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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

ktyb_Current folio_10K

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C.  20549

 

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

☒  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

or

 

☐  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                                          to                                        

 

Commission File Number:  000-52598

 

KENTUCKY BANCSHARES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

Kentucky

 

61-0993464

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

incorporation or organization)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.O. Box 157, Paris, Kentucky

 

40362-0157

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:  (859)987-1795

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

 

Title of each class

 

Name on each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, no par value per share

 

OTC QX

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes  ☐  No  ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.  Yes  ☐  No  ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  ☒  No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  ☒  No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer  ☐

 

Accelerated filer  ☐

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer   ☒

 

Smaller reporting company  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ☐  No  ☒

 

Aggregate market value of voting stock held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2016 was approximately $68.0 million.  For purposes of this calculation, it is assumed that the Bank’s Trust Department, directors, executive officers and beneficial owners of more than 5% of the registrant’s outstanding voting stock are affiliates.

 

Number of shares of Common Stock outstanding as of March 15, 2017:  2,972,763.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Portions of the Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for its Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on May 17, 2017 are incorporated by reference into Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Part III.

 

 

 

 


 

PART I

 

Item 1.  Business

 

General

 

Kentucky Bancshares, Inc. (“Company,” “Kentucky,” “we,” “our” and “us”) is a bank holding company headquartered in Paris, Kentucky.  The Company was organized in 1981 and is registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (“BHCA”).

 

The Company conducts its business in the Commonwealth of Kentucky through one banking subsidiary, Kentucky Bank, and one non-bank subsidiary KBI Insurance Company.

 

Kentucky Bank is a commercial bank and trust company organized under the laws of Kentucky.  Kentucky Bank has its main office in Paris (Bourbon County), with additional offices in Paris, Cynthiana (Harrison County), Georgetown (Scott County), Lexington (Fayette), Morehead (Rowan County), Nicholasville (Jessamine County), Richmond (Madison County), Sandy Hook (Elliott County), Versailles (Woodford County), Wilmore (Jessamine County) and Winchester (Clark County).  The deposits of Kentucky Bank are insured up to prescribed limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”).  KBI Insurance Company is a captive insurance subsidiary and was incorporated in 2014.

 

The Company had total assets of $1.0 billion, total deposits of $803.0 million and stockholders’ equity of $93.0 million as of December 31, 2016.  The Company’s principal executive office is located at 339 Main Street, Paris, Kentucky  40361, and the telephone number at that address is (859) 987-1795.

 

Business Strategy

 

The Company’s current business strategy is to operate a well-capitalized, profitable and independent community bank with a significant presence in Central and Eastern Kentucky.  Management believes the optimum way to grow the Company is by attracting new loan and deposit customers within its existing markets through its product offerings and premier customer service.  Management continues to consider opportunities for branch expansion and will also consider acquisition opportunities that help advance its strategic objectives.

 

Lending

 

Kentucky Bank is engaged in general full-service commercial and consumer banking.  A significant part of Kentucky Bank’s operating activities include originating loans, approximately 81% of which are secured by real estate at December 31, 2016.  Kentucky Bank makes commercial, agricultural and real estate loans to its commercial customers, with emphasis on small-to-medium-sized industrial, service and agricultural businesses.  It also makes residential mortgage, installment and other loans to its individual and other non-commercial customers.

 

Loan Rates:  Kentucky Bank offers variable and fixed rate loans.  Loan rates on variable rate loans generally adjust upward or downward based on changes in the loan’s index.  Rate adjustments on variable rate loans are made from 1 day to 5 years.  Variable rate loans may contain provisions that cap the amount of interest rate increases or decreases over the life of the loan.  In addition to the lifetime caps and floors on rate adjustments, loans secured by residential real estate may contain provisions that limit annual increases at a maximum of 200 basis points.  There is usually no annual limit applied to loans secured by commercial real estate.

 

Credit Risk:  Commercial lending and real estate construction lending, generally include a higher degree of credit risk than other loans, such as residential mortgage loans.  Commercial loans, like other loans, are evaluated at the time of approval to determine the adequacy of repayment sources and collateral requirements. Collateral requirements vary to some degree among borrowers and depend on the borrower’s financial strength, the terms and amount of the loan, and collateral available to secure the loan.  Credit risk results from the decreased ability or willingness to pay by a borrower.  Credit risk also results when a liquidation of collateral occurs and there is a shortfall in collateral value as compared to a loan’s outstanding balance.  For construction loans, inaccurate initial estimates of a project’s costs and the property’s completed value could weaken the Company’s position and lead to the property having a value that is insufficient to satisfy full payment of the amount of funds advanced for the property.  Secured and unsecured consumer loans generally are made for automobiles, boats, and other motor vehicles.  In most cases, loans are restricted to Kentucky Bank’s general market area.

 

Other Products:  Kentucky Bank offers its customers a variety of other services, including checking, savings, money market accounts, certificates of deposits, safe deposit facilities, credit cards and other consumer-oriented financial services.  Kentucky Bank has Internet banking, including bill payment available to its customers at www.kybank.com.  Through its Wealth Management Department, Kentucky Bank provides brokerage services, annuities, life and long term care insurance, personal trust and agency services (including management agency services).

 

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Competition and Market Served

 

Competition: The banking business is highly competitive.  Competition arises from a number of sources, including other bank holding companies and commercial banks, consumer finance companies, thrift institutions, other financial institutions and financial intermediaries.  In addition to commercial banks, savings and loan associations, savings banks and credit unions actively compete to provide a wide variety of banking services.  Mortgage banking firms, finance companies, insurance companies, brokerage companies, financial affiliates of industrial companies and government agencies provide additional competition for loans and for many other financial services.  Kentucky Bank also currently competes for interest-bearing funds with a number of other financial intermediaries, including brokerage firms and mutual funds, which offer a diverse range of investment alternatives.  Some of the Company’s competitors are not subject to the same degree of regulatory review and restrictions that apply to the Company and its subsidiary bank.  In addition, the Company must compete with much larger financial institutions that have greater financial resources than the Company.

 

Market Served.  We primarily conduct our business in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  Our primary market areas consist of Bourbon, Clark, Elliott, Fayette, Harrison, Jessamine, Madison, Rowan, Scott, Woodford and surrounding counties in Kentucky.  Per capita personal income for Kentucky increased from $38,989 in 2015 to $39,641 in 2016, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the unemployment rate in Kentucky has declined. The unemployment rate in Kentucky is 4.8% for December of 2016, compared to 5.7% for December of 2015.

 

Supervision and Regulation

 

Governing Regulatory Institutions:  As a bank holding company, the Company is subject to the regulation and supervision of the Federal Reserve Board.  The Company’s subsidiary bank is subject to supervision and regulation by applicable state and federal banking agencies, including the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions.  Kentucky Bank is also subject to various requirements and restrictions under federal and state law, including requirements to maintain reserves against deposits, restrictions on the types and amounts of loans that may be granted and the interest that may be charged thereon, and limitations on the types of investments that may be made and the types of services that may be offered.  In addition to the impact of regulation, Kentucky Bank is affected significantly by the actions of the Federal Reserve Board as it attempts to control the money supply and credit availability in order to influence the economy.  The company also has a captive insurance subsidiary which is regulated by the State of Nevada Division of Insurance.

