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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 

 

 

(Mark One)

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                  to                

 

Commission file number 001-33892

 


 

AMC ENTERTAINMENT HOLDINGS, INC.

 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

26-0303916
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

One AMC Way
11500 Ash Street, Leawood, KS
(Address of principal executive offices)

66211
(Zip Code)

 

(913) 213-2000

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:

 


 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

 

Title of Each Class

    

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Class A Common Stock, par value of $0.01 per share

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None.


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☒  No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐  No ☒

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒  No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulations S-T (§229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒  No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company,  or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and emerging growth company in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

 

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer ☐

Non-accelerated filer ☐

 

 

(Do not check if a

 

 

smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company ☐

Emerging Growth Company ☐

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐  No ☒

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2017, computed by reference to the price at which the registrant’s Class A common stock was last sold on the New York Stock Exchange on such date was $1,253,037,513 (55,078,572 shares at a closing price per share of $22.75).

 

Shares of Class A common stock outstanding—51,957,051 shares at February 23, 2018

Shares of Class B common stock outstanding—75,826,927 shares at February 23, 2018

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Certain portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement, in connection with its 2018 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed within 120 days of December 31, 2017, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

 


 

Table of Contents

AMC ENTERTAINMENT HOLDINGS, INC.

FORM 10-K

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2017

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

Page

PART I 

Item 1. 

 

Business

 

4

Item 1A. 

 

Risk Factors

 

23

Item 1B. 

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

36

Item 2. 

 

Properties

 

36

Item 3. 

 

Legal Proceedings

 

37

Item 4. 

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

37

PART II 

Item 5. 

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

38

Item 6. 

 

Selected Financial Data

 

42

Item 7. 

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

44

Item 7A. 

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

76

Item 8. 

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

77

Item 9. 

 

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

173

Item 9A. 

 

Controls and Procedures

 

173

Item 9B. 

 

Other Information

 

173

PART III 

Item 10. 

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

174

Item 11. 

 

Executive Compensation

 

174

Item 12. 

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

174

Item 13. 

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

174

Item 14. 

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

174

PART IV 

Item 15. 

 

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

175

Item 16 

 

Form 10-K Summary

 

183

 

 

 

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Forward-Looking Statements

 

In addition to historical information, this Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of words such as “may,” “will,” “forecast,” “estimate,” “project,” “intend,” “plan,” “expect,” “should,” “believe” and other similar expressions that predict or indicate future events or trends or that are not statements of historical matters. Similarly, certain statements made herein and elsewhere regarding our recent acquisitions are also forward-looking statements, including statements regarding the expected benefits of the acquisition on our future business, operations and financial performance and our ability to successfully integrate the recently acquired businesses.  These forward-looking statements are based only on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. These forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors, including those discussed in “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

·

risks relating to motion picture production and performance;

 

·

our lack of control over distributors of films;

 

·

intense competition in the geographic areas in which we operate;

 

·

increased use of alternative film delivery methods or other forms of entertainment;

 

·

shrinking exclusive theatrical release windows;

 

·

general and international economic, political, social and financial market conditions and other risks including the effects of the exit of the United Kingdom from the European Union;

 

·

risks and uncertainties relating to our significant indebtedness;

 

·

limitations on the availability of capital may prevent us from deploying strategic initiatives and continue our share repurchase program;

 

·

certain covenants in the agreements that govern our indebtedness may limit our ability to take advantage of certain business opportunities;

 

·

our ability to achieve expected synergies, benefits and performance from our recent strategic theatre acquisitions and strategic initiatives;

 

·

our ability to comply with, and the effects of, a settlement we entered into with the United States Department of Justice pursuant to which we agreed to divest our holdings in National CineMedia, LLC (“NCM”);

 

·

our ability to refinance our indebtedness on terms favorable to us;

 

·

optimizing our theatre circuit through new construction and the transformation of our existing theatres may be subject to delay and unanticipated costs;

 

·

failures, unavailability or security breaches of our information systems;

 

·

risks relating to impairment losses, including with respect to goodwill and other intangibles, and theatre and other closure charges;

 

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·

our ability to utilize net operating loss carryforwards to reduce our future tax liability or valuation allowances taken with respect to deferred tax assets;

 

·

review by antitrust authorities in connection with acquisition opportunities;

 

·

our investment and equity in earnings from NCM may be negatively impacted by the competitive environment in which NCM operates and by the risks associated with its strategic initiatives;

 

·

risks relating to unexpected costs or unknown liabilities relating to recently completed acquisitions;

 

·

risks relating to the incurrence of legal liability, including costs associated with recently filed securities class action lawsuits;

 

·

dependence on key personnel for current and future performance and our ability to attract and retain senior executives and other key personnel, including in connection with any future acquisitions;

 

·

risks of poor financial results may prevent us from deploying strategic initiatives;

 

·

operating a business in international markets AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc. (“AMC”) is unfamiliar with, including acceptance by movie-goers of AMC initiatives that are new to those markets;

 

·

increased costs in order to comply or resulting from a failure to comply with governmental regulation, including the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) and the impact of governmental investigations concerning potentially anticompetitive conduct, including film clearances and partnering with other major exhibitors in joint ventures; and

 

·

we may not generate sufficient cash flows or have sufficient restricted payment capacity under our Senior Secured Credit Facility or the indentures governing our debt securities to pay our intended dividends on our Class A and Class B common stock.

 

This list of factors that may affect future performance and the accuracy of forward-looking statements is illustrative but not exhaustive. In addition, new risks and uncertainties may arise from time to time. Accordingly, all forward-looking statements should be evaluated with an understanding of their inherent uncertainty.

 

Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements for any reason. Actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future.

 

Readers are urged to consider these factors carefully in evaluating the forwardlooking statements. For further information about these and other risks and uncertainties as well as strategic initiatives, see Item 1A. “Risk Factors” and Item 1. “Business” in this Annual Report on Form 10K.

 

 

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PART I

 

Item 1.  Business

 

General Development of Business

 

AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc. (“Holdings”), through its direct and indirect subsidiaries, including American Multi Cinema, Inc. and its subsidiaries, (collectively with Holdings, unless the context otherwise requires, the “Company” or “AMC”), is principally involved in the theatrical exhibition business and owns, operates or has interests in theatres primarily located in the United States and Europe. AMC is an indirect subsidiary of Dalian Wanda Group Co., Ltd. (“Wanda”), a Chinese private conglomerate.

 

As of December 31, 2017, Wanda owned approximately 59.37% of Holdings’ outstanding common stock and 81.43% of the combined voting power of Holdings’ outstanding common stock and has the power to control Holdings’ affairs and policies, including with respect to the election of directors (and, through the election of directors, the appointment of management), entering into of mergers, sales of substantially all of our assets and other extraordinary transactions.

 

Our business was founded in Kansas City, Missouri in 1920. Holdings was incorporated under the laws of the state of Delaware on June 6, 2007. We maintain our principal executive offices at One AMC Way, 11500 Ash Street, Leawood, Kansas 66211.

 

Recent Developments

 

Income Taxes:  In the fourth quarter of calendar 2017, we recorded the impact of the change in the U.S. enacted federal income tax rate from 35% to 21% which reduced our deferred tax assets. In the fourth quarter and in connection with the preparation of our 2017 consolidated financial statements, we also determined that realization of our deferred tax assets in the U.S. tax jurisdictions was not more likely than not, primarily as a result of cumulative net losses recorded for three years and we recorded a full valuation allowance for our deferred tax assets in U.S. tax jurisdictions. As a result of the change in enacted tax rate and recording a full valuation allowance for our deferred tax assets in U.S. tax jurisdictions, we recorded a charge to our income tax provision of approximately $310 million in our U.S. markets for the fourth quarter of calendar 2017. See Note 9 – Income Taxes in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements under Part II, Item 8, hereof for further information.

 

Nordic Acquisition:  On March 28, 2017, we completed the acquisition of Nordic Cinema Group Holding AB (“Nordic”) for cash. The purchase price for Nordic was SEK 5,756 million ($654.9 million), which includes payment of interest on the equity value and repayment of shareholder loans. As a result of the acquisition, we assumed the indebtedness of Nordic of approximately SEK 1,269 million ($144.4 million) and indebtedness of approximately €156 million ($169.5 million) as of March 28, 2017, which was refinanced subsequent to the acquisition. We also repaid approximately SEK 13.5 million ($1.6 million) and approximately €1.0 million ($1.1 million) of interest rate swaps related to the indebtedness, which were repaid following the acquisition. All amounts have been converted into U.S. Dollar amounts assuming an SEK/USD exchange rate of 0.11378 and an EUR/USD exchange rate of 1.0865, which were the exchange rates on March 27, 2017. Nordic operated or held a partial interest in 122 theatres with 683 screens in seven European countries: Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Denmark. This acquisition is now included within our International markets operating segment.

 

Department of Justice Final Judgment:  In connection with the acquisition of Carmike Cinemas, Inc. (“Carmike”) we entered into a Final Judgment with the United States Department of Justice (“DOJ”) on March  7, 2017, pursuant to which we agreed to take certain actions to enable us to complete our acquisition of Carmike, including the divestiture of 17 movie theatres (and certain related assets) in the 15 local markets where AMC and Carmike were direct competitors to one or more acquirers acceptable to the DOJ (we received gross proceeds of $25.1 million related to divested theatre assets that were held for sale and sold during the year ended December 31, 2017); establish firewalls to ensure we do not obtain National CineMedia, LLC’s (“NCM”), National CineMedia, Inc.’s (“NCM, Inc” and collectively with NCM LLC “NCM”), Screenvision’s or other exhibitors competitively sensitive information; relinquish seats on NCM’s board of directors and all other NCM governance rights; and transfer 24 theatres comprising 384 screens (which represent less than 2% of NCM’s total network) to the Screenvision network. This includes five Carmike theatres that implemented the Screenvision network prior to completion of the Carmike acquisition, an AMC theatre

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required to extend its existing term with the Screenvision network, and an AMC theatre that was also included in the divestitures. The settlement agreement also requires us  to divest the majority of our equity interests in NCM, so that by June 20, 2019, we own no more than 4.99% of NCM’s outstanding equity interests on a fully converted basis per the following schedule: (i) on or before December 20, 2017, AMC must own no more than 15% of NCM’s outstanding equity interests; (ii) on or before December 20, 2018, AMC must own no more than 7.5% of NCM’s outstanding equity interests; and (iii) on or before June 20, 2019 AMC must own no more than 4.99% of NCM’s outstanding equity interests. We sold 14,800,000 NCM, Inc. common shares during the year ended December 31, 2017 and have satisfied the DOJ divestiture requirements related to NCM for calendar 2017, as calculated pursuant to the Final Judgment.  In addition, in accordance with the terms of the settlement, effective December 20, 2016, Craig R. Ramsey, executive vice president and Chief Financial Officer of the Company, resigned his position as a member of the Board of Directors of NCM, Inc. and we relinquished certain other governance rights.

 

NCM Agreement:  On March 9, 2017, we reached an agreement with NCM to implement the requirements of the Final Judgment entered in connection with the DOJ approval of the Carmike transaction. Pursuant to the agreement, we received 18,425,423 NCM common units in March 2017 related to annual attendance at the Carmike theatres and 361,892 NCM common units related to the 2016 common unit adjustment. Because the Carmike theatres were subject to a pre-existing agreement with a third-party and will not receive advertising services from NCM, we will be obligated to make quarterly payments to NCM reflecting the estimated value of the advertising services at the Carmike theatres as if NCM had provided such services. The quarterly payments will continue until the earlier of (i) the date the theatres are transferred to the NCM network or (ii) expiration of the ESA with NCM. All calculations will be made pursuant to the terms of the existing ESA and Common Unit Adjustment Agreement with NCM. With regard to the existing AMC theatres on the NCM network that are required under the Final Judgment to be transferred to another advertising provider, we returned 2,850,453 NCM LLC common units (valued at $36.4 million) to NCM in March 2017, calculated under the Common Unit Adjustment Agreement as if such theatres had been disposed of on March 3, 2017. We are not obligated to make quarterly payments with respect to the transferred theatres. In addition, we returned 1,807,220 additional NCM LLC common units (valued at $22.6 million) in exchange for a waiver of exclusivity by NCM as to the required transferred theatres for the term of the Final Judgment, which was classified as General and administrative: Merger, acquisition and transaction costs when the common units were returned to NCM during the three months ended March 31, 2017.

 

NCM Disposition:  On September 18, 2017, we entered into an agreement to sell 12,000,000 common shares in NCM, Inc. for approximately $73.1 million, representing a price per share of $6.09. The sale was completed on September 20, 2017, and we recognized a loss on sale of approximately $17.4 million including transaction costs on the sale of the shares. On September 29, 2017, we sold an additional 2,800,000 common shares of NCM, Inc. for approximately $18.2 million representing a price per share of $6.49. We recognized a loss on sale of approximately $3.1 million including transaction costs on the sale of the shares.

 

Additional Public Offering:  On February 13, 2017, we completed an additional public offering of 19,047,619 shares of Class A common stock at a price of $31.50 per share. In connection with the additional public offering, the underwriters partially exercised their option to purchase an additional 1,283,255 shares of Class A common stock. As a result, the total size of the offering was 20,330,874 shares of Class A common stock and the net proceeds to Holdings were approximately $616.8 million after deducting underwriting discounts, commissions and offering expenses. We used a portion of the net proceeds to repay the aggregate principal amount of an interim bridge loan of $350.0 million for the Carmike acquisition and for general corporate purposes. 

 

Carmike Acquisition:  On December 21, 2016, we completed the acquisition of Carmike for cash and stock. The purchase price for Carmike was $858.2 million comprised of cash of $584.3 million and 8,189,808 shares of our Class A common stock with a fair value of $273.9 million (based on a closing share price of $33.45 per share on December 20, 2016). We also assumed debt of $230.0 million aggregate principal amount of 6.00% Senior Secured Notes due June 15, 2023 (the “Senior Secured Notes due 2023”) in connection with the acquisition of Carmike. As of the acquisition date, Carmike operated 271 theatres and 2,923 screens located in 41 states.

 

Odeon Acquisition: On November 30, 2016, we completed the acquisition of Odeon and UCI Cinemas Holdings Limited (“Odeon”) for cash and stock. The purchase price for Odeon was $637.1 million, comprised of cash of $480.3 million and 4,536,466 shares of Class A common stock with a fair value of $156.7 million (based on a closing sale price of $34.55 per share on November 29, 2017). In addition, we repaid indebtedness of Odeon of $593.2 million at closing. As of the acquisition date, Odeon operated 242 theatres with 2,243 screens in four major markets:

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United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and Germany; and three smaller markets: Austria, Portugal and Ireland. This acquisition is now included within our International markets reportable segment. In May 2017, we disposed of one theatre acquired from Odeon as required by the United Kingdom’s Competition and Markets Authority requiring a payment by us of $11.0 million for the sale. 

 

See Other Acquisitions, Dispositions, Financings and Developments below for additional information about financing for the Odeon, Carmike and Nordic acquisitions. The Odeon, Carmike and Nordic acquisitions are referred to herein as the “Acquisitions”.

 

Financial Information about Segments

 

Beginning with our Odeon acquisition in 2016, we identified two reportable segments for our theatrical exhibition operations, U.S. markets and International markets. Our International markets segment includes the operations of Nordic this year as a result of the Nordic acquisition. For information about our operating segments, see Note 15 – Operating Segments in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements under Part II, Item 8 hereof.

 

Narrative Description of Business

 

We are the world’s largest theatrical exhibition company and an industry leader in innovation and operational excellence. Over the course of our nearly 100 year history, we have pioneered many of the theatrical exhibition industry’s most important innovations. We introduced Multiplex theatres in the 1960s and the North American stadium-seated Megaplex theatre format in the 1990s. Most recently, we revolutionized movie-going with the deployment of our theatre renovations featuring plush, powered recliner seating. Our growth has been driven by a combination of organic growth through reinvestment in our existing assets and through the acquisition of some of the most respected companies in the theatrical exhibition industry.

