 

 

$

670,616 

 

$

312,639 

Total debt

 

$

824,602 

 

$

454,008 

 

$

390,243 

 

$

224,247 

 

$

1,500 

Total liabilities

 

$

999,789 

 

$

533,892 

 

$

508,262 

 

$

305,411 

 

$

41,083 

Equity

 

$

735,233 

 

$

473,636 

 

$

409,479 

 

$

365,205 

 

$

271,556 

Other Operating Information (dollars in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of homes delivered

 

 

3,640 

 

 

2,825 

 

 

2,401 

 

 

1,046 

 

 

448 

Average sales price of homes delivered

 

$

386.1 

 

$

346.5 

 

$

302.1 

 

$

336.4 

 

$

382.0 

Backlog at end of period, number of homes

 

 

1,320 

 

 

749 

 

 

714 

 

 

772 

 

 

222 

Backlog at end of period, aggregate sales value

 

$

572,888 

 

$

302,823 

 

$

271,138 

 

$

246,327 

 

$

103,250 

Average sales price of homes in backlog

 

$

434.0 

 

$

404.3 

 

$

379.7 

 

$

319.1 

 

$

465.1 

Net new home contracts

 

 

3,814 

 

 

2,860 

 

 

2,356 

 

 

1,042 

 

 

406 

Selling communities at period end

 

 

119 

 

 

89 

 

 

88 

 

 

75 

 

 

23 













ITEM 7.     MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

Overview

We are engaged in the development, design, construction, marketing and sale of single-family attached and detached homes in metropolitan areas in the States of California, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington.  In many of our projects, in addition to building homes, we are responsible for the entitlement and development of the underlying land.  Our homebuilding operations are organized into the following four reportable segments based on the geographic regions in which we operate: West, Mountain, Texas and Southeast.   Additionally, our indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries, Inspire Home Loans Inc. and Parkway Title, LLC, which provide mortgage services and title services, respectively, to our home buyers have been identified as our Financial Services operating segment.



We build and sell an extensive range of home types across a variety of price points. Our emphasis is on acquiring well-located land positions and offering quality homes with innovative design elements.



Results of Operations – Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2016



During the year ended December 31, 2017, we experienced moderate improvement in the homebuilding market throughout our operating segments.  The current homebuilding market enjoys a stable macro-economic environment, which includes stable employment growth as well as growth in median household incomes.   These factors along with low levels of existing housing inventory resulted in an environment in which we were able to achieve increases in net new home contracts, home deliveries, and average sales price for the year ended December 31, 2017 of 33.4%, 28.8%, and 11.4%, respectively, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016.  The

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increases in net new home contracts, home deliveries and average sales price, along with our continued focus on cost control and investing in our infrastructure prudently as we expand, resulted in total revenue and income before tax of $1.4 billion and $84.2 million, respectively for the year ended December 31, 2017, which represented a 43.2% and 15.1% increase, respectively, over the year ended December 31, 2016. 

In August 2017, we acquired UCP, Inc. (which we refer to as “UCP”), which was a homebuilder and land developer with expertise in residential land acquisition, development and entitlement, as well as home design, construction and sales.  Our acquisition of UCP included approximately 4,199 owned lots within 43 total communities located in the States of California, Washington, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The 4,199 lots included 346 homes in backlog and 59 model homes.  The results of UCP are included in our financial statements from August 4, 2017 through December 31, 2017 and consisted of $201.4 million in revenue related to 403 home deliveries.

Additionally in October 2017, we acquired substantially all the assets and operations and assumed certain liabilities of Sundquist Homes and affiliates, a homebuilder with operations in the greater Seattle, Washington area, for approximately $50 million. The acquired assets consisted of approximately 147 owned lots. The 147 lots included 45 homes in backlog.  The results of Sundquist Homes are included in our financial statements from October 31, 2017 through December 31, 2017 and consisted of $18.7 million in revenue related to 24 deliveries.