 

Laws Protecting Deposits:  There are a number of obligations and restrictions imposed on bank holding companies and their depository institution subsidiaries by federal law and regulatory policy.  These obligations and restrictions are designed to reduce potential loss exposure to the depositors of such depository institutions and to the FDIC insured funds in the event the depository institution becomes in danger of default or is in default.  For example, under a policy of the Federal Reserve Board with respect to bank holding company operations, a bank holding company is required to serve as a source of financial strength to its subsidiary depository institutions and commit resources to support such institutions in circumstances where it might not do so absent such policy.  In addition, the “cross-guarantee” provisions of federal law require insured depository institutions under common control to reimburse the FDIC for any loss suffered or reasonably anticipated as a result of the default of a commonly controlled insured depository institution or for any assistance provided by the FDIC to a commonly controlled insured depository institution in danger of default.

 

The federal banking agencies also have broad powers under current federal law to take prompt corrective action to resolve problems of insured depository institutions.  The extent of these powers depends upon whether the institutions in question are “well capitalized”, “adequately capitalized”, “undercapitalized”, “significantly undercapitalized” or “critically undercapitalized”, as such terms are defined under uniform regulation defining such capital levels issued by each of the federal banking agencies.

 

 

Capital and Liquidity:  On July 2, 2013, the Federal Reserve approved final rules known as the “Basel III Capital Rules” substantially revising the risk-based capital and leverage capital requirements applicable to bank holding companies and depository institutions.  The Basel III Capital Rules address the components of capital and other issues affecting the numerator in banking institutions’ regulatory capital ratios. Certain of the Basel III Capital Rules came into effect for the Company and Kentucky Bank on January 1, 2015; these rules are subject to a phase-in period which began on January 1, 2015.

 

Under the current rules, which were effective January 1, 2015, the Company is subject to additional capital requirements that include: (i) creation of a new required ratio for common equity Tier 1 (“CET1”) capital, (ii) an increase to the minimum Tier 1 Risk-based Capital ratio, (iii) changes to risk-weightings of certain assets for purposes of the risk-based capital ratios, (iv) creation of an additional capital conservation buffer in excess of the required minimum capital ratios, and (v) changes to what qualifies as capital for purposes of meeting these capital requirements.

 

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When fully phased-in on January 1, 2019, the Basel III Capital Rules will require banking organizations to maintain:

 

·

a minimum ratio of CET1 to risk-weighted assets of at least 4.5%, plus a 2.5% “capital conservation buffer” (which is added to the 4.5% CET1 ratio as that buffer is phased-in, effectively resulting in a minimum ratio of CET1 to risk-weighted assets of at least 7.0% upon full implementation);

 

·

a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of at least 6.0%, plus the 2.5% capital conservation buffer (which is added to the 6.0% Tier 1 capital ratio as that buffer is phased-in, effectively resulting in a minimum Tier 1 capital ratio of 8.5% upon full implementation);

 

·

a minimum ratio of total capital (that is, Tier 1 plus Tier 2 capital) to risk-weighted assets of at least 8.0%, plus the 2.5% capital conservation buffer (which is added to the 8.0% total capital ratio as that buffer is phased-in, effectively resulting in a minimum total capital ratio of 10.5% upon full implementation); and

 

·

a minimum leverage ratio of 4.0%, calculated as the ratio of Tier 1 capital to adjusted average consolidated assets.

 

The Basel III Capital Rules also provide for a “countercyclical capital buffer” that is applicable to only certain covered institutions and is not expected to have any current applicability to the Company or Kentucky Bank.

 

The aforementioned capital conservation buffer is designed to absorb losses during periods of economic stress. Banking institutions with a ratio of CET1 to risk-weighted assets above the minimum but below the conservation buffer will face limitations on the payment of dividends, common stock repurchases and discretionary cash payments to executive officers based on the amount of the shortfall.

 

The Basel III Capital Rules provides for a number of deductions from and adjustments to CET1. These include, for example, the requirement that mortgage servicing rights, deferred tax assets dependent upon future taxable income and significant investments in non-consolidated financial entities be deducted from CET1 to the extent that any one such category exceeds 10% of CET1 or all such categories in the aggregate exceed 15% of CET1.  Under the Basel III Capital Rules, the Company and Kentucky Bank were given a one-time election (“Opt-out Election”) to filter certain accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) components, comparable to the treatment under the current general risk-based capital rule. The Company and Kentucky Bank elected to choose the AOCI Opt-out Election.

 

Implementation of the deductions and other adjustments to CET1 began on January 1, 2015 and will be phased-in over a five-year period (20% per year). The implementation of the capital conservation buffer will begin on January 1, 2016 at the 0.625% level and be phased-in over a four-year period (increasing by that amount on each subsequent January 1, until it reaches 2.5% on January 1, 2019).  In addition, the Basel III Capital Rules revise the rules for calculating risk-weighted assets to enhance their risk sensitivity. They establish a new framework under which mortgage-backed securities and other securitization exposures will be subject to risk-weights ranging from 20% to 1,250%. The rules also establish adjusted risk-weights for credit exposures, including multi-family and commercial real estate exposures that are 90 days or more past due or on non-accrual, which will be subject to a 150% risk-weight, except in situations where qualifying collateral and/or guarantees are in place. The existing treatment of residential mortgage exposures will remain subject to either a 50% risk-weight (for prudently underwritten owner-occupied first liens that are current or less than 90 days past due) or a 100% risk-weight (for all other residential mortgage exposures including 90 days or more past due exposures).  As shown in Note 19, the Company and Kentucky Bank meet all capital adequacy requirements, and management does not anticipate any adverse impact from the implementation of the new capital ratio.

 

Deposit Insurance:  The Company is subject to several deposit insurance assessments, which are described below:

 

FDIC Assessments.  The Company’s subsidiary bank is a member of the FDIC, and its deposits are insured by the FDIC’s Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”) up to the amount permitted by law.  The Company’s subsidiary bank is thus subject to FDIC deposit insurance assessments.  The FDIC utilizes a risk-based assessment system that imposes insurance premiums based upon a risk matrix that takes into account a bank’s capital level and supervisory rating.

 

The assessment base must, with some possible exceptions, equal average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity.  The FDIC has adopted a DIF restoration plan to ensure that the reserve ratio increases to 1.35% from 1.15% of insured deposits by 2020.

 

Financing Corporation (“FICO”) Assessments.  FICO assessment costs were $50 thousand in 2016, $47 thousand in 2015 and $44 thousand for 2014.  FICO is a mixed-ownership government corporation established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 possessing assessment powers in addition to the FDIC.  The FDIC acts as a collection agent for FICO, whose sole purpose is to function as a financing vehicle for the now defunct Federal Savings & Loan Insurance Corporation.  Outstanding FICO bonds, which are 30-year noncallable bonds, mature in 2017 through 2019.