 

The combination of AMC, Odeon, Carmike and Nordic makes us the largest theatre operator in the world with 1,014 theatres and 11,169 screens in 15 countries as of December 31, 2017. We are the #1 theatre operator in the United States, the #1 theatre operator in the United Kingdom-Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania; the #2 theatre operator in Norway, Austria and Portugal and the #4 theatre operator in Germany. We have operations in four of the world’s ten largest economies, including four of the five largest European economies (the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and Germany). Additionally, the combined company is the largest global procurer in theatrical exhibition of film, food and beverage items, lighting and theatre supplies.

 

As of December 31, 2017, we owned, operated or held interests in 649 theatres with a total of 8,224 screens in the United States and 365 theatres and 2,945 screens in European markets. With operations in 44 states and the District of Columbia, approximately 52% of the U.S. population lives within 10 miles of one of our theatres. We have a diversified footprint with complementary global geographic and guest demographic profiles, which we believe gives our circuit a unique profile and offers strategic and operational advantages. We operate productive theaters in the top markets in the United States and have the #1 market share in the top three markets: New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. Our top five markets, in each of which we hold the #1 or #2 share position, are New York (44% share), Los Angeles (27%), Chicago (44%), Philadelphia (35%) and Dallas (29%). Strategically, these markets and our theatres in them are diverse, operationally complex and, in many cases, the scarcity of new theatre opportunities creates a significant competitive advantage for established locations against newcomers or alternative entertainment options.

 

Our theatrical exhibition revenues are generated primarily from box office admissions and theatre food and beverage sales. We offer consumers a broad range of entertainment alternatives including traditional film programming, independent and foreign films, performing arts, music and sports. We also offer food and beverage alternatives beyond traditional concession items, including made-to-order meals, customized coffee, healthy snacks, beer, wine, premium cocktails and dine-in theatre options. The balance of our revenues is generated from ancillary sources, including on‑screen advertising, fees earned from our AMC Stubs® customer loyalty program, rental of theatre auditoriums, income from gift card and exchange ticket sales, and on‑line ticketing fees.

 

Approximately 347 million consumers have attended AMC, Odeon and Nordic theatre circuits, combined for the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

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As a result of our ongoing focus to improve the quality of the movie-going experience, AMC theatres continue to maintain top-box customer satisfaction scores of nearly 60% and industry leading theatre productivity metrics. Over the period from the beginning of 2011 to December 31, 2017, we believe we have invested more than our comparable peers and believe our investments are yielding higher rates of return. According to publicly available information for our most comparable peers in the U.S. market, for the year ended December 31, 2017, our U.S. markets were #1 or #2 in revenues per patron ($15.45), food and beverage per patron ($5.06), and average ticket price ($9.67). We believe that it is the quality of our theatre locations and our customer‑focused innovation that continue to drive improved productivity per location (which we measure as increases in admissions revenues per screen relative to the industry and/or food and beverage revenues per patron).

 

To ensure that we are an imaginative and bold innovator today and in the years ahead, we have established the following key priorities.

 

·

Through our marketing programs we plan to strengthen the bonds with our current guests and create new connections with potential guests, to drive more attendance and increase market share. Our focus is to capture guests’ attention before they even leave their homes by paying close attention to our brands, our loyalty program and our communication with movie-goers via the internet, either directly or through social media;

 

·

We have a keen focus on the quality of on‑screen presentation and programing content. We plan to continue investing in technical innovation that will allow us to enhance the consumer experience through premium formats such as IMAX®, Dolby Cinema™, 3D and other premium format offerings. Additionally, in recognizing the varied tastes of our guests we will continue to explore offerings of alternative content such as live concerts, sporting events, Broadway shows, opera and other non‑traditional programming to provide incremental revenue;

 

·

We expect to continue deployment of our proven theatre innovations while simultaneously developing new concepts and initiatives that will elevate the movie-going experience at our theatres;

 

·

We are committed to deploying new technologies that will allow us to prosper and thrive even as consumers look to other ways to watch movies;

 

·

We plan for our growth to be driven through our guest‑focused strategy and will continue to explore growth through profitable acquisitions. We believe that acquisitions offer us additional opportunities to introduce our proven guest focused strategies to new movie-goers and will generate meaningful benefits to guests, associates, studio partners and our shareholders;

 

·

Studios, film makers and other institutions of the movie industry, whether in Hollywood or abroad, are valued partners with whom we must have cooperative and productive relationships; and

 

·

We will continue to motivate our associates by generating pride in their employment at AMC. Because so much of our guest satisfaction is determined by the service delivery of our theatre teams, taking good care of our associates should translate in turn to their taking good care of our guests.

 

We plan to continue investing in our theatres and upgrading the consumer experience to take greater advantage of incremental revenue-generating opportunities, primarily through an array of improved and differentiated customer experiences in (1) more comfort and convenience; (2) food and beverage; (3) engagement and loyalty; (4) sight and

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sound; and (5) targeted programming. The following table provides detail with respect to the geographic location of our theatrical exhibition circuit as of December 31, 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Markets

    

Theatres(1)

    

Screens(1)

 

Alabama

 

18

 

232

 

Arizona

 

12

 

194

 

Arkansas

 

 6

 

61

 

California

 

58

 

784

 

Colorado

 

15

 

199

 

Connecticut

 

 6

 

74

 

Delaware

 

 1

 

14

 

Florida

 

42

 

656

 

Georgia

 

35

 

438

 

Idaho

 

 1

 

11

 

Illinois

 

54

 

612

 

Indiana

 

25

 

329

 

Iowa

 

 7

 

92

 

Kansas

 

 8

 

113

 

Kentucky

 

 7

 

70

 

Louisiana

 

 7

 

99

 

Maryland

 

12

 

132

 

Massachusetts

 

10

 

133

 

Michigan

 

19

 

251

 

Minnesota

 

10

 

126

 

Missouri

 

12

 

150

 

Montana

 

 5

 

52

 

Nebraska

 

 5

 

57

 

Nevada

 

 2

 

28

 

New Hampshire

 

 1

 

10

 

New Jersey

 

27

 

356

 

New Mexico

 

 2

 

14

 

New York

 

26

 

280

 

North Carolina

 

25

 

338

 

North Dakota

 

 4

 

30

 

Ohio

 

16

 

205

 

Oklahoma

 

18

 

182

 

Oregon

 

 1

 

12

 

Pennsylvania

 

29

 

322

 

South Carolina

 

 8

 

80

 

South Dakota

 

 4

 

31

 

Tennessee

 

22

 

255

 

Texas

 

46

 

694

 

Utah

 

 3

 

33

 

Virginia

 

12

 

164

 

Washington

 

14

 

166

 

West Virginia

 

 2

 

20

 

Wisconsin

 

 6

 

73

 

Wyoming

 

 1

 

 9

 

District of Columbia

 

 5

 

43

 

Total U.S. Markets

 

649

 

8,224

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Markets

 

 

 

 

 

Austria

 

 3

 

38

 

Denmark

 

 2

 

10

 

Estonia

 

 3

 

15

 

Finland

 

24

 

139

 

Germany

 

23

 

203

 

Ireland

 

11

 

77

 

Italy

 

49

 

495

 

Latvia

 

 1

 

14

 

Lithuania

 

 6

 

40

 

Norway

 

11

 

74

 

Portugal

 

 3

 

45

 

Spain

 

46

 

514

 

Sweden

 

73

 

401

 

United Kingdom

 

110

 

880

 

Total International Markets

 

365

 

2,945

 

Total

 

1,014

 

11,169

 


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(1)

Included in the above table are 65 theatres and 334 screens that we manage or in which we have a partial interest. In the U.S. Markets segment we manage and own 50% economic interests in eight theatres and 92 screens accounted for following the equity method and own a 50% economic interest in one IMAX® screen accounted for following the equity method. In the International markets segment we manage and own 50% economic interests in 57 theatres and 240 screens accounted for following the equity method and own a 50% economic interest in one IMAX® screen accounted for following the equity method.

 

Our historic growth also has been driven by a combination of organic growth and acquisition strategies, in addition to strategic alliances and partnerships that highlight our ability to capture innovation and value beyond the traditional exhibition space. For example:

 

·

We own an interest in NCM along with Cinemark Holdings, Inc. (“Cinemark”) and Regal Entertainment Group (“Regal”) as the “Founding Members” of NCM.

 

We believe that the reach, scope and digital delivery capability of NCM’s network provides an effective platform for national, regional and local advertisers to reach an engaged audience. We receive a monthly theatre access fee for participation in the NCM network. In addition, we are entitled to receive mandatory quarterly distributions of excess cash from NCM.

 

·

In December 2013, NCM spun-off its Fathom Events (“Fathom”) business to a newly formed limited liability company AC JV, LLC (“AC JV”). AC JV focuses exclusively on alternative content programming, including live and pre-recorded concerts, sporting events and other non-film entertainment.

 

·

We hold an interest in Digital Cinema Implementation Partners, LLC (“DCIP”), a joint venture charged with implementing digital cinema in our theatres, which has allowed us to substantially complete our planned digital deployments. Future digital cinema developments will be managed by DCIP, subject to certain approvals.

 

·

We own an interest in Digital Cinema Distribution Coalition, LLC (“DCDC”), a joint venture with certain other exhibitors and film distributors. DCDC was formed to develop a satellite distribution network for feature films and other digital cinema content. As of December 31, 2017, 611 of our theatre locations are equipped to receive content via the DCDC network.

 

·

In 2017, we made investments in Dreamscape Immersive, Inc. (“Dreamscape”) and Central Services Studios, Inc. (“Central Services Studios”) as a part of our virtual reality technologies strategy.

 

The following table sets forth our historical information concerning new builds (including expansions), acquisitions and dispositions (including net construction closures) and end-of-period operated theatres and screens through December 31, 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permanent/Temporary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closures/(Openings),

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Builds

 

Acquisitions

 

net

 

Total Theatres

 

 

  

Number of

  

Number of

  

Number of

  

Number of

  

Number of

  

Number of

  

Number of

  

Number of

 

Fiscal Year

 

Theatres

 

Remodels

 

Theatres

 

Screens

 

Theatres

 

Screens

 

Theatres

 

Screens

 

Beginning balance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

342

 

4,975

 

Calendar 2013

 

 1

 

12

 

 4

 

37

 

 4

 

61

 

343

 

4,963

 

Calendar 2014

 

 3

 

29

 

 4

 

36

 

 4

 

81

 

346

 

4,947

 

Calendar 2015

 

 2

 

23

 

40

 

410

 

 1

 

(46)

 

387

 

5,426

 

Calendar 2016

 

 2

 

17

 

520

 

5,201

 

 3

 

86

 

906

 

10,558

 

Calendar 2017

 

12

 

96

 

128

 

736

 

32

 

221

 

1,014

 

11,169

 

 

 

20

 

177

 

696

 

6,420

 

44

 

403

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The following table provides detail with respect to digital delivery, 3D enabled projection, large screen formats, such as IMAX® and our proprietary Dolby Cinema™ at AMC, other PLF screens, enhanced food and beverage offerings and our premium seating as deployed throughout our circuit on December 31, 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Format

    

Theatres

    

Screens

 

Digital

 

1,014

 

11,169

 

3D enabled (includes IMAX, ETX and IDX)

 

1,014

 

5,471

 

IMAX (3D enabled)

 

208

 

209

 

Dolby Cinema at AMC

 

89

 

89

 

Other PLF (3D enabled)

 

99

 

99

 

Dine-in theatres

 

28

 

430

 

Premium seating

 

268

 

2,631

 

 

Our Strategy

 

We are committed to maintaining a leadership position in the exhibition industry by focusing on forward thinking initiatives for the benefit of our guests. Improving the guest experience remains at our core and is now supported by three strategic elements: (1) Enhance, (2) Engage and (3) Expand. Consistent with our history and culture of innovation, we believe our vision and relentless focus on these three elements, which apply strategic and marketing components to traditional theatrical exhibition, will drive our future success.

 

1)

Enhance

 

We plan to continue investing in our theatres and enhancing the consumer experience to take greater advantage of incremental revenue-generating opportunities, primarily through comfort and convenience innovations, imaginative food and beverage initiatives, and exciting PLF offerings.

 

Comfort and Convenience Innovations - Recliner seating is the key feature of our theatre renovations. We believe that maximizing comfort and convenience for our customers will be increasingly necessary to maintain and improve our relevance. These renovations, in conjunction with capital contributions from our landlords, involve stripping theatres to their basic structure in order to replace finishes throughout, upgrade the sight and sound experience, installing modernized points of sale and, most importantly, replacing traditional theatre seats with plush, electric recliners that allow customers to deploy a leg rest and fully recline at the push of a button. The quality improvement in the customer experience drives a 30% to 50% increase in attendance, on average, at these locations in their first-year post renovation. Our customers have responded favorably to the significant personal space gains from ample row depths, ability to recline or stretch their legs, extra-wide pillowed chaise and oversized armrests. The reseated theatres attract more midweek audiences than normal theatres and tend to draw more adults who pay higher ticket prices than teens or young children. We typically do not change ticket prices in the first year after renovation, however, in subsequent years we typically increase our ticket prices by amounts well in excess of price adjustments for our non‑renovated theatres.

 

We plan to continue investing in our theatres and upgrading the consumer experience to take greater advantage of incremental revenue-generating opportunities, primarily through an array of improved and differentiated customer experiences. These experiences include greater engagement and loyalty through world class marketing, a keen focus on the quality of on-screen presentation and programming content, more and faster deployment of comfort and convenience and food and beverage initiatives, all while developing and utilizing new technologies across these platforms for the benefit of our consumers.

 

We also plan to open new-build theatres, explore profitable acquisitions, and expand through disciplined spot-acquisitions. A spot-acquisition is usually a single theatre that is currently leased by another party that is nearing the end of its lease term. The landlord desires to have AMC replace the existing theatre operator and assume the lease, with term extensions and perform renovations consistent with our recliner renovation program. We believe new-build construction, spot-acquisitions, and other acquisitive activity offer us additional opportunities to introduce our proven guest focused strategies to new movie-goers and will generate meaningful benefits to guests, associates, studio partners and our shareholders.

 

As of December 31, 2017, we now feature recliner seating in approximately 268 theatres, including Dine-in-Theatres, totaling approximately 2,631 screens and representing approximately 25% of total screens. By the end of 2018,

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we expect AMC theatres to operate 3,296 screens with recliner seating. Based on feedback from our guests, we believe there is universal appeal for the ample space, comfort and convenience of our powered recliners, and that appeal will translate into additional attendance in new markets both domestically and in Europe. As such, deploying powered recliners will be an integral strategy in the former Carmike and Odeon circuits going forward as we are targeting approximately 42% of our total screens to be comprised of screens with recliner seating by the end of 2021.

 

We are currently testing new recliner seat designs and innovations that will continue to provide guests with an improved level of comfort and convenience while optimizing the number of seats available for guests post renovation. Reducing the number of seats removed during renovation, would expand the number of theatres we could renovate, allowing us to introduce our guest centered amenities to more movie-goers.

 

Rebalancing of the new supply-and-demand relationship created by recliner seating presents us two further opportunities to improve customer convenience and maximize operating results: open-source internet ticketing and reserved seating.