We believe our operations are well positioned for future growth as a result of the strong markets in which we operate, our product offerings which span the home buying segment as well as current and future inventories of attractive land positions.  As we have grown, we have continued to focus on maintaining prudent leverage and, as a result, we believe we are well positioned to execute on our growth strategy in order to optimize our stockholder returns. 



We anticipate the homebuilding markets in each of our operating segments to continue to be tied to the local economy and, to a lesser degree, the macro-economic environment.  Accordingly, our net sales, home deliveries, and average sales price in future years could be negatively affected by economic conditions such as decreases in employment and median household incomes, as well as decreases in household formations and increasing supply of inventories.  Additionally, our results could be impacted by a decrease in home affordability as a result of price appreciation or significant increases in mortgage interest rates or tightening of mortgage lending standards. 



Strategy



Our strategy is focused on increasing the returns on our inventory while generating strong profitability. In general, we are focused on the following initiatives:

·

Maintaining a strong balance sheet and prudent use of leverage as we grow;

·

Offering products that appeal to a broad range of entry-level, move-up, lifestyle and luxury homebuyers based on each local market in which we operate;

·

Maintaining a strong pipeline of future land holdings, including utilizing lot option contracts to manage our risk to land holdings;

·

Expanding into new markets that meet our underwriting criteria either through organic start-up operations or through acquisitions of existing homebuilders; and

·

Controlling costs, including costs of home sales revenue and selling and general administrative expenses, to achieve increased profitability.



Our operating strategy has resulted in growth in revenue and income before income taxes over the last five years, and we believe it will continue to produce positive results.  Our operating strategy will continue to evolve to market changes, and we cannot provide any assurances that our strategies will continue to be successful. 



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The following table summarizes our results of operation for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016. 

 









 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

2017

 

2016

 

Amount

 

%



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home sales revenues

 

$

1,405,443 

 

 

$

978,733 

 

 

$

426,710 

 

 

43.6 

%

Land sales revenues

 

 

8,503 

 

 

 

15,707 

 

 

 

(7,204)

 

 

(45.9)

%



 

 

1,413,946 

 

 

 

994,440 

 

 

 

419,506 

 

 

42.2 

%

Financial services revenue

 

 

9,853 

 

 

 

 —

 

 

 

9,853 

 

 

 —

 

Total revenues

 

 

1,423,799 

 

 

 

994,440 

 

 

 

429,359 

 

 

43.2 

%

Homebuilding cost of revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of home sales revenues

 

 

(1,153,359)

 

 

 

(786,127)

 

 

 

(367,232)

 

 

46.7 

%

Cost of land sales and other revenues

 

 

(6,516)

 

 

 

(14,217)

 

 

 

7,701 

 

 

(54.2)

%



 

 

(1,159,875)

 

 

 

(800,344)

 

 

 

(359,531)

 

 

44.9 

%

Financial services costs

 

 

(8,664)

 

 

 

 —

 

 

 

(8,664)

 

 

 

 

Selling, general, and administrative

 

 

(176,304)

 

 

 

(122,224)

 

 

 

(54,080)

 

 

44.2 

%

Acquisition expense

 

 

(9,905)

 

 

 

(490)

 

 

 

(9,415)

 

 

1,921.4 

%

Equity in income of unconsolidated subsidiaries

 

 

12,176 

 

 

 

191 

 

 

 

11,985 

 

 

6,274.9 

%

Other income (expense)

 

 

2,937 

 

 

 

1,576 

 

 

 

1,361 

 

 

86.4 

%

Income before income tax expense

 

 

84,164 

 

 

 

73,149 

 

 

 

11,015 

 

 

15.1 

%

Income tax expense

 

 

(33,869)

 

 

 

(23,609)

 

 

 

(10,260)

 

 

43.5 

%

Net income

 

$

50,295 

 

 

$

49,540 

 

 

$

755 

 