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Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”):  Dodd-Frank was signed into law by the President on July 21, 2010, and represents a significant change in the American financial regulatory environment affecting all Federal financial regulatory agencies and affecting almost every aspect of the nation’s financial services industry.  Dodd-Frank includes, among others, the following:

 

·

the creation of a Financial Stability Oversight Counsel to identify emerging systemic risks and improve interagency cooperation;

·

the establishment of the same or strengthened capital and liquidity requirements for bank holding companies that apply to insured depository institutions;

·

restrictions in proprietary trading and investing in or sponsoring of any hedge fund or private equity fund;

·

the establishment of minimum credit risk retention requirements relating to securitizations;

·

the establishment of detailed asset-level and data-level disclosure requirements relating to loan brokers and originators;

·

codification and expansion of the “source of strength” doctrine as a statutory requirement.  The source of strength doctrine represents the long held policy view by the Federal Reserve that a bank holding company should serve as a source of financial strength for its subsidiary banks;

·

a permanent increase of FDIC deposit insurance to $250,000;

·

authorization for financial institutions to pay interest on business checking accounts;

·

changes in the calculation of FDIC deposit insurance assessments;

·

expanded restrictions on transactions with affiliates and insiders under Section 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and lending limits for derivative transactions, repurchase agreements and securities lending and borrowing transactions;

·

provisions for new disclosure and other requirements regarding corporate governance and executive compensation;

·

the creation of a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which is authorized to promulgate consumer protection regulations relating to bank and non-bank financial products and examine and enforce these regulations on institutions with more than $10 billion in assets.

 

Volcker Rule:  On December 10, 2013, in implementing section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Act, the final Volcker Rule was approved by the OCC, the Federal Reserve, the FDIC, the SEC, and the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”).  The Volcker Rule attempts to reduce risk and banking system instability by restricting U.S. banks from investing in or engaging in proprietary trading and speculation and imposing a strict framework to justify exemptions for underwriting, market making and hedging activities.  U.S. banks will be restricted from investing in funds with collateral comprised of less than 100% loans that are not registered with the SEC and from engaging in hedging activities that do not hedge a specific identified risk.  The Volcker Rule has not had a significant effect on operations of the Company.

 

Several of the requirements of Dodd-Frank still need to be implemented.  These requirements will be subject to regulations to be implemented, which will not become fully effective for several years.

 

Consumer Regulations:  In addition to the laws and regulations discussed above, Kentucky Bank is also subject to certain consumer laws and regulations that are designed to protect consumers in transactions with banks.  While the list set forth herein is not exhaustive, these laws and regulations include the Truth in Lending Act, the Truth in Savings Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, the Fair Housing Act and the Fair and Accurate Transactions Act, among others.  These laws and regulations mandate certain disclosure requirements and regulate the manner in which financial institutions must deal with clients when taking deposits or making loans. These laws also limit Kentucky Bank’s ability to share information with affiliated and unaffiliated entities.  The bank must comply with the applicable provisions of these consumer protection laws and regulations as part of its ongoing business operations.

 

Dividend Restrictions:  There are various legal and regulatory limits on the extent to which the Company’s subsidiary bank may pay dividends or otherwise supply funds to the Company.  In addition, federal and state regulatory agencies also have the authority to prevent a bank or bank holding company from paying a dividend or engaging in any other activity that, in the opinion of the agency, would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice.  Dividends paid by the subsidiary bank have provided substantially all of the Company’s operating funds, and this may reasonably be expected to continue for the foreseeable future.

 

Employees

 

At December 31, 2016, the number of full time equivalent employees of the Company was 241.

 

Nature of Company’s Business

 

The business of the Company is not seasonal.  The Company’s business does not depend upon a single customer, or a few customers, the loss of any one or more of which would have material adverse effect on the Company.

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No material portion of the Company’s business is subject to renegotiation of profits or termination of contracts or subcontracts at the election of any governmental entity.

 

Available Information

 

The Company files annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) pursuant to section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

The public may read and copy any material the Company files with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC  20549 and may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.  The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC on its website at www.sec.gov.  The Company’s website is located at www.kybank.com.

 

Item 1A.  Risk Factors

 

There are factors, many beyond our control, which may significantly affect the Company’s financial position and results of operations.  Some of these factors are described below in the sections titled financial risk, business risk and operational risk.  These risks are not totally independent of each other; some factors affect more than one type of risk.  These include regulatory, economic, and competitive environments.  As part of the annual internal audit plan, our risk management department meets with management to assess these risks throughout the Company.  Many risks are further addressed in other sections of this Form 10-K document.  Additional risks and uncertainties that management is not aware of or focused on or that management currently deems immaterial may also impair the Company’s business operations.  This report is qualified in its entirety by these risk factors.

 

Industry Risk

 

Industry risk includes risks that affect the entire banking service industry.

 

Significant decline in general economic conditions will negatively affect the financial results of our banking operations.  Kentucky Bank serves both individuals and business customers throughout Central and Eastern Kentucky. The substantial majority of our loan portfolio is to individuals and businesses in these markets. As a result, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows are affected by local and regional economic conditions. A downturn in these economies could have a negative impact on us and the ability of Kentucky Bank’s customers to repay their loans. The value of the collateral securing loans to borrowers may also decline as the economy declines. As a result, deteriorating economic conditions in these markets could cause a decline in the overall quality of our loan portfolio requiring us to charge-off a higher percentage of loans and/or increase its allowance for loan losses. A decline in economic conditions in these markets may also force customers to utilize deposits held by Kentucky Bank in order to pay current expenses causing Kentucky Bank’s deposit base to shrink. As a result Kentucky Bank may have to borrow funds at higher rates in order to meet liquidity needs. These events may have a negative impact on our earnings and financial condition.

 

Significant declines in U.S. and global markets could have a negative impact on our earnings. The capital and credit markets could experience extreme disruption. These conditions result in less liquidity, greater volatility, widening of credit spreads and a lack of price transparency in certain asset types. In many cases, markets could exert downward pressure on stock prices, security prices and credit capacity for certain issuers without regard to those issuers’ underlying financial strength. Sustained weakness in business and economic conditions in any or all of the domestic or foreign financial markets could result in credit deterioration in investment securities held by us, rating agency downgrades for such securities or other market factors that (such as lack of liquidity for re-sales, absence of reliable pricing information or unanticipated changes in the competitive market) could result in us having to recognize other-than-temporary impairment in the value of such investment securities, with a corresponding charge against earnings.  If the markets deteriorate further, these conditions may be material to our ability to access capital and may adversely impact results of operations.

Further, Kentucky Bank’s trust and investment services income could be impacted by fluctuations in the securities market. A portion of this revenue is based on the value of the underlying investment portfolios. If the values of those investment portfolios decline, Kentucky Bank’s revenue could be negatively impacted.

The exercise of regulatory power may have negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.  We are subject to extensive federal and state regulation, supervision and examination. Banking regulations are primarily intended to protect depositors’ funds, federal deposit insurance funds and the banking system as a whole, rather than corporate shareholders. These regulations affect our lending practices, capital structure, investment practices, dividend policy, operations and growth, among other things. These regulations also impose obligations to maintain appropriate policies, procedure and controls. Congress and federal regulatory agencies continually review banking laws, regulations and policies for possible changes. Changes to statutes, regulations or regulatory policies, including changes in interpretation or implementation of statutes, regulations or policies, could affect us in substantial and unpredictable ways.

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Such changes could subject us to additional costs, limit the types of financial services and products that could be offered, and/or increase the ability of non-banks to offer competing financial services and products, among other things. Failure to comply with laws, regulations or policies could result in sanctions by regulatory agencies, civil penalties and/or reputation damage, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and result of operations.