 

Open-source internet ticketing makes legacy AMC’s entire universe of seats (over 1,220,000 as of December 31, 2017), for all our show times, as available as possible, on as many websites and mobile applications as possible. Our tickets are currently on sale over the internet, either directly or through mobile apps, at our own website and app and Fandango®, Movietickets.com®, and Atom Tickets. We believe increased online access is important because it captures customers’ purchase intent more immediately and directly than if we wait for their arrival at the theatre box office to make a purchase. Carefully monitoring internet pre-sales also lets us adjust capacity in real time, moving movies that are poised to over perform to larger capacity auditoriums or more additional auditoriums, thereby maximizing yield. During calendar 2017, our internet and mobile ticketing app services sold approximately 70 million tickets for AMC.

 

Reserved seating at some of AMC’s busiest theatre locations, allows our customers to choose a specific seat in advance of the movie. We believe that knowing there is a specifically chosen seat waiting for a show that promises to be a sellout is comforting to our customers, reduces anxiety around the experience and compels ticket purchases. We believe reserved seating will become increasingly prevalent to the point of being a prerequisite in the medium-term future.

 

We believe the comfort and personal space gains from recliner seating, coupled with the immediacy of demand captured from open-source internet ticketing and the appeal of reserved seating make a powerful economic combination for us.

Imaginative Food and Beverage Initiatives - Our deployment initiatives apply to food and beverage enhancements. To address recent consumer trends, we have expanded our menu of enhanced food and beverage products to include meals, healthy snacks, premium beers, wine and mixed drinks and other gourmet products. We plan to invest across a spectrum of enhanced food and beverage formats, ranging from simple, less capital‑intensive food and beverage design improvements to the development of new dine‑in theatre options. We launched the AMC Feature Fare menu in 2017 to over 300 AMC brand locations with an additional 50-100 planned in 2018. This was the largest menu overall in AMC history. The new menu included flatbread pizzas, burgers, sandwiches, more pretzel variety and healthy snack options.

 

Leading the charge are our MacGuffins Bar and Lounges (“MacGuffins”) which give us a fresh opportunity to engage our over-21 customers. We believe that few innovations have won over the adult movie goer more decisively than our full-service bars featuring premium beers, wines and liquors. Extremely versatile in design with a significant impact on theatre economics, MacGuffins is our fastest growing idea in the enhanced food and beverage space. As of December 31, 2017, we offer alcohol in approximately 309 AMC theatres in the U.S. markets. We expect to increase that number to approximately 325 by the end of 2018. We believe there is ample opportunity to introduce premium beers, wines and liquors throughout the former Carmike and Odeon circuits, and we would like to install our MacGuffins concept in as many theatres globally as we can. We will continue to work with state and local officials in the United States, and the necessary officials in Europe to expand the number of theatres with this appealing amenity. Due to our success in operating MacGuffins, we believe we can leverage our substantial experience when it comes to permitting, installing and commissioning these improvements.

 

Coca Cola Freestyle® puts customers in charge with over 100 drink flavor options in a technologically advanced compact footprint. Our operational excellence and history of innovation rewarded us with first-mover advantage on this

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new technology, which, as of December 31, 2017, was deployed in substantially all of our AMC theatres. This technology improves the guest experience, shortens lines in our concession areas and allows for more efficient staffing.

 

Our commitment to participate in new technologies is evident in the recent testing of new food and beverage functionality for our new website and mobile apps. In our reserved seat auditoriums, our innovative new service allows for advance online ordering of concession items with an advance ticket order that, in certain theatres, is then delivered to the guest’s seat at a specified time of the guest’s choosing. Initial results are encouraging, and we currently operate 40 theatres with the pre-order service. We are currently evaluating system compatibility and mobile application functionality to determine timing for deployment in Europe.

 

The number of guests at legacy AMC theatres who are choosing to purchase a beverage or food item has increased from 64% of our attendance in 2011 to approximately 71% in 2017.  

 

Exciting Premium Large Format Offerings - Our business is a visual and aural medium requiring a keen focus on the quality of on-screen presentation and programing content to ensure success. PLF auditoriums generate our highest customer satisfaction scores, and we believe the investment in premium formats increases the value of the movie-going experience for our guests, ultimately leading to additional ticket revenue. To that end we are committed to investing in and expanding our offerings of the best sight and sound experiences through a combination of our partnerships with IMAX® and Dolby Cinema™ and the future development of our own proprietary PLF offering.

 

IMAX®—IMAX® is one of the world’s leading entertainment technology companies, specializing in motion picture technologies and presentations. IMAX® offers a unique end‑to‑end cinematic solution combining proprietary software, theater architecture and equipment to create the highest‑quality, most immersive motion picture experience for which the IMAX® brand has become known globally. Top filmmakers and studios utilize IMAX® theaters to connect with audiences in innovative ways, and as such, IMAX’s theater network is among the most important and successful theatrical distribution platforms for major event films around the world.

 

As of December 31, 2017, legacy AMC was the largest IMAX® exhibitor in the U.S., with 187 (3D enabled) IMAX® screens including and a 49% market share. Each one of our IMAX® local installations is protected by geographic exclusivity, and as of December 31, 2017, our IMAX® screen count was 100% greater than our closest competitor. We also operate 22 IMAX® screens in Europe. We will also expand our IMAX® relationship into former Carmike, Odeon, and Nordic theatres as we integrate all three of the circuits, further strengthening our position as the largest IMAX® exhibitor in the U.S. and with plans to make us the largest IMAX® distributor in the United Kingdom and Europe.

 

Dolby Cinema™ at AMC— Dolby Cinema™ at AMC was introduced to AMC guests in May 2015, when we partnered with Dolby Laboratories, Inc., to unveil a premium cinema offering for movie-goers that combined state‑of‑the‑art image and sound technologies with inspired theatre design and comfort. Dolby Cinema™ at AMC includes Dolby Vision™ laser projection and object‑oriented Dolby Atmos® audio technology, as well as AMC’s plush power reclining seats with seat transducers that vibrate with the action on screen.

 

In August 2016, we announced the acceleration of our Dolby Cinema™ at AMC deployment and as of December 31, 2017, we operated 89 Dolby Cinema™ at AMC auditoriums. The legacy AMC circuit expects to have 160 Dolby Cinema™ at AMC auditoriums operational by the end of 2018. We expect to expand deployment of our innovative Dolby Cinema™ at AMC auditoriums into former Carmike, Odeon, and Nordic locations as we integrate all circuits.

 

Prime at AMC—We believe there is considerable opportunity to add a private label PLF experience to many of our locations, with superior sight and sound technology and enhanced seating as contrasted with our traditional auditoriums. This proprietary PLF auditorium is branded Prime at AMC and offers an enhanced theatrical experience for movie-goers beyond our current core theatres, at a lower price premium as IMAX® or Dolby Cinema™ at AMC. Therefore, it may be especially relevant in smaller or more price sensitive markets.

 

2)

Engage

 

Marketing - AMC is engaging moviegoers marketing activities to strengthen the bonds with our current guests and create new connections with potential customers that drive both growth and loyalty. This effort begins with the legacy AMC loyalty program, AMC Stubs®, which we believe is one of the most popular loyalty programs in the

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industry. AMC Stubs® is a customer loyalty program which allows members to earn rewards, receive discounts and participate in exclusive members‑only offerings and services. It features both a traditional paid tier called AMC Stubs Premiere™ and a new non-paid tier called AMC Stubs Insider™. Both programs reward loyal guests for their patronage of AMC theatres. The AMC Stubs Insider™ tier rewards guests for simply coming to the movies, and benefits include free refills on certain food items, discount ticket offers, a birthday gift and 20 reward points earned for every dollar spent. For a $15 annual membership fee, AMC Stubs Premiere™ members enjoy express service with specially marked shorter lines at the box office and concession stand, free size upgrades on certain food and beverage items, discount ticket offers, a birthday gift, discounted online ticketing fees and 100 points for every dollar spent. Some of the rewards earned are redeemable on future purchases at AMC locations.

 

As of June 30, 2016, prior to our national relaunch, we had 2,672,000 active member households in the AMC Stubs® program. As of December 31, 2017, we had more than 11,408,000 member households enrolled in both the AMC Stubs Premiere™ and AMC Stubs Insider™ programs, combined. Our AMC Stubs® members represented approximately 23% of AMC U.S. markets attendance during the year ended December 31, 2017. We expect the number of member households to continue to increase over the next 24 to 36 months. We believe movie-goers want to be recognized and rewarded for attending our theatres and as a result, our new AMC Stubs® program is designed to strengthen guest loyalty, attract new guests and drive additional return visits. Our much larger database of identified moviegoers also provides us with additional insight into our customers’ movie preferences, and this enables us to have both a larger and a more targeted marketing effort to support our Hollywood studio partners. We intend to creatively mine this rapidly growing consumer database to increase sales and otherwise boost loyalty to AMC.

 

Odeon currently has loyalty programs in all the major territories in which it operates. Odeon movie-goers can earn points for spending money at the theatre, and those points can be redeemed for tickets and concession items at a later date. Odeon currently has more than three million active members in these various loyalty programs. We are currently evaluating the Odeon loyalty programs to determine how best to reward our European movie-goers and heighten guest loyalty to drive additional attendance to Odeon theatres.

 

Our marketing efforts are not limited to our loyalty program as we seek to improve our customer connections. Given the high degree of acceptance by consumers to interacting with companies through our website and apps, AMC introduced an all-new website and mobile application in 2016. The new website and app are designed to offer a more graphically rich interface, feature more robust content and improve functionality. We believe our new website and mobile application provide users with an improved online experience where they can more easily find information about movies, theatres and amenities and seamlessly purchase tickets and concessions online.

 

The competitive advantage of a robust and easy‑to‑use online and mobile presence combined with an effective loyalty program that provides better market intelligence to anticipate customer’s future behavior should allow us to capture incremental share of both entertainment dollars and time.

 

Additionally, to align guest expectations and cost structures across the broader U.S. platform comprised of legacy AMC and former Carmike theatres, on March 1, 2017 we announced a differentiated multi-brand strategy. 

 

During 2017, all Carmike theatres were re-branded to be part of the AMC theatres. Every AMC location now operates under one of the following AMC brands:

 

·

AMC Theatres – AMC Amazing. Approximately 400 theatres, located primarily in larger, more urban markets, offering the AMC amazing experience through amenities such as recliner seating, MacGuffins bars, and PLF auditoriums like IMAX® at AMC, Dolby Cinema™ at AMC, and AMC’s new proprietary PLF, “Prime at AMC.”

 

·

AMC Classic Theatres – America’s Hometown Theatres. Approximately 200 theatres, located primarily in smaller mid-sized and suburban markets, offering fun, friendly, amenities guests can depend on for a great movie-going experience with value in mind. These theatres will offer Coca-Cola Freestyle® machines and menu items like pretzel bites, movie nachos, and refillable annual popcorn buckets.  Some AMC Classic theatres may include MacGuffins bars and Prime at AMC PLF auditoriums. The brand logo for AMC Classic incorporates the folded “C” graphical element from the legacy Carmike brand logo while adopting Carmike’s “America’s Hometown Theatres” tagline.

 

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·

AMC Dine-In Theatres – Movies with a Menu. Approximately 50 locations, equipped with full kitchens and MacGuffins full bars, will offer great experiences including full-service dining as well as delivery-to-seat of AMC’s menu and beverage offerings. Guests can enjoy a variety of fresh, hand-crafted menu items that rival anything they’d find at their local restaurant, as well as an exciting array of drinks and desserts; all from the comfort of their seat while taking in the latest film.

 

The new branding strategy is just one example of how we intend to extend our marketing strengths, including our loyalty program and our robust, easy‑to‑use online and mobile presence across our larger footprint as we work to integrate our recent acquisitions. We also expect to retain some of the existing guest engagement and marketing programs currently used at Carmike, Odeon, and Nordic to further bond with our guests.

 

Target Programming - Our fundamental business, historically and now, revolves around the theatrical exhibition of Hollywood movies. If a movie is commercially available, it is likely to be playing at an AMC theatre today or tonight, because we schedule shows in the morning, afternoon and even at midnight or later, just to make sure it is convenient for our customers.

 

We also are playing movies and other content originating from more sources. We believe that as diversity grows in the United States, the United Kingdom and the rest of Europe, the ability to adapt and target programming for a fragmented audience will become critical.

 

For movies targeted at diverse audiences, AMC theatres frequently experience attendance levels greater than our average, national market share. AMC theatres have a strong Bollywood following with more than 60 locations serving diaspora audiences. During the year ended December 31, 2017, AMC theatres exhibited 173 popular Indian movies which generated approximately $22.0 million of box office revenue.

 

Through AMC Independent™, we have also reached into the independent production and distribution community. AMC theatres played 206 films (excluding community programming and film festivals) during 2017, generating $175.0 million in U.S. box office revenue.

 

Fathom is the recognized leader in the alternative entertainment industry, offering a variety of one-of-a-kind entertainment events in movie theaters nationwide that include live, high definition performances of the Metropolitan Opera, the performing arts, major sporting events, music concerts, comedy series, Broadway shows, original programming featuring entertainment’s biggest stars, socially relevant documentaries with audience Q&A and much more. We are working with Fathom to further broaden our programming options to appeal to even wider audiences.

 

We believe we are a vital partner for Hollywood studios and for independent distributors because we generate more box office revenue per screen and provide stronger in theatre and online promotional exposure for their movies. To that end, we are committed to working with our studio partners to further innovation, exchange ideas and discover mutually beneficial ways to expand movie-going.

 

3)

Expand

 

We intend to grow through the deployment of our strategic growth initiatives and will continue exploration of acquisitions. Our acquisition strategy combines discipline and purpose with a strong investment thesis for each transaction that we believe will drive value in the long term.

 

Disciplined new-build theatres and acquisitions expand the platform, whether domestically or internationally, upon which to further deploy our proven strategic initiatives while further diversifying AMC’s consumer base, leading to greater appeal for more films.

 

The additional scale achieved through new build theatres and acquisitions also serves to benefit AMC through global procurement savings and increased overhead efficiencies. We believe that expansion offers us additional opportunities to introduce our proven guest focused strategies to new movie-goers and will generate meaningful benefits to guests, associates, studio partners and our shareholders.

 

We believe significant financial opportunities exist in our current portfolio of theatres both in the United States and in Europe, and we have a substantial pipeline of investments to exploit that offer incremental attendance-generating and revenue-generating prospects. By expanding through new-build development and acquisitions and deploying

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building-by-building solutions from a proprietary menu of proven, customer-endorsed comfort and convenience, enhanced food and beverage, and premium sight and sound concepts, we believe we have the formula for continuing growth and success.

 

Our Competitive Strengths

 

We believe we have the following competitive strengths:

 

Leading Market Share in Important, Affluent and Diverse Markets— Across the three biggest metropolitan markets in the United States—New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, representing 20% of the country’s total box office—we hold a 36% combined market share. As of December 31, 2017, we have theatres located in 24 of the top 25 U.S. markets, holding the #1 or #2 position in 22 of those 25 markets based on box office revenue. On any given weekend, nearly one-half of the top ten theatres for the #1 opening movie title in the United States are AMC theatres, according to data provided by Rentrak. We are also the #1 theatre operator in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy and Spain; the #2 operator in Austria and Portugal; and the #4 operator in Germany. We believe our strong presence in these top markets makes our theatres highly visible and therefore strategically more important to content providers, who rely on the large audiences and marketing momentum provided by major markets to drive opinion‑making and deliver a movie’s overall box office results.

 

We have a diversified footprint with complementary global geographic and guest demographic profiles. There are inherent complexities in effectively and efficiently serving them. In some of our more densely populated major metropolitan markets, there is also a scarcity of attractive retail real estate opportunities. Taken together, these factors solidify our market share position. Further, our history and strong presence in these markets have created a greater opportunity to introduce our enhanced customer experience concepts and exhibit a broad array of programming and premium formats, all of which we believe drive higher levels of attendance and higher revenues at our theatres.