 

1.5 

%

Earnings per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

2.06 

 

 

$

2.34 

 

 

$

(0.28)

 

 

(12.0)

%

Diluted

 

$

2.03 

 

 

$

2.33 

 

 

$

(0.30)

 

 

(12.9)

%

Adjusted diluted earnings per share(1)

 

$

2.87 

 

 

$

2.36 

 

 

$

0.51 

 

 

21.6 

%

Other Operating Information (dollars in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of homes delivered

 

 

3,640 

 

 

 

2,825 

 

 

 

815.0 

 

 

28.8 

%

Average sales price of homes delivered

 

$

386.1 

 

 

$

346.5 

 

 

$

39.6 

 

 

11.4 

%

Homebuilding gross margin percentage

 

 

17.9 

%

 

 

19.7 

%

 

 

(1.8)

%

 

(9.1)

%

Adjusted homebuilding gross margin excluding interest and purchase price accounting for acquired work in process inventory (1)

 

 

21.4 

%

 

 

21.7 

%

 

 

(0.3)

%

 

(1.4)

%

Cancellation rate

 

 

21 

%

 

 

20 

%

 

 

%

 

5.0 

%

Backlog at end of period, number of homes

 

 

1,320 

 

 

 

749 

 

 

 

571 

 

 

76.2 

%

Backlog at end of period, aggregate sales value

 

$

572,888 

 

 

$

302,823 

 

 

$

270,065 

 

 

89.2 

%

Average sales price of homes in backlog

 

$

434.0 

 

 

$

404.3 

 

 

$

29.7 

 

 

7.3 

%

Net new home contracts

 

 

3,814 

 

 

 

2,860 

 

 

 

954 

 

 

33.4 

%

Selling communities at period end

 

 

119 

 

 

 

89 

 

 

 

30 

 

 

33.7 

%

Average selling communities

 

 

101 

 

 

 

89 

 

 

 

12 

 

 

13.5 

%

Total owned and controlled lot inventory

 

 

30,784 

 

 

 

18,296 

 

 

 

12,488 

 

 

68.3 

%

Adjusted EBITDA(1)

 

$

150,477 

 

 

$

100,343 

 

 

$

50,134 

 

 

50.0 

%

Adjusted income before income tax expense(1)

 

$

109,694 

 

 

$

74,028 

 

 

$

35,666 

 

 

48.2 

%

Adjusted net income(1)

 

$

71,082 

 

 

$

50,135 

 

 

$

20,947 

 

 

41.8 

%

Net debt to net capital(1)

 

 

48.7 

%

 

 

46.1 

%

 

 

2.6 

%

 

5.6 

%

(1)Non-GAAP financial measure.









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Results of Operations by Segment

   



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

New Homes Delivered

 

Average Sales Price of Homes Delivered

 

Home Sales Revenues

 

Income before Income Tax



 

Year Ended December 31,

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

Year Ended December 31,



 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016

West

 

 

398 

 

 

 —

 

$

529.4 

 

$

 —

 

$

210,696 

 

$

 —

 

$

14,640 

 

$

 —

Mountain

 

 

1,465 

 

 

1,222 

 

$

418.0 

 

$

409.5 

 

 

612,392 

 

 

500,386 

 

 

75,704 

 

 

66,613 

Texas

 

 

413 

 

 

338 

 

$

389.6 

 

$

400.0 

 

 

160,891 

 

 

135,207 

 

 

10,952 

 

 

2,686 

Southeast

 

 

1,364 

 

 

1,265 

 

$

309.0 

 

$

271.3 

 

 

421,464 

 

 

343,140 

 

 

29,662 

 

 

31,138 

Financial Services

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

1,225 

 

 

 —

Corporate

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(48,019)

 

 

(27,288)

Total

 

 

3,640 

 

 

2,825 

 

$

386.1 

 

$

346.5 

 

$

1,405,443 

 

$

978,733 

 

$

84,164 

 

$

73,149 



West 



In our West segment, for the year ended December 31, 2017, our income before income tax increased by $14.6 million to $14.6 million.  We acquired the entirety of our operations in our West segment in conjunction with our acquisitions of UCP and Sundquist Homes as discussed above.  Since completing these acquisitions, we delivered 398 new homes with an average price of $529.4 thousand and generated $210.7 million in home sales revenues in our West segment. 