Regulation of the Company and our subsidiaries is expected to continue to expand in scope and complexity in the future. These laws are expected to have the effect of increasing our costs of doing business and reducing our revenues, and may limit our ability to pursue business opportunities or otherwise adversely affect our business and financial condition. The Dodd-Frank Act and other laws, as well as rules implementing or related to them, may adversely affect us. Specifically, any governmental or regulatory action having the effect of requiring us to obtain additional capital could reduce earnings and have a material dilutive effect on current shareholders, including the Dodd-Frank Act source of strength requirement that bank holding companies make capital infusions into a troubled subsidiary bank. Legislation and regulation of debit card fees, credit cards and other bank services, as well as changes in our practices relating to those and other bank services, may affect our revenue and other financial results. Additional information about increased regulation is provided in “Item 1. Business” under the heading “Supervision and Regulation.”

We are also subject to tax laws and regulations promulgated by the United States government and the states in which it operates. Changes to these laws and regulations or the interpretations of such laws and regulations by taxing authorities could impact future tax expense and the value of deferred tax assets.

A new accounting standard will result in a significant change in how we recognize credit losses and may have a material impact on our financial condition or results of operationsIn June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standard update, “Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326), Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments,” which replaces the current “incurred loss” model for recognizing credit losses with an “expected loss” model referred to as the Current Expected Credit Loss (“CECL”) model. Under the CECL model, we will be required to present certain financial assets carried at amortized cost, such as loans held for investment and held-to-maturity debt securities, at the net amount expected to be collected. The measurement of expected credit losses is to be based on information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount. This measurement will take place at the time the financial asset is first added to the balance sheet and periodically thereafter. This differs significantly from the “incurred loss” model required under current generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), which delays recognition until it is probable a loss has been incurred. Accordingly, we expect that the adoption of the CECL model will materially affect how we determine our allowance for loan losses and could require us to significantly increase our allowance. Moreover, the CECL model may create more volatility in the level of our allowance for loan losses. If we are required to materially increase our level of allowance for loan losses for any reason, such increase could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The new CECL standard will become effective for us for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 and for interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the impact the CECL model will have on our accounting, but we expect to recognize a one-time cumulative-effect adjustment to our allowance for loan losses as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the new standard is effective, consistent with regulatory expectations set forth in interagency guidance issued at the end of 2016. We cannot yet determine the magnitude of any such one-time cumulative adjustment or of the overall impact of the new standard on our financial condition or results of operations.

 

Deposit insurance premiums levied against the Company may increase if the number of bank failures increase or the cost of resolving failed banks increases.  The FDIC maintains a DIF to protect insured depositors in the event of bank failures. The DIF is funded by fees assessed on insured depository institutions including Kentucky Bank.  Future deposit premiums paid by Kentucky Bank depend on the level of the DIF and the magnitude and cost of future bank failures. Kentucky Bank may be required to pay significantly higher FDIC premiums if market developments change such that the DIF balance is reduced.

 

Increased competition from other providers may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.  We face vigorous competition from banks and other financial institutions.  This competition may reduce or limit our margins on banking services, reduce market share and adversely affect results of operations and financial condition.

 

Many other banks and financial institutions have substantially greater resources and lending limits, larger branch systems and a wider array of banking services.  Additionally, we encounter competition from both de novo and smaller community banks entering the markets we are currently in.  We also compete with other providers of financial services, such as money market mutual funds, brokerage firms, consumer finance companies and insurance companies.

 

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Changes in consumer use of banks and changes in consumer spending and saving habits could adversely affect our financial results.  Technology and other changes now allow many consumers to complete financial transactions without using banks. For example, consumers can pay bills and transfer funds directly without going through a bank and can access loans through lending groups and other non-regulated entities. This “disintermediation” could result in the loss of fee and interest income, as well as the loss of customer deposits and income generated from those deposits. In addition, changes in consumer spending and saving habits could adversely affect our operations, and we may be unable to timely develop competitive new products and services in response to these changes that are accepted by new and existing customers.

 

Financial Risk

 

Financial risk components include, but are not limited to, credit risk, interest rate risk, goodwill impairment, market risk and liquidity risk.  We have adopted various policies to minimize potential adverse effects of interest rate, market and liquidity risks.  However, even with these policies in place, a change in interest rates could negatively impact our results of operations or financial position.

 

Defaults in the repayment of loans may negatively impact our business.  Credit risk is most closely associated with lending activities at financial institutions.  Credit risk is the risk to earnings and capital when a customer fails to meet the terms of any contract or otherwise fails to perform as agreed.  Credit risk arises from all activities where the Company is dependent on issuer, borrower, or counterparty performance, not just traditional lending activities.  For example, the investment security portfolio has inherent credit risk as do counterparties in derivative contracts.  Credit risk encompasses a broad range of financial institution activities and includes items reflected both on and off the balance sheet.

 

Management makes various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of its borrowers and the value of real estate and other assets serving as collateral for repayment of many of the loans.  In determining the size of the allowance for loan losses, management considers, among other factors, the Company’s loan loss experience and an evaluation of economic conditions.  If these assumptions prove to be incorrect, the current allowance may not be sufficient to cover future loan losses and adjustments may be necessary to allow for different economic conditions or adverse developments in the loan portfolio.  Material additions to the Company’s allowance would materially decrease our net income.

 

Fluctuations in interest rates may negatively impact our banking business.  Interest rate risk focuses on the impact to earnings and capital arising from movements in interest rates.  Interest rate risk focuses on the value implications for accrual portfolios (e.g., available-for-sale portfolios) and includes the potential impact to the Company’s accrual earnings as well as the economic perspective of the market value of portfolio equity.  The interest rate risk is comprised of repricing risk, basis risk, yield curve risk and options risk.  Repricing risk represents the risk associated with the differences in timing of cash flows and rate changes with our products.  Basis risk represents the risk associated with changing rate relationships among varying yield curves.  Yield curve risk is associated with changing rate relationships over the maturity structure.  Options risk is associated with interest-related options, which are embedded in our products.

 

Changes in market multiples may negatively affect the value of Goodwill.  Goodwill resulting from business combinations prior to January 1, 2009 represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net assets of businesses acquired.  Goodwill resulting from business combinations after January 1, 2009, is generally determined as the excess of the fair value of the consideration transferred, plus the fair value of any noncontrolling interests in the acquiree, over the fair value of the net assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date.  Goodwill and intangible assets acquired in a purchase business combination and determined to have an indefinite useful life are not amortized, but tested for impairment at least annually.  The Company has selected December 31 as the date to perform the annual impairment test.  Intangible assets with definite useful lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives to their estimated residual values.  Goodwill is the only intangible asset with an indefinite life on our balance sheet.  At a minimum, management is required to assess goodwill and other intangible assets annually for impairment.  This assessment involves estimating cash flows for future periods, preparing analyses of market multiples for similar operations, and estimating the fair value of the reporting unit to which the goodwill is allocated.  If these variables change negatively, the Company would be required to take a charge against earnings to write down the asset to the lower fair value.

 

Changes in market factors may negatively affect the value of our investment assetsMarket risk focuses on the impact to earnings and capital arising from changes in market factors (e.g., interest rates, market liquidity, volatilities, etc.) that affect the value of traded instruments.  Market risk includes items reflected both on and off the balance sheet.  Market risk focuses primarily on mark-to-market portfolios (e.g., accounts revalued for financial statement presentation).

