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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
R ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ___________ to ___________

Commission File Number: 001-15393

HEARTLAND FINANCIAL USA, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
42-1405748
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer identification number)
1398 Central Avenue, Dubuque, Iowa 52001
(563) 589-2100
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Class
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock $1.00 par value
The NASDAQ Global Select Market
Preferred Share Purchase Rights
 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes þ No ¨

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.
Yes ¨ No þ

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes þ No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "smaller reporting company," and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer    þ          Accelerated filer    ¨            Non-accelerated filer   ¨         Smaller reporting company  ¨
Emerging growth company ¨
 (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Exchange Act Rule 12b-2). Yes  ¨ No þ






The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant (assuming, for purposes of this calculation only, that the Registrant's directors, executive officers and greater than 10% shareholders are affiliates of the Registrant), based on the last sales price quoted on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2017, the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was approximately $1,163,696,144. 

As of February 27, 2018, the Registrant had issued and outstanding 31,054,186 shares of common stock, $1.00 par value per share.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III.





HEARTLAND FINANCIAL USA, INC.
Form 10-K Annual Report
Table of Contents
Part I
 
A.
General Description
B.
Market Areas
C.
Competition
D.
Employees
E.
Internet Access 
F.
Supervision and Regulation
 
Part II
 
Part III
 
Part IV
 
 






PART I

SAFE HARBOR STATEMENT

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (including information incorporated by reference) contains, and future oral and written statements of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. and its management may contain, forward-looking statements, within the meaning of such term in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, with respect to the financial condition, results of operations, plans, objectives, future performance and business of Heartland. Forward-looking statements, which may be based upon beliefs, expectations and assumptions of Heartland's management and on information currently available to management, are generally identifiable by the use of words such as "believe", "expect", "anticipate", "plan", "intend", "estimate", "may", "will", "would", "could", "should" or other similar expressions. Additionally, all statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including forward-looking statements, speak only as of the date they are made, and Heartland undertakes no obligation to update any statement in light of new information or future events.

Heartland's ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. The factors which could have a material adverse effect on the operations and future prospects of Heartland are detailed in the "Risk Factors" section included under Item 1A. of Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements.

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

A. GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Heartland Financial USA, Inc. (individually referred to herein as "Parent Company" and collectively with all of its subsidiaries and affiliates referred to herein as "Heartland," "we," "us," or "our") is a multi-bank holding company registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the "BHCA"), that was originally formed in the state of Iowa in 1981 and reincorporated in the State of Delaware in 1993. Heartland's headquarters are located at 1398 Central Avenue, Dubuque, Iowa. Our website address is www.htlf.com. You can access, free of charge, our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"), including our Annual Report on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any other amendments to those reports, at our website under the Investor Relations tab, or at the SEC website at www.sec.gov. Proxy materials for our upcoming 2018 Annual Shareholders Meeting to be held on May 16, 2018, will be available electronically via a link on our website at www.htlf.com.

At December 31, 2017, Heartland had total assets of $9.81 billion, total loans of $6.39 billion and total deposits of $8.15 billion. Heartland’s total capital as of December 31, 2017, was $991.5 million. Net income available to common stockholders for 2017 was $75.2 million.

Heartland conducts a community banking business through independently chartered community banks (collectively, the "Banks") operating in the states of Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, New Mexico, Arizona, Montana, Colorado, Minnesota, Kansas, Missouri, Texas and California. All Banks are members of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the "FDIC"). Listed below are our current ten Banks, which, as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, operate a total of 118 banking locations:

Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, Dubuque, Iowa, is chartered under the laws of the state of Iowa.
Illinois Bank & Trust, Rockford, Illinois, is chartered under the laws of the state of Illinois.
Wisconsin Bank & Trust, Madison, Wisconsin, is chartered under the laws of the state of Wisconsin.
New Mexico Bank & Trust, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is chartered under the laws of the state of New Mexico.
Rocky Mountain Bank, Billings, Montana, is chartered under the laws of the state of Montana.
Arizona Bank & Trust, Phoenix, Arizona, is chartered under the laws of the state of Arizona.
Citywide Banks (formerly known as Centennial Bank and Trust), Denver, Colorado, is chartered under the laws of the state of Colorado.
Minnesota Bank & Trust, Edina, Minnesota, is chartered under the laws of the state of Minnesota.
Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company, Merriam, Kansas, is chartered under the laws of the state of Kansas.
Premier Valley Bank, Fresno, California, is chartered under the laws of the state of California.






Dubuque Bank and Trust Company also has two wholly-owned non-bank subsidiaries:

DB&T Insurance, Inc., a multi-line insurance agency, with one wholly-owned subsidiary:
Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services, a multi-line insurance agency with the primary purpose of providing online insurance products to consumers and small business clients in Bank markets.
DB&T Community Development Corp., a community development company with the primary purpose of partnering in low-income housing and historic rehabilitation projects.

Heartland has three active non-bank subsidiaries as listed below:

Citizens Finance Parent Co., a consumer finance company with two wholly-owned companies:
Citizens Finance Co., a consumer finance company with offices in Iowa and Wisconsin.
Citizens Finance of Illinois Co., a consumer finance company with offices in Illinois.
Heartland Community Development Inc., a property management company with the primary purpose of holding and managing certain nonperforming assets acquired from the Banks.

In addition, as of December 31, 2017, Heartland had trust preferred securities issued through special purpose trust subsidiaries formed for the purpose of offering cumulative capital securities, including Heartland Financial Statutory Trust IV, Heartland Financial Statutory Trust V, Heartland Financial Statutory Trust VI, Heartland Financial Statutory Trust VII, Morrill Statutory Trust I, Morrill Statutory Trust II, Sheboygan Statutory Trust I, CBNM Capital Trust I, Citywide Capital Trust III, Citywide Capital Trust IV and Citywide Capital Trust V.

All of Heartland’s subsidiaries were wholly owned as of December 31, 2017.

The principal business of our Banks consists of making loans to and accepting deposits from businesses and individuals. Our Banks provide full service commercial and retail banking in their communities. Both our loans and our deposits are generated primarily through strong banking and community relationships, and through management that is actively involved in the community. Our lending and investment activities are funded primarily by core deposits. This stable source of funding is achieved by developing strong banking relationships with customers through value-added product offerings, competitive market pricing, convenience and high-touch personal service. Deposit products, which are insured by the FDIC to the full extent permitted by law, include checking and other demand deposit accounts, NOW accounts, savings accounts, money market accounts, certificates of deposit, individual retirement accounts, health savings accounts and other time deposits. Loan products include commercial and industrial, commercial real estate, small business, agricultural, real estate mortgage, consumer, and credit cards for commercial, business and personal use.

We enhance the customer-centric local services of our Banks with a full complement of value-added services, including wealth management, investment and insurance services. We provide contemporary technology solutions that provide our customers convenient electronic banking services and client access to account information through business and personal online banking, mobile banking, bill payment, remote deposit capture, treasury management services, credit and debit cards and automated teller machines.

Business Model and Operating Philosophy

Heartland’s operating philosophy is to maximize the benefits of a community banking model by:

1.
Creating strong community ties through customer-centric local bank delivery of products and services.

Deeply rooted local leadership and boards
Local community knowledge and relationships
Local decision-making
Independent charters
Locally recognized brands
Commitment to an exceptional customer experience

2.
Providing extensive banking services to increase revenue.

Full range of commercial products, including government guaranteed lending and treasury management services
Private client services, including investment management, trust, retirement plans and brokerage and investment services





Convenient and competitive retail products and services, including consumer finance
Residential mortgage origination
Providing added client value through consultative relationship building

3.
Centralizing back-office operations for efficiency.

Leverage expertise across all Banks
Contemporary technology for account processing and delivery systems
Efficient back-office support for loan processing and deposit operations
Centralized loan underwriting and collections
Centralized loss management and risk analysis
Centralized support for other professional services, including human resources, marketing, legal, compliance, finance, administration, internal audit, investment management, customer support and facilities

We believe the personal and professional service we offer to our customers provides an appealing alternative to the service provided by the "megabanks." While we are committed to a community banking philosophy, we believe our size, combined with our robust suite of financial products and services, allows us to effectively compete in our respective market areas. To remain price competitive, we also believe that we must manage expenses and gain economies of scale by centralizing back office support functions. Although each of our Banks operates under the direction of its own board of directors, we have standard operating policies regarding asset/liability management, liquidity management, investment management, and lending and deposit structure management.

Another component of our operating strategy is to encourage all directors, officers and employees to maintain a strong ownership interest in Heartland. We have established ownership guidelines for our directors and executive management and have an employee stock purchase plan available to employees.

We maintain a strong community commitment by encouraging the active participation of our employees, officers and board members in local charitable, civic, school, religious and community development activities.

Acquisition and Expansion Strategy

Our primary objectives are to increase profitability and diversify our market area and asset base by expanding through acquisitions and to grow organically by increasing our customer base in the markets we serve. In the current environment, we are continuing to seek opportunities for growth through acquisitions. Although we are focused on opportunities in our existing and adjacent markets, we would consider acquisitions in new growth markets if they fit our business model, support our customer-centric culture, provide a sufficient return on investment and would be accretive to earnings within the first year of combined operations. We typically consider acquisitions of established financial institutions, primarily commercial banks or thrifts. We have also formed de novo banking institutions in locations determined to have high growth market potential and management with banking expertise and a philosophy similar to our own.

In recent years, we have focused on markets with growth potential in the Midwestern and Western regions of the United States. Our strategy is to balance the growth in our Western markets with the stability of our Midwestern markets.

Through acquisition and organic growth, our goal is to reach at least $1 billion in assets in each state where Heartland operates. To that end, as of December 31, 2017, Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, Wisconsin Bank & Trust, New Mexico Bank & Trust, and Citywide Banks each have assets over $1 billion.






The following table provides information about the implementation of Heartland's expansion strategy:
Year
 
Name
 
De Novo
 
Acquisition
 
Merged Into
1988
 
Citizens Finance Co.
 
 
 
X
 
N/A
1989
 
Key City Bank
 
 
 
X
 
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
1991
 
Farley State Bank
 
 
 
X
 
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
1992
 
Galena State Bank & Trust Co.
 
 
 
X
 
Illinois Bank & Trust (2015)
1994
 
First Community Bank
 
 
 
X
 
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company (2011)
1995
 
Riverside Community Bank(1)
 
X
 
 
 
N/A
1997
 
Cottage Grove State Bank(2)
 
 
 
X
 
N/A
1998
 
New Mexico Bank & Trust
 
X
 
 
 
N/A
1999
 
Bank One Monroe (branch)
 
 
 
X
 
Wisconsin Bank & Trust
2000
 
First National Bank of Clovis
 
 
 
X
 
New Mexico Bank & Trust
2003
 
Arizona Bank & Trust
 
X
 
 
 
N/A
2004
 
Rocky Mountain Bank
 
 
 
X
 
N/A
2006
 
Summit Bank & Trust(3)
 
X
 
 
 
N/A
2006
 
Bank of the Southwest
 
 
 
X
 
Arizona Bank & Trust
2008
 
Minnesota Bank & Trust
 
X
 
 
 
N/A
2009
 
Elizabeth State Bank
 
 
 
X
 
Galena State Bank & Trust Co.
2012
 
Liberty Bank, FSB (three branches)
 
 
 
X
 
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
2012
 
First National Bank Platteville
 
 
 
X
 
Wisconsin Bank & Trust
2012
 
Heritage Bank, N.A.
 
 
 
X
 
Arizona Bank & Trust
2013
 
Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company
 
 
 
X
 
N/A
2013
 
Freedom Bank
 
 
 
X
 
Illinois Bank & Trust (2014)
2015
 
Community Bank & Trust (Sheboygan)
 
 
 
X
 
Wisconsin Bank & Trust
2015
 
Community Bank (Santa Fe)
 
 
 
X
 
New Mexico Bank & Trust
2015
 
First Scottsdale Bank, N.A.
 
 
 
X
 
Arizona Bank & Trust
2015
 
Premier Valley Bank
 
 
 
X
 
N/A
2016
 
Centennial Bank(3)
 
 
 
X
 
Summit Bank & Trust(3)
2017
 
Founders Community Bank
 
 
 
X
 
Premier Valley Bank
2017
 
Citywide Banks
 
 
 
X
 
Centennial Bank and Trust(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) Riverside Community Bank changed its name to Illinois Bank & Trust in 2014.
(2) Cottage Grove State Bank was renamed Wisconsin Community Bank upon acquisition and subsequently changed its name to Wisconsin Bank & Trust.
(3) Summit Bank & Trust changed its name to Centennial Bank and Trust upon the acquisition of Centennial Bank.
(4) Centennial Bank and Trust changed its name to Citywide Banks upon the acquisition of Citywide Banks.

On February 23, 2018, Heartland completed the acquisition of Signature Bancshares, Inc., parent company of Signature Bank, headquartered in Minnetonka, Minnesota. Under the terms of the definitive merger agreement, Heartland acquired Signature Bancshares, Inc. in a transaction valued at approximately $61.4 million, of which $7.7 million was cash and the remainder was settled by delivery of approximately 1,001,246 shares of Heartland common stock. As of December 31, 2017, Signature Bank had total assets of $409.2 million, including $339.1 million of gross loans held to maturity, and deposits of $368.1 million. Signature Bank was merged with Heartland’s wholly-owned subsidiary Minnesota Bank & Trust, and the combined entity operates under the Minnesota Bank & Trust brand name. The transaction was a tax-free reorganization with respect to the stock consideration received by the stockholders of Signature Bancshares, Inc. The systems conversion for this transaction is expected to occur in the second quarter of 2018.

On December 12, 2017, Heartland entered into a definitive merger agreement with First Bank Lubbock Bancshares, Inc., parent company of FirstBank & Trust Company, headquartered in Lubbock, Texas. Under the terms of the definitive merger agreement, Heartland will acquire First Bank Lubbock Bancshares, Inc. in a transaction valued at approximately $185.6 million as of the





announcement date, subject to certain adjustments. Shareholders of First Bank Lubbock Bancshares, Inc. will receive a combination of Heartland common stock and cash. As of December 31, 2017, FirstBank & Trust Company had total assets of $929.6 million, including $669.3 million of gross loans held to maturity, and deposits of $821.9 million. FirstBank & Trust Company will operate as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Heartland. The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2018.

Primary Business Lines

General
Our Banks provide a wide range of commercial, small business and consumer banking services to businesses, including public sector and non-profit entities, and to individuals. We provide a contemporary menu of traditional and non-traditional service channels including online banking, mobile banking and telephone banking. Our Banks provide a comprehensive suite of banking services comprised of competitively priced deposit and innovative credit offerings, along with treasury management and private client services.

Our bankers actively solicit the business of new companies entering their market areas as well as established companies in their respective business communities. We believe that the Banks are successful in attracting new customers in their markets through professional service, a suite of comprehensive banking products, competitive pricing, innovative credit facilities, convenient locations and proactive communications.

Commercial Banking
Our Banks have a strong commercial loan base generated primarily through business networks and personal relationships in the communities they serve. The current portfolios of the Banks reflect the businesses in those communities and include a wide range of business loans, including lines of credit for working capital and operational purposes and term loans for the acquisition of equipment and real estate. Although most loans are made on a secured basis, loans may be made on an unsecured basis where warranted by the overall financial condition of the borrower. Generally, terms of commercial business loans range from one to five years.

Commercial bankers at the Banks provide a consultative customer-centric approach utilizing the comprehensive suite of banking products and services to deliver tailored solutions to the client in an organized and efficient manner both for the client and the bank. Bankers are trained and experienced in providing consultative solutions to clients to assist them in accomplishing their business strategies and objectives. The suite of banking services used to accompany this approach are developed to be at the highest level in the industry and can be customized to fit the objectives of the client.

Closely integrated with our loan programs is a significant emphasis on treasury management services that enhance our business clients' ability to monitor, accumulate and disburse funds efficiently. Our treasury management has five basic functions:

collection;
disbursement;
management of cash;
information reporting; and
fraud detection and prevention.

Our treasury management services suite includes online banking and bill payment, automated clearing house ("ACH") services, wire transfer, zero balance accounts, transaction reporting, lock box services, remote deposit capture, accounts receivable solutions, commercial purchasing cards, merchant credit card services, investment sweep accounts, reconciliation services, foreign exchange and several fraud prevention services, including check and electronic positive pay, and virus/malware protection service.