 

The recent Carmike acquisition further diversifies our footprint with theatres located in complementary suburban and rural markets as well as in geographic areas of the United States like the southeast, where legacy AMC did not have a strong presence. Guests from different demographic and geographic profiles have different tastes in movies, and we believe by broadening our geographic base, we can help mitigate the impact of film genre volatility on our box office revenues.

 

Well Located, Highly Productive Theatres—Our U.S. theatres are generally located in the top retail centers across the United States. We believe this provides for long-term visibility and higher productivity, and is a key element in the success of our Enhanced Food and Beverage and More Comfort and Convenience initiatives. Our location strategy, combined with our strong major market presence and our focus on a superior customer experience, enable us to deliver industry-leading theatre-level productivity. During the year ended December 31, 2017, six of the ten highest grossing theatres in the United States were AMC theatres, according to data provided by Rentrak. During the same period AMC’s U.S. markets average total revenues per theatre was approximately $6.0 million. This per unit productivity is important not only to content providers, but also to developers and landlords, for whom per location and per square foot sales numbers are critical measures. The net effect is a close relationship with the commercial real estate community, which often gives us first‑look and preferred tenant status on emerging opportunities.

 

Legacy Carmike theatres, are located primarily in smaller, suburban and rural markets, which affects total revenues per theatre. However, in general, theatres located in smaller suburban and rural markets tend to have less competition and a lower cost structure, and we believe when combined with our innovative strategic initiatives that productivity will improve.

 

Many Odeon theatres share similar characteristics as legacy AMC theatres in that they tend to be located in the top retail centers in major metropolitan markets with higher visibility. We believe that deploying our proven strategic initiatives in these markets will help drive attendance and greatly improve productivity. 

 

The Nordic theatres are in larger and mid-sized cities and towns in affluent Northern Europe as well as in the Baltic region. The theatres are well maintained including some with AMC-like amenities already evident. With a modern, up-to-date circuit and very high market share, the Nordic theatres will require some investment but not nearly the amount expected for the Odeon theatres. Nordic has an ample pipeline of new-build and renovation opportunities

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already identified, and with some investment in our enhanced food and beverage and premium sight and sound initiatives, we believe there are ample growth opportunities.

 

Selectively Participating in a Consolidating Industry—Throughout the last two decades, AMC has been an active participant in our industry’s consolidation. We intend to selectively explore acquisitions in the U.S. and internationally where the characteristics of the location, overall market and facilities further enhance the quality of our theatre portfolio.

 

Additionally, our focus on improving the customer experience and our strong relationships with landlords and developers have provided opportunities to expand our footprint in existing markets by acquiring competitors’ existing theatres at the end of their lease term at little or no cost. We believe that our More Comfort and Convenience and Enhanced Food and Beverage concepts have high appeal to landlords wanting to increase traffic and sales in their retail centers. These “spot acquisitions” have given us the ability to bolster our presence in existing markets at relatively low cost and more quickly (weeks, months) as compared to new builds (months, years).

 

Substantial Operating Cash Flow—For the years ended December 31, 2017, December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015, AMC’s net cash provided by operating activities totaled $577.4 million, $431.7 million, and $467.6 million, respectively. We believe that our strategic initiatives, highly productive theatre circuit and continued focus on cost control will enable us to generate sufficient cash flow provided by operating activities to execute our strategy, to grow our revenues, maintain our facilities, service our indebtedness, continue our stock repurchase plan and pay dividends to our stockholders.

 

Experienced and Dynamic Team—Our senior management team, led by Adam Aron, President and Chief Executive Officer, has the expertise that we believe will be required to transform movie-going from a commodity to a differentiated entertainment experience. A dynamic and balanced team of executives combines long-tenured leaders in operations, real estate and finance who contributed to building AMC’s hard-earned reputation for operations excellence with creative entertainment and restaurant industry executives in marketing, programming and food and beverage who bring to AMC business acumen and experience that support innovation in theatrical exhibition.

 

Our senior management team has experience operating both domestic and international theatres.

 

With a technology platform in our Theatre Support Center that provides for real-time monitoring of AMC screens across the country and a workplace conducive to collaboration and teamwork, our management team has the organization well aligned with our strategy.

 

Furthermore, we believe that our people, the nearly 39,800 AMC associates, constitute an essential strength of AMC. They strive to make movie-going experiences at AMC theatres always a treat. We create events and want our customers to always feel special at an AMC theatre.

 

Key Strategic Shareholder—Our key strategic shareholder, the Dalian Wanda Group Co. (“Wanda”), is one of the largest, privately-held conglomerates in China. Wanda is our single largest shareholder with a 59.37% ownership stake as of December 31, 2017. In addition to its core business as a prominent developer and owner of commercial real estate, Wanda also owns related businesses in entertainment, hospitality and retail. Wanda is the largest theatre exhibition operator in China through its controlling ownership interest in Wanda Cinema Line. The combined ownership and scale of AMC and Wanda Cinema Line has enabled us to enhance relationships and obtain better terms from important food and beverage, lighting and theatre supply vendors, and to expand our strategic partnerships with IMAX® and Dolby®. When our scale and Wanda’s growth are taken into account, we believe AMC is the most efficient and effective partner a content owner has. Wanda is controlled by its chairman, Mr. Jianlin Wang.

 

Film Content

 

Box office admissions are our largest source of revenue. We predominantly license “first-run” films from distributors owned by major film production companies and from independent distributors on a film-by-film and theatre-by-theatre basis. Film exhibition costs are accrued based on the applicable admissions revenues and estimates of the final settlement pursuant to our film licenses. Licenses that we enter into typically state that rental fees are based on aggregate terms established prior to the opening of the picture. In certain circumstances and less frequently, our rental fees are based on a mutually agreed settlement upon the conclusion of the picture. In some European territories, rental fees are

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established on a weekly basis for the coming week’s percentage forecast. Some European licenses use a per capita agreement instead, paying a flat amount per ticket, where the sum is agreed in long-term agreements in advance of the film showing. Under an aggregate terms formula, we usually pay the distributor a specified percentage of box office gross or pay based on a scale of percentages tied to different amounts of box office gross, or in Europe, we pay based on the number of weeks since release. The settlement process allows for negotiation based upon how a film actually performs.

 

During the 2017 calendar year, films licensed from our seven largest distributors based on revenues accounted for approximately 88% of our U.S. admissions revenues. In Europe, approximately 77% of our box office revenue came from films attributed to our six largest distributors. Our revenues attributable to individual distributors may vary significantly from year to year depending upon the commercial success of each distributor’s films in any given year.

 

Our revenues are dependent upon the timing and popularity of film releases by distributors. The most marketable films are usually released during the summer and the calendar year-end holiday seasons. Therefore, our business is highly seasonal, with higher attendance and revenues generally occurring during the summer months and holiday seasons. Our results of operations may vary significantly from quarter to quarter and from year to year.

 

North American film distributors typically establish geographic film licensing zones and license on a film-by-film basis to one theatre in each zone. In film zones where we are the sole exhibitor, we obtain film licenses by selecting a film from among those offered and negotiating directly with the distributor. In competitive zones, where we compete with one or more exhibitors to secure film, distributors generally allocate their films to the exhibitors located in that area based on screen capacity, grossing potential, and licensing terms. In Europe, local markets are not broken up into licensing zones in the same way, therefore there is rarely a restriction on cinemas opening a film in that market. The exception is smaller films opening on a limited print number. We negotiate directly with all distributors to manage for the opening of new films.

 

Food and beverage

 

Food and beverage sales are our second largest source of revenue after box office admissions. Food and beverage items traditionally include popcorn, soft drinks, candy and hot dogs. Different varieties of food and beverage items are offered at our theatres based on preferences in the particular geographic region. Our traditional food and beverage strategy emphasizes prominent and appealing food and beverage offerings designed for rapid service and efficiency, including a customer friendly self-serve experience. We design our theatres to have more food and beverage capacity to make it easier to serve larger numbers of customers. Strategic placement of large food and beverage operations within theatres increases their visibility, aids in reducing the length of lines, allows flexibility to introduce new concepts and improves traffic flow around the food and beverage stands.

 

To address recent consumer trends, we have expanded our menu of enhanced food and beverage products to include made-to-order drinks and meals, customized coffee, healthy snacks, premium beers, wine and mixed drinks and other gourmet products. We plan to continue investment across a spectrum of enhanced food and beverage formats, ranging from simple, less capital-intensive food and beverage design improvements to the development of new dine-in theatre options. The costs of these conversions in some cases are partially covered by investments from the theatre landlord. We currently operate 28 Dine-In Theatres that deliver chef-inspired menus with seat-side or delivery service to luxury recliners with tables. Our recent Dine-In Theatre concepts are designed to capitalize on the latest food service trend, the fast casual eating experience.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2017, we employed 4,332 full-time and 35,511 part-time employees. We consider our employee relations to be good.

 

Theatrical Exhibition Industry and Competition

 

U.S. Markets

 

Movie-going is embedded in the American social fabric. For over 100 years people young and old, of all races and socio-economic levels, have enjoyed the entertainment that motion pictures offer.

 

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In the United States, the movie exhibition business is large, stable and mature. While in any given calendar quarter the quantity and quality of movies can drive volatile results, box office revenues have generally advanced from 2011 to 2017. The industry’s best year ever, in terms of revenues, was 2016, with box office revenues of approximately $11.4 billion, an increase of approximately 2.0% from 2015 with over 1.3 billion admissions in the U.S. and Canada. The Industry’s U.S. and Canada box office for 2017 was $11.1 billion, with over 1.2 billion admissions, a decline of approximately 2.7% from 2016.

 

The movie exhibition business has survived the booms and busts of economic cycles and has adapted to myriad changes in technology and customer behavior. There is great value for the entertainment dollar in movie-going, and no replacement has been invented for the escape and fun that a night at the movies represents.

 

We believe the exhibition business is in the early stages of a transition. After decades of economic models driven by quantity (number of theatres, screens and seats), we believe it is the quality of the movie-going experience that will define future success. Whether through enhanced food and beverage options (Food and Beverage Kiosks, Marketplaces, Coke Freestyle®, MacGuffins or Dine-in Theatres), more comfort and convenience (recliner seating, open-source internet ticketing, reserved seating), engagement and loyalty (AMC Stubs®, open-source internet ticketing, mobile apps, social media) or sight and sound (digital projectors, 3D, Dolby Cinema™ at AMC, other PLF screens or IMAX®), it is the ease of use and the amenities that these innovations bring to customers that we believe will drive sustained profitability in the years ahead.

 

The following table represents information about the U.S./Canada exhibition industry obtained from the National Association of Theatre Owners (“NATO”) and Box Office Mojo:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Box Office

    

 

    

Average

    

 

    

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

Attendance

 

Ticket

 

Number of

 

Indoor

 

Calendar Year

 

(in millions)

 

(in millions)

 

Price

 

Theatres

 

Screens

 

2017

 

$

11,065

 

1,233

 

$

8.97

 

5,398

 

39,798

 

2016

 

 

11,372

 

1,314

 

 

8.65

 

5,472

 

39,579

 

2015

 

 

11,135

 

1,321

 

 

8.43

 

5,484

 

39,411

 

2014

 

 

10,353

 

1,267

 

 

8.17

 

5,463

 

39,356

 

2013

 

 

10,921

 

1,343

 

 

8.13

 

5,326

 

39,368

 

2012

 

 

10,837

 

1,361

 

 

7.96

 

5,317

 

39,056

 

2011

 

 

10,174

 

1,283

 

 

7.93

 

5,331

 

38,974

 

2010

 

 

10,566

 

1,339

 

 

7.89

 

5,399

 

38,902

 

2009

 

 

10,596

 

1,413

 

 

7.50

 

5,561

 

38,605

 

2008

 

 

9,631

 

1,341

 

 

7.18

 

5,403

 

38,201

 

2007

 

 

9,664

 

1,405

 

 

6.88

 

5,545

 

38,159

 

2006

 

 

9,210

 

1,406

 

 

6.55

 

5,543

 

37,765

 

 

Based on information obtained from Rentrak, we believe that the four largest exhibitors, in terms of U.S. / Canada box office revenue (Regal Entertainment Group, AMC, Cinemark Holdings, Inc. and Cineplex Inc.) generated approximately 65% of the box office revenues in 2017. This statistic is up from 35% in 2000 and is evidence that the theatrical exhibition business in the U.S. / Canada have been consolidating.

 

International Markets

 

Movie-going is a popular leisure activity with high penetration across Odeon’s and Nordic’s key geographies. Theatre appeal has proven resilient to competition for consumers’ leisure spending and to recessionary periods and we believe we will continue to benefit from increased spending across international markets. The European market lags the U.S. market across a number of factors, including annual spend per customer, number of IMAX® screens and screens per capita that cause us to believe that the deployment of our customer initiatives will be successful in these markets. On the other hand, our European markets are more densely populated and operate with fewer screens per one million of population, making the screens we acquired more valuable.

 

While in any calendar year the quantity and quality of movies can drive results, in the medium term theatre attendance has remained consistent since 2012 across Odeon’s key geographies. Additionally, International markets have become increasingly important. The percentage of total box office revenues attributable to International markets increased from 69% in 2012 to 72% in 2015 and is expected to continue to increase to 75% by 2019. U.S. films generate

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the majority of the box office in Europe, but movie-goers in specific geographies welcome locally produced films with local actors and familiar story lines which can mitigate film genre attendance fluctuations. Going forward, we believe we will see positive growth in theatre attendance as we deploy our proven guest centered innovations like recliner seating, enhanced food and beverage offerings and premium large format experiences.

 

Our theatres are subject to varying degrees of competition in the geographic areas in which they operate. Competition is often intense with respect to attracting patrons, licensing motion pictures and finding new theatre sites. Where real estate is readily available, it is easier to open a theatre near one of our theatres, which may adversely affect operations at our theatre. However, in certain of our densely populated major metropolitan markets, we believe a scarcity of attractive retail real estate opportunities enhances the strategic value of our existing theatres. We also believe the complexity inherent in operating in these major metropolitan markets is a deterrent to other less sophisticated competitors, protecting our market share position.

 

The theatrical exhibition industry faces competition from other forms of out-of-home entertainment, such as concerts, amusement parks and sporting events, and from other distribution channels for filmed entertainment, such as cable television, pay-per-view, video streaming services, and home video systems, as well as from all other forms of entertainment.

 

Movie-going is a compelling consumer out-of-home entertainment experience. Movie theatres currently garner a relatively small share of overall consumer entertainment time and spend, leaving significant room for further expansion and growth in the United States and internationally. In addition, our industry benefits from available capacity to satisfy additional consumer demand without capital investment.

 

Regulatory Environment

 

The distribution of motion pictures is, in large part, regulated by federal and state antitrust laws and has been the subject of numerous antitrust cases. The consent decrees, resulting from one of those cases to which we were not a party, have a material impact on the industry and us. Those consent decrees bind certain major motion picture distributors and require the motion pictures of such distributors to be offered and licensed to exhibitors, including us, on a film-by-film and theatre-by-theatre basis. Consequently, we cannot assure ourselves of a supply of motion pictures by entering into long-term arrangements with major distributors, but must compete for our licenses on a film-by-film and theatre-by-theatre basis.

 

Our theatres in the United States must comply with Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. Compliance with the ADA requires that public accommodations “reasonably accommodate” individuals with disabilities and that new construction or alterations made to “commercial facilities” conform to accessibility guidelines unless “structurally impracticable” for new construction or technically infeasible for alterations. Non-compliance with the ADA could result in the imposition of injunctive relief, fines, and awards of damages to private litigants or additional capital expenditures to remedy such noncompliance. As an employer covered by the ADA, we must make reasonable accommodations to the limitations of employees and qualified applicants with disabilities, provided that such reasonable accommodations do not pose an undue hardship on the operation of our business. In addition, many of our employees are covered by various government employment regulations, including minimum wage, overtime and working conditions regulations. In Europe, all territories have similar national regulations relating to disabilities.