 

Our inability to maintain appropriate levels of liquidity may have a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.  Liquidity risk focuses on the impact to earnings and capital resulting from our inability to meet our obligations as they become due in the normal course of business without incurring significant losses.  It also includes the management of unplanned decreases or changes in funding sources as well as managing changes in market conditions, which could affect the ability to liquidate assets in the normal course of business without incurring significant losses.  Liquidity risk includes items both on and off the balance sheet.

 

 

8


 

Our results of operations and financial condition may be negatively affected if we are unable to meet a debt covenant and, correspondingly, unable to obtain a waiver regarding the debt covenant from the lender.  From time to time we may obtain financing from other lenders.  The loan documents reflecting the financing often require us to meet various debt covenants.  If we are unable to meet one or more of our debt covenants, then we will typically attempt to obtain a waiver from the lender.  If the lender does not agree to a waiver, then we will be in default under our borrowing obligation.  This default could affect our ability to fund various strategies that we may have implemented resulting in a negative impact in our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Business Risk

 

Business risk is composed mainly of legal (compliance) risk, strategic risk and reputation risk.

 

Our results of operations and financial condition are susceptible to legal or compliance risks.  Legal or compliance risk is the risk to earnings or capital arising from the impact of unenforceable contracts, lawsuits, adverse judgments, violations or nonconformance with laws, rules, regulations, prescribed practices, or ethical standards.  The risk also arises in situations where laws or rules governing certain products or activities of our customers may be ambiguous or untested.  This risk is not limited to the traditional thinking that legal/compliance risk is only associated with consumer protection laws.  It includes the exposure to litigation from all aspects of both traditional and nontraditional financial institution activities.

 

Incorrect strategic decisions may have a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Adverse publicity may have a negative impact on our business. Reputation risk is the risk to earnings and capital arising from negative public opinion.  This affects the ability to establish new relationships or services or to continue servicing existing relationships.  Examiners will assess reputation risk by recognizing the potential effect the public’s opinion could have on our franchise value.

 

Operational Risk

 

Because the nature of the financial services business involves a high volume of transactions, we face significant operational risks.  Operational risk is the risk of loss resulting from our operations, including, but not limited to, the risk of fraud by employees or persons outside of the Company, the execution of unauthorized transactions by employees, errors relating to transaction processing and technology, breaches of the internal control system and compliance requirements and business continuation and disaster recovery.

This risk of loss also includes the potential legal actions that could arise as a result of an operational deficiency or as a result of noncompliance with applicable regulatory standards, adverse business decisions or their implementation, and customer attrition due to potential negative publicity.

 

In the event of a breakdown in the internal control system, improper operation of systems or improper employee actions, we could suffer financial loss, face regulatory action and suffer damage to its reputation.

 

Technology Risk

 

Systems failure, interruption or breach of security may have a negative impact on our business.  Communications and information systems are essential to the conduct of Kentucky Bank’s business, as such systems are used to manage customer relationships, deposits, loans, general ledger accounts, financial reporting and regulatory compliance.  While Kentucky Bank has established policies and procedures to prevent or limit the impact of systems failures, interruptions, and security breaches, there can be no assurance that such events will not occur or that they will be adequately addressed if they do.  In addition, any compromise of Kentucky Bank’s information security systems could deter customers from using Kentucky Bank’s web site and its internet banking service, both of which involve the transmission of confidential information.  

Although Kentucky Bank relies on commonly used security and processing systems to provide the security and authentication necessary to ensure the secure transmission and processing of data, these precautions may not protect our systems from all compromises or breaches of security.

 

The business continuity of third-party providers may have a negative impact on our technology operations.  Kentucky Bank outsources certain of its data processing to third-party providers.  If third-party providers encounter difficulties, or if the Bank has difficulty communicating with them, Kentucky Bank’s ability to adequately process and account for customer transactions could be affected, and its business operations could be adversely impacted.  Threats to information security also exist in the processing of customer information through various other vendors and their personnel.

 

We and our subsidiary bank have addressed technology risks through the use of logon and user access controls, transaction limits, firewalls, antivirus software, intrusion protection monitoring and third party vulnerability scans.  Systems failure or interruption has been addressed by adopting a disaster recovery and contingency plan.  In addition, for all third-party providers of data processing services, we obtain and review audit reports prepared by independent registered public accounting firms regarding their financial condition and the effectiveness of their internal controls.

 

9


 

Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None.

 

Item 2.  Properties

 

The Company’s corporate headquarters is located at 339 Main Street, Paris, KY 40361, which it owns.  The main banking office of Kentucky Bank is located at 401 Main Street, Paris, Kentucky 40361.  In addition, Kentucky Bank serves customer needs at 16 other locations.  All locations offer a full range of banking services.  Kentucky Bank owns all of the properties at which it conducts its business with the exception of the Lexington and Richmond locations.  The Company owns approximately 100,000 square feet of office space and leases approximately 9,800 square feet of office space.

 

Note 6 to the Company’s audited and consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 (“2016 Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes”) contains additional information relating to amounts invested in premises and equipment.

 

Kentucky Bank Banking Offices

 

Owned

 

401 Main Street, Paris, KY 40361

2021 South Main Street, Paris, KY 40361

24 West Lexington Avenue, Winchester, KY 40391

1975 By Pass Road, Winchester, KY 40391

144 South KY 7, Sandy Hook, KY 41171

939 US Hwy 27 South, Cynthiana, KY 41031

920 North Main Street, Nicholasville, KY 40356

108 East Main Street, Wilmore, KY 40390

400 West First Street, Morehead, KY 40351

1500 Flemingsburg Road, Morehead, KY 40351

260 Blossom Park Drive, Georgetown, KY 40324

103 West Showalter Drive, Georgetown, KY 40324

520 Marsailles Road, Versailles, KY 40383

 

 

Leased

 

360 East Vine Street, Suite 100, Lexington, KY 40507

1001 Gibson Bay Drive, Suite 101, Richmond, KY 40475

680 Dwight Drive Richmond, KY 40475, Richmond, KY 40475

724 West Main Street, Richmond, KY 40475

 

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings

 

None to report.

 

 

PART II

 

Item 5.  Market for Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters

 

Market Information

 

There is no established public trading market for the Company’s Common Stock.  The Company’s Common Stock is not listed on any national securities exchange.  However, it is traded on OTCQX under the symbol “KTYB”.  Trading in the Common Stock has been infrequent, with retail brokerage firms making the market.

 

10


 

The following table sets forth the high and low closing sales prices of the Common Stock from the OTC Bulletin Board and the dividends declared thereon, for the periods indicated as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

High

    

Low

    

Dividend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

Quarter 4

 

$

32.65

 

$

30.01

 

$

0.27

 

 

 

Quarter 3

 

 

31.00

 

 

27.00

 

 

0.27

 

 

 

Quarter 2

 

 

28.00

 

 

26.41

 

 

0.27

 

 

 

Quarter 1

 

 

29.65

 

 

26.01

 

 

0.27

 

2015

 

Quarter 4

 

$

30.19

 

$

29.54

 

$

0.26

 

 

 

Quarter 3

 

 

33.00

 

 

30.05

 

 

0.26

 

 

 

Quarter 2

 

 

32.35

 

 

27.75

 

 

0.26

 

 

 

Quarter 1

 

 

28.15

 

 

27.00

 

 

0.26

 

 

Note 16 to the Company’s 2016 Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes included Item 8 contains additional information relating to amounts available to be paid as dividends.