Many of the businesses in the communities we serve are small to mid-sized businesses, and commercial lending to small businesses has been, and continues to be, an emphasis for the Banks. The table below shows the certifications granted to the Banks from the United States Small Business Administration ("SBA") and United States Department of Agriculture (the "USDA") Rural Development Business and Industry loan program.
Bank
 
SBA
Express
Lender
 
SBA
Preferred
Lender
 
SBA
Certified
Lender
 
SBA
Export
Express
 
USDA
Certified
Lender
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
 
X
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Illinois Bank & Trust
 
X
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wisconsin Bank & Trust
 
X
 
X
 
X
 
 
 
X
New Mexico Bank & Trust
 
X
 
X
 
 
 
 
 
 
Arizona Bank & Trust
 
X
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky Mountain Bank
 
X
 
X
 
X
 
 
 
 
Citywide Banks
 
X
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Minnesota Bank & Trust
 
X
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company
 
X
 
X
 
X
 
X
 
 
Premier Valley Bank
 
X
 
X
 
X
 
X
 
 

Our commercial loans are primarily made based on the identified cash flow of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. We value the collateral for most of these loans based upon its estimated fair market value and require personal guarantees in most instances. The primary repayment risks of commercial loans are that the cash flow of the borrowers may be unpredictable, and the collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value.

In order to limit underwriting risk, we are committed to ensuring that all loan personnel are well trained. We use a third-party assessment to assess the credit skills and training needs for our loan personnel, and we have developed specific individualized training. All new lending personnel are expected to complete a similar diagnostic training program. Centralized staff in the credit administration department assists all of the commercial and agricultural lending officers of the Banks in the analysis and underwriting of credit.

In addition to the lending personnel of the Banks reporting to their respective board of directors each month, we use an internal loan review function to analyze credits of the Banks and provide periodic reports to their boards of directors. To reduce the risk of loss, we have processes to help identify problem loans early, and we aggressively seek resolution of credit problems.

As a result of the economic recession between 2008 and 2011, an internal Special Assets group was formed to focus on resolving assets. Commercial or agricultural loans in a default or workout status are assigned to the Special Assets group. Special Assets personnel are also responsible for marketing repossessed properties and meet with representatives from each Bank on a monthly basis.

Small Business Banking
In 2013, Heartland established a Small Business Lending Center dedicated to serving the credit needs of small businesses with annual sales generally under $5 million. The Center is designed to provide quick turnaround on small business customer credit requests on a wide variety of credit products. We believe that small businesses are an underserved market segment and see additional opportunity in serving this market with competitively priced deposit offerings and convenient electronic banking services, as well as wealth management, retirement plan services and brokerage services. The Banks have designated business bankers and banking center managers that serve the distinct banking needs of this customer segment.

Agricultural Loans
Agricultural loans are emphasized by those Banks with operations in and around rural areas, including Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, Rocky Mountain Bank, Wisconsin Bank & Trust's Monroe and Platteville banking centers, New Mexico Bank & Trust’s Clovis banking offices and the Morrill & Janes Bank & Trust Company's northeast Kansas banking offices. Agricultural loans constituted approximately 8% of our total loan portfolio at December 31, 2017. Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, Wisconsin Bank & Trust and Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company are designated as Preferred Lenders by the USDA Farm Service Agency (the "FSA"). In making agricultural loans, we have policies designating a primary lending area for each Bank, in which a majority of its agricultural operating and real estate loans are made. Under this policy, loans in a secondary market area must be secured by real estate.






Agricultural loans, many of which are secured by crops, machinery and real estate, are provided to finance capital improvements and farm operations as well as acquisitions of livestock and machinery. Agricultural loans present unique credit risks relating to adverse weather conditions, loss of livestock due to disease or other factors, declines in market prices for agricultural products and the impact of government regulations. The ultimate repayment of agricultural loans is dependent upon the profitable operation or management of the agricultural entity.

In underwriting agricultural loans, the lending officers of the Banks work closely with their customers to review budgets and cash flow projections for the ensuing crop year. These budgets and cash flow projections are monitored closely during the year and reviewed with the customers at least annually. The Banks also work closely with governmental agencies, including the FSA, to help agricultural customers obtain credit enhancement products such as loan guarantees or interest assistance.

Residential Real Estate Mortgage Lending
Mortgage lending remains a focal point for Heartland as we continue to strengthen our residential real estate lending business. As long-term interest rates have remained at low levels during the past several years, many customers have elected mortgage loans that are fixed rate with fifteen- year or thirty-year maturities. We generally sell these loans into the secondary market and retain servicing rights. We believe that mortgage servicing on loans sold in the secondary market provides a relatively steady source of fee income compared to fees generated solely from mortgage origination operations. Moreover, the retention of servicing provides an opportunity to maintain ongoing contact with borrowers and to cross-sell a wide variety of additional services such as checking, savings, consumer loans, wealth management and investment products. At December 31, 2017, residential real estate mortgage loans serviced, primarily for government sponsored entities ("GSEs"), totaled $3.56 billion.

As with agricultural and commercial loans, we encourage participation in lending programs sponsored by U.S. government agencies when justified by market conditions. Loans insured or guaranteed under programs through the Veterans Administration (the "VA") and the Federal Home Administration (the "FHA") are offered at all of the Banks.

Our mortgage unit, which operates as a division of our lead bank, Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, provides operational, administrative and back office support for our Banks to offer a full complement of mortgage services. Residential mortgage lending services are provided as a direct channel under the brand, "National Residential Mortgage."

Dubuque Bank and Trust Company has been a Ginnie Mae ("GNMA") issuer since 2012 for the GNMA I and II single-family mortgage-backed securities program. As a GNMA issuer, Dubuque Bank and Trust Company is allowed to pool and securitize FHA loans, VA loans, and Department of Agriculture's Rural Development loans. Beginning July 1, 2017, any GNMA government guaranteed residential real estate loans originated by Heartland's banks are sold into the secondary market with servicing released.

Retail Banking
A wide variety of retail banking services are delivered through our 118 banking centers. Services include checking, savings, money market accounts, certificates of deposit, individual retirement accounts ("IRAs"), health savings accounts ("HSAs") and consumer credit cards. Brokerage services, including fixed rate annuity products are also provided in many locations. Consumer lending services of the Banks include a broad array of consumer loans, including motor vehicle, home improvement, home equity lines of credit ("HELOC"), fixed rate home equity and personal lines of credit. Consumer loans typically have shorter terms, lower balances, higher yields and higher risks of default than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. Consumer loan collections are dependent on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and are therefore more likely to be affected by adverse personal circumstances.

Our Banks continue to enhance our retail customers' banking experience through the addition of secure electronic banking options including on-line account opening and mobile banking. Our retail customers receive high-touch service in our banking center locations and further enjoy the convenience of on-line bill pay, mobile deposit, and 24-hour access to account detail. As technology advances, we are committed to offering our customers the convenience of online and mobile delivery channels with the security they expect.

Consumer Finance
Our consumer finance company, Citizens Finance Parent Co., specializes in consumer lending and currently serves the consumer credit needs of nearly 16,000 customers from 14 locations in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. Citizens Finance Parent Co., through its subsidiaries Citizens Finance Co. and Citizens Finance of Illinois Co., and typically lends to borrowers with past credit problems or limited credit histories. Heartland expects to incur a higher level of credit losses on Citizens' loans compared to consumer loans originated by the Banks. Correspondingly, returns on these loans are higher than those at the Banks.






Private Client Services
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, Illinois Bank & Trust, Wisconsin Bank & Trust, New Mexico Bank & Trust, Arizona Bank & Trust, Citywide Banks, Minnesota Bank & Trust and Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company offer trust and investment services in their respective communities. In the Heartland markets that do not yet warrant a full trust department, the sales and administration of trust and investment services is performed by Dubuque Bank and Trust Company personnel. As of December 31, 2017, total trust assets under management were $2.31 billion. Collectively, the Banks provide a full complement of trust, investment and financial planning services for individuals and corporations. Heartland also specializes in Retirement Plan Services, offering business clients customized 401(k), 403(b) and Profit Sharing plans.

Heartland has contracted with LPL Financial Institution Services, a division of LPL Financial, to operate independent securities brokerage offices at all of the Banks. Through LPL Financial, Heartland offers a full array of investment services including mutual funds, annuities, retirement products, education savings products, brokerage services, employer sponsored plans and insurance products. A complete line of vehicle, property and casualty, life and disability insurance is also offered by Heartland through DB&T Insurance, Inc. and Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services.

B.      MARKET AREAS

Heartland is a geographically diversified company with a Midwestern and Western franchise, which balances the risk of regional economic fluctuations. In general, we view our Midwest markets as stable with slower growth prospects and the West as offering greater opportunities for growth accompanied by the potential of wider economic swings. We strive to balance the growth in our Western markets with the stability of our Midwestern markets. The following table sets forth certain information about the offices and total deposits of each of the Banks as of December 31, 2017, (dollars in thousands):
Charter
State
 
Bank
Name
 
Banking
Locations
 
Market
Areas
Served
 
Total
Bank
Deposits
IA
 
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
 
9
 
Dubuque MSA
 
$
1,084,415

 
 
 
 
2
 
Lee County
 
 
IL
 
Illinois Bank & Trust
 
2
 
Galena
 
$
692,227

 
 
 
 
2
 
Jo Daviess County
 
 
 
 
 
 
4
 
Rockford MSA
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Whiteside County
 
 
WI
 
Wisconsin Bank & Trust
 
3
 
Madison MSA
 
$
890,835

 
 
 
 
1
 
Green Bay MSA
 
 
 
 
 
 
7
 
Sheboygan MSA
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Calumet County
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Milwaukee County
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Grant County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Green County
 
 
NM
 
New Mexico Bank & Trust
 
9
 
Albuquerque MSA
 
$
1,229,324

 
 
 
 
2
 
Santa Fe MSA
 
 
 
 
 
 
3
 
Clovis MSA
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Rio Arriba County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Los Alamos County
 
 
AZ
 
Arizona Bank & Trust
 
8
 
Phoenix MSA
 
$
522,490

MT
 
Rocky Mountain Bank
 
3
 
Billings MSA
 
$
424,487

 
 
 
 
2
 
Flathead County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Gallatin County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Ravalli County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Jefferson County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Sanders County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Sheridan County
 
 






Charter
State
 
Bank
Name
 
Banking
Locations
 
Market
Areas
Served
 
Total
Bank
Deposits
CO
 
Citywide Banks
 
12
 
Denver MSA
 
$
1,895,540

 
 
 
 
4
 
Jefferson County
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Arapahoe County
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Boulder County
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Eagle County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Grand County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Routt County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Clear Creek County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Summit County
 
 
MN
 
Minnesota Bank & Trust
 
1
 
Minneapolis/St. Paul MSA
 
$
178,036

KS
 
Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company
 
4
 
Kansas City MSA
 
$
563,638

 
 
 
 
1
 
Nemaha County
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
 
Brown County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Atchison County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Dallas, TX MSA
 
 
CA
 
Premier Valley Bank
 
1
 
Fresno MSA
 
$
705,142

 
 
 
 
1
 
Madera County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Mariposa County
 
 
 
 
 
 
4
 
San Luis Obispo County
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Tuolumne County
 
 

Heartland's consumer finance company, Citizens Finance Parent Co., operates two subsidiary companies in the following locations:
Citizens Finance Co.
 
Citizens Finance of Illinois Co.
Ÿ
Cedar Rapids, IA
 
Ÿ
Aurora, IL
Ÿ
Davenport, IA
 
Ÿ
Crystal Lake, IL
Ÿ
Des Moines, IA
 
Ÿ
Elgin, IL
Ÿ
Dubuque, IA
 
Ÿ
Loves Park, IL
Ÿ
Appleton, WI
 
Ÿ
Peoria, IL
Ÿ
Madison, WI
 
Ÿ
Springfield, IL
Ÿ
Milwaukee, WI
 
Ÿ
Tinley Park, IL
                                        
C.  COMPETITION

We face direct competition for deposits, loans and other financial related services. To compete effectively, develop our market share, maintain flexibility and keep pace with changing economic and social conditions, we continuously refine and develop our banking products and services. We have found the principal methods of competing in the financial services industry are through personal service, product selection, convenience and technology.

The market areas of the Banks are highly competitive, and our competitors are comprised of other commercial banks, credit unions, thrifts, stock brokers, mutual fund companies, mortgage companies and loan production offices, insurance companies and on-line providers and other non-bank financial service companies. Some of these competitors are local, while others are regional, national or global.

Under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, effective in 2000, securities firms and insurance companies that elect to become financial holding companies may acquire banks and other financial institutions. As a result of the enactment of the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act") in 2010, substantial changes to the regulation of bank holding companies and their subsidiaries have occurred, significantly changing the regulatory environment in which we operate.






The financial services industry is also likely to face heightened competition as technological advances enable more companies to provide financial services. These technological advances may diminish the importance of depository institutions and other financial intermediaries in the transfer of funds between parties.

We believe we are positioned to compete for loans effectively through the array and quality of the credit services we provide, and the high-touch, customer-centric way in which we provide them. We invest in building long-lasting customer relationships, and our strategy is to serve our customers above and beyond their expectations through excellence in customer service and providing banking solutions that are tailored to our customers’ needs. We believe that our long-standing presence and commitment to the communities we serve and the personal service we emphasize enhance our ability to compete favorably in attracting and retaining consumer and business customers. We continue to attract deposit-oriented customers by offering personal attention, combined with contemporary electronic banking convenience, professional service and competitive interest rates. The breadth of our product suite, coupled with our superior customer service allows us to compete favorably with our larger competitors.

D. EMPLOYEES

At December 31, 2017, Heartland employed 2,008 full-time equivalent employees, none of whom are covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

E.  INTERNET ACCESS

Heartland maintains an Investor Relations website at www.htlf.com. We offer our Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and other reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, free of charge from our website.

F.  SUPERVISION AND REGULATION

General

Financial institutions, their holding companies, and their affiliates are extensively regulated under federal and state law. As a result, the growth and earnings performance of Heartland may be affected not only by management decisions and general economic conditions, but also by the requirements of federal and state statutes and by the regulations and policies of various bank regulatory authorities.

As a bank holding company with subsidiary banks chartered under the laws of ten different states, Heartland is regulated by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the "Federal Reserve"). Each of the Banks is regulated by the FDIC as its principal federal regulator and one of the following as its state regulator: the Arizona State Banking Department (the "Arizona Department"); the California Department of Business Oversight, Division of Financial Institutions (the "California Division"); the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies, Division of Banking (the "Colorado Division"); the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (the "Illinois DFPR"); the Iowa Superintendent of Banking (the "Iowa Superintendent"); the State Bank Commissioner of Kansas Division of Banking (the "Kansas Division"); the Minnesota Department of Commerce: Division of Financial Institutions (the "Minnesota Division"); the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions (the "Montana Division"); the New Mexico Financial Institutions Division (the "New Mexico FID"); and the Division of Banking of the Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions (the "Wisconsin DFI").

Heartland also operates a consumer finance company, Citizens Finance Parent Co., with state licenses in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. Citizens Finance Parent Co. is subject to regulation by the state banking authorities of those states. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the "CFPB"), which has direct supervisory authority for compliance with federal consumer financial service laws over banks with assets of more than $10 billion and over nonbank entities that provide consumer financial services and products. The CFPB has rulemaking authority for federal laws covering the consumer financial services and products offered by all Heartland subsidiaries.

Federal and state laws and regulations generally applicable to financial institutions regulate, among other things, the scope of business, the kinds and amounts of investments, reserve requirements, capital levels, the establishment of branches, mergers and consolidations and the payment of dividends. This system of supervision and regulation establishes a comprehensive framework for the respective operations of Heartland and its subsidiaries and is intended primarily for the protection of the FDIC-insured deposits and depositors of the Banks, rather than stockholders.

The following is a summary of material elements of the regulatory framework that applies to Heartland and its subsidiaries. It does not describe all of the statutes, regulations and regulatory policies that apply to us, nor does it disclose all of the requirements





of the statutes, regulations and regulatory policies requirements that are described. Any change in regulations or regulatory policies including further changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act, or further change in applicable law, may have a material effect on the business of Heartland and its subsidiaries.

Heartland

General
Heartland, as the sole shareholder of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, New Mexico Bank & Trust, Rocky Mountain Bank, Wisconsin Bank & Trust, Illinois Bank & Trust, Arizona Bank & Trust, Citywide Banks, Minnesota Bank & Trust, Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company and Premier Valley Bank, is a bank holding company. As a bank holding company, Heartland is registered with, and is subject to regulation by, the Federal Reserve under the BHCA. In accordance with Federal Reserve policy, Heartland is expected to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to the Banks and to commit resources to support the Banks in circumstances where Heartland might not otherwise do so. In addition, under the Dodd-Frank Act, the FDIC has backup enforcement authority over a depository institution holding company, such as Heartland, if the conduct or threatened conduct of the holding company poses a risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund, although such authority may not be used if the holding company is in sound condition and does not pose a foreseeable and material risk to the insurance fund.

Under the BHCA, Heartland is subject to periodic examination by the Federal Reserve. Heartland is also required to file with the Federal Reserve periodic reports of Heartland's operations and such additional information regarding Heartland and its subsidiaries as the Federal Reserve may require.

Acquisitions, Activities and Change in Control
The primary purpose of a bank holding company is to control and manage banks. The BHCA generally requires the prior approval of the Federal Reserve for any merger involving a bank holding company or any acquisition by a bank holding company. Subject to certain conditions (including certain deposit concentration limits established by the BHCA), the Federal Reserve may allow a bank holding company to acquire banks located in any state of the United States. In approving interstate acquisitions, the Federal Reserve is required to give effect to applicable state law limitations on the aggregate amount of deposits that may be held by the acquiring bank holding company and its insured depository institution affiliates in the state in which the target bank is located (provided that those limits do not discriminate against out-of-state depository institutions or their holding companies).