 

Our operations also are subject to federal, state and local laws regulating such matters as construction, renovation and operation of theatres as well as wages and working conditions, citizenship, health and sanitation requirements and licensing. We believe our theatres are in material compliance with such requirements.

 

We own and operate theatres and other properties that operate in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Ireland, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Denmark, which are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations. Certain of these laws and regulations, including those relating to environmental protection, may impose joint and several liability on certain statutory classes of persons for the costs of investigation or remediation of contamination, regardless of fault or the legality of original disposal. We believe our theatres are in material compliance with such requirements.

 

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Other Acquisitions, Dispositions, Financings and Developments

 

Other Acquisitions

 

In September 2017, we acquired $5.0 million in Dreamscape and $5.0 million in Central Services Studios, Inc. as part of our virtual reality technologies strategy. During January 2018, we invested an additional $5.0 million in Dreamscape and $5.0 million in Central Services Studios. We do not have significant influence over these entities and will follow the cost method of accounting.

 

In December 2015, we completed the acquisition of 33 theatres and 346 screens from Starplex Cinemas.

 

Other Dispositions

 

On August 4, 2017, AMC and Regal Entertainment Group consummated a transaction for the sale of all the issued and outstanding ownership interests in Open Road Releasing, LLC (“Open Road”) for total proceeds of $28.8 million of which we received $14.0 million in net proceeds after transaction expenses for our 50% investment and for collection of amounts due from Open Road and recognized a gain on sale of $17.2 million.

 

On September 14, 2017, we completed the sale and leaseback of the real estate assets associated with seven theatres for proceeds net of closing costs of $128.4 million. The gain on sale of $78.2 million has been deferred and will be amortized over the remaining lease terms. 

 

On December 18, 2017, we completed the sale and leaseback of the real estate assets associated with one theatre for proceeds net of closing costs of $7.8 million. The loss on sale of $0.5 million was recognized immediately.

 

In the second quarter of 2017 and in the fourth quarter of 2016, in connection with the Carmike acquisition, we divested 17 theatres as required by the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice. See Part I – Recent Developments for further information.

 

In January 2016, we divested of two Starplex Cinemas theatres with 22 screens, as required by the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice.

 

Debt Financing of Acquisitions

 

On March 17, 2017, we completed an offering of $475.0 million aggregate principal amount of our Senior Subordinated Notes due 2027 (the “Notes due 2027”). We capitalized deferred financing costs of approximately $19.8 million, related to the issuance of the Notes due 2027. The Notes due 2027 mature on May 15, 2027. We will pay interest on the Notes due 2027 at 6.125% per annum, semi-annually in arrears on May 15th and November 15th, commencing on November 15, 2017. We used the net proceeds from the Notes due 2027 private offering, together with a portion of the net proceeds from the Sterling Notes due 2024 (see below) to pay a portion of the consideration for the acquisition of Nordic plus related transaction fees and expenses.

 

On March 17, 2017, we completed an offering of £250.0 million additional aggregate principal amount of our Sterling Notes due 2024 and an offering of $250.0 million additional aggregate principal amount of our Sterling Notes due 2024. We used the net proceeds to pay a portion of the consideration for the acquisition of Nordic plus related transaction fees and expenses.

 

On December 21, 2016, in connection with the Carmike acquisition, we incurred $350.0 million of bridge loans (the “Bridge Loans”) under a Bridge Loan Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2016 (the “Bridge Loan Agreement”). We repaid the Bridge Loans on February 13, 2017, with a portion of the net proceeds from our additional public offering.

 

On November 8, 2016, in connection with the Carmike and Odeon acquisitions, we issued $595.0 million aggregate principal amount of our 5.875% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2026 and £250.0 million ($310.0 million) of our 6.375% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2024. On November 29, 2016, in connection with the Odeon acquisition, we borrowed $500.0 million of incremental term loans under our Credit Agreement, dated as of April 30, 2013 as amended.

 

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See the Liquidity and Capital Resources section of Item 7 of Part II hereof for further information and Note 7 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II hereof for further information.

 

Seasonality

 

Our revenues are dependent upon the timing of motion picture releases by distributors. The most marketable motion pictures are usually released during the summer and the year-end holiday seasons. Therefore, our business is highly seasonal, with higher attendance and revenues generally occurring during the summer months and holiday seasons. Our results of operations may vary significantly from quarter to quarter.

 

Financial Information About Geographic Areas

 

For information about the geographic areas in which we operate, see Note 15 – Operating Segments in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements under Part II, Item 8 hereof. During the year ended December 31, 2017, revenues from our continuing theatre operations outside the United States accounted for 26.7% of our total revenues. We currently have operations in the U.S., United Kingdom, Austria, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, and Denmark, which are reflected in the consolidated financial statements.

 

Available Information

 

We make available free of charge on our website (www.amctheatres.com) under “Investor Relations” / Financial Performance”/ “SEC Filings,” annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, proxy materials on Schedule 14A and amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file or furnish such materials with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The contents of our Internet website are not incorporated into this report. In addition, the public may read and copy any materials that we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission at the Securities and Exchange Commission Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information about the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the Securities and Exchange Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330.

 

Executive Officers

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding our executive officers and key employees as of February 12, 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name

    

Age

    

Position(s) Held

Adam M. Aron

 

63

 

Chief Executive Officer, President and Director

Craig R. Ramsey

 

66

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

John D. McDonald

 

60

 

Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations

Elizabeth Frank

 

48

 

Executive Vice President, Worldwide Programming and Chief Content Officer

Mark A. McDonald

 

59

 

Executive Vice President, Global Development

Stephen A. Colanero

 

51

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

Kevin M. Connor

 

55

 

Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary

Chris A. Cox

 

52

 

Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer

Carla Sanders

 

52

 

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

 

All our current executive officers hold their offices at the pleasure of our board of directors, subject to rights under their respective employment agreements in some cases. There are no family relationships between or among any executive officers, except that Messrs. John D. McDonald and Mark A. McDonald are brothers.

 

Mr. Adam Aron has served as Chief Executive Officer, President and Director of the Company since January 2016. From February 2015 to December 2015, Mr. Aron was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. Since 2006, Mr. Aron has served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of World Leisure Partners, Inc. a personal consultancy for matters related to travel and tourism, high-end real estate development, and professional sports, that he founded. Mr. Aron served as Chief Executive Officer and Co-Owner of the Philadelphia 76ers from 2011 to 2013, and remains a co-owner currently. From 2006 to 2015, Mr. Aron served as Senior Operating Partner of Apollo Management L.P. Mr. Aron currently serves on the board of directors of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, Ltd. and the Philadelphia 76ers. Mr. Aron served on the board of directors of Prestige Cruise

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Holdings Inc. from 2007 to 2014. Mr. Aron received a Master’s of Business Administration degree with distinction from the Harvard Business School and a bachelor of arts degree cum laude from Harvard College.

 

Mr. Craig R. Ramsey has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of AMC since April 2002. Mr. Ramsey served as Interim Chief Executive Officer and President of the Company from August 7, 2015 until January 4, 2016. Mr. Ramsey served as Secretary of the Company from April 2002 until April 2003. Mr. Ramsey served as Senior Vice President, Finance, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accounting Officer from August 1998 until May 2002. Mr. Ramsey served as Vice President, Finance from January 1997 to August 1998, and prior thereto, Mr. Ramsey had served as Director of Information Systems and Director of Financial Reporting since joining AMC in February 1995. Mr. Ramsey has over 30 years of experience in finance in public and private companies. Mr. Ramsey holds a B.S. degree in Accounting and Business Administration from the University of Kansas.

 

Mr. John D. McDonald has served as Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations of AMC since July 2009. Prior to July 2009, Mr. McDonald served as Executive Vice President, U.S. and Canada Operations effective October 1998. Mr. McDonald served as Senior Vice President, Corporate Operations from November 1995 to October 1998. Mr. McDonald is a member of the National Association of Theatre Owners Advisory board of directors, Chairman of the Technology Committee for the National Association of Theatre Owners, and member of the board of directors for DCIP. Mr. McDonald has successfully managed the integration for the Gulf States, General Cinema, Loews, and Kerasotes mergers and acquisitions. Mr. McDonald attended California State Polytechnic University where he studied economics and history.

 

Ms. Elizabeth Frank has served as Executive Vice President, Worldwide Programming and Chief Content Officer for AMC since July 2012. Between August 2010 and July 2012, Ms. Frank served as Senior Vice President, Strategy and Strategic Partnerships. From 2006 to 2010, Ms. Frank served as Senior Vice President of Global Programs for AmeriCares. From 2003 to 2006, Ms. Frank served as Vice President of Corporate Strategic Planning for Time Warner Inc. Prior to Time Warner Inc., Ms. Frank was a partner at McKinsey & Company for nine years. Ms. Frank holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Lehigh University and a Masters of Business Administration from Harvard University.

 

Mr. Mark A. McDonald has served as Executive Vice President, Global Development of AMC since July 2009. Prior thereto, Mr. McDonald served as Executive Vice President, International Operations from December 1998 to July 2009. Prior thereto, Mr. McDonald had served as Senior Vice President, Asia Operations since November 1995. Mr. McDonald holds a B.A. degree from the University of Southern California and a M.B.A. from the Anderson School at University of California Los Angeles.

 

Mr. Stephen A. Colanero has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of AMC since December 2009. Prior to joining AMC, Mr. Colanero served as Vice President of Marketing for RadioShack Corporation from April 2008 to December 2009. Mr. Colanero also served as Senior Vice President of Retail Marketing for Washington Mutual Inc. from February 2006 to August 2007 and as Senior Vice President, Strategic Marketing for Blockbuster Inc. from November 1994 to January 2006. Mr. Colanero holds a B.S. degree in Accounting from Villanova University and a M.B.A. in Marketing and Strategic Management from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Mr. Kevin M. Connor has served as Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of AMC since April 2003. Prior to April 2003, Mr. Connor served as Senior Vice President, Legal beginning November 2002. Prior thereto, Mr. Connor was in private practice in Kansas City, Missouri as a partner with the firm Seigfreid Bingham, P.C. from October 1995. Mr. Connor holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and History from Vanderbilt University, a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Kansas School of Law and LLM in Taxation from the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

 

Mr. Chris A. Cox has served as Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer of AMC since June 2010. Prior thereto Mr. Cox served as Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer since May 2002. Prior to May 2002, Mr. Cox had served as Vice President and Controller since November 2000. Previously, Mr. Cox had served as Director of Corporate Accounting for the Dial Corporation from December 1999 until November 2000. Mr. Cox holds a Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting and Finance degree from the University of Iowa.

 

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Ms. Carla Sanders has served as Senior Vice President, Human Resources of AMC since January 2014. Ms. Sanders served as Vice President, Human Resources Services from September 2006 to January 2014. Prior thereto, Ms. Sanders served as Vice President, Recruitment and Development from April 2005 to September 2006. Ms. Sanders’ prior experience includes human resources manager and director of employment practices. Ms. Sanders began her career at AMC in 1988 as a theatre manager in Philadelphia. Ms. Sanders serves as co-chair for the AMC Cares Invitational and is a member of the AMC Investment Committee. She is formerly a board member for the Quality Hill Playhouse and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kansas City. She currently serves on the boards of the Kansas City Zoo, Negro League Baseball Museum and is the chair of Win Win. Ms. Sanders has over 20 years of human resources experience. Ms. Sanders holds a B.S. from The Pennsylvania State University.

 

Item 1A.  Risk Factors

 

Risk Factors Associated with AMC’s Business

 

We depend on motion picture production and performance.

 

Our ability to operate successfully depends upon the availability, diversity and appeal of motion pictures, our ability to license motion pictures and the performance of such motion pictures in our markets. The most attended films are usually released during the summer and the calendar year-end holidays, making our business highly seasonal. We license first‑run motion pictures, the success of which has increasingly depended on the marketing efforts of the major motion picture studios. Poor performance of, or any disruption in the production of these motion pictures (including by reason of a strike or lack of adequate financing), or a reduction in the marketing efforts of the major motion picture studios, could hurt our business and results of operations. Conversely, the successful performance of these motion pictures, particularly the sustained success of any one motion picture, or an increase in effective marketing efforts of the major motion picture studios, may generate positive results for our business and operations in a specific fiscal quarter or year that may not necessarily be indicative of, or comparable to, future results of operations. As movie studios rely on a smaller number of higher grossing “tent pole” films there may be increased pressure for higher film licensing fees. In addition, a change in the type and breadth of movies offered by motion picture studios may adversely affect the demographic base of movie-goers.

 

Except to the extent that we own some film distribution rights in a small number of European territories, we have no control over distributors of the films and our business may be adversely affected if our access to motion pictures is limited or delayed. 

 

We rely on distributors of motion pictures, over whom we have no control, for the films that we exhibit. Major motion picture distributors are required by law to offer and license film to exhibitors, including us, on a film-by-film and theatre-by-theatre basis. Consequently, we cannot assure ourselves of a supply of motion pictures by entering into long‑term arrangements with major distributors, but must compete for our licenses on a film-by-film and theatre-by-theatre basis. Our business depends on maintaining good relations with these distributors, as this affects our ability to negotiate commercially favorable licensing terms for first-run films or to obtain licenses at all. With only seven distributors representing approximately 88% of the U.S. box office in 2017, there is a high level of concentration in the industry. Our business may be adversely affected if our access to motion pictures is limited or delayed because of deterioration in our relationships with one or more distributors or for some other reason. To the extent that we are unable to license a popular film for exhibition in our theatres, our operating results may be adversely affected.

 

Our substantial debt could adversely affect our operations and prevent us from satisfying those debt obligations.

 

We have a significant amount of debt. As of December 31, 2017, we had outstanding approximately $4,886.7 million of indebtedness ($4,963.6 million face amount), which consisted of $1,337.6 million under our Senior Secured Credit Facility ($1,359.3 million face amount), $2,654.5 million of our existing subordinated notes ($2,720.1 million face amount), $240.4 million of the Carmike Notes ($230.0 million face amount), a $2.8 million ($2.8 million face amount) promissory note, and $651.4 million of existing capital and financing lease obligations. As of December 31, 2017, we had $212.8 million available for borrowing under our Senior Secured Revolving Credit Facility and £84.3 million ($113.0 million) available for borrowing under our Odeon Revolving Credit Facility. As of December 31, 2017, we also had approximately $6.9 billion of undiscounted rental payments under operating leases

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(with initial base terms generally between 15 to 20 years). The amount of our indebtedness and lease and other financial obligations could have important consequences to our stockholders. For example, it could:

 

·

increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

·

limit our ability to obtain additional financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures, dividend payments, acquisitions, general corporate purposes or other purposes;

 

·

require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the payment of lease rentals and principal and interest on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the funds available to us for operations, dividends and any future business opportunities;

 

·

limit our planning flexibility for, or ability to react to, changes in our business and the industry; and

 

·

place us at a competitive disadvantage with competitors who may have less indebtedness and other obligations or greater access to financing.

 

If we fail to make any required payment under our Senior Secured Credit Facility or the indentures governing our notes or to comply with any of the financial and operating covenants contained therein, we would be in default. Lenders under our Senior Secured Credit Facility or holders of our notes, as applicable, could then decide to accelerate the maturity of the indebtedness under the Senior Secured Credit Facility or the indentures and in the case of the Senior Credit Facility, foreclose upon the stock and personal property of our subsidiaries that is pledged to secure the Senior Secured Credit Facility. Other creditors might then accelerate other indebtedness. If the lenders under the Senior Secured Credit Facility or holders of our notes accelerate the maturity of the indebtedness thereunder, we might not have sufficient assets to satisfy our obligations under the Senior Secured Credit Facility, the indentures, or our other indebtedness. Our indebtedness under our Senior Secured Credit Facility bears interest at rates that fluctuate with changes in certain prevailing interest rates (although, subject to certain conditions, such rates may be fixed for certain periods). If interest rates increase, we may be unable to meet our debt service obligations under our Senior Secured Credit Facility and other indebtedness.