  

Mountain 



In our Mountain segment, for the year ended December 31, 2017, our income before income tax increased by $9.1 million to $75.7 million, as compared to $66.6 million for the same period in 2016.  This increase is related to an increase in the number of homes delivered and an increase in the average selling price of those homes in 2017.  

  

Texas 



In our Texas segment, for the year ended December 31, 2017, our income before income tax increased by $8.3 million to $11.0 million as compared $2.7 million for the same period in 2016.  This increase is primarily related to an increase in the number of homes delivered in 2017.  

  

Southeast 



In our Southeast segment, for the year ended December 31, 2017, our income before income tax decreased by $1.5 million to $29.7 million, as compared to $31.1 million for the same period in 2016.  The number of homes delivered, home sales revenue and average selling price all increased in our Southeast segment year over year.  However, as we have recently started operations in North Carolina, our selling, general and administrative expenses have increased without a corresponding increase in revenues.

  

Financial Services 



Our indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries, Inspire Home Loans Inc. and Parkway Title, LLC, which provide mortgage services and title services, respectively, to our home buyers have been identified as our Financial Services segment.  We began providing mortgage services to our customers during the second quarter of 2017.  Substantially all of the loans we originate are sold in the secondary market within a short period of time after origination, generally within 30 days.  During the year ended December 31, 2017, we originated and closed 550 loans with a total principal amount of $172.2 million.  



Corporate 



During the year ended December 31, 2017, our Corporate segment generated losses of $48.0 million, as compared to losses of $27.3 million for the same period in 2016.  The increase in expenses during the year ended December 31, 2017 was primarily attributed to the following: (1) an increase of $9.4 million in acquisition expenses, (2)  an increase of $11.6 million in compensation related expenses, including non-cash expenses for share based payments and an increase in the  number of employees after our acquisition of UCP and

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Sundquist Homes, (3) an increase of $3.4 million in information technology related expenses, and (4) an increase of $1.0 million in advertising costs, partially offset by an increase in equity in income from unconsolidated subsidiaries.



Homebuilding Gross Margin

Homebuilding gross margin represents home sales revenue less cost of home sales revenues. Our homebuilding gross margin percentage, which represents homebuilding gross margin divided by home sales revenues, decreased for the year ended December 31, 2017 to 17.9%, as compared to 19.7% for the year ended December 31, 2016.  The decrease is primarily driven by purchase accounting for acquired work in process inventory.

In the following table, we calculate our gross margins adjusting for interest in cost of sales, and purchase price accounting for acquired work in process inventory.  See “Critical Accounting Policies” below and Footnote 3 (Business Combinations) of our Consolidated Financial Statements for additional discussion regarding our methodology for estimating the fair value of acquired work in process inventory.

(dollars in thousands)   





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Year Ended December 31,



 

2017

 

% 

 

2016

 

% 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home sales revenues

 

$

1,405,443 

 

100.0 

%

 

$

978,733 

 

100.0 

%

Cost of home sales revenues

 

 

(1,153,359)

 

82.1 

%

 

 

(786,127)

 

80.3 

%

Gross margin from home sales

 

 

252,084 

 

17.9 

%

 

 

192,606 

 

19.7 

%

Add: Interest in cost of home sales revenues

 

 

32,898 

 

2.3 

%

 

 

19,502 

 

2.0 

%

Adjusted homebuilding gross margin excluding interest (1)

 

 

284,982 

 

20.3 

%

 

 

212,108 

 

21.7