The BHCA generally prohibits Heartland from acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of the voting shares of any company that is not a bank and from engaging in any business other than that of banking, managing and controlling banks, or furnishing services to banks and their subsidiaries. This general prohibition is subject to a number of exceptions. The principal exception allows bank holding companies to engage in, and to own shares of companies engaged in, certain businesses found by the Federal Reserve to be "so closely related to banking ... as to be a proper incident thereto." This authority permits Heartland to engage in a variety of banking-related businesses, including consumer finance, equipment leasing, mortgage banking, brokerage and the operation of a computer service bureau (which may engage in software development). Under the Dodd-Frank Act, however, any non-bank subsidiary would be subject to regulation no less stringent than the regulation applicable to the lead bank of the bank holding company. The BHCA generally does not place territorial restrictions on the domestic activities of non-bank subsidiaries of bank holding companies.

Additionally, bank holding companies that meet certain eligibility requirements prescribed by the BHCA and elect to operate as financial holding companies may engage in, or own shares in companies engaged in, a wider range of nonbanking activities. As of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, Heartland has not applied for approval to operate as a financial holding company.

Federal law also prohibits any person or persons acting in concert from acquiring "control" of an FDIC-insured institution or its holding company without prior notice to the appropriate federal bank regulator or any other company from acquiring "control" without Federal Reserve approval to become a bank holding company. "Control" is conclusively presumed to exist upon the acquisition of 25% or more of the outstanding voting securities of a bank or bank holding company, but may exist at 10% ownership levels for public companies, such as Heartland, and under certain other circumstances. Each of the Banks is generally subject to similar restrictions on changes in control under the law of the state granting its charter.

Capital Requirements
Bank holding companies are required to maintain minimum levels of capital in accordance with Federal Reserve capital adequacy guidelines, separate from and in addition to the capital requirements applicable to subsidiary financial institutions. If a bank holding company is not well-capitalized, it will have difficulty engaging in acquisition transactions, and, if its capital levels fall below the minimum required levels, a bank holding company, among other things, may be denied approval to acquire or establish additional banks or non-bank businesses.






In general, the regulations of the Federal Reserve and the FDIC as the primary regulator of state banks, separate capital into two components, Tier 1 or "Core" capital and Tier 2 or "Supplementary" capital, and test these capital components based on their ratio to assets and to "risk weighted assets." Beginning January 1, 2015, when the third installment of the Basel Accords ("Basel III") regulatory capital reforms became applicable to Heartland, a third category of capital, "Common Equity Tier 1 capital," has been added. It is tested against risk weighted assets. Tier 1 capital generally consists of (a) common stockholders' equity, qualifying noncumulative preferred stock, and to the extent they do not exceed 25% of total Tier 1 capital, qualifying cumulative perpetual preferred stock and trust preferred securities, and (b) among other things, goodwill and specified intangible assets, credit enhancing strips and investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries. Tier 2 capital includes, to the extent not in excess of Tier 1 capital, the allowance for loan losses, other qualifying perpetual preferred stock, certain hybrid capital instruments, qualifying term subordinated debt and unrealized gains on equity securities. Risk weighted assets include the sum of specific assets of an institution multiplied by risk weightings for each asset class.

Until the implementation of the Basel III requirements, the Federal Reserve's capital guidelines applicable to bank holding companies, like the regulations applicable to subsidiary banks, required holding companies with less than $10 billion of assets to comply with three capital ratios: (i) a leverage requirement consisting of a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets (the "Leverage Ratio") of 3.0% for the most highly-rated banks with a minimum requirement of at least 4.0% for all others; (ii) a risk-based capital requirement consisting of a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to total risk-weighted assets (the "Tier1 Capital Ratio") of 4.0% and (iii) a risk-based capital requirement consisting of a minimum ratio of total capital to total risk-weighted assets (the "Total Capital Ratio") of 8.0%. The Basel III regulations, which became effective for Heartland and the Banks on January 1, 2015, (1) increased the minimum Leverage Ratio to 4.0% for all banks, (2) increased the Tier 1 Capital Ratio to 6.0% on January 1, 2015 and will increase the Tier 1 Capital Ratio to 8.5% on January 1, 2019, and (3) created a new requirement to maintain a ratio of Common Equity Tier 1 capital ("Common Equity Tier 1 Capital Ratio") to risk-weighted assets of 4.5% as of January 1, 2015, gradually increasing to 7.0% on January 1, 2019. The Basel III Rules require inclusion in Common Equity Tier 1 Capital of the effects of other comprehensive income adjustments, such as gains and losses on securities held to maturity, that are currently excluded from the definition of Tier1 capital, but allow institutions, such as Heartland, to make a one-time election not to include those effects. Heartland and its banks elected not to include the effects of other comprehensive income in Common Equity Tier 1 Capital. Further, under the Basel III rules, if an institution grows beyond $15 billion in assets and makes an acquisition, its ability to include trust preferred securities in Tier 1 capital is phased out. However, the trust preferred securities issued by Heartland, as a holding company with less than $15 billion in assets, is grandfathered as Tier 1 capital by the Dodd-Frank Act.

Additional requirements may be imposed in the future. The Basel Committee has recently finalized a package of revisions to the Basel III framework, unofficially known as Basel IV. The changes are meant to improve the calculation of risk-weighted assets and the comparability of capital ratios. Federal banking regulators are expected to undertake one or more rulemakings in future years to implement these revisions in the United States. The ultimate impact on our capital and liquidity will depend on the final United States rulemakings and implementation process thereafter.

Further, federal law and regulations provide various incentives for financial institutions to maintain regulatory capital at levels in excess of minimum regulatory requirements. For example, a financial institution generally must be "well-capitalized" to engage in acquisitions, and well-capitalized institutions may qualify for exemptions from prior notice or application requirements otherwise applicable to certain types of activities and may qualify for expedited processing of other required notices or applications. Additionally, one of the criteria that determines a bank holding company's eligibility to operate as a financial holding company is a requirement that both the holding company and all of its financial institution subsidiaries be "well-capitalized." Under current federal regulations, in order to be "well-capitalized" a financial institution must maintain a Total Capital Ratio of 10.0% or greater, a Tier 1 Capital Ratio of 6.0% or greater and a Leverage Ratio of 5.0% or greater. In order to be "well-capitalized" under the new Basel III Rules, a bank or bank holding company will be required to have a Total Capital Ratio of 10.0% or greater, a Tier 1 Capital Ratio of 8.0% or greater, a Leverage Ratio of 5.0% or greater, and a Common Equity Tier 1 Capital Ratio of 6.5% or greater. As of December 31, 2017, Heartland had regulatory capital in excess of the Federal Reserve requirements for well-capitalized bank holding companies.

Dividend Payments
Heartland's ability to pay dividends to its stockholders may be affected by both general corporate law consideration, and policies of the Federal Reserve applicable to bank holding companies. As a Delaware corporation, Heartland is subject to the limitations of the Delaware General Corporation Law (the "DGCL"), which allows Heartland to pay dividends only out of its surplus (as defined and computed in accordance with the provisions of the DGCL) or, if Heartland has no such surplus, out of its net profits for the fiscal year in which the dividend is declared and/or the preceding fiscal year. In addition, policies of the Federal Reserve suggest that a bank holding company should not pay cash dividends unless its net income available to common stockholders over the past year has been sufficient to fully fund the dividends and the prospective rate of earnings retention appears consistent with its capital needs, asset quality, and overall financial condition. The Federal Reserve also possesses enforcement powers over bank holding companies and their non-bank subsidiaries to prevent or remedy actions that represent unsafe or unsound practices or





violations of applicable statutes and regulations. Among these powers is the ability to proscribe the payment of dividends by banks and bank holding companies.

Income Tax Expense
On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was enacted into law. As additional regulations and transition relief are adopted, we will continue to assess the impact of the Tax Cuts and Job Act on Heartland, including the following:

Federal Corporate Tax Rate
The legislation replaces the graduated corporate tax rates applicable under prior law, which imposed a maximum tax rate of 35%, with a reduced 21% flat tax rate. Although the reduced tax rate generally should be favorable to Heartland by resulting in increased earnings and capital, it decreased the value of existing deferred tax assets. Generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP") requires that the impact of the provisions of the legislation be accounted for in the period of enactment. Accordingly, the incremental income tax expense recorded in the fourth quarter of 2017 was $10.4 million.
FDIC Insurance Premiums
The legislation prohibits taxpayers with consolidated assets between $10 and $50 billion from deducting the portion of the FDIC premiums equal to the ratio, expressed as a percentage, that (i) the taxpayer’s total consolidated assets over $10 billion, as of the close of the taxable year, bears to (ii) $40 billion. Heartland's ability to deduct FDIC premiums could be limited in future years.
Employee Compensation
A "publicly held corporation" is not permitted to deduct compensation in excess of $1 million per year paid to certain covered employees. Subject to a transition period, the legislation eliminates certain exceptions to the $1 million limit related to performance-based compensation, such as equity grants and cash bonuses that are paid only on the attainment of performance goals. As a result, Heartland's ability to deduct certain compensation paid to the most highly compensated employees will be limited.
Business Asset Expensing
The legislation allows taxpayers to immediately expense the entire cost (instead of only 50%, as under prior law) of certain depreciable tangible property and real property improvements acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023 (with an additional year for certain property). This 100% “bonus” depreciation is phased out proportionately for property placed in service on or after January 1, 2023, and before January 1, 2027 (with an additional year for certain property).
Interest Expense
The legislation limits a taxpayer’s annual deduction of business interest expense to the sum of (i) business interest income and (ii) 30% of "adjusted taxable income," defined as a business’s taxable income without taking into account business interest income or expense, net operating losses, and, for 2018 through 2021, depreciation, amortization and depletion. Because the Banks generate significant amounts of net interest income, this limitation is not expected to have an impact to Heartland's results of operations.

The foregoing description of the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act should be read in conjunction with Note 13," Income Taxes" of the notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

The Banks

General
All of the Banks are state chartered, non-member banks, which means that they are all formed under state law and are not members of the Federal Reserve System. As a result, each Bank is subject to direct regulation by the banking authorities in the state in which it was chartered, as well as by the FDIC as its primary federal regulator.

Dubuque Bank and Trust Company is an Iowa-chartered bank. As an Iowa-chartered bank, Dubuque Bank and Trust Company is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Iowa Superintendent, the chartering authority for Iowa banks.

Illinois Bank & Trust is an Illinois-chartered bank. As an Illinois-chartered bank, Illinois Bank & Trust is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Illinois DFPR, the chartering authority for Illinois banks.

Wisconsin Bank & Trust is a Wisconsin-chartered bank. As a Wisconsin-chartered bank, Wisconsin Bank & Trust is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Wisconsin DFI, the chartering authority for Wisconsin banks.






New Mexico Bank & Trust is a New Mexico-chartered bank. As a New Mexico-chartered bank, New Mexico Bank & Trust is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the New Mexico FID, the chartering authority for New Mexico banks.

Arizona Bank & Trust is an Arizona-chartered bank. As an Arizona-chartered bank, Arizona Bank & Trust is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Arizona Department, the chartering authority for Arizona banks.

Rocky Mountain Bank is a Montana-chartered bank. As a Montana-chartered bank, Rocky Mountain Bank is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Montana Division, the chartering authority for Montana banks.

Citywide Banks is a Colorado-chartered bank. As a Colorado-chartered bank, Citywide Banks is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Colorado Division, the chartering authority for Colorado banks.

Minnesota Bank & Trust is a Minnesota-chartered bank. As a Minnesota-chartered bank, Minnesota Bank & Trust is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Minnesota Division, the chartering authority for Minnesota banks.

Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company is a Kansas-chartered bank. As a Kansas-chartered bank, Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Kansas Division, the chartering authority for Kansas banks.

Premier Valley Bank is a California-chartered bank. As a California-chartered bank, Premier Valley Bank is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the California Division, the chartering authority for California banks.

Deposit Insurance
The FDIC is an independent federal agency that insures the deposits, up to $250,000 per depositor, of federally insured banks and savings institutions and safeguards the safety and soundness of the commercial banking and thrift industries.

As FDIC-insured institutions, the Banks are required to pay deposit insurance premium assessments to the FDIC using a risk-based assessment system based upon average total consolidated assets minus tangible equity of the insured bank.

The Dodd-Frank Act directed that the minimum deposit insurance fund reserve ratio would increase from 1.15% to 1.35% by September 30, 2020, and the cost of the increase will be borne by depository institutions with assets of $10 billion or more. The Dodd-Frank Act also provides the FDIC with discretion to determine whether to pay rebates to insured depository institutions when its deposit insurance reserves exceed certain thresholds. Previously, the FDIC was required to give rebates to depository institutions equal to the excess once the reserve ratio exceeded 1.50%, and was required to rebate 50% of the excess over 1.35% but not more than 1.50% of insured deposits. In July 2016, the FDIC implemented rules for the reserve ratio requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act. Under the rules, banks with assets of less than $10 billion will receive assessment credits for the portion of their assessments that contribute to the increase in the reserve ratio from 1.15% to 1.35%. The FDIC will apply the credits each quarter that the bank's reserve ratio is at or above 1.38% to offset the regular deposit insurance assessments.

In addition, all institutions with deposits insured by the FDIC are required to pay assessments to fund interest payments on bonds issued by the Financing Corporation, an agency of the federal government established to recapitalize the predecessor to the Savings Association Insurance Fund. Since December 31, 2013, the assessment rate was 0.01450% of total deposits. These assessments will continue until the Financing Corporation bonds mature in 2019.

Supervisory Assessments
Each of the Banks is required to pay supervisory assessments to its respective state banking regulator to fund the operations of that agency. In general, the amount of the assessment is calculated on the basis of each institution's total assets. During 2017, the Banks paid supervisory assessments totaling $920,000.

Capital Requirements
Like Heartland, under current federal regulations, each Bank is required to maintain the minimum Leverage Ratio, Tier 1 Capital Ratio and Total Capital Ratio described under the caption "Heartland-Capital Requirements" above, and effective January 1, 2015, was required to comply with the enhanced capital requirements under the Basel III regulations, as well as the new Common Equity Tier 1 Capital Ratio. The capital requirements described above are minimum requirements and higher capital levels may be required





if warranted by the particular circumstances or risk profiles of individual institutions. For example, federal regulators regularly require new institutions to maintain higher capital ratios during the first few years after their formation, and may require additional capital to take adequate account of, among other things, interest rate risk or the risks posed by concentrations of credit, nontraditional activities or securities trading activities.

Federal law also provides the federal banking regulators with broad power to take prompt corrective action to resolve the problems of undercapitalized institutions. The extent of the regulators' powers depends on whether the institution in question is "adequately capitalized," "undercapitalized," "significantly undercapitalized" or "critically undercapitalized," in each case as defined by regulation. Depending upon the capital category to which an institution is assigned, the regulators' corrective powers include: (i) requiring the institution to submit a capital restoration plan; (ii) limiting the institution's asset growth and restricting its activities; (iii) requiring the institution to issue additional capital stock (including additional voting stock) or to be acquired; (iv) restricting transactions between the institution and its affiliates; (v) restricting the interest rate the institution may pay on deposits; (vi) ordering a new election of directors of the institution; (vii) requiring that senior executive officers or directors be dismissed; (viii) prohibiting the institution from accepting deposits from correspondent banks; (ix) requiring the institution to divest certain subsidiaries; (x) prohibiting the payment of principal or interest on subordinated debt; and (xi) ultimately, appointing a receiver for the institution.

As of December 31, 2017: (i) none of the Banks was subject to a directive from its primary federal regulator to increase its capital; (ii) each of the Banks exceeded its minimum regulatory capital requirements under applicable capital adequacy guidelines; (iii) each of the Banks was "well-capitalized," as defined by applicable regulations; and (iv) each of the Banks subject to a directive to maintain capital higher than the regulatory capital requirements, as discussed below under the caption "Safety and Soundness Standards," complied with the directive.

Liability of Commonly Controlled Institutions
Under federal law, institutions insured by the FDIC may be liable for any loss incurred by, or reasonably expected to be incurred by, the FDIC in connection with the default of commonly controlled FDIC-insured depository institutions or any assistance provided by the FDIC to commonly controlled FDIC-insured depository institutions in danger of default. Because Heartland controls each of the Banks, the Banks are commonly controlled for purposes of these provisions of federal law.