 

The agreements governing our indebtedness contain covenants that may limit our ability to take advantage of certain business opportunities advantageous to us.

 

The agreements governing our indebtedness contain various covenants that limit our ability to, among other things:

 

·

incur or guarantee additional indebtedness;

 

·

pay dividends or make other distributions to our stockholders;

 

·

make restricted payments;

 

·

incur liens;

 

·

engage in transactions with affiliates; and

 

·

enter into business combinations.

 

These restrictions could limit our ability to obtain future financing, make acquisitions, fund needed capital expenditures, withstand economic downturns in our business or the economy in general, conduct operations or otherwise take advantage of business opportunities that may arise.

 

At the same time, the covenants in the instruments governing our indebtedness may not provide investors with protections against transactions they may deem undesirable. Although the indentures governing our notes contain a fixed charge coverage test that limits our ability to incur indebtedness, this limitation is subject to a number of significant exceptions and qualifications. Moreover, the indentures do not impose any limitation on our incurrence of lease obligations or liabilities that are not considered “Indebtedness” under the indentures (such as operating leases), nor do

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they impose any limitation on the amount of liabilities incurred by subsidiaries, if any, that might be designated as “unrestricted subsidiaries,” which are subsidiaries that we designate, that are not subject to the restrictive covenants contained in the indentures governing our indebtedness.

 

Furthermore, there are no restrictions in the indentures on our ability to invest in other entities (including unaffiliated entities) and no restrictions on the ability of our subsidiaries to enter into agreements restricting their ability to pay dividends or otherwise transfer funds to us. Also, although the indentures limit our ability to make dividends and other restricted payments, these restrictions are subject to significant exceptions and qualifications.

 

If our cash flows prove inadequate to service our debt and provide for our other obligations, we may be required to refinance all or a portion of our existing debt or future debt at terms unfavorable to us.

 

Our ability to make payments on and refinance our debt and other financial obligations and to fund our capital expenditures and acquisitions will depend on our ability to generate substantial operating cash flow. This will depend on our future performance, which will be subject to prevailing economic conditions and to financial, business and other factors beyond our control.

 

In addition, our debt obligations require us to repay or refinance our obligations when they come due. If our cash flows were to prove inadequate to meet our debt service, rental and other obligations in the future, we may be required to refinance all or a portion of our existing or future debt, on or before maturity, to sell assets or to obtain additional financing. We cannot give assurance that we will be able to refinance any of our indebtedness, including our Senior Secured Credit Facility and our notes, sell any such assets, or obtain additional financing on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

 

The terms of the agreements governing our indebtedness restrict, but do not prohibit us from incurring additional indebtedness. If we are in compliance with the financial covenants set forth in the Senior Secured Credit Facility and our other outstanding debt instruments, we may be able to incur substantial additional indebtedness. If we incur additional indebtedness, the related risks that we face may intensify.

 

Limitations on the availability of capital may prevent deployment of strategic initiatives.

 

Implementation of our key strategic initiatives, including recliner seating, enhanced food and beverage and premium sight and sound, require significant capital expenditures. Our gross capital expenditures were approximately $630.6 million, $421.7 million and $333.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2017, December 31, 2016 and, December 31, 2015, respectively. We estimate that our gross cash outflows for capital expenditures will be approximately $600.0 million to $640.0 million, before giving effect to expected landlord contributions of approximately $140.0 million to $150.0 million for the year ending December 31, 2018. The lack of available capital resources due to business performance or other financial commitments could prevent or delay the deployment of innovations in our theatres. We may have to seek additional financing or issue additional securities to fully implement our growth strategy. We cannot be certain that we will be able to obtain new financing on favorable terms, or at all. In addition, covenants under our existing indebtedness limit our ability to incur additional indebtedness, and the performance of any additional or improved theatres may not be sufficient to service the related indebtedness that we are permitted to incur.

 

We are subject, at times, to intense competition.

 

Our theatres are subject to varying degrees of competition in the geographic areas in which we operate. Competitors may be multi‑national circuits, national circuits, regional circuits or smaller independent exhibitors. Competition among theatre exhibition companies is often intense with respect to the following factors:

 

·

Attracting patrons.  The competition for patrons is dependent upon factors such as the availability of popular motion pictures, the location and number of theatres and screens in a market, the comfort and quality of the theatres and pricing. Many of our competitors have sought to increase the number of screens that they operate. Competitors have built or may be planning to build theatres in certain areas where we operate, which could result in excess capacity and increased competition for patrons.

 

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·

Licensing motion pictures.  We believe that the principal competitive factors with respect to film licensing include licensing terms, number of seats and screens available for a particular picture, revenue potential and the location and condition of an exhibitor’s theatres.

 

·

Theatre Locations.  We must compete with exhibitors and others in our efforts to locate and acquire attractive new and existing sites for our theatres and when renewing leases on our existing theatres. There can be no assurance that we will be able to acquire such new sites or existing theatres at reasonable prices or on favorable terms. Moreover, some of these competitors may be stronger financially than we are. As a result of the foregoing, we may not succeed in acquiring theatres or may have to pay more than we would prefer to make an acquisition.

 

The theatrical exhibition industry also faces competition from other forms of out-of-home entertainment, such as concerts, amusement parks and sporting events and from other distribution channels for filmed entertainment, such as cable television, pay-per-view, video streaming, and home video systems and from other forms of in-home entertainment.

 

An increase in the use of alternative film delivery methods or other forms of entertainment may drive down our attendance and limit our ticket prices.

 

We compete with other film delivery methods, including network, syndicated cable and satellite television and DVDs, as well as video-on-demand, pay-per-view services, video streaming and downloads via the Internet. We also compete for the public’s leisure time and disposable income with other forms of entertainment, including sporting events, amusement parks, live music concerts, live theatre and restaurants. An increase in the popularity of these alternative film delivery methods and other forms of entertainment could reduce attendance at our theatres, limit the prices we can charge for admission and materially adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

Our results of operations may be impacted by shrinking theatrical exclusive release windows.

 

Over the last decade, the average theatrical exclusive release window, which represents the time that elapses from the date of a film’s theatrical release to the date a film is available to consumers in-home, has decreased from approximately six months to approximately three to four months. If patrons choose to wait for in-home viewing options rather than attend a theatre for viewing the film, it may adversely impact our business and results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. In 2011, several major film studios tested premium video-on-demand products released in homes approximately 60 days after a movie’s theatrical debut, which threatened the length of the release window. In January 2015, Amazon Studios announced its intention to produce and acquire original movies for theatrical release with video streaming available just 4 to 8 weeks after their theatrical debut. We cannot give assurance that this release window, which is determined by the film studios, will not shrink further or be eliminated altogether, which could have an adverse impact on our business and results of operations.

 

Our business is subject to international economic, political and other risks that could negatively affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

As a result of the Odeon and Nordic Acquisitions, 26.7% of our revenues were derived from countries outside the United States for the year ended December 31, 2017. The success of our acquisitions of Odeon and Nordic is dependent upon our ability to operate a business in markets where we have limited experience and is subject to risks that are beyond our control. Accordingly, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally, including:

 

·

difficulties and costs of staffing and managing international operations among diverse geographies, languages and cultures;

 

·

the impact of regional or country-specific business cycles and economic instability;

 

·

the impact of the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union and the potential that other countries could also exit;

 

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·

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates which could lead to fluctuations in our reported results of operations or result in significant decreases in the value of our international investments as denominated in U.S. Dollars;

 

·

increased foreign interest rates, foreign exchange fees and other bank charges as a result of financing our foreign operations;

 

·

exposure to anti-corruption laws, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and the U.K. Bribery Act (the “Bribery Act”), and export-control regulations and economic sanctions regulations, including those promulgated by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, United States Department of Treasury (“OFAC”);

 

·

exposure to local economic conditions and local laws and regulations;

 

·

exposure to local labor and employment laws;

 

·

relationships with local labor unions and works councils;

 

·

limited borrowing capabilities relating to activities in non‑U.S. countries;

 

·

economic and/or credit conditions abroad;

 

·

potential adverse changes in the political and/or economic stability of foreign countries or in their diplomatic relations with the United States;

 

·

restrictions on the withdrawal of foreign investment and earnings;

 

·

government policies against businesses owned by foreigners;

 

·

investment restrictions or requirements;

 

·

exposure to piracy laws and regulations, including the European Union GDPR;

 

·

diminished ability to legally enforce our contractual rights in foreign countries;

 

·

difficulty in protecting our brand, reputation and intellectual property;

 

·

restrictions on the ability to obtain or retain licenses required for operation;

 

·

foreign exchange restrictions;

 

·

adverse changes in regulatory or tax requirements;

 

·

restrictions on foreign ownership of subsidiaries;

 

·

multijurisdictional data protection and privacy laws, including GDPR, which is expected to be effective in May 2018 and restrictions on transferring personally identifiable information outside of a jurisdiction; and

 

·

tariffs and other trade barriers.

 

If we are unable to manage the complexity of our global operations successfully, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We may not achieve the expected benefits and performance from our recent acquisitions.

 

As a result of our recent acquisitions of Carmike, Odeon, and Nordic, we expect to achieve certain synergies and cost savings through, for example, reducing general and administrative expenses by combining operating functions such as accounting, finance and technology, achieving purchasing efficiencies and achieving revenue enhancements resulting from the acquisitions. However, there can be no assurance that we will be able to generate sufficient cash flow from these acquisitions to service the indebtedness incurred to finance such acquisitions or realize any other anticipated benefits. Nor can there be any assurance that our profitability will be improved by these or any future acquisitions. Although we have a long history of successfully integrating acquisitions, any acquisition involves risks, such as:

 

·

the difficulty of assimilating and integrating the acquired operations and personnel into our current business;

 

·

the potential disruption of our ongoing business;

 

·

the diversion of management’s attention and other resources;

 

·

the possible inability of management to maintain uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies;

 

·

the risks of entering markets in which we have little or no experience;

 

·

the potential impairment of relationships with employees;

 

·

unexpected costs, charges or expenses;

 

·

our effective implementation and customer acceptance of our marketing strategy, including our loyalty programs;

 

·

the possibility that any liabilities we may incur or assume may prove to be more burdensome than anticipated; and

 

·

the possibility that the acquired theatres do not perform as expected.

 

Optimizing our theatre circuit through new construction and the transformation of our existing theatres may be subject to delay and unanticipated costs.

 

·

The availability of attractive site locations for new construction is subject to various factors that are beyond our control. These factors include:

 

·

local conditions, such as scarcity of space or increase in demand for real estate, demographic changes and changes in zoning and tax laws; and

 

·

competition for site locations from both theatre companies and other businesses.

 

We typically require 18 to 24 months in the United States from the time we reach an agreement with a landlord to when a theatre opens. This timeframe may vary as we introduce this concept in international markets.

 

In addition, the improvement of our existing theatres through our enhanced food and beverage and recliner seating and premium sight and sound initiatives is subject to substantial risks, such as difficulty in obtaining permits, landlord approvals and operating licenses (e.g. liquor licenses). We may also experience cost overruns from delays or other unanticipated costs in both new construction and facility improvements. Furthermore, our new sites and transformed locations may not perform to our expectations.

 

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We rely on our information systems to conduct our business, and any failure to protect these systems against security breaches or failure of these systems themselves could adversely affect our business, results of operations and liquidity and could result in litigation and penalties. Additionally, if these systems fail or become unavailable for any significant period of time, our business could be harmed.

 

The efficient operation of our business is dependent on computer hardware and software systems. Among other things, these systems collect and store certain personal information from customers, vendors and employees and process customer payment information. Additionally, open source internet ticketing allows tickets for all of our theatres to be sold by various third-party vendors on websites using information systems we do not control. Our information systems and those maintained by our third-party vendors and the sensitive data they are designed to protect are vulnerable to security breaches by computer hackers, cyber terrorists and other cyber attackers. We rely on industry-accepted security measures and technology to securely maintain confidential and proprietary information maintained on our information systems, and we rely on our third-party vendors to take appropriate measures to protect the confidentiality of the information on those information systems. However, these measures and technology may not adequately prevent security breaches. Our information systems may become unavailable or fail to perform as anticipated for any reason, including viruses, loss of power or human error. Any significant interruption or failure of our information systems or those maintained by our third-party vendors or any significant breach of security could adversely affect our reputation with our customers, vendors and employees and could adversely affect our business, results of operations and liquidity and could result in litigation against us or the imposition of penalties. A significant interruption, failure or breach of the security of our information systems or those of our third-party vendors could also require us to expend significant resources to upgrade the security measures and technology that guard sensitive data against computer hackers, cyber terrorists and other cyber attackers. We maintain cyber risk insurance coverage to protect against such risks, however, there can be no assurance that such coverage will be adequate.

 

We may incur future impairment charges to goodwill or long-lived assets and future theatre and other closure charges. 

 

We review long‑lived assets, including goodwill, indefinite-lived intangible assets and other intangible assets, marketable securities and non‑consolidated entities for impairment annually and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable. The review for goodwill compares the fair value for each of our reporting units to its associated carrying value, including goodwill. Factors that could lead to impairment of goodwill and intangible assets include adverse industry or economic trends, reduced estimates of future cash flows, and declines in the market price of our common stock. Our valuation methodology for assessing impairment requires management to make judgments and assumptions based on historical experience and projections of future operating performance. We may be required to record future charges to earnings during the period in which an impairment of goodwill or intangible assets is determined to exist. During the years ended December 31, 2017, December 31, 2016, and December 31, 2015, we recorded impairment charges of $43.6 million, $5.5 million, and $1.7 million, respectively. During 2017, we impaired 12 theatres in the U.S. markets with 179 screens (in Illinois, Texas, Virginia, Michigan, Oklahoma, New York and Maryland).

 

We have a significant amount of goodwill on our balance sheet as a result of acquisitions. As of December 31, 2017, goodwill recorded on our consolidated balance sheet totaled $4,931.7 million. In light of the decline in the market price of our common stock since the second quarter of 2017, we performed an interim goodwill impairment test as of September 30, 2017 and again as of December 31, 2017. Based on the results of these tests, we determined that the goodwill recorded on our consolidated balance sheet was not impaired. However, if the market price of our common stock further declines from current levels, or if other events or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of our reporting units below their respective carrying value, all or a portion of our goodwill may be impaired in future periods. Examples of such adverse events or circumstances that could change include (i) an adverse change in macroeconomic conditions; (ii) increased cost factors that have a negative effect on our earnings and cash flows; (iii) negative or overall declining financial performance compared with our actual and projected results of relevant prior periods; and (iv) a sustained decrease in our share price. Any impairment charges that we may take in the future could be material to our results of operations and financial condition and could adversely affect our stock price.

 

The opening of new theatres by us and certain of our competitors has drawn audiences away from some of our older theatres. In addition, demographic changes and competitive pressures have caused some of our theatres to become unprofitable. Since not all theatres are appropriate for our new initiatives, we may have to close certain theatres or recognize impairment losses related to the decrease in value of particular theatres. Deterioration in the performance of

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our theatres could require us to recognize additional impairment losses and close additional theatres, which could have an adverse effect on the results of our operations. We continually monitor the performance of our theatres, and factors such as changing consumer preferences and our inability to sublease vacant retail space could negatively impact operating results and result in future closures, sales, dispositions and significant theatre and other closure charges prior to expiration of underlying lease agreements.

 

We may be limited in our ability to utilize, or may not be able to utilize, net operating loss carryforwards to reduce our future tax liability.