 

Holders

 

As of December 31, 2016 the Company had 2,973,232 shares of Common Stock outstanding and approximately 563 holders of record of its Common Stock.

 

Dividends

 

During 2016 and 2015, the Corporation declared quarterly cash dividends aggregating $1.08 and $1.04 per share, respectively.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliates Purchasers

 

The table below lists issuer purchases of equity securities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

(a)

    

 

    

(c) Total Number

    

(d) Maximum Number

 

 

 

Total

 

(b) 

 

of Shares (or Units) 

 

(or Approximate Dollar

 

 

 

Number of

 

Average

 

Purchased as Part 

 

Value) of Shares (or

 

 

 

Shares (or

 

Price Paid

 

of Publicly

 

Units) that May Yet Be

 

 

 

Units)

 

Per Share

 

Announced Plans

 

Purchased Under the

 

Period

 

Purchased

 

(or Unit)

 

Or Programs

 

Plans or Programs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10/1/16 - 10/31/16

 

3,000

 

$
31.05

 

3,000

 

69,480 shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/1/16 - 11/30/16

 

 

 

 

119,480 shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12/1/16 - 12/31/16

 

9,538

 

29.17

 

9,538

 

109,942 shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

12,538

 

$
29.62

 

12,538

 

109,942 shares

 

 

On October 25, 2000, the Company announced that its Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program.  The Company was authorized to purchase up to 100,000 shares of its outstanding common stock.  On November 11, 2002, the Board of Directors approved and authorized the Company’s repurchase of an additional 100,000 shares.  On May 20, 2008, the Board of Directors approved and authorized the purchase of an additional 100,000 shares.  On May 17, 2011, the Board of Directors approved and authorized the Company’s repurchase of an additional 100,000 shares. On November 18, 2016, the Board of Directors approved and authorized the Company’s repurchase of an additional 50,000 shares.   Shares will be purchased from time to time in the open market depending on market prices and other considerations.

 

Through December 31, 2016, 340,058 shares have been purchased, with the most recent share repurchase under the Board-approved stock repurchase program having occurred on December 15, 2016.

 

11


 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding Company compensations plans under which equity securities of the company are authorized for issuance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

    

    

    

    

No. of securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remaining available

 

 

 

Number of securities

 

 

 

for future issuance

 

 

 

to be issued

 

Weighted average

 

under equity

 

 

 

upon exercise of

 

exercise price of

 

compensation plans

 

 

 

outstanding options,

 

outstanding options

 

(excluding securities

 

Plan category

 

warrants and rights

 

warrants and rights

 

reflected in column 1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plans Approved By Stockholders:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1999 Nonemployee Directors Stock Ownership Incen- tive Plan

 

1,200

 

$
31.00

 

 —

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2005 Stock Award Plan

 

 —

 

 —

 

1,069

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2009 Stock Award Plan

 

 —

 

 —

 

140,378

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12


 

Performance Graph

 

The information included under the caption “Performance Graph” in this Item 5 of this Form 10-K is not deemed to be “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filings we make under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except to the extent we specifically incorporate it by reference into such a filing.

 

The graph below matches Kentucky Bancshares Inc's cumulative 5-Year total shareholder return on common stock with the cumulative total returns of the Russell MicroCap index and the NASDAQ Bank index. The graph tracks he performance of a $100 investment in our common stock and in each index (with the reinvestment of all dividends) from 12/31/2011 to 12/31/2016.

 

Picture 2

 

13


 

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data (in thousands except per share data)

The following selected financial data should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements and the accompanying notes presented in Item 8.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At or For the Year ended December 31,

 

 

  

2016

  

2015

  

2014

  

2013

  

2012

 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF INCOME:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Interest Income

 

$

36,554

 

$

33,185

 

$

29,731

 

$

28,168

 

$

28,233

 

Total Interest Expense

 

 

4,426

 

 

4,050

 

 

3,756

 

 

3,456

 

 

3,716

 

Net Interest Income

 

 

32,128

 

 

29,135

 

 

25,975

 

 

24,712

 

 

24,517

 

Provision for Losses

 

 

1,150

 

 

1,450

 

 

950

 

 

1,050

 

 

2,050

 

Net Interest Income After Provision for Losses

 

 

30,978

 

 

27,685

 

 

25,025

 

 

23,662

 

 

22,467

 

Noninterest Income

 

 

12,149

 

 

11,484

 

 

10,158

 

 

10,222

 

 

11,870

 

Noninterest Expense

 

 

33,785

 

 

31,807

 

 

27,215

 

 

27,203

 

 

25,686

 

Income Before Income Tax Expense

 

 

9,342

 

 

7,362

 

 

7,968

 

 

6,681

 

 

8,651

 

Income Tax Expense

 

 

773

 

 

530

 

 

897

 

 

859

 

 

1,643

 

Net Income

 

 

8,569

 

 

6,832

 

 

7,071

 

 

5,822

 

 

7,008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SHARE DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Earnings per Share (EPS)

 

$

2.87

 

$

2.40

 

$

2.60

 

$

2.15

 

$

2.59

 

Diluted EPS

 

 

2.87

 

 

2.40

 

 

2.60

 

 

2.15

 

 

2.59

 

Cash Dividends Declared

 

 

1.08

 

 

1.04

 

 

1.00

 

 

0.96

 

 

0.92

 

Book Value

 

 

31.27

 

 

29.62

 

 

28.65

 

 

24.90

 

 

27.21

 

Average Common Shares-Basic

 

 

2,991

 

 

2,823

 

 

2,721

 

 

2,705

 

 

2,705

 

Average Common Shares-Diluted

 

 

2,991

 

 

2,823

 

 

2,721

 

 

2,709

 

 

2,708

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SELECTED BALANCE SHEET DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans, net

 

$

648,466

 

$

617,600

 

$

532,293

 

$

463,214

 

$

423,928

 

Investment Securities

 

 

273,770

 

 

264,212

 

 

246,861

 

 

230,396

 

 

192,780

 

Trading Assets

 

 

5,592

 

 

5,531

 

 

5,370

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Total Assets

 

 

1,028,447

 

 

974,684

 

 

855,209

 

 

770,579

 

 

701,010

 

Deposits

 

 

802,981

 

 

758,981

 

 

654,869

 

 

617,400

 

 

590,425

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

 

20,873

 

 

18,514

 

 

12,457

 

 

12,867

 

 

4,315

 

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

 

92,500

 

 

87,833

 

 

93,785

 

 

57,847

 

 

17,449

 

Note Payable

 

 

4,090

 

 

4,794

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Subordinated Debentures

 

 

7,217

 

 

7,217

 

 

7,217

 

 

7,217

 

 

7,217

 

Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

92,972

 

 

89,413

 

 

77,942

 

 

67,672

 

 

74,009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERFORMANCE RATIOS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Average Balances)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return on Assets

 

 

0.86

%  

 

0.76

%  

 

0.89

%  

 

0.80

%  

 

1.03

%

Return on Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

9.10

%  

 

8.20

%  

 

9.50

%  

 