Anti-Money Laundering
The Bank Secrecy Act, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the "PATRIOT Act") and other related federal laws and regulations require financial institutions, including the Banks, to implement policies and procedures relating to anti-money laundering, customer identification and due diligence requirements and the reporting of certain types of transactions and suspicious activity. In May 2016, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network published a final rule that requires financial institutions to develop policies, procedures and practices to prevent and deter money laundering. The program must be a written board-approved program that is reasonably designed to identify and verify the identities of beneficial owners of legal entity customers at the time a new account is opened. The program must, at a minimum (1) provide for a system of internal controls to assure ongoing compliance; (2) designate a compliance officer; (3) establish an ongoing employee training program; and (4) implement an independent audit function to test programs. Financial institutions must comply with the new rule beginning May 11, 2018. This rule will increase compliance costs for the Banks.

Dividend Payments
The primary source of funds for Heartland is dividends from the Banks. In general, the Banks may only pay dividends either out of their historical net income after any required transfers to surplus or reserves have been made or out of their retained earnings.

The payment of dividends by any financial institution is affected by the requirement to maintain adequate capital pursuant to applicable capital adequacy guidelines and regulations, and a financial institution generally is prohibited from paying any dividends if, following payment thereof, the institution would be undercapitalized. As described above, each of the Banks exceeded its minimum capital requirements under applicable guidelines as of December 31, 2017.

As of December 31, 2017, approximately $242.3 million was available in retained earnings at the Banks for payment of dividends to Heartland under the regulatory capital requirements to remain well-capitalized. Notwithstanding the availability of funds for dividends, however, the FDIC and state regulators may reduce or prohibit the payment of dividends by the Banks.
Transactions with Affiliates
The Federal Reserve regulates transactions between Heartland and its subsidiaries. Generally, the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation W, as amended by the Dodd-Frank Act, limit lending and other "covered transactions" between the Banks and their affiliates. The aggregate amount of covered transactions a Bank may enter into with an affiliate may not exceed 10% of the capital





stock and surplus of the Bank. The aggregate amount of covered transactions with all affiliates may not exceed 20% of the capital stock and surplus of the Bank.

Covered transactions with affiliates are also subject to collateralization requirements and must be conducted on arm’s length terms. Covered transactions include (a) a loan or extension of credit by a Bank, including derivative contracts, (b) a purchase of securities issued to a Bank, (c) a purchase of assets by a Bank unless otherwise exempted by the Federal Reserve, (d) acceptance of securities issued by an affiliate to the Bank as collateral for a loan, and (e) the issuance of a guarantee, acceptance or letter of credit by a Bank on behalf of an affiliate.

Insider Transactions
The Banks are subject to certain restrictions imposed by federal law on extensions of credit to Heartland and its subsidiaries, on investments in the stock or other securities of Heartland and its subsidiaries and the acceptance of the stock or other securities of Heartland or its subsidiaries as collateral for loans made by the Banks. Certain limitations and reporting requirements are also placed on extensions of credit by each of the Banks to its directors and officers, to directors and officers of Heartland and its subsidiaries, to principal stockholders of Heartland and to "related interests" of such directors, officers and principal stockholders. In addition, federal law and regulations may affect the terms upon which any person who is a director or officer of Heartland or any of its subsidiaries or a principal stockholder of Heartland may obtain credit from banks with which the Banks maintain correspondent relationships.

Safety and Soundness Standards
The federal banking agencies have adopted guidelines that establish operational and managerial standards to promote the safety and soundness of federally insured depository institutions. The guidelines set forth standards for internal controls, information systems, internal audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate exposure, asset growth, compensation, fees and benefits, vendor and model risk management, asset quality and earnings. In general, the safety and soundness guidelines prescribe the goals to be achieved in each area, and each institution is responsible for establishing its own procedures to achieve those goals. If an institution fails to comply with any of the standards set forth in the guidelines, the institution's primary federal regulator may require the institution to submit a plan for achieving and maintaining compliance. If an institution fails to submit an acceptable compliance plan, or fails in any material respect to implement a compliance plan that has been accepted by its primary federal regulator, the regulator is required to issue an order directing the institution to cure the deficiency. Until the deficiency cited in the regulator's order is cured, the regulator may restrict the institution's rate of growth, require the institution to increase its capital, restrict the rates the institution pays on deposits or require the institution to take any action the regulator deems appropriate under the circumstances. Noncompliance with the standards established by the safety and soundness guidelines may also constitute grounds for other enforcement action by the federal banking regulators, including cease and desist orders and civil money penalty assessments.

In June 2016, the Federal Reserve Board issued supervisory guidance for assessing risk management for supervised institutions with total consolidated assets of less than $50 billion ("SR 16-11"). This guidance provides four key areas to evaluate in assessing a risk management system: board and senior management oversight of risk management; policies, procedures and limits; risk monitoring and management information systems and internal controls. In August 2017, the Federal Reserve Board issued a proposed guidance addressing supervisory expectations of boards of directors that includes a proposal to further revise and align the supervisory expectations of boards of directors in areas beyond risk management with the board expectations set forth in SR 16-11.

Branching Authority
Each of the Banks has the authority, pursuant to the laws under which it is chartered, to establish branches anywhere in the state in which its main office is located, subject to the receipt of all required regulatory approvals.

Federal law permits state and national banks to merge with banks in other states subject to: (i) regulatory approval; (ii) federal and state deposit concentration limits; and (iii) state law limitations requiring the merging bank to have been in existence for a minimum period of time (not to exceed five years) prior to the merger.

State Bank Investments and Activities
Each of the Banks generally is permitted to make investments and engage in activities directly or through subsidiaries as authorized by the laws of the state under which it is chartered. However, under federal law and FDIC regulations, FDIC-insured state banks are prohibited, subject to certain exceptions, from making or retaining equity investments of a type, or in an amount, that are not permissible for a national bank. Federal law and FDIC regulations also prohibit FDIC-insured state banks and their subsidiaries, subject to certain exceptions, from engaging as principal in any activity that is not permitted for a national bank, unless the bank meets, and continues to meet, its minimum regulatory capital requirements and the FDIC determines the activity would not pose a significant risk to the deposit insurance fund of which the bank is a member.






Incentive Compensation Policies and Restrictions
In July 2010, the federal banking agencies issued guidance that applies to all banking organizations supervised by the agencies. Pursuant to the guidance, to be consistent with safety and soundness principles, Heartland's incentive compensation arrangements should: (1) appropriately balance risk and financial reward; (2) be compatible with effective controls and risk management; and (3) be supported by strong corporate governance, including active and effective oversight by Heartland's board of directors.

In addition, in March 2011, the federal banking agencies, along with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, and the Securities and Exchange Commission, released a proposed rule intended to ensure that regulated financial institutions design their incentive compensation arrangements to account for risk. In May 2016, financial regulators proposed a rule replacing the 2011 proposed rule. While the proposed 2011 proposed rule was principles-based, the new proposed rule is prescriptive in nature and is intended to prohibit incentive-based compensation arrangements that could encourage inappropriate risk taking by providing excessive compensation or could lead to material financial loss. The new proposed rule would require financial institutions to consider compensation arrangements for "senior executive officers" and "significant risk takers" against several factors, and would require that such arrangements contain both financial and non-financial measures of performance. Until a final rule is issued, it is not clear whether and how this rule will ultimately impact the Banks.

The Volcker Rule and Proprietary Trading
In December 2013, federal banking regulators jointly issued a final rule to implement Section 13 of the BHCA (adopted as part 619 of the Dodd-Frank Act), which prohibits banking entities (including Heartland and the Banks) from engaging in proprietary trading of securities, derivatives and certain other financial instruments for the entity's own account, and prohibits certain interests in, or relationships with, a hedge fund or private equity fund. It also imposes rules regarding compliance programs. Commonly referred to as the "Volcker Rule," the final rule as originally adopted was effective on April 1, 2014 and would have required banking entities to conform their activities to its requirements by July 21, 2015. However, based upon announcements of the Federal Reserve Board in December 2014, certain key elements that require sale of investment in private equity and hedge funds were not effective until July 21, 2017. Heartland did not engage in any significant amount of proprietary trading, as defined in the Volcker Rule, and the impact of the Volcker Rule on Heartland's business activities and investment portfolio was minimal. Heartland has reviewed its investment portfolio to determine if any investments meet the Volcker Rule's definition of covered funds. Based on the review, Heartland determined that the impact related to investments considered to be covered funds did not have a significant effect on its financial condition or results of operations.

Federal Reserve Liquidity Regulations
Federal Reserve regulations, as presently in effect, require depository institutions to maintain non-interest earning reserves against their transaction accounts (primarily NOW and regular checking accounts), as follows: (i) for transaction accounts aggregating $10.7 million or less, there is no reserve requirement; (ii) for transaction accounts over $10.7 million and up to $55.2 million, the reserve requirement is 3% of total transaction accounts; and (iii) for transaction accounts aggregating in excess of $55.2 million, the reserve requirement is $1.3 million plus 10% of the aggregate amount of total transaction accounts in excess of $55.2 million. These reserve requirements are subject to annual adjustment by the Federal Reserve. The Banks are in compliance with the foregoing requirements.

Community Reinvestment Act Requirements
The Community Reinvestment Act imposes a continuing and affirmative obligation on each of the Banks to help meet the credit needs of their respective communities, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, in a safe and sound manner. The FDIC and the respective state regulators regularly assess the record of each Bank in meeting the credit needs of its community. Applications for additional acquisitions would be subject to evaluation of the effectiveness of the Banks' in meeting their Community Reinvestment Act requirements.

Consumer Protection
The CFPB has undertaken numerous rule-making and other initiatives, including issuing informal guidance and taking enforcement actions against certain financial institutions. The CFPB’s rulemaking, examination and enforcement authority has affected and will continue to significantly affect financial institutions involved in the provision of consumer financial products and services.
The CFPB has also been publishing complaints submitted by consumers regarding consumer financial products and services in a publicly-accessible online portal. In June 2015, the CFPB also began publishing complaint narratives from consumers that opted to have their narratives made public. The publication of complaint narratives could affect the Banks in the following ways: (i) complaint data might be used by the CFPB to make decisions regarding regulatory, enforcement or examination issues; and (ii) the publication of such narratives may have a negative effect on the reputation of those institutions that are the subject of complaints.






Mortgage Operations
Each of the Banks is subject to a number of laws and rules affecting residential mortgages, including the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act ("HMDA") and Regulation C and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act ("RESPA") and Regulation X. In recent years, the CFPB and other federal agencies have proposed and finalized a number of rules affecting residential mortgages. These rules implement the Dodd-Frank Act amendments to the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Truth in Lending Act ("TILA") and RESPA. The final rules, among other things, impose requirements regarding procedures to ensure compliance with "ability to repay" requirements, policies and procedures for servicing mortgages, and additional rules and restrictions regarding mortgage loan originator compensation and qualification and registration requirements for individual loan originator employees. These rules also impose new or revised disclosure requirements, including a new integrated mortgage origination disclosure that combines disclosures currently required under TILA and RESPA.

Regulation C requires lenders to report certain information regarding home loans. In October 2015, the CFPB issued a final rule amending Regulation C which, among other things, revises tests for determining what financial institutions and credit transactions are covered under HMDA and imposes reporting requirements for new data points identified in the Dodd-Frank Act or identified by the CPFB as necessary to carry out the purposes of HMDA. The final rule requires more detailed information from lenders and requires lenders to deliver certain information about mortgage loan underwriting and pricing.

In October 2016, federal regulators issued a proposed rule to implement provisions of the Briggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act. Federal law generally requires financial institutions to impose a mandatory purchase requirement for flood insurance for loans secured by certain real property located in areas with special flood hazards. The proposed rule outlines provisions for identifying when private flood insurance policies must be accepted and criteria to apply in determining whether certain types of coverage qualify as "flood insurance" for federal flood insurance law purposes. Until a final rule is issued, it is not clear whether and how this rule will ultimately impact the Banks.

Ability-to-Repay and Qualified Mortgage Rule
Effective on January 10, 2014, Regulation Z was amended to require mortgage lenders to make a reasonable and good faith determination based on verified and documented information that a consumer applying for a mortgage loan has a reasonable ability to repay the loan according to its terms. Mortgage lenders are required to determine consumers’ ability to repay in one of two ways. The first alternative requires the mortgage lender to consider the following eight underwriting factors when making the credit decision: (1) current or reasonably expected income or assets; (2) current employment status; (3) the monthly payment on the covered transaction; (4) the monthly payment on any simultaneous loan; (5) the monthly payment for mortgage-related obligations; (6) current debt obligations, alimony and child support; (7) the monthly debt-to-income ratio or residual income; and (8) credit history. Alternatively, the mortgage lender can originate "qualified mortgages," which are entitled to a presumption that the creditor making the loan satisfied the ability-to-repay requirements. In general, a "qualified mortgage" is a mortgage loan without negative amortization, interest-only payments, balloon payments or terms exceeding 30 years. In addition, to be a qualified mortgage, the points and fees paid by a consumer cannot exceed 3% of the total loan amount. Qualified mortgages that are "higher-priced" (e.g., subprime loans) have a rebuttable presumption of compliance with the ability-to-repay rules, while qualified mortgages that are not "higher-priced" (e.g., prime loans) are given a safe harbor of compliance. The Banks primarily originate compliant qualified mortgages.

Risk Retention and Qualified Residential Mortgage Rule
In October 2014, the FDIC, the Federal Reserve and four other federal regulatory agencies issued a final rule to implement amendments to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, that impose risk retention requirements on asset-backed securities. The final rule generally requires a sponsor of an asset-backed securitization to retain not less than 5% of the credit risk of the underlying asset. Certain securitizations that are comprised of "qualified residential mortgages" are exempt from the risk retention requirements, with qualified residential mortgage defined to be consistent with the definition of qualified mortgages. The final rule for residential securitizations was effective December 24, 2015, and rules for all other categories of covered asset-based securitizations were effective December 24, 2016. The operations of the Banks were not materially impacted by the final rule particularly since the Banks primarily originate qualified residential mortgages.

Data Security
In January 2015, new legislative proposals and administration efforts regarding privacy and cybersecurity were announced which, among other things, propose a national data breach notification standard. Legislation regarding data security with respect to security breach notifications and sharing cybersecurity threat information has also been proposed. In 2015, the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council ("FFIEC") developed the Cybersecurity Assessment Tool to help institutions identify their risks and determine their preparedness for cybersecurity threats.






In September 2016, the FFIEC issued a revised Information Security booklet. The revised booklet includes updated guidelines for evaluating the adequacy of information security programs (including effective threat identification, assessment and monitoring, and incident identification assessment and response), assurance reports and testing of information security programs.

New laws or guidance with respect to data security could impact card issuers and increase compliance costs related to credit card or debit card products. However, it is currently uncertain what (if any) impact these developments will have on the Banks.

Increased Supervision and Regulation for Bank Holding Companies with Consolidated Assets of $10 Billion or More
Heartland currently has total consolidated assets of approximately $9.81 billion. If Heartland’s assets increase and exceed $10 billion, which is likely to occur in 2018, Heartland will become subject to increased supervision and regulation, including the following:

Risk Committee
Publicly traded bank holding companies with $10 billion or more in total assets are required to establish a risk committee responsible for oversight of enterprise-wide risk management practices. The committee must be comprised only of independent directors and must include at least one risk management expert with experience in managing risk exposures of a large, complex firm.
Stress Testing
Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, any banking organization, including whether a bank holding company or a depository institution, with more than $10 billion in total consolidated assets and regulated by a federal financial regulatory agency is required to conduct annual stress tests to ensure it has sufficient capital during periods of economic downturn. Currently, the Federal Reserve and FDIC release stress-test scenarios on February 15 of each year, and banking organizations are required to submit the results of their tests to the appropriate regulator by July 31 of the following year. Currently, the results of each year's stress tests are publicly disclosed in October, following each banking organization's submission.
Durbin Amendment
The Dodd-Frank Act included provisions (known as the "Durbin Amendment") which restrict interchange fees to those which are "reasonable and proportionate" for certain debit card issuers and limits the ability of networks and issuers to restrict debit card transaction routing. The Federal Reserve issued final rules implementing the Durbin Amendment on June 29, 2011.  In the final rules, interchange fees for debit card transactions were capped at $0.21 plus five basis points in order to be eligible for a safe harbor such that the fee is conclusively determined to be reasonable and proportionate.  The interchange fee restrictions contained in the Durbin Amendment, and the rules promulgated thereunder, only apply to debit card issuers with $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets. Based on estimated calculations using 2017 debit card volume, the impact of the Durbin Amendment would be approximately $6.0 million.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

In addition to the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, stockholders or prospective investors should carefully consider the following risk factors that may adversely affect our business, financial results or stock price. Additional risks that we currently do not know about or currently view as immaterial may also impair our business or adversely impact our financial results or stock price.

Credit Risks

Our business and financial results are significantly affected by general business and economic conditions.
Our business activities and earnings are affected by general business conditions in the United States and particularly in the states in which our Banks operate. Factors such as the volatility of interest rates, home prices and real estate values, unemployment, credit defaults, increased bankruptcies, decreased consumer spending and household income, volatility in the securities markets, and the cost and availability of capital have negatively impacted our business in the past and may adversely impact us in the future. Economic deterioration that affects household and/or corporate incomes could result in renewed credit deterioration and reduced demand for credit or fee-based products and services, negatively impacting our performance. In addition, changes in securities market conditions and monetary fluctuations could adversely affect the availability and terms of funding necessary to meet our liquidity needs.