 

As of December 31, 2017, we had an estimated federal income tax loss carryforward of $443.9 million and estimated state income tax loss carryforward of $404.0 million which will be limited annually due to certain change in ownership provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, as amended (“IRC”), Section 382. The federal tax loss carryforwards prior to January 1, 2018 will begin to expire in 2018 and will completely expire in 2036. Any federal tax loss carryforwards generated after January 1, 2018 will be available to be used indefinitely. Our state loss carryforwards may be used over various periods ranging from 1 to 20 years. As of December 31, 2017, we had estimated foreign income tax loss carryforwards of $638.6 million. Our foreign tax loss carryforwards are available to be used indefinitely, except approximately $12.9 million which will expire in various periods ranging from 1 to 20 years. The tax loss carryforwards are reflected in our balance sheet as an asset valued at our current effective rate and reduced by the valuation allowance.

 

We have experienced numerous “ownership changes” within the meaning of Section 382(g) of the IRC, including our merger with Wanda. These ownership changes have and will continue to subject our tax loss carryforwards to annual limitations which will restrict our ability to use them to offset our taxable income in periods following the ownership changes. In general, the annual use limitation equals the aggregate value of our equity at the time of the ownership change multiplied by a specified tax‑exempt interest rate. On December 21, 2016 we acquired Carmike Cinemas, Inc. Carmike has experienced numerous “ownership changes” within the meaning of Section 382(g). These ownership changes have and will continue to subject losses acquired with the transaction to annual limitations which will restrict our ability to use them to offset our taxable income in periods following the ownership changes.

 

We are subject to complex taxation, changes in tax rates, adoption of new U.S. or international tax legislation and disagreements with tax authorities that could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

We are subject to many different forms of taxation in both the U.S. and in foreign jurisdictions where we operate. Current economic and political conditions, including the recent United Kingdom referendum in which voters approved an exit from the E.U., make tax rates and policy in any jurisdiction, including the U.S., U.K. and E.U., subject to significant change. Recent examples include the Organization for Economic Co‑operation and Development’s (“OECD”) recommendations on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (“BEPS”), the European Commission’s Anti‑Tax Avoidance Package, and the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act signed into law in December 2017. The costs of compliance with these laws and regulations are high and are likely to increase in the future. Any failure on our part to comply with these laws and regulations can result in negative publicity and diversion of management time and effort and may subject us to significant liabilities and other penalties.

 

The value of our deferred tax assets may not be realizable to the extent our future profits are less than we have projected and we may be required to record valuation allowances against previously-recorded deferred tax assets, which may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and our financial condition.

 

Our income tax expense includes deferred income taxes arising from changes in temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, credit carry-forwards and net operating losses. We evaluate the realizability of our deferred income tax assets and assess the need for a valuation allowance on an ongoing basis. In evaluating our deferred income tax assets, we consider whether it is more likely than not that the deferred income tax assets will be realized. The ultimate realization of our deferred income tax assets depends upon generating sufficient future taxable income during the periods in which our temporary differences become deductible and before our credit carry-forwards and net operating losses expire. Our assessment of the realizability of our deferred income tax assets requires significant judgment. If we fail to achieve our projections or if we need to lower our projections, we may not have sufficient evidence of our ability to realize our deferred tax assets, and we may need to increase our valuation allowance. Our U.S. cumulative pretax losses have raised uncertainty about the likelihood of realizing our deferred tax

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assets, along with the change in U.S. Federal enacted tax rates, and as a result we have recorded a valuation allowance against all of the U.S. deferred tax assets and liabilities, except those deemed indefinite-lived. This resulted in a charge to our income tax provision of approximately $310 million in our U.S. markets during the fourth quarter of 2017. For our U.S. markets, a total income tax provision of $154.3 million was recorded for the year ended December 31, 2017. There are no assurances that we will not increase or decrease the valuation allowances in future periods against deferred tax assets and liabilities. Any increase in the valuation allowance would result in additional deferred tax expense; likewise, any decrease would result in additional deferred tax benefit. Any deferred tax expense could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

We may be reviewed by antitrust authorities in connection with acquisition opportunities that would increase our number of theatres in markets where we have a leading market share.

 

Given our size and market share, pursuit of acquisition opportunities that would increase the number of our theatres in markets where we have a leading market share would likely result in significant review by antitrust regulators in the applicable jurisdictions, and we may be required to dispose of theatres in order to complete such acquisition opportunities. For example, in connection with the acquisition of Carmike, we were required, among other things, to dispose of 17 theatres located in various markets across the United States to obtain approval of the transaction. As a result, we may not be able to succeed in acquiring other exhibition companies or we may have to dispose of a significant number of theatres in key markets in order to complete such acquisitions.

 

We are subject to substantial government regulation, which could entail significant cost.

 

We are subject to various federal, state and local laws, regulations and administrative practices both domestically and internationally affecting our business, and we must comply with provisions regulating antitrust, health and sanitation standards, equal employment, environmental, data protection and licensing for the sale of food and, in some theatres, alcoholic beverages. Our new theatre openings could be delayed or prevented or our existing theatres could be impacted by difficulties or failures in our ability to obtain or maintain required approvals or licenses. Changes in existing laws or implementation of new laws, regulations and practices could have a significant impact on our business. A significant portion of our theatre level employees are part time workers who are paid at or near the applicable minimum wage in the theatre’s jurisdiction. Increases in the minimum wage and implementation of reforms requiring the provision of additional benefits will increase our labor costs.

 

We own and operate facilities throughout the United States and various international markets throughout Europe and are subject to the environmental laws and regulations of those jurisdictions, particularly laws governing the cleanup of hazardous materials and the management of properties. We might in the future be required to participate in the cleanup of a property that we own or lease, or at which we have been alleged to have disposed of hazardous materials from one of our facilities. In certain circumstances, we might be solely responsible for any such liability under environmental laws, and such claims could be material.

 

We are presently cooperating with the relevant governmental authorities in connection with certain Civil Investigative Demands (“CIDs”) received from the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice and from the Attorneys General for the States of Ohio, Texas, Washington, Florida, New York, Kansas and from the District of Columbia concerning potentially anticompetitive conduct, including film clearances and partnering in certain joint ventures. We may receive additional CIDs from antitrust authorities in other jurisdictions in which we operate. If we were found to have violated antitrust laws, it could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial condition.

 

In the U.S., our theatres must comply with Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (“ADA”). Compliance with the ADA requires that public accommodations “reasonably accommodate” individuals with disabilities and that new construction or alterations made to “commercial facilities” conform to accessibility guidelines unless “structurally impracticable” for new construction or technically infeasible for alterations. Non‑compliance with the ADA could result in the imposition of injunctive relief, fines, and an award of damages to private litigants or additional capital expenditures to remedy such noncompliance, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial condition. In Europe, all territories have similar national regulations relating to disabilities that our theatres operate in accordance with. Noncompliance with these regulations could carry financial, operational and reputation risks.

 

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We may not be able to replace our earnings from NCM, or our investment in NCM may otherwise be negatively impacted, as a result of the competitive environment in which NCM operates or our obligation to divest most of our equity interest in NCM.

 

We have maintained an investment in NCM. NCM’s in-theatre advertising operations compete with other cinema advertising companies and other advertising mediums including, most notably, television, newspaper, radio and the Internet. There can be no guarantee that in-theatre advertising will continue to attract major advertisers or that NCM’s in-theatre advertising format will be favorably received by the theatre-going public. If NCM is unable to generate expected sales of advertising, it may not maintain the level of profitability it hopes to achieve, its results of operations and cash flows may be adversely affected and our investment in and revenues and dividends from NCM may be adversely impacted.

 

On December 20, 2016, in resolution of a complaint filed by the United States Department of Justice, Antitrust Division, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia issued a Hold Separate Stipulation and Order (the “Order”) requiring us to divest sufficient interests in NCM to reduce our beneficial ownership to 4.99% on a fully converted basis. Pursuant to the Order, we must decrease our ownership levels on the following schedule:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ownership

Date

 

Limit

December 20, 2017

 

 

15.0%

December 20, 2018

 

 

7.5%

June 20, 2019

 

 

4.99%

 

In addition, we agreed to transfer 24 theatres with a total of 384 screens to the Screenvision network, the cinema screen advertising business in which Carmike participates. This includes five Carmike theatres that implemented the Screenvision network prior to completion of the Carmike acquisition, an AMC theatre required to extend its existing term with the Screenvision network, and an AMC theatre that was also included in the divestitures.

 

Pursuant to the Order, we are enjoined from making any additional acquisitions, directly or indirectly, of ownership interests in NCM except in situations involving an adjustment resulting from annual audience attendance or an acquisition of a movie theatre or movie theatre chain. If our ownership of NCM exceeds the applicable threshold as a result of the situations described above, we will have 90 days to sell down our interests so that their ownership complies with the applicable threshold. As a result of these requirements, we may have to sell portions of our investment in NCM below current market value, we will cease receiving distributions as to the interests we sell, and we may incur significant tax liability. The reinvestment or other uses we make of any proceeds we receive as a result of the sales of our interest in NCM may not generate the same earnings we currently receive from our investment.

 

In 2017, we sold 14,800,000 shares of NCM, Inc. in response to the Final Judgment and are in compliance with the ownership directives. We have recorded impairment losses and losses on the disposition of our NCM ownership interest of approximately $230.7 million and we recorded a charge of $22.6 million related to the return of NCM units for a waiver of exclusivity in connection with the Final judgment by the DOJ.

 

As a result of our IPO, we and certain of our domestic affiliates may not be able to file a consolidated tax return which could result in increased tax liability.

 

Prior to our initial public offering, we and certain of our domestic affiliates (the “AMC affiliated tax group”) were members of a consolidated group for federal income tax purposes, of which a Wanda domestic subsidiary is the common parent. As a result of our initial public offering, the AMC affiliated tax group ceased to be members of the Wanda federal consolidated group. The AMC affiliated tax group will not be permitted to file a consolidated return for federal income tax purposes for five years, unless we obtain a waiver from the Internal Revenue Service. It is uncertain whether we will obtain a waiver if we seek one. If we do not obtain a waiver, each member of the AMC affiliated tax group will be required to file a separate federal income tax return, and, as a result, the income (and tax liability) of a member will only be offset by its own tax loss carryforwards (and other tax attributes) and not by tax loss carryforwards, current year losses or other tax attributes of other members of the group. We believe that we should not incur substantial additional federal tax liability if we are not permitted to file a federal consolidated return, because (i) most of our revenues are generated by a single member of the AMC affiliated tax group and most of our tax loss carryforwards are attributable to such member and (ii) there are certain other beneficial aspects of the structure of the AMC affiliated tax

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group. We cannot give assurance, however, that we will not incur substantial additional tax liability if the AMC affiliated tax group is not permitted to file a federal consolidated return for five years.

 

We have had significant financial losses in previous years.

 

Prior to fiscal 2007, we had reported net losses in each of the prior nine fiscal years totaling approximately $551.1 million. For fiscal 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, the period March 30, 2012 through August 30, 2012, the period August 31, 2012 through December 31, 2012, the year ended 2013, the year ended 2014, the year ended 2015, the year ended 2016, and the year ended 2017, we reported net earnings (losses) of $116.9 million, $(6.2) million, $(149.0) million, $79.9 million, $(174.3) million, $(94.1) million, $90.2 million, $(42.7) million, $364.4 million, $64.1 million, $103.9 million, $111.7 million, and $(487.2) million, respectively. If we experience poor financial results in the future, we may be unable to meet our payment obligations while attempting to expand our theatre circuit and withstand competitive pressures or adverse economic conditions.

 

General political, social and economic conditions can reduce our attendance.

 

Our success depends on general political, social and economic conditions and the willingness of consumers to spend money at movie theatres. If going to motion pictures becomes less popular or consumers spend less on food and beverage, which accounted for 30.5% of our revenues in calendar 2017, our operations could be adversely affected. In addition, our operations could be adversely affected if consumers’ discretionary income falls as a result of an economic downturn. Geopolitical events, including the threat of terrorism or cyber‑attacks, could cause people to avoid our theatres or other public places where large crowds are in attendance. In addition, due to our concentration in certain markets, natural disasters such as hurricanes or earthquakes in those markets could adversely affect our overall results of operations.

 

We depend on key personnel for our current and future performance.

 

Our current and future performance depends to a significant degree upon the retention of our senior management team and other key personnel. The loss or unavailability to us of any member of our senior management team or a key employee could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We cannot give assurance that we would be able to locate or employ qualified replacements for senior management or key employees on acceptable terms.

 

Our controlling shareholder owns more than 80% of the combined voting power of our common stock and has significant influence over our corporate management and affairs.

 

Our Class B common stock has three votes per share, and our Class A common stock, which is the publicly traded stock, has one vote per share. As of December 31, 2017, Wanda owns 75,826,927 shares of Class B common stock, or 59.37% of our outstanding common stock, representing approximately 81.43% of the voting power of our outstanding common stock. As such, Wanda has significant influence over our reporting and corporate management and affairs, and, because of the three-to-one voting ratio between our Class B and Class A common stock, Wanda will continue to control a majority of the combined voting power of our common stock and therefore be able to control all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval (including election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions, such as mergers) so long as the shares of Class B common stock owned by Wanda and its permitted transferees represent at least 30% of all outstanding shares of our Class A and Class B common stock. The shares of our Class B common stock automatically convert to shares of Class A common stock upon Wanda and its permitted transferees holding less than 30% of all outstanding shares of our Class A and Class B common stock.

 

We may not generate sufficient cash flows or have sufficient restricted payment capacity under our Senior Secured Credit Facility or the indentures governing our debt securities to pay our intended dividends on our Class A common stock.

 

Subject to legally available funds, we intend to pay quarterly cash dividends. We will only be able to pay dividends from our available cash on hand and funds received from our subsidiaries. Our subsidiaries' ability to make distributions to us will depend on their ability to generate substantial operating cash flow. Our ability to pay dividends to our stockholders is subject to the terms of our Senior Secured Credit Facility and the indentures governing our outstanding notes. Our operating cash flow and ability to comply with restricted payment covenants in our debt

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instruments will depend on our future performance, which will be subject to prevailing economic conditions and to financial, business and other factors beyond our control. In addition, dividend payments are not mandatory or guaranteed, and our board of directors may decrease the level of dividends or entirely discontinue the payment of dividends. We may not pay dividends as a result of the following additional factors, among others:

 

·

we are not legally or contractually required to pay dividends;

 

·

while we currently intend to pay a regular quarterly dividend, this policy could be modified or revoked at any time;

 

·

even if we do not modify or revoke our dividend policy, the actual amount of dividends distributed and the decision to make any distribution is entirely at the discretion of our board of directors and future dividends, if any, will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, cash requirements, financial condition, business opportunities, provisions of applicable law and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant;

 

·

the amount of dividends distributed is and will be subject to contractual restrictions under the restrictive payment covenants contained in:

 

·

the indentures governing our debt securities,

 

·

the terms of our Senior Secured Credit Facility, and

 

·

the terms of any other outstanding or future indebtedness incurred by us or any of our subsidiaries;

 

·

the amount of dividends distributed is subject to state law restrictions; and

 

·

our stockholders have no contractual or other legal right to dividends.

 

The maximum amount we would be permitted to distribute in accordance with our Senior Secured Credit Facility and the indentures governing our notes was approximately $2.7 billion as of December 31, 2017. As a result of the foregoing limitations on our ability to make distributions, we cannot give assurance that we will be able to make all of our intended quarterly dividend payments.

 

There may be future dilution of our Class A common stock, which could adversely affect the market price of shares of our Class A common stock.

 

In the future, we may issue additional shares of Class A common stock to raise cash to refinance indebtedness, for working capital, to finance strategic initiatives and future acquisitions or for other purposes. We may also acquire interests in other companies by using a combination of cash and shares of Class A common stock or just shares of Class A common stock. We may also issue securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, shares of Class A common stock. Any of these events may dilute the ownership interests of current stockholders, reduce our earnings per share or have an adverse effect on the price of our shares of Class A common stock.