8.12

%  

 

9.70

%

Net Interest Margin (1)

 

 

3.60

%  

 

3.63

%  

 

3.69

%  

 

3.85

%  

 

4.19

%

Equity to Assets (annual average)

 

 

9.41

%  

 

9.25

%  

 

9.34

%  

 

9.84

%  

 

10.60

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SELECTED STATISTICAL DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividend Payout Ratio

 

 

37.68

%  

 

43.20

%  

 

38.48

%  

 

41.53

%  

 

35.71

%

Number of Employees (at period end)

 

 

241

 

 

243

 

 

215

 

 

208

 

 

193

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALLOWANCE COVERAGE RATIOS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allowance to Total Loans

 

 

1.15

%  

 

1.04

%  

 

1.12

%  

 

1.16

%  

 

1.41

%

Net Charge-offs as a Percentage of Average Loans

 

 

0.02

%  

 

0.16

%  

 

0.08

%  

 

0.37

%  

 

0.44

%


(1)

Tax equivalent

14


 

 

Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis

 

This section presents an analysis of the consolidated financial condition of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Kentucky Bank, at December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, and the consolidated results of operations for each of the years in the three year period ended December 31, 2016.  The following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the 2016 Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes included in Item 8.  When necessary, reclassifications have been made to prior years’ data throughout the following discussion and analysis for purposes of comparability with 2016 data.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Overview.  The accounting and reporting policies of the Company and its subsidiary are in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and conform to general practices within the banking industry.  Significant accounting policies are listed in Note 1 of the Company’s 2016 Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes included in Item 8.  Critical accounting and reporting policies include accounting for loans and the allowance for loan losses, goodwill and fair value.  Different assumptions in the application of these policies could result in material changes in the consolidated financial position or consolidated results of operations.

 

Loan Values and Allowance for Loan Losses.  Loans are stated at the amount of unpaid principal, reduced by an allowance for loan losses.  Interest on loans is recognized on the accrual basis, except for those loans on the nonaccrual status.  Interest income received on such loans is accounted for on the cash basis or cost recovery method.  The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for probable incurred credit losses.  Management estimates the allowance balance required using past loan loss experience, the nature and volume of the portfolio, information about specific borrower situations and estimated collateral values, economic conditions, and other factors.  The accounting policies relating to the allowance for loan losses involve the use of estimates and require significant judgments to be made by management.  The loan portfolio also represents the largest asset group on the consolidated balance sheets.  Additional information related to the allowance for loan losses that describes the methodology and risk factors can be found under the captions “Asset Quality” and “Loan Losses” in this management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operation, as well as Notes 1 and 4 of the Company’s 2016 Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes.

 

Goodwill.   Goodwill and intangible assets acquired in a purchase business combination and determined to have an indefinite useful life are not amortized, but tested for impairment at least annually.  The Company has selected December 31 as the date to perform the annual impairment test.  Intangible assets with definite useful lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives to their estimated residual values. Goodwill is the only intangible asset with an indefinite life on our balance sheet.

 

Fair Values.  Fair values of financial instruments are estimated using relevant market information and other assumptions, as more fully disclosed in the description of each asset and liability category in Note 17 of the Company’s 2016 Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes.  Fair value estimates involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment regarding interest rates, credit risk, prepayments, and other factors, especially in the absence of broad markets for particular items.  Changes in assumptions or in market conditions could significantly affect the estimates.

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This discussion contains forward-looking statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that involve risks and uncertainties.  Although the Company believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, any of the assumptions could be inaccurate, and therefore, there can be no assurance that the forward-looking statements included herein will prove to be accurate.  Factors that could cause actual results to differ from the results discussed in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:  economic conditions (both generally and more specifically in the markets, including the tobacco market, the thoroughbred horse industry and the automobile industry relating to Toyota vehicles, in which the Company and its bank operate); competition for the Company’s customers from other providers of financial and mortgage services; government legislation, regulation and monetary policy (which changes from time to time and over which the Company has no control); changes in interest rates (both generally and more specifically mortgage interest rates); material unforeseen changes in the liquidity, results of operations, or financial condition of the Company’s customers; and other risks detailed in Part 1, Item 1A “Risk Factors” in this report and other risks detailed in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond the control of the Company.  The Company undertakes no obligation to republish revised forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

 

Overview

 

We conduct our business through our one bank subsidiary, Kentucky Bank, and our one non-bank subsidiary KBI Insurance Company.  Kentucky Bank is engaged in general full-service commercial and consumer banking.  A significant part of Kentucky Bank’s operating activities include originating loans, approximately 81% of which are secured by real estate at December 31, 2016. 

15


 

Kentucky Bank makes commercial, agricultural and real estate loans to its commercial customers, with emphasis on small-to-medium-sized industrial, service and agricultural businesses.  It also makes residential mortgages, installment and other loans to its individual and other non-commercial customers.  Kentucky Bank’s primary market is Bourbon, Clark, Elliott, Fayette, Harrison, Jessamine, Madison, Rowan, Scott, Woodford and surrounding counties in Kentucky.  KBI Insurance Company is a captive insurance subsidiary and was incorporated in 2014.

 

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2016 was $8.6 million, or $2.87 per common share compared to $6.8 million, or $2.40 for 2015 and $7.1 million, or $2.60 for 2014.  Earnings per share assuming dilution were $2.87, $2.40 and $2.60 for 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  For 2016, net income increased $1.7 million, or 25.4%.  Net interest income increased $3.0 million, provision for loan losses decreased $300 thousand, total other income increased $665 thousand, while total other expenses increased $2.0 million and income tax expense increased $243 thousand.

 

For 2015, net income decreased $239 thousand, or 3.4%.  Net interest income increased $3.2 million, the provision for loan losses increased $500 thousand, total other income increased $1.4 million, while total other expenses increased $4.6 million and income tax expense decreased $367 thousand.

 

Return on average equity was 9.1% in 2016 compared to 8.2% in 2015 and 9.5% in 2014.  Return on average assets was 0.86% in 2016 compared to 0.76% in 2015 and 0.89% in 2014.

 

Non-performing loans as a percentage of loans (including held for sale) were 1.15%, 1.54% and 2.36% as of December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Net Interest Income

 

Net interest income, the Company’s largest source of revenue, on a tax equivalent basis increased from $27.6 million in 2014 to $30.7 million in 2015, and to $34.0 million in 2016.  The taxable equivalent adjustment (nontaxable interest income on state and municipal obligations net of the related non-deductible portion of interest expense) is based on our Federal income tax rate of 34%.

 

Average earning assets and interest bearing liabilities both increased from 2015 to 2016.  Average earning assets increased $97.9 million, or 11.6%.  Average investment securities increased $18.9 million and average loans increased $72.0 million, largely due to the acquisition of Madison Financial Corporation on July 24, 2015.  Average interest bearing liabilities increased $78.6 million, or 12.7% during this same period.  This change was mostly attributed to an increase of $65.9 million, or 13.2%, in interest bearing deposits, which ws partly attributed to the acquisition of Madison Financial Corporation on July 24, 2015.  Average borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank increased $3.3 million, or 3.6%.  The Company continues to actively pursue quality loans and fund these primarily with deposits and Federal Home Loan Bank advances.  Average Repurchase agreements and other borrowings increased $9.4 million or 35.7% from 2015 to 2016.

 

The bank prime rates remained unchanged from 2008 until December 2015 at which time they increased twenty-five basis points and increased another twenty-five basis points in December 2016.  The tax equivalent yield on earning assets decreased from 4.11% in 2015 to 4.07% in 2016.

 

The volume rate analysis for 2016 that follows indicates that $3.8 million of the increase in interest income is attributable to an increase in volume, while the change in rates contributed to a decrease of $461 thousand in interest income.  Further, an increase in interest bearing liability balances resulted in $375 thousand additional interest expense in 2016 compared to 2015.  The average rate of these liabilities decreased from 0.66% in 2015 to 0.64% in 2016.  In summary, the increase in the Company’s 2016 net interest income is attributed mostly to an increase in volume in the loan and security portfolios.

 

The volume rate analysis for 2015 that follows indicates that $4.1 million of the increase in interest income is attributable to an increase in volume, while the change in rates contributed to a decrease of $691 thousand in interest income. Further, decreases in rates caused a decrease in the cost of interest bearing liabilities. The average rate of these liabilities decreased from 0.68% in 2014 to 0.66% in 2015. Based on the volume rate analysis that follows, the lower level of interest rates contributed to a decrease of $235 thousand in interest expense and a change in volume contributed to a $530 thousand increase in interest expense. In summary, the increase in the Company’s 2015 net interest income is attributed mostly to an increase in volume in the loan and security portfolios and decreases in rates in time deposits and Federal Home Loan Bank advances.

 

The accompanying analysis of changes in net interest income in the following table shows the relationships of the volume and rate portions of these changes in 2016 vs. 2015 and 2015 vs. 2014.  Changes in interest income and expenses due to both rate and volume are allocated on a pro rata basis.

 

16


 

Changes in Interest Income and Expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

2016 vs. 2015

 

2015 vs. 2014

 

 

    

Increase

    

(Decrease)

    

Due to Change in

    

Increase

    

(Decrease)

    

Due to Change in

 

 

 

Volume

 

Rate

 

Net Change

 

Volume

 

Rate

 

Net Change

 

INTEREST INCOME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans

 

$

3,349

 

$

(413)

 

$

2,936

 

$

3,742

 

$

(535)

 

$

3,207

 

Investment Securities

 

 

438

 

 

(70)

 

 

368

 

 

399

 

 

(182)

 

 

217

 

Trading Assets

 

 

6

 

 

(23)

 

 

(17)

 

 

8

 

 

(6)

 

 

2

 

Federal Funds Sold and Securities Purchased under Agreements to Resell

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposits with Banks

 

 

36

 

 

43

 

 

79

 

 

(3)

 

 

32

 

 

29

 

Total Interest Income

 

 

3,829

 

 

(460)

 

 

3,369

 

 

4,146

 

 

(691)

 

 

3,455

 

INTEREST EXPENSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demand

 

 

101

 

 

140

 

 

241

 

 

44

 

 

22

 

 

66

 

Savings

 

 

12

 

 

(6)

 

 

6

 

 

11

 

 

(16)

 

 

(5)

 

Negotiable Certificates of Deposit and Other Time Deposits

 

 

49

 

 

(109)

 

 

(60)

 

 

77

 

 

(152)

 

 

(75)

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase and other borrowings

 

 

156

 

 

(8)

 

 

148

 

 

103

 

 

19

 

 

122

 

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

 

57

 

 

(16)

 

 

41

 

 

295

 

 

(108)

 

 

187

 

Total Interest Expense

 

 

375

 

 

1

 

 

376

 

 

530

 

 

(235)

 

 

295

 

Net Interest Income

 

$

3,454

 

$

(461)

 

$

2,993

 

$

3,616

 

$

(456)

 

$

3,160

 

 

 

 

17


 

 

 

Average Consolidated Balance Sheets and Net Interest Income Analysis ($ in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

 

    

Average

    

    

 

    

Average

    

Average

    

    

 

    

Average

    

Average

    

    

 

    

Average

 

 

 

Balance

 

Interest

 

Rate

 

Balance

 

Interest

 

Rate

 

Balance

 

Interest

 

Rate

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-Earning Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities Available for Sale (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Treasury and Federal Agency Securities

 

$

172,632

 

$

3,201

 

1.85

%  

$

157,285

 

$

2,840

 

1.81

%  

$

142,426

 

$

2,583

 

1.81

%

State and Municipal obligations

 

 

90,265

 

 

2,772

 

3.07

%  

 

87,147

 

 

2,783

 

3.19

%  

 

85,772

 

 

2,835

 

3.31

%

Other Securities

 

 

7,354

 

 

289

 

3.93

%  

 

6,968

 

 

271

 

3.89

%  

 

6,364

 

 

259

 

3.89

%

Total Investment Securities

 

 

270,251

 

 

6,262

 

2.32

%  

 

251,400

 

 

5,894

 

2.34

%  

 

234,562

 

 

5,677

 

2.42

%

Tax Equivalent Adjustment

 

 

 

 

 

1,878

 

0.69

%  

 

 

 

 

1,586

 

0.63

%  

 

 

 

 

1,620

 

0.69

%

Tax Equivalent Total

 

 

 

 

 

8,140

 

3.01

%  

 

 

 

 

7,480

 

2.98

%  

 

 

 

 

7,297

 

3.11

%

Trading Assets

 

 

5,625

 

 

153

 

2.72

%  

 

5,431

 

 

170

 

3.13

%  

 

5,199

 

 

168

 

3.23

%  

Federal Funds Sold and Agreements to Repurchase

 

 

1,086

 

 

3

 

0.28

%

 

1,042

 

 

 

 

 

327

 

 

 

 

Interest-Bearing Deposits with Banks

 

 

20,403

 

 

136

 

0.67

%  

 

13,609

 

 

57

 

0.52

%  

 

13,359

 

 

28

 

0.23

%

Loans, Net of Deferred Loan Fees (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial

 

 

77,284

 

 

2,970

 

3.84

%  

 

60,269

 

 

2,577

 

4.28

%  

 

48,307

 

 

2,268

 

4.69

%

Real Estate Mortgage

 

 

551,413

 

 

25,645

 

4.65

%  

 

496,965

 

 

23,147

 

4.66

%  

 

429,773

 

 

20,249

 

4.71

%

Consumer

 

 

17,470

 

 

1,385

 

7.93

%  

 

16,907

 

 

1,340

 

7.93

%  

 

16,886

 

 

1,340

 

7.94

%

Total Loans

 

 

646,167

 

 

30,000

 

4.64

%  

 

574,141

 

 

27,064

 

4.71

%  

 

494,966

 

 

23,857

 

4.82

%

Total Interest-Earning Assets

 

 

943,532

 

 

38,432

 

4.07

%  

 

845,623

 

 

34,771

 

4.11

%  

 

748,413

 

 

31,350

 

4.19

%

Allowance for Loan Losses

 

 

(7,244)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6,068)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(5,673)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and Due From Banks

 

 

12,230

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16,607

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12,274

 

 

 

 

 

 

Premises and Equipment

 

 

16,296

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16,571

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16,700

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Assets

 

 

35,478

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28,910

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26,414

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Assets

 

$

1,000,292

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

901,643

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

797,148

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-Bearing Deposits