We could suffer material credit losses if we do not appropriately manage our credit risk.
There are many risks inherent in making any loan, including risks of dealing with individual borrowers, risks of nonpayment, risks resulting from uncertainties as to the future value of collateral and risks resulting from changes in economic and industry conditions. We attempt to minimize our credit risk through prudent loan application approval procedures, careful monitoring of the concentration of our loans within specific industries, periodic independent reviews of outstanding loans by our loan review department and appropriate training of our credit administration staff. However, changes in the economy can cause the assumptions





that we made at the time of loan origination to change and can cause borrowers to be unable to make payments on their loans. In addition, significant changes in collateral values can cause us to be unable to collect the full value of loans we make. We cannot assure you that our loan approval and monitoring procedures will reduce these credit risks.

We depend on the accuracy and completeness of information about our customers and counterparties.
In deciding whether to extend credit or enter into other transactions, we may rely on information furnished by or on behalf of customers and counterparties, including financial statements, credit reports and other financial information. We may also rely on representations of those customers, counterparties or other third parties, such as independent auditors, as to the accuracy and completeness of that information. Reliance on inaccurate or misleading financial statements, credit reports or other financial information could cause us to make uncollectible loans or enter into other unfavorable transactions, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Commercial loans, which involve greater complexities to underwrite and administer, make up a significant portion of our loan portfolio.
Heartland's commercial loans were $4.81 billion (including $3.16 billion of commercial real estate loans), or approximately 75%, of our total loan portfolio as of December 31, 2017. Our commercial loans, which tend to be larger and more complex credits than loans to individuals, are primarily made based on the identified cash flow of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. Most often, this collateral consists of accounts receivable, inventory, machinery or real estate. In the case of loans secured by accounts receivable, the availability of funds for the repayment of these loans may be substantially dependent on the ability of the borrower to collect amounts due from its customers. The other types of collateral securing these loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value based on the success of the customer's business and market conditions.

Our loan portfolio has a large concentration of commercial real estate loans, a segment that can be subject to volatile cash flows and collateral values.
Commercial real estate lending is a large portion of our commercial loan portfolio. These loans were $3.16 billion, or approximately 66%, of our total commercial loan portfolio as of December 31, 2017. The market value of real estate can fluctuate significantly in a short period of time as a result of market conditions in the geographic area in which the real estate is located. Adverse developments affecting real estate values could negatively affect some of our commercial real estate loans, and other developments could increase the credit risk associated with our loan portfolio. Non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans typically are dependent, in large part, on sufficient income from the properties securing the loans to cover operating expenses and debt service. A weaker economy has an impact on the absorption period associated with lot and land development loans. When the source of repayment is reliant on the successful and timely sale of lots or land held for resale, a default on these loans becomes a greater risk. Economic events or governmental regulations outside of the control of Heartland or the borrower could negatively impact the future cash flow and market values of the affected properties.

The construction, land acquisition and development loans that are part of our commercial real estate loans present project completion risks, as well as the risks applicable to other commercial real estate loans.
Our commercial real estate loan portfolio includes commercial construction loans, including land acquisition and development loans, which involve additional risks because funds are advanced based upon estimates of costs and the estimated value of the completed project. Because of the uncertainties inherent in estimating construction costs, as well as the market value of the completed project and the effects of governmental regulation on real property, it is difficult to evaluate accurately the total funds required to complete a project and the related loan-to-value ratio. As a result, commercial construction loans often involve the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment dependent, in part, on the success of the ultimate project and the ability of the borrower to sell or lease the property. If our appraisal of the value of the completed project proves to be overstated, we may have inadequate security for the repayment of the loan upon completion of construction of the project.

We may encounter issues with environmental law compliance if we take possession, through foreclosure or otherwise, of the real property that secures a commercial real estate loan.
A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real property. During the ordinary course of business, we may foreclose on and take title to properties securing certain loans. In doing so, there is a risk that hazardous or toxic substances could be found on these properties. If previously unknown or undisclosed hazardous or toxic substances are discovered, we may be liable for remediation costs, as well as for personal injury and property damage. Environmental laws may require us to incur substantial expenses which may materially reduce the affected property's value or limit our ability to use or sell the affected property. In addition, future laws or more stringent interpretations or enforcement policies with respect to existing laws may increase our exposure to environmental liability. Although we have policies and procedures to perform an environmental review at the time of underwriting a loan secured by real property, and also before initiating any foreclosure action on real property, these reviews may not be sufficient to detect all potential environmental hazards. The remediation costs and any other financial liabilities associated with an environmental hazard could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.






Our agricultural loans are often dependent upon the health of the agricultural industry in the location of the borrower, and the ability of the borrower to repay may be affected by many factors outside of the borrower’s control.
At December 31, 2017, agricultural real estate loans totaled $244.9 million, or approximately 4%, of our total loan portfolio. Payments on agricultural real estate loans are dependent on the profitable operation or management of the farm property securing the loan. The success of the farm may be affected by many factors outside the control of the borrower, including adverse weather conditions that prevent the planting of a crop or limit crop yields (such as hail, drought and floods), loss of livestock due to disease or other factors, declines in market prices for agricultural products (both domestically and internationally) and the impact of government regulations (including changes in price supports, subsidies and environmental regulations). In addition, many farms are dependent on a limited number of key individuals whose injury or death may significantly affect the successful operation of the farm. If the cash flow from a farming operation is diminished, the borrower's ability to repay the loan may be impaired. The primary crops in our market areas are corn, soybeans, peanuts and wheat. Accordingly, adverse circumstances affecting these crops could have a negative effect on our agricultural real estate loan portfolio.

We also originate agricultural operating loans. At December 31, 2017, these loans totaled $266.7 million, or approximately 4%, of our total loan portfolio. As with agricultural real estate loans, the repayment of operating loans is dependent on the successful operation or management of the farm property. Likewise, agricultural operating loans involve a greater degree of risk than lending on residential properties, particularly in the case of loans that are unsecured or secured by rapidly depreciating assets such as farm equipment or assets such as livestock or crops. The primary livestock in our market areas include dairy cows, hogs and feeder cattle. In these cases, any repossessed collateral for a defaulted loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment of the outstanding loan balance as a result of the greater likelihood of damage to or depreciation in the value of livestock.

We hold one- to four-family first-lien residential mortgage loans in our loan portfolio that may not meet the strict definition of a qualified mortgage.
The residential mortgage loans that we hold in our loan portfolio, which totaled $624.3 million, or approximately 10% of our total loan portfolio as of December 31, 2017, are primarily to borrowers we believe to be credit worthy based on internal standards and guidelines. Repayment is dependent upon the borrower's ability to repay the loan and the underlying value of the collateral. If we have overestimated or improperly calculated the abilities of the borrowers to repay those loans, default rates could be high, and we could face more legal process and costs in order to enforce collection of the loan obligations. If the value of the collateral is incorrect, we could face higher losses on the loans.

Our consumer loans generally have a higher degree of risk of default than our other loans.
At December 31, 2017, consumer loans totaled $447.5 million, or approximately 7%, of our total loan portfolio. Our consumer loan portfolio is comprised of home equity loans and other personal loans and lines of credit originated by our banks and loans originated by our consumer finance subsidiaries. Our consumer finance subsidiaries typically lend to borrowers with past credit problems or limited credit histories. These consumer loans typically have shorter terms and lower balances with higher yields as compared to one- to four-family first-lien residential mortgage loans, but generally carry higher risks of default. Consumer loan collections are dependent on the borrower's continuing financial stability, and thus are more likely to be affected by adverse personal circumstances. Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on these loans.

Our allowance for loan losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb losses in our loan portfolio.
We establish our allowance for loan losses in consultation with management of the Banks and maintain it at a level considered appropriate by management to absorb probable loan losses that are inherent in the portfolio. The amount of future loan losses is susceptible to changes in economic, operating and other conditions, including changes in interest rates, which may be beyond our control, and such losses may exceed current estimates. Despite the current stable economic and market conditions, there remains a risk of continued asset and economic deterioration. At December 31, 2017, our allowance for loan losses as a percentage of total loans was 0.87% and as a percentage of total nonperforming loans was approximately 88%. Although we believe that the allowance for loan losses is appropriate to absorb probable losses on any existing loans that may become uncollectible, we cannot predict loan losses with certainty, and we cannot provide assurance that our allowance for loan losses will prove sufficient to cover actual loan losses in the future. Further significant provisions, or charge-offs against our allowance that result in provisions, could have a significant negative impact on our profitability. Loan losses in excess of our reserves may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business is concentrated in and dependent upon the continued growth and welfare of the various markets that we serve.
We operate over a wide area, including markets in Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, Arizona, New Mexico, Montana, Colorado, Minnesota, Kansas, Missouri, Texas and California, and our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows are subject to changes in the economic conditions in those markets. Our success depends upon the business activity, population, income levels, deposits and real estate activity in those areas. Although our customers' business and financial interests may extend well beyond our market





areas, adverse economic conditions that affect our specific market area could reduce our growth rate, affect the ability of our customers to repay their loans to us and generally affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Liquidity and Interest Rate Risks

Liquidity is essential to our businesses.
We require liquidity to meet our deposit and debt obligations as they come due. Access to liquidity could be impaired by an inability to access the capital markets or unforeseen outflows of deposits. Our ability to meet current financial obligations is a function of our balance sheet structure, ability to liquidate assets and access to alternative sources of funds. Our access to deposits can be impacted by the liquidity needs of our customers as a substantial portion of our deposit liabilities are on demand, while a substantial portion of our assets are loans that cannot be sold in the same timeframe or are securities that may not be readily saleable if there is disruption in capital markets. If we become unable to obtain funds when needed, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Changes in interest rates and other conditions could negatively impact our results of operations.
Our profitability is in part a function of the spread between the interest rates earned on investments and loans and the interest rates paid on deposits and other interest-bearing liabilities. Like most banking institutions, our net interest spread and margin will be affected by general economic conditions and other factors, including fiscal and monetary policies of the Federal Reserve that influence market interest rates, and our ability to respond to changes in such rates. At any given time, our assets and liabilities may be affected differently by a given change in interest rates. As a result, an increase or decrease in rates, the length of loan terms or the mix of adjustable and fixed rate loans in our portfolio could have a positive or negative effect on our net income, capital and liquidity. We measure interest rate risk under various rate scenarios using specific criteria and assumptions. A summary of this process, along with the results of our net interest income simulations, is presented under the caption "Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk" included under Item 7A of Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Although we believe our current level of interest rate sensitivity is reasonable and effectively managed, significant fluctuations in interest rates may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, and specifically, our net interest income. Also, our interest rate risk modeling techniques and assumptions may not fully predict or capture the impact of actual interest rate changes on our financial condition and results of operations.

The required accounting treatment of loans we acquire through acquisitions, including purchase credit impaired loans, could result in higher net interest margins and interest income in current periods and lower net interest margins and interest income in future periods.
Under United States generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"), we are required to record loans acquired through acquisitions, including purchase credit impaired loans, at fair value. Estimating the fair value of such loans requires management to make estimates based on available information and facts and circumstances on the acquisition date. Any discount, which is the excess of the amount of reasonably estimable and probable discounted future cash collections over the purchase price, is accreted into interest income over the weighted average remaining contractual life of the loans. Therefore, our net interest margins may initially increase due to the discount accretion. We expect the yields on the total loan portfolio will decline as our acquired loan portfolios pay down or mature and the corresponding accretion of the discount decreases. We expect downward pressure on our interest income to the extent that the runoff of our acquired loan portfolios is not replaced with comparable high-yielding loans. This could result in higher net interest margins and interest income in current periods and lower net interest margins and interest income in future periods.

Our liability portfolio, including deposits, may subject us to additional liquidity risk and pricing risk from concentrations.
We strive to maintain a diverse liability portfolio, and we manage portfolio diversification through our asset/liability committee process. However, even with our efforts to maintain diversification, we occasionally accept larger deposit customers, and our typical deposit customers might occasionally carry larger balances. Unanticipated, significant changes in these large balances could affect our liquidity risk and pricing risk, particularly within the portfolio of a single Bank, where the effects of the concentration would be greater than for Heartland as a whole. Our inability to manage deposit concentration risk could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Revenue from our mortgage banking operations is sensitive to changes in economic conditions, decreased economic activity, a slowdown in the housing market, higher interest rates or new legislation.
We earn revenue from fees we receive for originating mortgage loans and for servicing mortgage loans conducted through our banking locations, Heartland Mortgage and National Residential Mortgage unit. Our overall mortgage banking revenue is highly dependent upon the volume of loans we originate and sell in the secondary market. Mortgage loan production levels are sensitive to changes in economic conditions and activity, strengths or weaknesses in the housing market and interest rate fluctuations. Generally, any sustained period of decreased economic activity or higher interest rates could adversely affect mortgage originations and, consequently, reduce our income from mortgage lending activities.






The value of our mortgage servicing rights can decline during periods of falling interest rates and we may be required to take a charge against earnings for the decreased value.
A mortgage servicing right ("MSR") is the right to service a mortgage loan for a fee. We capitalize MSRs when we originate mortgage loans and retain the servicing rights after we sell the loans. We carry MSRs at the lower of amortized cost or estimated fair value. Fair value is the present value of estimated future net servicing income, calculated based on a number of variables, including assumptions about the likelihood of prepayment by borrowers. Changes in interest rates can affect prepayment assumptions. When interest rates fall, borrowers are more likely to prepay their mortgage loans by refinancing them at a lower rate. As the likelihood of prepayment increases, the fair value of our MSRs can decrease. Each quarter we evaluate our MSRs for impairment based on the difference between the carrying amount and fair value, and, if temporary impairment exists, we establish a valuation allowance through a charge that negatively affects our earnings.

The derivative instruments that we use to hedge interest rate risk associated with the loans held for sale and rate locks on our mortgage banking business are complex and can result in significant losses.
We typically use derivatives and other instruments to hedge changes in the value of loans held for sale and interest rate lock commitments. We generally do not hedge all of our risk, and we may not be successful in hedging any of the risk. Hedging is a complex process, requiring sophisticated models and constant monitoring, and our hedging models and assumptions may not fully predict or capture market changes. In addition, we may use hedging instruments that may not perfectly correlate with the value or income being hedged. There may be periods where we elect not to use derivatives and other instruments to hedge mortgage banking interest rate risk. We could incur significant losses from our hedging activities.

The market for loans held for sale to secondary purchasers, primarily GSEs, has changed during recent years and further changes could impair the gains we recognize on sale of mortgage loans.
We sell most of the fixed-rate mortgage loans we originate in order to reduce our credit and interest rate risks and to provide funding for additional loans. We rely on GSEs to purchase loans that meet their conforming loan requirements and on other capital markets investors to purchase loans that do not meet those requirements, which are referred to as "nonconforming" loans. During the past few years investor demand for nonconforming loans has fallen sharply, increasing credit spreads and reducing the liquidity for those loans. In response to the reduced liquidity in the capital markets, we may retain more nonconforming loans. When we retain a loan, not only do we keep the credit risk of the loan, but we also do not receive any sale proceeds that could be used to generate new loans. The absence of these sales proceeds could limit our ability to fund, and thus originate, new mortgage loans, reducing the fees we earn from originating and servicing loans. In addition, we cannot be assured that GSEs will not materially limit their purchases of conforming loans because of capital constraints or changes in their criteria for conforming loans (e.g., maximum loan amount or borrower eligibility). Each of the GSEs to which Heartland sells loans is currently in conservatorship, with its primary regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency acting as conservator. We cannot predict if, when or how the conservatorship will end, or any associated changes to the business structure and operations of the GSEs that could result. As noted above, there are various proposals to reform the housing finance market in the U.S., including the role of the GSEs in the housing finance market. The extent and timing of any such regulatory reform regarding the housing finance market and the GSEs, including whether the GSEs will continue to exist in their current form, as well as any effect on Heartland's business and financial results, are uncertain.

Our growth may require us to raise additional capital in the future, but that capital may not be available when it is needed.
We are required by federal and state regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations. We anticipate that our existing capital resources will satisfy our capital requirements for the foreseeable future. However, from time to time, we raise additional capital to support continued growth, both internally and through acquisitions. Our ability to raise additional capital, if needed, will depend on conditions in the capital markets at that time, which are outside of our control, and on our financial performance. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be able to raise additional capital if needed on terms acceptable to us. If we cannot raise additional capital when needed, our ability to further expand our operations through internal growth and acquisitions could be materially impaired.

We rely on dividends from our subsidiaries for most of our revenue and are subject to restrictions on payment of dividends.
The primary source of funds for Heartland is dividends from the Banks. In general, the Banks may only pay dividends either out of their historical net income after any required transfers to surplus or reserves have been made or out of their retained earnings. The payment of dividends by any financial institution is affected by the requirement to maintain adequate capital pursuant to applicable capital adequacy guidelines and regulations, and a financial institution generally is prohibited from paying any dividends if, following payment thereof, the institution would be undercapitalized. These dividends are the principal source of funds to pay dividends on Heartland's common stock and preferred stock, and to pay interest and principal on our debt.






Reduction in the value, or impairment of our investment securities, can impact our earnings and common stockholders' equity.
We maintained a balance of $2.49 billion, or 25% of our assets, in investment securities at December 31, 2017. Changes in market interest rates can affect the value of these investment securities, with increasing interest rates generally resulting in a reduction of value. Although the reduction in value from temporary increases in market rates does not affect our income until the security is sold, it does result in an unrealized loss recorded in other comprehensive income that can reduce our common stockholders’ equity. Further, we must periodically test our investment securities for other-than-temporary impairment in value. In assessing whether the impairment of investment securities is other-than-temporary, we consider the length of time and extent to which the fair value has been less than cost, the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer, and the intent and ability to retain our investment in the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value in the near term.

Operational Risks

We have a continuing need for technological change and we may not have the resources to effectively implement new technology.
The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to being able to better serve customers, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to reduce costs. Our future success will depend, in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands for convenience, as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations as we continue to grow and expand our market areas. Many of our larger competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements. As a result, they may be able to offer additional or superior products to those that we will be able to offer, which would put us at a competitive disadvantage.

Our operations are affected by risks associated with our use of vendors and other third party service providers.
We rely on vendor and third party relationships for a variety of products and services necessary to maintain our day-to-day activities, particularly in the areas of correspondent relationships, operations, treasury management, information technology and security. This reliance exposes us to risks of those third parties failing to perform financially or failing to perform contractually or to our expectations. These risks could include material adverse impacts on our business, such as credit loss or fraud loss, disruption or interruption of business activities, cyber-attacks and information security breaches, poor performance of services affecting our customer relationships and/or reputation, and possibilities that we could be responsible to our customers for legal or regulatory violations committed by those third parties while performing services on our behalf. While we have implemented an active program of oversight to address this risk, there can be no assurance that our vendor and third party relationships will not have a material adverse impact on our business.

Interruption in or breaches of our network security, including the occurrence of a cyber incident or a deficiency in our cybersecurity, may result in a loss of customer business or damage to our brand image and could subject us to increased operating costs as well as litigation, regulatory sanctions and other liabilities.
The computer systems and network infrastructure we use could be vulnerable to unforeseen problems. Our business is dependent on our ability to process and monitor large numbers of daily transactions in compliance with legal, regulatory and internal standards and specifications. In addition, a significant portion of our operations relies heavily on the secure processing, storage and transmission of personal and confidential information, such as the personal information of our customers and clients.

Our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our computer equipment against damage from physical theft, fire, power loss, telecommunications failure or a similar catastrophic event, as well as from security breaches, denial of service attacks, viruses, worms and other disruptive problems caused by hackers. Any damage or failure that causes an interruption in our operations could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Computer break-ins, phishing and other disruptions could also jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted through our computer systems and network infrastructure, which may result in significant liability to us and may cause existing and potential customers to refrain from doing business with us. Although we, with the help of third-party service providers, intend to continue to implement security technology and establish operational procedures to protect our computer systems, there can be no assurance that these security measures will be successful. In addition, advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other developments could result in a compromise or breach of the algorithms we and our third-party service providers use to encrypt and protect customer transaction data. The occurrence of any failure, interruption, or security breach of our information systems could result in violations of privacy and other laws, damage our reputation, result in a loss of customer business, subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny or expose us to civil litigation, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

The potential for business interruption exists throughout our organization.
Integral to our performance is the continued efficacy of our technical systems, operational infrastructure, relationships with third parties and the vast array of associates and key executives in our day-to-day and ongoing operations. Failure by any or all of these resources subjects us to risks that may vary in size, scale and scope. These risks include, but are not limited to, operational or





technical failures, ineffectiveness or exposure due to interruption in third party support, as well as the loss of key individuals or failure on the part of key individuals to perform properly. These risks are heightened during necessary data system changes or conversions and system integrations of newly acquired entities. Although management has established policies and procedures to address such failures, the occurrence of any such event could have a material adverse effect on our business, which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to risks from employee errors, customer or employee fraud and data processing system failures and errors.
Employee errors and employee or customer misconduct could subject us to financial losses or regulatory sanctions and seriously harm our reputation. Misconduct by our employees could include hiding unauthorized activities from us, improper or unauthorized activities on behalf of our customers or improper use of confidential information. It is not always possible to prevent employee errors and misconduct, and the precautions we take to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective in all cases. Employee errors could also subject us to financial claims for negligence. We maintain a system of internal controls and insurance coverage to mitigate against operational risks, including data processing system failures and errors and customer or employee fraud. Should our internal controls fail to prevent or detect an occurrence, or if any resulting loss is not insured or exceeds applicable insurance limits, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our market and growth strategy relies heavily on our management team, and the unexpected loss of key managers may adversely affect our operations.
Much of our success to date has been influenced strongly by our ability to attract and to retain senior management experienced in banking and financial services and familiar with the communities in our different market areas. Because our service areas are spread over such a wide geographical area, our management headquartered in Dubuque, Iowa, is dependent on the effective leadership and capabilities of the management in our local markets for the continued success of Heartland. Our ability to retain executive officers, the current management teams and loan officers of our operating subsidiaries will continue to be important to the successful implementation of our strategy. It is also critical, as we grow, to be able to attract and retain qualified additional management and loan officers with the appropriate level of experience and knowledge about our market area to implement our community-based operating strategy. The unexpected loss of services of any key management personnel, or the inability to recruit and retain qualified personnel in the future, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

New lines of business, products and services are essential to our ability to compete but may subject us to additional risks.
We continually implement new lines of business and offer new products and services within existing lines of business to offer our customers a competitive array of products and services. There can be substantial risks and uncertainties associated with these efforts, particularly in instances where the markets for such products and services are still developing. In developing and marketing new lines of business and/or new products or services, we may invest significant time and resources. Initial timetables for the introduction and development of new lines of business and/or new products or services may not be achieved, and price and profitability targets may not prove feasible. External factors, such as compliance with regulations, competitive alternatives, and shifting market preferences, may also impact the successful implementation of a new line of business or a new product or service. Furthermore, any new line of business and/or new product or service could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of our system of internal controls. Failure to successfully manage these risks in the development and implementation of new lines of business or new products or services could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our models may be improper or ineffective.
We use quantitative systems, often referred to as modeling, which involve the input of date and assumptions, processing the information under conditions of uncertainty, and using the data output to support various processes or decisions. We apply various methods of model design, control and validation to help ensure that the risk appurtenant of our use of models remains at an acceptable level. Improper or ineffective design, controls or use of the models could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our internal controls may be ineffective.
Management regularly reviews and updates our internal controls, disclosure controls and procedures and corporate governance policies and procedures. Any system of controls, however well designed and operated, is based in part on certain assumptions and can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurances that the objectives of the controls are met. Any failure or circumvention of our controls and procedures or failure to comply with regulations related to controls and procedures could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

We have recorded goodwill as a result of acquisitions that can significantly affect our earnings if it becomes impaired.
Under current accounting standards, goodwill is not amortized but, instead, is subject to impairment tests on at least an annual basis or more frequently if an event occurs or circumstances change that reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying





amount. Although we do not anticipate impairment charges, if we conclude that some portion of our goodwill may be impaired, a non-cash charge for the amount of such impairment would be recorded against earnings. A goodwill impairment charge could be caused by a decline in our stock price or occurrence of a triggering event that compounds the negative results in an unfavorable quarter. At December 31, 2017, we had goodwill of $236.6 million, representing approximately 24% of stockholders’ equity.

The FASB has recently issued an accounting standard update that will result in a significant change in how we recognize credit losses and may have a material impact on our results of operations, financial condition or liquidity.
In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued an accounting standard update, "Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326), Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments," which replaces the current "incurred loss" model for recognizing credit losses with an "expected loss" model referred to as the Current Expected Credit Loss ("CECL") model. Under the CECL model, we will be required to present certain financial assets carried at amortized cost, such as loans held for investment and held-to-maturity debt securities, at the net amount expected to be collected. The measurement of expected credit losses is to be based on information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount. This measurement will take place at the time the financial asset is first added to the balance sheet and periodically thereafter. This differs significantly from the incurred loss model required under current GAAP, which delays recognition until it is probable a loss has been incurred. Accordingly, we expect that the adoption of the CECL model will materially affect how we determine our allowance for loan losses and could require us to significantly increase our allowance. Moreover, the CECL model may create more volatility in the level of our allowance for loan losses. If we are required to materially increase our level of allowance for loan losses for any reason, such increase could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The new CECL standard will become effective for us for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 and for interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the impact the CECL model will have on our accounting, but we expect to recognize a one-time cumulative-effect adjustment to our allowance for loan losses as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the new standard is effective, consistent with regulatory expectations set forth in interagency guidance issued at the end of 2016. We cannot yet determine the magnitude of any such one-time cumulative adjustment or of the overall impact of the new standard on our results of operations, financial position and liquidity.

Changes in the federal, state or local tax laws may negatively impact our financial performance.
We are subject to changes in tax law that could increase our effective tax rates. These law changes may be retroactive to previous periods and as a result could negatively affect our current and future financial performance. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the full impact of which is subject to further evaluation and analysis, is likely to have both positive and negative effects on our financial performance. For example, the new legislation will result in a reduction in our federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% beginning in 2018, which will have a favorable impact on our earnings and capital generation abilities in future years. However, the new legislation also limits certain deductions, such as the deduction of FDIC deposit insurance premiums, which will partially offset the anticipated increase in net earnings from the lower corporate tax rate. In addition, as a result of the lower corporate tax rate, the value of our deferred tax assets decreased and we were required under GAAP to record a non-cash charge of $10.4 million to income tax expense in the fourth quarter of 2017. We will continue to monitor the evolving impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which may differ from the foregoing description, possibly materially, due to changes in interpretations or in assumptions that we have made, guidance or regulations that may be promulgated, and other actions that we may take as a result of this legislation. Similarly, our customers are likely to experience varying effects from both the individual and business tax provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and such effects, whether positive or negative, may have a corresponding impact on our business and the economy as a whole.

We have substantial deferred tax assets that could require a valuation allowance and a charge against earnings if we conclude that the tax benefits represented by the assets are unlikely to be realized.
Our balance sheet reflected approximately $42.2 million of deferred tax assets at December 31, 2017, that represents differences in the timing of the benefit of deductions, credits and other items for accounting purposes and the benefit for tax purposes. To the extent we conclude that the value of this asset is not more likely than not to be realized, we would be obligated to record a valuation allowance against the asset, impacting our earnings during the period in which the valuation allowance is recorded. Assessing the need for, or the sufficiency of, a valuation allowance requires management to evaluate all available evidence, both negative and positive. Positive evidence necessary to overcome the negative evidence includes whether future taxable income in sufficient amounts and character within the carryback and carryforward periods is available under the tax law. When negative evidence (e.g., cumulative losses in recent years, history of operating losses or tax credit carryforwards expiring unused) exists, more positive evidence than negative evidence will be necessary. If the positive evidence is not sufficient to exceed the negative evidence, a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets is established. The creation of a substantial valuation allowance could have a significant negative impact on our reported results in the period in which it is recorded. The impact of the impairment of Heartland's deferred tax assets could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.






Strategic and External Risks

Government regulation can result in limitations on our growth strategy.
We operate in a highly regulated environment and are subject to supervision and regulation by a number of governmental regulatory agencies, including the Federal Reserve, the FDIC, the CFPB, and the various state agencies where we have a bank presence. Regulations adopted by these agencies, which are generally intended to provide protection for depositors and customers rather than for the benefit of stockholders, govern a comprehensive range of matters relating to ownership and control of our shares, our acquisition of other companies and businesses, our ability to offer new products, our ability to obtain financing and other aspects of our strategy.

The soundness of other financial institutions could adversely affect our liquidity and operations.
Our ability to engage in routine funding transactions could be adversely affected by the actions and commercial soundness of other financial institutions. Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty or other relationships. We have exposure to many different counterparties, and we routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial industry, including brokers and dealers, commercial banks, investment banks, and other institutional clients. As a result, defaults by, or even rumors or questions about, one or more financial services institutions, or the financial services industry generally, have led to market-wide liquidity problems and could lead to losses or defaults by Heartland or the Banks or by other institutions. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of default of our counterparty or client. In addition, our credit risk may be exacerbated when the collateral held by us cannot be realized upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the financial instrument exposure due us. There is no assurance that any such losses would not materially and adversely affect our results of operations.

We may experience difficulties in managing our growth and our growth strategy involves risks that may negatively impact our net income.
As part of our general growth strategy, we recently acquired several banks and may acquire additional banks that we believe provide a strategic and geographic fit with our business. We cannot predict the number, size or timing of acquisitions. To the extent that we grow through acquisitions, we cannot assure you that we will be able to adequately and profitably manage this growth. Acquiring other banks and businesses will involve risks commonly associated with acquisitions, including:

potential exposure to unknown or contingent liabilities of the banks and businesses we acquire;
exposure to potential asset quality issues of the acquired bank or related business;
difficulty and expense of integrating the operations and personnel of banks and businesses we acquire;
potential disruption to our business;
potential restrictions on our business resulting from the regulatory approval process;
inability to realize the expected revenue increases, costs savings, market presence and/or other anticipated benefits;
potential diversion of our management's time and attention; and
the possible loss of key employees and customers of the banks and businesses we acquire.

In addition to acquisitions, we may expand into additional communities or attempt to strengthen our position in our current markets by undertaking additional de novo bank formations or branch openings. Based on our experience, we believe that it generally takes three years or more for new banking facilities to first achieve operational profitability, due to the impact of organization and overhead expenses and the start-up phase of generating loans and deposits. To the extent that we undertake additional branching and de novo bank and business formations, we are likely to continue to experience the effects of higher operating expenses relative to operating income from the new operations, which may have an adverse effect on our levels of reported net income, return on average equity and return on average assets.

We face intense competition in all phases of our business and competitive factors could adversely affect our business.
The banking and financial services business in our markets is highly competitive and is currently undergoing significant change. Our competitors include large regional banks, local community banks, online banks, thrifts, securities and brokerage companies, mortgage companies, insurance companies, finance companies, money market mutual funds, credit unions and other non-bank financial service providers, and increasingly these competitors provide integrated financial services over a broad geographic area. Some of our competitors may also have access to governmental programs that impact their position in the marketplace favorably. Increased competition in our markets may result in a decrease in the amounts of our loans and deposits, reduced spreads between loan rates and deposit rates or loan terms that are more favorable to the borrower. Any of these results could have a material adverse effect on our ability to grow and remain profitable.






Legal, Compliance and Reputational Risks

We are subject to extensive and evolving government regulation and supervision, which can increase the cost of doing business and lead to enforcement actions.
Federal and state banking laws impose a comprehensive system of supervision, regulation and enforcement on the operations of FDIC-insured institutions, their holding companies and affiliates that is intended primarily for the protection of the FDIC-insured deposits and depositors of banks, rather than shareholders. These laws, and the regulations of the bank regulatory agencies issued under them, affect, among other things, the scope of our business, the kinds and amounts of investments that we and the Banks may make, reserve requirements, required capital levels relative to assets, the nature and amount of collateral for loans, the establishment of branches, our ability to merge, consolidate and acquire, dealings with our and the Banks' insiders and affiliates and our payment of dividends.

While it is anticipated that the current administration will not increase the regulatory burden on community banks and may reduce some of the burdens associated with implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act, the true impact of the new administration is impossible to predict with any certainty, and changes in existing regulations and their enforcement may require modification to Heartland's existing regulatory compliance and risk management infrastructure.

We have experienced heightened regulatory requirements and scrutiny following the global financial crisis and as a result of the Dodd-Frank Act. Although the reforms primarily targeted systemically important financial service providers, their influence filtered down in varying degrees to community banks over time and the reforms have caused our compliance and risk management processes, and the costs thereof, to increase. The Dodd-Frank Act established the CFPB with broad authority to administer and enforce a new federal regulatory framework of consumer financial regulation, changing the base for deposit insurance assessments, introducing regulatory rate-setting for interchange fees charged to merchants for debit card transactions, enhancing the regulation of consumer mortgage banking, changing the methods and standards for resolution of troubled institutions, and changing the Tier 1 regulatory capital ratio calculations for bank holding companies.

The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System regulates the supply of money and credit in the United States. Its fiscal and monetary policies determine, in a large part, our cost of funds for lending and investing and the return that can be earned on those loans and investments, both of which affect our net interest margin. Federal Reserve Board policies can also materially affect the value of financial instruments that we hold, such as debt securities and mortgage servicing rights. Recent changes in the laws and regulations that apply to us have been significant. Further dramatic changes in statutes, regulations or policies could affect us in substantial and unpredictable ways, including limiting the types of financial services and products that we offer and/or increasing the ability of non-banks to offer competing financial services and products.

More stringent requirements related to capital and liquidity may limit our ability to return earnings to stockholders or operate or invest in our business.
The Federal Reserve has adopted capital adequacy guidelines that are used to assess the adequacy of capital in supervising a bank holding company. The federal banking agencies implemented final rules to establish a new comprehensive regulatory capital framework with a phase-in period beginning on January 1, 2015, and ending on January 1, 2019. The final Basel III rules and changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act substantially amended the regulatory risk-based capital rules applicable to Heartland. Under Basel III, Heartland must hold a conservation buffer above the minimum capital requirement. The capital conservation buffer for 2017 is 1.25% above the minimum capital requirement, and the fully-phased in capital conservation buffer for 2019 is 2.50% above the minimum capital requirement.

Additional requirements may be imposed in the future. The Basel Committee has recently finalized a package of revisions to the Basel III framework, unofficially known as Basel IV. The changes are meant to improve the calculation of risk-weighted assets and the comparability of capital ratios. Federal banking regulators are expected to undertake one or more rulemakings in future years to implement these revisions in the United States. The ultimate impact on our capital and liquidity will depend on the final United States rulemakings and implementation process thereafter.

We will become subject to additional regulatory requirements when our total assets exceed $10 billion, which we anticipate occurring in 2018, and these additional requirements could have an adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
Various federal banking laws and regulations, including rules adopted by the Federal Reserve pursuant to the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act, impose heightened requirements on certain large banks and bank holding companies. Most of these rules apply primarily to bank holding companies with at least $50 billion in total consolidated assets, but certain rules also apply to banks and bank holding companies with at least $10 billion in total consolidated assets.






Following the fourth consecutive quarter (and any applicable phase-in period) where our or any of the Banks' total average consolidated assets equals or exceeds $10 billion, we or the Banks, as applicable, will, among other requirements:

be required to perform annual stress tests;
be required to establish a dedicated risk committee of our board of directors responsible for overseeing our enterprise-risk management policies, commensurate with our capital structure, risk profile, complexity, size and other risk-related factors, and including as a member at least one risk management expert;
calculate our FDIC deposits assessment base using a performance score and loss-severity score system; and
be subject to more frequent regulatory examinations.

While we do not currently have $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets, we have begun analyzing these requirements to ensure we are prepared to comply with the rules when and if they become applicable. It is reasonable to assume that our total assets will exceed $10 billion at some point in 2018, based on our historic organic growth rates and our potential to grow through acquisitions.

We may be required to repurchase mortgage loans or reimburse investors and others as a result of breaches in contractual representations and warranties.
We sell residential mortgage loans to various parties, including GSEs and other financial institutions that purchase mortgage loans for investment or private label securitization. The agreements under which we sell mortgage loans and the insurance or guaranty agreements with the FHA and VA contain various representations and warranties regarding the origination and characteristics of the mortgage loans, including ownership of the loan, compliance with loan criteria set forth in the applicable agreement, validity of the lien securing the loan, absence of delinquent taxes or liens against the property securing the loan, and compliance with applicable origination laws. We may be required to repurchase mortgage loans, indemnify the investor or insurer, or reimburse the investor or insurer for credit losses incurred on loans in the event of a breach of contractual representations or warranties that is not remedied within a period (usually 90 days or less) after we receive notice of the breach. Contracts for mortgage loan sales to the GSEs include various types of specific remedies and penalties that could be applied to inadequate responses to repurchase requests. Similarly, the agreements under which we sell mortgage loans require us to deliver various documents to the investor, and we may be obligated to repurchase any mortgage loan as to which the required documents are not delivered or are defective. We establish a mortgage repurchase liability related to the various representations and warranties that reflect management's estimate of losses for loans which we have a repurchase obligation. Our mortgage repurchase liability represents management's best estimate of the probable loss that we may expect to incur for the representations and warranties in the contractual provisions of our sales of mortgage loans. Because the level of mortgage loan repurchase losses depends upon economic factors, investor demand strategies and other external conditions that may change over the life of the underlying loans, the level of the liability for mortgage loan repurchase losses is difficult to estimate and requires considerable management judgment. If economic conditions and the housing market deteriorate or future investor repurchase demand and our success at appealing repurchase requests differ from past experience, we could experience increased repurchase obligations and increased loss severity on repurchases, requiring additions to the repurchase liability.

Litigation and enforcement actions could result in negative publicity and could adversely impact our business and financial results.
We face significant legal and regulatory risks in our business, and the volume of claims and amount of damages and penalties claimed in litigation and governmental proceedings against financial institutions have increased in recent years. Reputation risk, or the risk to our earnings and capital from the resulting negative publicity, is inherent to our business. Current public uneasiness with the United States banking system heightens this risk, as banking customers often transfer news regarding consumer fraud, financial difficulties or even failure of some institutions, to fear of fraud, financial difficulty or failure of even the most secure institutions. In this climate, any negative news may become cause for curtailment of business relationships, withdrawal of funds or other actions that can have a compounding effect, and could adversely affect our operations. Substantial legal liability or significant governmental action against us could materially impact our business and financial results. Also, the resolution of a litigation or regulatory matter could result in additional accruals or exceed established accruals for a particular period, which could materially impact our results from operations for that period.

Risks of Owning Stock in Heartland

Our stock price can be volatile.
Our stock price can fluctuate widely in response to a variety of factors, including: actual or anticipated variations in our quarterly operating results; recommendations by securities analysts; acquisitions or business combinations; capital commitments by or involving Heartland or our Banks; operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors deem comparable to us; new technology used or services offered by our competitors; new reports relating to trends, concerns and other issues in the financial services industry; and changes in government regulations. General market fluctuations, industry factors and general





economic and political conditions and events have caused a decline in our stock price in the past, and these factors, as well as, interest rate changes, continued unfavorable credit loss trends, or unforeseen events such as terrorist attacks could cause our stock price to be volatile regardless of our operating results.

Stockholders may experience dilution as a result of future equity offerings and acquisitions.
In order to raise capital for future acquisitions or for general corporate purposes, we may offer additional shares of our common stock or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for our common stock at a price per share that may be lower than the current price. In addition, investors purchasing shares or other securities in the future could have rights superior to existing stockholders. The price per share at which we sell additional shares of our common stock, or securities convertible or exchangeable into common stock, may be higher or lower than the price paid by existing stockholders.

Certain banking laws and the Heartland Stockholder Rights Plan may have an anti-takeover effect.
Certain federal banking laws, including regulatory approval requirements, could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire Heartland, even if doing so would be perceived to be beneficial to Heartland’s stockholders. In addition, Heartland's Amended and Restated Rights Agreement (the "Rights Plan") causes it to be difficult for any person to acquire 15% or more of Heartland's outstanding stock (with certain limited exceptions) without the permission of our board of directors. The combination of these provisions may inhibit a non-negotiated merger or other business combination, which, in turn, could adversely affect the market price of Heartland's common stock.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

As of December 31, 2017, Heartland had no unresolved staff comments.






ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

The following table is a listing of Heartland’s principal operating facilities and the home offices of each of the Banks and of Citizens Finance Parent Co. as of December 31, 2017:
Name and Main Facility Address
Main Facility
Square Footage
Main Facility
Owned or Leased
Number of
Locations(1)
Heartland Financial USA, Inc.
     1398 Central Avenue
     Dubuque, IA  52001
65,000
Owned
3
Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
     1398 Central Avenue
     Dubuque, IA  52001
65,500
Owned
11
Illinois Bank & Trust
     6855 E. Riverside Blvd.
     Rockford, IL  60114
8,000
Owned
10
Wisconsin Bank & Trust
     8240 Mineral Point Road
     Madison, WI  53719
19,000
Owned
18
New Mexico Bank & Trust
     320 Gold NW
     Albuquerque, NM  87102
11,400
Lease term
through 2021
19
Arizona Bank & Trust
     2036 E. Camelback Road
     Phoenix, AZ  85016
14,000
Owned
8
Rocky Mountain Bank
     2615 King Avenue West
     Billings, MT 59102
16,600
Owned
16
Citywide Banks
     1800 Larimer Street
     Suite 100
     Denver, CO 80202
8,700
Lease term
through 2030
26
Minnesota Bank & Trust(2)
     7701 France Avenue South, Suite 110
     Edina, MN 55435
6,100
Lease term
through 2018
2
Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company
     6740 Antioch Road
     Merriam, KS 66204
7,500
Owned
9
Premier Valley Bank
     255 East River Park Circle, Suite 180
     Fresno, CA 93720
17,600
Lease term
through 2023
8
Citizens Finance Parent Co.
     2200 John F. Kennedy Road, Suite 103
     Dubuque, IA  52002
5,900
Lease term
through 2019
14
 
 
 
 
(1) Includes loan production offices.
 
 
 
(2) As a result of the acquisition of Signature Bancshares, Inc. on February 23, 2018, Minnesota Bank & Trust currently has 3 banking locations.

The corporate office of Heartland is located in Dubuque Bank and Trust Company's main office. A majority of the support functions provided to the Banks by Heartland are performed in two leased facilities: one located at 1301 Central Avenue in Dubuque, Iowa, which is leased from Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, and the other located at 700 Locust Street, Suite 300 in Dubuque, Iowa, which is leased from an unrelated third party.






ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

There are no material pending legal proceedings to which Heartland or its subsidiaries are a party at December 31, 2017, other than ordinary routine litigation incidental to their respective businesses. While the ultimate outcome of current legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty, it is the opinion of management that the resolution of these legal actions should not have a material effect on Heartland's consolidated financial position or results of operations.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

The names and ages of the executive officers of Heartland, the position held by these officers with Heartland, and the positions held with Heartland subsidiaries as of December 31, 2017, are set forth below:
Name
Age
Position with Heartland and Subsidiaries and Principal Occupation
Lynn B. Fuller
68
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Director of Heartland; Vice Chairman of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company, Wisconsin Bank & Trust, New Mexico Bank & Trust, Arizona Bank & Trust, Rocky Mountain Bank, Citywide Banks, Minnesota Bank & Trust and Premier Valley Bank; Chairman of Citizens Finance Parent Co.; Director of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services
Bruce K. Lee
57
President and Director of Heartland; Director of Rocky Mountain Bank; President of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services
Bryan R. McKeag
57
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Heartland; Treasurer of Citizens Finance Parent Co.; Director of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services
Andrew E. Townsend
51
Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of Heartland
Lynn H. Fuller
34
President and Chief Executive Officer of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company
Brian J. Fox
69
Executive Vice President, Operations, of Heartland
Frank E. Walter
71
Executive Vice President, Commercial Sales, of Heartland
Rodney L. Sloan
58
Executive Vice President and Chief Risk Officer of Heartland
Deborah K. Deters
53
Executive Vice President, Chief Human Resources Officer, of Heartland
Michael J. Coyle
72
Executive Vice President, Senior General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Heartland; Secretary of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services
Kelly J. Johnson
56
Executive Vice President, Private Client Services, of Heartland
Janet M. Quick
52
Executive Vice President, Deputy Chief Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer of Heartland
Steven M. Braden
51
Executive Vice President, Director of Retail Banking

Lynn B. Fuller has been a Director of Heartland and of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company since 1984 and Chief Executive Officer of Heartland since 1999. He was President of Heartland from 1987 to 2015. Mr. Fuller has been a Director of Wisconsin Bank & Trust since 1997, New Mexico Bank & Trust since 1998, Arizona Bank & Trust since 2003, Citywide Banks since 2006, Minnesota Bank & Trust since 2008, Heritage Bank, N.A. from 2012 until its merger with Arizona Bank & Trust in 2013 and Morrill & Janes Bank and Trust Company since January 2014. In 2015, he was named Director of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services. He was a Director of Galena State Bank & Trust Co. from 1992 to 2004 and of Illinois Bank & Trust from 1995 until 2004. Mr. Fuller joined Dubuque Bank and Trust Company in 1971 as a consumer loan officer and was named Dubuque Bank and Trust Company's Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer in 1985. Mr. Fuller was President of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company from 1987 until 1999 at which time he was named Chief Executive Officer of Heartland. Mr. Fuller is the father of Lynn H. Fuller, President and Chief Executive Officer of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company.

Bruce K. Lee joined Heartland in 2015 as President and was elected a Director of Heartland in 2017. Mr. Lee was named a Director of Rocky Mountain Bank and Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services in 2015. Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. Lee held various leadership positions at Fifth Third Bancorp from 2001 to 2013, serving most recently as Executive Vice President, Chief Credit Officer from 2011 to 2013. Mr. Lee previously served as President and CEO of a Fifth Third affiliate bank in Ohio where he managed sales and service functions for retail, commercial, residential mortgage, and investments as well as finance, human resources, and marketing. Prior to Fifth Third, Mr. Lee served as an Executive Vice President and board member for Capital Bank, a community bank located in Sylvania, Ohio.






Bryan R. McKeag joined Heartland in 2013 as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Mr. McKeag was named Director of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services in 2015. Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. McKeag served as Executive Vice President, Corporate Controller and Principal Accounting Officer with Associated Banc-Corp in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Prior to Associated Banc-Corp, Mr. McKeag spent 9 years in various finance positions at JP Morgan and 9 years in public accounting at KPMG in Minneapolis. He is an inactive holder of the certified public accountant certification.

Andrew E. Townsend was named Executive Vice President, Chief Credit Officer, of Heartland in 2016. Mr. Townsend joined Dubuque Bank and Trust Company in 1993 as a Loan Review Officer and was selected to join Galena State Bank as Executive Vice President, Head of Lending in 1996. In 2003, Mr. Townsend assumed the position of President and CEO of Galena State Bank and joined the bank's board of directors. He was named Deputy Chief Credit Officer of Heartland in 2013. Prior to joining Heartland, he worked at Bank One in the loan review area and had also been an examiner for the Iowa Division of Banking.

Lynn H. Fuller was named President and Chief Executive Officer of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company in 2017. Mr. Fuller joined Heartland in 2014 as Executive Vice President, Corporate Director of Retail. In 2016, Mr. Fuller assumed the position of Market President of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company. He serves on the board of Dubuque Bank and Trust Company. Prior to joining Heartland, from 2010 to 2013, Mr. Fuller was a Case Team Leader at Bain & Company in Chicago, Illinois. He led his team in providing expert advice on client issues and industry topics and recommended solutions.

Brian J. Fox joined Heartland in 2010 as Executive Vice President, Operations. From 2008 until joining Heartland, Mr. Fox served as Chief Information Officer of First Olathe Bancshares in Overland Park, Kansas. For the eight years prior to joining First Olathe Bancshares, Mr. Fox drew on his 30 years of experience at various banking organizations to provide consulting services to over 100 community banks as Senior Consultant at Vitex, Inc. His areas of responsibility have included strategic planning, credit administration, loan workouts, information technology, project management, mortgage banking, deposit operations and loan operations.

Frank E. Walter joined Heartland in 2009 as Executive Vice President, Commercial Sales. Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. Walter was the Rockford Regional President of JP Morgan Chase in Rockford, Illinois for five years. Mr. Walter was President and Chief Executive Officer of Bank One/Rockford from 1993 until Bank One's merger with JP Morgan Chase in 2004. Prior to joining Bank One/Rockford, he served as CEO of Bank One/Chicago from 1987 to 1993 and held various management positions at Wells Fargo for the 16 years prior to joining Bank One/Chicago. Mr. Walter is responsible for commercial sales at Heartland.

Rodney L. Sloan was named Executive Vice President, Chief Risk Officer in August 2011. Mr. Sloan previously served as Senior Vice President, Credit Administration of Heartland since January 2011. Prior to joining Heartland, he served in various roles with Old Second Bancorp in Aurora, Illinois from 1990 to 2011. Mr. Sloan oversees all facets of the enterprise-wide risk management program and provides executive leadership to the internal audit, compliance, and loan review functions at Heartland.

Deborah K. Deters joined Heartland in December 2017 as Executive Vice President, Chief Human Resource Officer. Ms. Deters most recently served as the Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer at HUB International, LTD., based in Chicago, Illinois. While at HUB she was named the organization's first Chief Human Resources Officer and transformed its Human Resources function while supporting the company’s growth from 4,000 to over 10,000 employees. Prior to HUB International, LTD., Ms. Deters held several positions over 17 years with Bally Entertainment, finishing as Senior Vice President, Chief Human Resource Officer of Bally Total Fitness.

Michael J. Coyle joined Heartland in 2009 as Executive Vice President, Senior General Counsel, Corporate Secretary. In 2015, Mr. Coyle was named Secretary of Heartland Financial USA, Inc. Insurance Services. Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. Coyle was an attorney with the Dubuque, Iowa based law firm of Fuerste, Carew, Coyle, Juergens & Sudmeier, P.C. for 38 years, including 35 years as a senior partner. He has extensive experience in corporate and contract law.

Kelly J. Johnson joined Heartland in 2014 as Executive Vice President, Private Client Services. Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. Johnson served as Executive Vice President of Wealth Management at Umpqua Holdings in Portland, Oregon, where he developed and led the wealth management divisions of Private Banking, Trust Services, Wealth Planning, and Investment Services. Mr. Johnson has also held executive positions with RBC Wealth Management and UBS Wealth Management.

Janet M. Quick was named Executive Vice President, Deputy Chief Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer in January 2016. Ms. Quick had served as Senior Vice President, Deputy Chief Financial Officer since July 2013. Ms. Quick has been with Heartland since 1994, serving in various audit, finance and accounting positions. Prior to joining Heartland, Ms. Quick was with Hawkeye Bancorporation in the corporate finance area. She is an active holder of the certified public accountant certification.






Steven M. Braden was named Executive Vice President, Head of Retail Banking in August 2016. Prior to joining Heartland, Mr. Braden was the Executive Director for Community Banking and Senior Consultant for Strategic Direction for Ningbo Donghai Bank in Zhejiang Province, Ningbo, China from 2013 to 2016 where he was responsible for developing and overseeing the bank's new community bank division. Mr. Braden also previously served as Executive Vice President, Regional Executive of Umpqua Bank in Portland, Oregon from 2003 to 2012. He also held senior management positions at US Bank and First Bank System.

PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Heartland's common stock was held by approximately 3,200 stockholders of record as of February 22, 2018, and approximately 14,700 additional stockholders held shares in street name. The common stock of Heartland has been quoted on the NASDAQ Stock Market since May 2003 under the symbol "HTLF" and is a NASDAQ Global Select Market security.

For the periods indicated, the following table shows the range of intraday sales prices per share of Heartland's common stock in the NASDAQ Global Select Market. These quotations represent inter-dealer prices without retail markups, markdowns, or commissions and do not necessarily represent actual transactions.
Calendar Quarter
 
High
 
Low
2017:
 
 
 
 
First
 
$
51.70

 
$
44.55

Second
 
52.65

 
44.15

Third
 
50.10

 
42.10

Fourth
 
56.40

 
46.50

2016:
 
 
 
 
First
 
$
32.44

 
$
25.95

Second
 
35.96

 
29.58

Third
 
37.90

 
33.50

Fourth
 
49.15

 
35.30


Cash dividends have been declared by Heartland quarterly during the two years ending December 31, 2017. The following table sets forth the cash dividends per share paid on Heartland's common stock for the past two years:
Calendar Quarter
 
2017
 
2016
First
 
$
0.11

 
$
0.10

Second
 
0.11

 
0.10

Third
 
0.11

 
0.10

Fourth
 
0.18

 
0.20


Heartland's ability to pay dividends to stockholders is largely dependent upon the dividends it receives from the Banks, and the Banks are subject to regulatory limitations on the amount of cash dividends they may pay. See "Business – Supervision and Regulation – Heartland – Dividend Payments" and "Business – Supervision and Regulation - The Banks – Dividend Payments" and Note 18, "Capital Issuance and Redemption", of the consolidated financial statements for a more detailed description of these limitations.

Heartland has issued junior subordinated debentures in several private placements. Under the terms of the debentures, Heartland may be prohibited, under certain circumstances, from paying dividends on shares of its common stock. None of these circumstances currently exist.

Effective January 24, 2008, Heartland's board of directors authorized management to acquire and hold up to 500,000 shares of common stock as treasury shares at any one time. Heartland and its affiliated purchasers made no purchases of its common stock during the quarter ended December 31, 2017.






The following table and graph show a five-year comparison of cumulative total returns for Heartland, the NASDAQ Composite Index, the SNL U.S. Bank NASDAQ Index and the SNL Bank and Thrift Index, in each case assuming investment of $100 on December 31, 2012, and reinvestment of dividends. The table and graph were prepared at our request by SNL Financial, LC.
Cumulative Total Return Performance
 
 
12/31/2012

 
12/31/2013

 
12/31/2014

 
12/31/2015

 
12/31/2016

 
12/31/2017

Heartland Financial USA, Inc.
 
$
100.00

 
$
111.80

 
$
106.96

 
$
125.41

 
$
194.58

 
$
219.81

NASDAQ Composite Index
 
100.00

 
140.12

 
160.78

 
171.97

 
187.22

 
242.71

SNL U.S. Bank NASDAQ Index
 
100.00

 
143.73

 
148.86

 
160.70

 
222.81

 
234.58

SNL Bank and Thrift Index
 
100.00

 
136.92

 
152.85

 
155.94

 
196.86

 
231.49


COMPARISON OF FIVE YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN*
ASSUMES $100 INVESTED ON DECEMBER 31, 2012
* Total return assumes reinvestment of dividends


392387576_chart-9818a3f23b875df091e.jpg

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables contain selected historical financial data for Heartland for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013. The selected historical consolidated financial information set forth below is qualified in its entirety by reference to, and should be read in conjunction with, Heartland’s consolidated financial statements and notes thereto, included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and Item 7. "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations."








SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
STATEMENT OF INCOME DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
$
363,658

 
$
326,479

 
$
265,968

 
$
237,042

 
$
199,511

Interest expense
33,350

 
31,813

 
31,970

 
33,969

 
35,683

Net interest income
330,308

 
294,666

 
233,998

 
203,073

 
163,828

Provision for loan losses
15,563

 
11,694

 
12,697

 
14,501

 
9,697

Net interest income after provision for loan losses
314,745

 
282,972

 
221,301

 
188,572

 
154,131

Noninterest income
102,022

 
113,601

 
110,685

 
82,224

 
89,618

Noninterest expenses
297,675

 
279,668

 
251,046

 
215,800

 
196,561

Income taxes
43,820

 
36,556

 
20,898

 
13,096

 
10,335

Net income(1)
75,272

 
80,349

 
60,042

 
41,900

 
36,853

Net (income) loss available to noncontrolling interest, net of tax

 

 

 

 
(64
)
Net income attributable to Heartland
75,272

 
80,349

 
60,042

 
41,900

 
36,789

Preferred dividends and discount
(58
)
 
(292
)
 
(817
)
 
(817
)
 
(1,093
)
Interest expense on convertible preferred debt
12

 
51

 

 

 

Net income available to common stockholders
$
75,226

 
$
80,108

 
$
59,225

 
$
41,083

 
$
35,696

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PER COMMON SHARE DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income – diluted
$
2.65

 
$
3.22

 
$
2.83

 
$
2.19

 
$
2.04

Cash dividends
$
0.51

 
$
0.50

 
$
0.45

 
$
0.40

 
$
0.40

Dividend payout ratio
19.25
%
 
15.53
%
 
15.90
%
 
18.26
%
 
19.61
%
Book value per common share (GAAP)
$
33.07

 
$
28.31

 
$
25.92

 
$
22.40

 
$
19.44

Tangible book value per common share (non-GAAP)(2)
$
23.99

 
$
22.55

 
$
20.60

 
$
20.57

 
$
19.99

Weighted average shares outstanding-diluted
28,425,652

 
24,873,430

 
20,929,385

 
18,741,921

 
17,460,066

Tangible common equity ratio (non-GAAP)(3)
7.53
%

7.28
%

6.09
%

6.16
%

5.29
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reconciliation of Tangible Book Value Per Common Share (non-GAAP)(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stockholders' equity (GAAP)
$
990,519

 
$
739,559

 
$
581,475

 
$
414,619

 
$
357,762

  Less goodwill
236,615

 
127,699

 
97,852

 
35,583

 
35,583

  Less core deposit intangibles and customer relationship intangibles, net
35,203

 
22,775

 
22,020

 
8,948

 
11,171

Tangible common stockholders' equity (non-GAAP)
$
718,701

 
$
589,085

 
$
461,603

 
$
370,088

 
$
311,008

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common shares outstanding, net of treasury stock
29,953,356

 
26,119,929

 
22,435,693

 
18,511,125

 
18,399,156

Common stockholders' equity (book value) per share (GAAP)
$
33.07

 
$
28.31

 
$
25.92

 
$
22.40

 
$
19.44

Tangible book value per common share (non-GAAP)
$
23.99

 
$
22.55

 
$
20.57

 
$
19.99

 
$
16.90

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reconciliation of Tangible Common Equity Ratio (non-GAAP)(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets (GAAP)
$
9,810,739

 
$
8,247,079

 
$
7,694,754

 
$
6,051,812

 
$
5,923,716

    Less goodwill
236,615

 
127,699

 
97,852

 
35,583

 
35,583

    Less core deposit intangibles and customer relationship
intangibles, net
35,203

 
22,775

 
22,020

 
8,948

 
11,171

Total tangible assets (non-GAAP)
$
9,538,921

 
$
8,096,605

 
$
7,574,882

 
$
6,007,281

 
$
5,876,962

Tangible common equity ratio (non-GAAP)
7.53
%
 
7.28
%
 
6.09
%
 
6.16
%
 
5.29
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) For a discussion of the impact of recent acquisitions on our net income, see Item 7. "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition."
(2) Refer to the "Reconciliation of Tangible Book Value Per Common Share (non-GAAP)" table.
(3) Refer to the "Reconciliation of Tangible Common Equity Ratio (non-GAAP)" table.
(4) Tangible book value per common share is total common stockholders' equity less goodwill and core deposit and customer relationship intangibles, net, divided by common shares outstanding, net of treasury. This amount is a non-GAAP financial measure but has been included as it is considered to be a critical metric with which to analyze and evaluate the financial condition and capital strength of Heartland. This measure should not be considered a substitute for operating results determined in accordance with GAAP.
(5) The tangible common equity ratio is total common stockholders' equity less goodwill and core deposit intangibles, net divided by total assets less goodwill and core deposit intangibles, net. This ratio is a non-GAAP financial measure but has been included as it is considered to be a critical metric with which to analyze and evaluate the financial condition and capital strength of Heartland. This measure should not be considered a substitute for operating results determined in accordance with GAAP.





SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA (Continued)
(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)
 
As of and For the Years Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
BALANCE SHEET DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investments
$
2,492,866

 
$
2,131,086

 
$
1,878,994

 
$
1,706,953

 
$
1,895,044

Loans held for sale
44,560

 
61,261

 
74,783

 
70,514

 
46,665

Total loans receivable(1)
6,391,464

 
5,351,719

 
5,001,486

 
3,878,003

 
3,502,701

Allowance for loan losses
55,686

 
54,324

 
48,685

 
41,449

 
41,685

Total assets
9,810,739

 
8,247,079

 
7,694,754

 
6,051,812

 
5,923,716

Total deposits
8,146,909

 
6,847,411

 
6,405,823

 
4,768,022

 
4,666,499

Long-term obligations
285,011

 
288,534

 
263,214

 
395,705

 
350,109

Preferred equity
938

 
1,357

 
81,698

 
81,698

 
81,698

Common stockholders’ equity
990,519

 
739,559

 
581,475

 
414,619

 
357,762

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EARNINGS PERFORMANCE DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Return on average total assets
0.83
%
 
0.98
%
 
0.88
%
 
0.70
%
 
0.70
%
Return on average common equity (GAAP)
8.63

 
11.80

 
11.92

 
10.62

 
10.87

Return on average tangible common equity (non-GAAP)(2)
11.45

 
15.15

 
13.90

 
12.04

 
12.16

Net interest margin (GAAP)
4.04

 
3.95

 
3.80

 
3.77

 
3.58

Net interest margin, fully tax-equivalent (non-GAAP)(3)
4.22

 
4.13

 
3.97

 
3.96

 
3.78

Efficiency ratio, fully tax equivalent(4)
65.40
%
 
66.25
%
 
69.16
%
 
71.61
%
 
75.01
%
Earnings to fixed charges:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Excluding interest on deposits
7.69x

 
7.27x

 
5.20x

 
3.98x

 
3.58x

Including interest on deposits
4.30

 
4.38

 
3.33

 
2.50

 
2.23

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ASSET QUALITY RATIOS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nonperforming assets to total assets
0.76
%
 
0.91
%
 
0.67
%
 
0.74
%
 
1.23
%
Nonperforming loans to total loans
0.99

 
1.20

 
0.79

 
0.65

 
1.21

Net loan charge-offs to average loans
0.24

 
0.11

 
0.12

 
0.39

 
0.22

Allowance for loan losses to total loans
0.87

 
1.02

 
0.97

 
1.07

 
1.19

Allowance for loan losses to nonperforming loans
87.82

 
84.37

 
122.77

 
165.33

 
98.27

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CONSOLIDATED CAPITAL RATIOS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average equity to average assets
9.69
%
 
8.53
%
 
8.55
%
 
8.00
%
 
8.09
%
Average common equity to average assets
9.68

 
8.31

 
7.35

 
6.60

 
6.46

Total capital to risk-adjusted assets
13.45

 
14.01

 
13.74

 
15.73

 
14.69

Tier 1 capital
11.70

 
11.93

 
11.56

 
12.95

 
13.19

Common Equity Tier 1(5)
10.07

 
10.09

 
8.23

 

 

Tier 1 leverage
9.20

 
9.28

 
9.58

 
9.75

 
9.67

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reconciliation of Return on Average Tangible Common Equity (non-GAAP)(6)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income available to common stockholders (GAAP)
$
75,226

 
$
80,108

 
$
59,225

 
$
41,083

 
$
35,696

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average common stockholders' equity (GAAP)
$
871,683

 
$
678,989

 
$
496,877

 
$
386,844

 
$
328,454

    Less average goodwill
184,554

 
125,724

 
56,781

 
35,688

 
30,833

    Less average other intangibles, net
30,109

 
24,553

 
14,153

 
10,022

 
4,117

Average tangible common equity (non-GAAP)
$
657,020

 
$
528,712

 
$
425,943

 
$
341,134

 
$
293,504

Annualized return on average common equity (GAAP)
8.63
%
 
11.80
%
 
11.92
%
 
10.62
%
 
10.87
%
Annualized return on average tangible common equity (non-GAAP)
11.45
%
 
15.15
%
 
13.90
%
 
12.04
%
 
12.16
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA (Continued)
(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)
 
As of and For the Years Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Reconciliation of Annualized Net Interest Margin,
Fully Tax-Equivalent (non-GAAP)
(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Interest Income (GAAP)
$
330,308

 
$
294,666

 
$
233,998

 
$
203,073

 
$
163,828

    Plus tax-equivalent adjustment(8)
15,139

 
12,919

 
10,216

 
10,298

 
9,465

Net interest income - tax-equivalent (non-GAAP)
$
345,447

 
$
307,585

 
$
244,214

 
$
213,371

 
$
173,293

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average earning assets
$
8,181,914

 
$
7,455,217

 
$
6,152,090

 
$
5,384,275

 
$
4,582,296

Net interest margin (GAAP)
4.04
%
 
3.95
%
 
3.80
%
 
3.77
%
 
3.58
%
Net interest margin, fully tax-equivalent (non-GAAP)
4.22
%
 
4.13
%
 
3.97
%
 
3.96
%
 
3.78
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measure-Efficiency Ratio(9)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Interest Income (GAAP)
$
330,308

 
$
294,666

 
$
233,998

 
$
203,073

 
$
163,828

    Plus tax-equivalent adjustment(8)
15,139

 
12,919

 
10,216

 
10,298

 
9,465

Net interest income - tax-equivalent (non-GAAP)
345,447

 
307,585

 
244,214

 
213,371

 
173,293

Noninterest income
102,022

 
113,601

 
110,685

 
82,224

 
89,618

Securities gains, net
(6,973
)
 
(11,340
)
 
(13,143
)
 
(3,668
)
 
(7,121
)
Impairment loss on securities

 

 
769

 

 

Gain on extinguishment of debt
(1,280
)
 

 

 

 

Adjusted income
$
439,216

 
$
409,846

 
$
342,525

 
$
291,927

 
$
255,790

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total noninterest expenses
$
297,675

 
$
279,668

 
$
251,046

 
$
215,800

 
$
196,561

Less:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Core deposit intangibles and customer relationship intangibles amortization
6,077

 
5,630

 
2,978

 
2,223

 
1,063

Partnership investment in tax credit projects
1,860

 
1,051

 
4,357

 
2,436

 
596

Loss on sales/valuations of assets, net
2,475

 
1,478

 
6,821

 
2,105

 
3,034

Adjusted noninterest expenses
$
287,263

 
$
271,509

 
$
236,890

 
$
209,036

 
$
191,868

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Efficiency ratio, fully tax-equivalent (non-GAAP)
65.40
%
 
66.25
%
 
69.16
%
 
71.61
%
 
75.01
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) Excludes loans held for sale.
(2) Refer to the "Reconciliation of Return on Average Tangible Common Equity (non-GAAP)" table.
(3) Refer to the "Reconciliation of Annualized Net Interest Margin, Fully Tax-Equivalent (non-GAAP)" table.
(4) Refer to the "Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measure-Efficiency Ratio" (non-GAAP)" table.
(5) Prior to the adoption of Basel III requirements effective January 1, 2015, the common equity Tier 1 capital ratio was not a capital standard required by bank regulatory agencies.
(6) Return on average tangible common equity is net income available to common stockholders divided by average common stockholders' equity less goodwill and core deposit intangibles and customer relationship intangibles, ne