 

Future sales of our Class A common stock in the public market could adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock.

 

We cannot predict the effect, if any, that market sales of shares of our Class A common stock or the availability of shares of our Class A common stock for sale will have on the prevailing market price of our Class A common stock. Sales of a substantial number of shares of our Class A common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales may occur, could reduce the market price of our shares of Class A common stock.

 

Wanda holds shares of our Class B common stock, all of which constitute "restricted securities" under the Securities Act. The shares of our Class B common stock automatically convert to Class A common stock (1) if transferred to a person other than certain permitted transferees or (2) upon Wanda and its permitted transferees holding less than 30% of all outstanding shares of our Class A and Class B common stock. Provided the holders comply with the

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applicable volume limits and other conditions prescribed in Rule 144 under the Securities Act, all of these restricted securities are currently freely tradeable. Pursuant to a registration rights agreement dated December 23, 2013, we have agreed to use our best efforts to effect registered offerings upon request from Wanda and to grant incidental or "piggyback" registration rights with respect to any registrable securities held by Wanda. The obligation to effect any demand for registration by Wanda will be subject to certain conditions, including limitations on the number of demand registrations and limitations on the minimum value of securities to be registered. We have also agreed to use our best efforts to grant certain incidental or "piggyback" registration rights with respect to securities issued to certain current and former officers. The exercise of such registration rights by Wanda and/or the current and former officers may substantially increase the number of shares of Class A common stock in the public market and could reduce the market price of shares of our Class A common stock.

 

We have elected to take advantage of the "controlled company" exemption to the corporate governance rules for publicly-listed companies, which could make our Class A common stock less attractive to some investors or otherwise harm our stock price.

 

Because we qualify as a "controlled company" under the corporate governance rules for publicly-listed companies, we are not required to have a majority of our board of directors be independent, nor are we required to have a compensation committee or an independent nominating function. In light of our status as a controlled company, our board of directors has determined not to have a majority of our board of directors be independent, have a compensation committee composed solely of independent directors or have an independent nominating function and has chosen to have the full board of directors be directly responsible for nominating members of our board. Accordingly, should the interests of Wanda, as our controlling stockholder, differ from those of other stockholders, the other stockholders may not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to all of the corporate governance rules for publicly-listed companies. Our status as a controlled company could make our Class A common stock less attractive to some investors or otherwise harm our stock price.

 

The super voting rights of our Class B common stock and other anti-takeover protections in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws may discourage or prevent a takeover of our Company, even if an acquisition would be beneficial to our stockholders.

 

Provisions contained in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws, as amended, as well as provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law and the supermajority rights of our Class B common stockholder, could delay or make it more difficult to remove incumbent directors or for a third-party to acquire us, even if a takeover would benefit our stockholders. These provisions include:

 

·

a dual class common stock structure, which provides Wanda with the ability to control the outcome of matters requiring stockholder approval, even if they own significantly less than a majority of the shares of our outstanding Class A and Class B common stock;

 

·

a classified board of directors;

 

·

the sole power of a majority of the board of directors to fix the number of directors;

 

·

limitations on the removal of directors;

 

·

the sole power of the board of directors to fill any vacancy on the board of directors, whether such vacancy occurs as a result of an increase in the number of directors or otherwise;

 

·

the ability of our board of directors to designate one or more series of preferred stock and issue shares of preferred stock without stockholder approval; and

 

·

the inability of stockholders to call special meetings.

 

Our issuance of shares of preferred stock could delay or prevent a change of control of our company. Our board of directors has the authority to cause us to issue, without any further vote or action by the stockholders, up to 50,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.01 per share, in one or more series, to designate the number of shares constituting any series, and to fix the rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions thereof, including dividend rights,

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voting rights, rights and terms of redemption, redemption price or prices and liquidation preferences of such series. The issuance of shares of preferred stock may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of our company without further action by the stockholders, even where stockholders are offered a premium for their shares.

 

Our incorporation under Delaware law, the ability of our board of directors to create and issue a new series of preferred stock or a stockholder rights plan and certain other provisions of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws, as amended, could impede a merger, takeover or other business combination involving our company or the replacement of our management or discourage a potential investor from making a tender offer for our Class A common stock, which, under certain circumstances, could reduce the market value of our Class A common stock.

 

Our issuance of preferred stock could dilute the voting power of the common stockholders and adversely affect the market value of our Class A common stock.

 

The issuance of shares of preferred stock with voting rights may adversely affect the voting power of the holders of our other classes of voting stock either by diluting the voting power of our other classes of voting stock if they vote together as a single class, or by giving the holders of any such preferred stock the right to block an action on which they have a separate class vote even if the action were approved by the holders of our other classes of voting stock.

 

In addition, the issuance of shares of preferred stock with dividend or conversion rights, liquidation preferences or other economic terms favorable to the holders of preferred stock could adversely affect the market price for our Class A common stock by making an investment in the common stock less attractive. For example, investors may not wish to purchase Class A common stock at a price above the conversion price of a series of convertible preferred stock because the holders of the preferred stock would effectively be entitled to purchase Class A common stock at the lower conversion price causing economic dilution to the holders of Class A common stock.

 

Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

None.

 

Item 2.  Properties.

 

The following table sets forth the general character and ownership classification of our theatre circuit, excluding non-consolidated joint ventures and managed theatres, as of December 31, 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property Holding Classification

    

Theatres

    

Screens

 

Owned

 

68

 

579

 

Leased pursuant to ground leases

 

14

 

133

 

Leased pursuant to building leases

 

867

 

10,123

 

Total

 

949

 

10,835

 

 

Our theatre leases generally have initial terms ranging from 12 to 20 years, with options to extend the lease for up to 20 additional years. The leases typically require escalating minimum annual rent payments and additional rent payments based on a percentage of the leased theatre’s revenue above a base amount and require us to pay for property taxes, maintenance, insurance and certain other property-related expenses. In some instances, our escalating minimum annual rent payments are contingent upon increases in the consumer price index. In some cases, our rights as tenant are subject and subordinate to the mortgage loans of lenders to our lessors, so that if a mortgage were to be foreclosed, we could lose our lease. Historically, this has never occurred.

 

We lease our corporate headquarters in Leawood, Kansas. We believe our facilities are currently adequate for our operations.

 

Currently, the majority of the food and beverage, seating and other equipment required for each of our theatres are owned. The majority of our digital projection equipment is leased from DCIP.

 

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All obligations under the Senior Secured Credit Facility, and the guarantees of those obligations (as well as cash management obligations), are secured by substantially all of AMC’s assets as well as those of each subsidiary guarantor.

 

Please refer to Narrative Description of Business under Part I, Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the geographic locations of our Theatrical Exhibition circuit as of December 31, 2017. See Note 3 – Property in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements under Part II, Item 8 hereof.

 

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings.

 

The information required to be furnished by us under this Part I, Item 3 (Legal Proceedings) is incorporated by reference to the information contained in Note 12 – Commitments and Contingencies to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Part II, Item 8 on this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

Item 5.  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

Our common equity consists of Class A and Class B common stock. Our Class A common stock has traded on the New York Stock Exchange since December 18, 2013 under the symbol “AMC.” There is no established public trading market for our Class B common stock.

 

The following table sets forth the historical high and low sales prices per share of our Class A common stock as reported by the New York Stock Exchange for the calendar periods indicated:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

First Quarter (January 1, 2017 - March 31, 2017)

    

$

34.90

    

$

29.10

 

Second Quarter (April 1, 2017 - June 30, 2017)

 

 

32.10

 

 

22.15

 

Third Quarter (July 1, 2017 - September 30, 2017)

 

 

23.60

 

 

12.05

 

Fourth Quarter (October 1, 2017 - December 31, 2017)

 

 

16.50

 

 

10.80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

First Quarter (January 1, 2016 - March 31, 2016)

    

$

29.92

    

$

19.28

 

Second Quarter (April 1, 2016 - June 30, 2016)

 

 

30.31

 

 

25.75

 

Third Quarter (July 1, 2016 - September 30, 2016)

 

 

32.28

 

 

26.97

 

Fourth Quarter (October 1, 2016 - December 31, 2016)

 

 

35.65

 

 

30.40

 

 

Holders of Common Stock

 

On February 23, 2018, there were 38 stockholders of record of our Class A common Stock and one stockholder of record of our Class B common Stock.

 

Temporary Equity:  Certain members of management have the right to require Holdings to purchase the Class A common stock held by them under certain limited circumstances pursuant to the terms of a stockholders agreement. Beginning on January 1, 2016 and ending on January 1, 2019 (or upon the termination of a management stockholder’s employment by us without cause, by the management stockholder for good reason, or due to the management stockholder’s death or disability), management shareholders will have the right, in limited circumstances, to require Holdings to purchase shares that are not fully and freely tradeable at a price equal to the price per share paid by such management shareholder with appropriate adjustments for any subsequent events such as dividends, splits, or combinations. The shares of Class A common stock subject to the stockholder agreement are classified as temporary equity, apart from permanent equity, as a result of the contingent redemption feature contained in the stockholder agreement.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, a former employee who held 27,197 shares, relinquished his put right, therefore the related share amount of $0.3 million was reclassified to additional paid-in capital, a component of stockholders’ equity. During the year ended December 31, 2016, a former employee who held 27,197 shares, relinquished his put right, therefore the related share amount of $0.2 million was reclassified to additional paid-in capital, a component of stockholders’ equity. During the year ended December 31, 2015, a former employee who held 5,939 shares, relinquished his put right, therefore the related share amount of $0.1 million was reclassified to additional paid-in capital, a component of stockholders’ equity.

 

Dividend Policy

 

Subject to legally available funds, we intend to pay a quarterly cash dividend at an annual rate initially equal to approximately $0.80 per share (or a quarterly rate initially equal to approximately $0.20 per share) of Holdings’ Class A and Class B common stock. The payment of future dividends is subject to our Board of Directors’ discretion and

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dependent on many considerations, including limitations imposed by covenants in the agreements governing our indebtedness, operating results, capital requirements, strategic considerations and other factors.

 

We will only be able to pay dividends from our available cash on hand and funds received from our subsidiaries. Their ability to make any payments to us will depend upon many factors, including our operating results, cash flows and the terms of the Senior Secured Credit Facility and the indentures governing our debt securities. Our ability to pay dividends to our stockholders will also be subject to the terms of the indebtedness. The declaration and payment of any future dividends will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors after taking into account various factors, including legal requirements, our subsidiaries’ ability to make payments to us, our financial condition, operating results, cash flow from operating activities, available cash and current and anticipated cash needs. We do not intend to borrow funds to pay the quarterly dividend described above. See the Liquidity and Capital Resources section of Item 7 of Part II hereof for further information regarding the dividend restrictions.

 

The following is a summary of dividends and dividend equivalents declared to stockholders for the calendar periods indicated:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

 

    

Amount per

    

Total Amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share of

 

Declared

 

Declaration Date

 

Record Date

 

Date Paid

 

Common Stock

 

(In millions)(1)

 

February 14, 2017

 

March 13, 2017

 

March 27, 2017

 

$

0.20

 

$

26.2

 

April 27, 2017

 

June 5, 2017

 

June 19, 2017

 

 

0.20

 

 

26.5

 

August 3, 2017

 

September 11, 2017

 

September 25, 2017

 

 

0.20

 

 

26.5

 

October 27, 2017

 

December 4, 2017

 

December 18, 2017

 

 

0.20

 

 

25.9

 

February 25, 2016

 

March 7, 2016

 

March 21, 2016

 

 

0.20

 

 

19.8

 

April 27, 2016

 

June 6, 2016

 

June 20, 2016

 

 

0.20

 

 

19.8

 

July 25, 2016

 

September 6, 2016

 

September 19, 2016

 

 

0.20

 

 

19.8

 

November 3, 2016

 

December 5, 2016

 

December 19, 2016

 

 

0.20

 

 

20.7

 


(1)

Includes amounts related to restricted stock unit and performance stock unit awards that were not paid until such awards vested.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

See Item 12. of Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

Sale of Unregistered Securities

 

None.

 

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Issuer Purchase of Equity Securities

 

The following table provides information with respect to Common Stock purchases by the Company during the fourth fiscal quarter of 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approximate Dollar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Number of

 

Value of Shares that

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares Purchased as

 

May Yet Be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part of Publicly

 

Purchased Under the

 

 

Total Number of

 

Average Price Paid

 

Announced Plans or

 

Plans or Program (a)

Period

    

Shares Purchased

    

Per Share

    

Programs (a)

    

(in millions)

October 1, 2017 through October 31, 2017

 

826,905

 

$

14.39

 

826,905

 

$

71.6

November 1, 2017 through November 30, 2017

 

124,630

 

$

13.02

 

124,630

 

$

69.9

December 1, 2017 through December 31, 2017

 

1,176,021

 

$

14.89

 

1,176,021

 

$

52.5

Total

 

2,127,556

 

 

 

 

2,127,556

 

 

 


(a)

As announced on August 3, 2017, our Board of Directors authorized a share repurchase program for an aggregate purchase of up to $100.0 million of our common stock, excluding transaction costs. As of December 31, 2017, $52.5 million remained available for repurchase under this plan. A two-year time limit has been set for the completion of this program, expiring August 2, 2019.

 

Performance Graph

 

The following stock price performance graph should not be deemed incorporated by reference by any general statement incorporating by reference this Annual Report on Form 10-K into any filing under the Exchange Act or the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate this information by reference, and shall not otherwise be deemed filed under such acts.

 

The following stock performance graph compares, for the period December 18, 2013 through December 31, 2017, the cumulative total stockholder returns for AMC’s common stock, the Standard & Poor’s Corporation Composite 500 Index and a self-determined peer group consisting of Cinemark Holdings, Inc. (CNK) and Regal Entertainment Group (RGC). Measurement points are the last trading day for each month ended December 31, 2013 through December 31, 2017. The graph assumes that $100 was invested on December 18, 2013 in our common stock and in our peer group and on November 30, 2013 in the Standard & Poor’s Corporation Composite 500 Index and assumes reinvestment of any dividends.

 

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The stock price performance below is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.

 

COMPARISON OF 4 YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN*


Among AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc., the S&P 500 Index, and a Peer Group

 

Picture 1


*$100 invested on 12/18/13 in stock or 11/30/13 in index, including reinvestment of dividends.

Fiscal year ending December 31.

Copyright© 2018 Standard & Poor's, a division of S&P Global. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

12/18/13

    

12/13

    

3/14

    

6/14

    

9/14

    

12/14

    

3/15

    

6/15

    

9/15

AMC

 

100.00

 

110.60

 

130.52

 

135.04

 

125.87

 

144.46

 

196.96

 

171.47

 

141.82

S&P 500

 

100.00

 

102.53

 

104.38

 

109.85

 

111.09

 

116.57

 

117.67

 

118.00

 

110.40

Peer Group

 

100.00

 

101.00

 

92.46

 

110.20

 

106.06

 

115.14

 

137.58

 

124.82

 

105.86

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

12/15

 

3/16

    

6/16

    

9/16

    

12/16

    

3/17

    

6/17

    

9/17

    

12/17

AMC

 

136.21

 

160.10

 

159.01

 

180.23

 

196.23

 

184.64

 

134.71

 

88.34

 

92.04

S&P 500

 

118.18

 

119.77

 

122.71

 

127.44

 

132.31

 

140.34

 

144.67

 

151.16

 

161.20

Peer Group

 

109.09

 

120.13

 

124.55

 

128.62

 

127.11

 

145.20

 

129.92

 

115.00

 

130.18

 

 

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Item 6.  Selected Financial Data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

December 31,

(In millions, except operating data)

 

2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

Statement of Operations Data: