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Section 1: 10-K (FORM 10-K)

bdn-10k_20161231.htm

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                    to                   

Commission file number

001-9106 (Brandywine Realty Trust)

000-24407 (Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.)

Brandywine Realty Trust

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

MARYLAND (Brandywine Realty Trust)

23-2413352

DELAWARE (Brandywine Operating Partnership L.P.)

23-2862640

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

555 East Lancaster Avenue

 

Radnor, Pennsylvania

19087

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (610) 325-5600

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Shares of Beneficial Interest,

New York Stock Exchange

par value $0.01 per share

 

(Brandywine Realty Trust)

 

 

 

6.90% Series E Cumulative Redeemable Preferred

New York Stock Exchange

Shares of Beneficial Interest

 

par value $0.01 per share

 

(Brandywine Realty Trust)

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Units of General Partnership Interest (Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.)

(Title of class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 

Brandywine Realty Trust

Yes   No 

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.

Yes   No 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

 

Brandywine Realty Trust

Yes   No 

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.

Yes   No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Brandywine Realty Trust

Yes   No 

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.

Yes   No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 

Brandywine Realty Trust

Yes   No 

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.

Yes   No 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):

Brandywine Realty Trust:

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.:

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Brandywine Realty Trust

Yes   No 

Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P.

Yes   No 

As of June 30, 2016, the aggregate market value of the Common Shares of Beneficial Interest held by non-affiliates of Brandywine Realty Trust was $2,908,952,336 based upon the last reported sale price of $16.80 per share on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2016. An aggregate of 175,186,624 Common Shares of Beneficial Interest were outstanding as of February 17, 2017.

As of June 30, 2016 the aggregate market value of the 1,479,799 common units of limited partnership (“Units”) held by non-affiliates of Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P. was $24,860,623 based upon the last reported sale price of $16.80 per share on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2016 of the Common Shares of Beneficial Interest of Brandywine Realty Trust, the sole general partner of Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P. (For this computation, the Registrant has excluded the market value of all Units beneficially owned by Brandywine Realty Trust.)

Documents Incorporated By Reference

Portions of the proxy statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Brandywine Realty Trust are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 

 

 


EXPLANATORY NOTE

This report combines the annual reports on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 of Brandywine Realty Trust (the “Parent Company”) and Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P. (the “Operating Partnership”). The Parent Company is a Maryland real estate investment trust, or REIT, that owns its assets and conducts its operations through the Operating Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership, and subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership. The Parent Company, the Operating Partnership and their consolidated subsidiaries are collectively referred to in this report as the “Company”. In addition, terms such as “we”, “us”, or “our” used in this report may refer to the Company, the Parent Company, or the Operating Partnership.

The Parent Company is the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership and as of December 31, 2016, owned a 99.1% interest in the Operating Partnership. The remaining 0.9% interest consists of common units of limited partnership interest issued by the Operating Partnership to third parties in exchange for contributions of properties to the Operating Partnership. As the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, the Parent Company has full and complete authority over the Operating Partnership’s day-to-day operations and management.

As general partner with control of the Operating Partnership, the Parent Company consolidates the Operating Partnership for financial reporting purposes, and the Parent Company does not have significant assets other than its investment in the Operating Partnership. Therefore, the assets and liabilities of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership are the same on their respective financial statements. The separate discussions of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in this report should be read in conjunction with each other to understand the results of the Company’s operations on a consolidated basis and how management operates the Company.

Management operates the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership as one enterprise. The management of the Parent Company consists of the same members as the management of the Operating Partnership. These members are officers of both the Parent Company and of the Operating Partnership.

The Company believes that combining the annual reports on Form 10-K of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership into a single report will result in the following benefits:

 

facilitate a better understanding by the investors of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership by enabling them to view the business as a whole in the same manner as management views and operates the business;

 

remove duplicative disclosures and provide a more straightforward presentation in light of the fact that a substantial portion of the disclosure applies to both the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership; and

 

create time and cost efficiencies through the preparation of one combined report instead of two separate reports.

There are few differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, which are reflected in the footnote disclosures in this report. The Company believes it is important to understand the differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in the context of how these entities operate as an interrelated consolidated company. The Parent Company is a REIT, whose only material asset is its ownership of the partnership interests of the Operating Partnership. As a result, the Parent Company does not conduct business itself, other than acting as the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, issuing public equity from time to time and guaranteeing the debt obligations of the Operating Partnership. The Operating Partnership holds substantially all the assets of the Company and directly or indirectly holds the ownership interests in the Company’s real estate ventures. The Operating Partnership conducts the operations of the Company’s business and is structured as a partnership with no publicly traded equity. Except for net proceeds from equity issuances by the Parent Company, which are contributed to the Operating Partnership in exchange for partnership units, the Operating Partnership generates the capital required by the Company’s business through the Operating Partnership’s operations, by the Operating Partnership’s direct or indirect incurrence of indebtedness or through the issuance of partnership units of the Operating Partnership or equity interests in subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership.

The equity and non-controlling interests in the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership’s equity are the main areas of difference between the consolidated financial statements of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership. The common units of limited partnership interest in the Operating Partnership are accounted for as partners’ equity in the Operating Partnership’s financial statements while the common units of limited partnership interests held by parties other than the Parent Company are presented as non-controlling interests in the Parent Company’s financial statements. The differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership’s equity relate to the differences in the equity issued at the Parent Company and Operating Partnership levels.

To help investors understand the significant differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, this report presents the following as separate notes or sections for each of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership:

 

Consolidated Financial Statements;

 

Parent Company’s and Operating Partnership’s Equity

3


This report also includes separate Item 9A. (Controls and Procedures) disclosures and separate Exhibit 31 and 32 certifications for each of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in order to establish that the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer of each entity have made the requisite certifications and that the Parent Company and Operating Partnership are compliant with Rule 13a-15 or Rule 15d-15 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and 18 U.S.C. § 1350.

In order to highlight the differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, the separate sections in this report for the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership specifically refer to the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership. In the sections that combine disclosures of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, this report refers to such disclosures as those of the Company. Although the Operating Partnership is generally the entity that directly or indirectly enters into contracts and real estate ventures and holds assets and debt, reference to the Company is appropriate because the business is one enterprise and the Parent Company operates the business through the Operating Partnership.

 

 

 

4


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Page

PART I

 

 

Item 1. Business

8

 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

20

 

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

31

 

 

Item 2. Properties

32

 

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

38

 

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

38

 

 

PART II

 

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

38

 

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

41

 

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

42

 

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

72

 

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

72

 

 

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

72

 

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

73

 

 

Item 9B. Other Information

74

 

 

PART III

 

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

75

 

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation

75

 

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Shareholder Matters

75

 

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

75

 

 

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

75

 

 

PART IV

 

 

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

75

 

 

Item 16. Form 10-K Summary

83

 

 

SIGNATURES

84

 

 

5


 

Exhibit 3.2.19

 Exhibit 12.1

 Exhibit 12.2

 Exhibit 21

 Exhibit 23.1

 Exhibit 23.2

 Exhibit 31.1

 Exhibit 31.2

 Exhibit 31.3

 Exhibit 31.4

 Exhibit 32.1

 Exhibit 32.2

 Exhibit 32.3

 Exhibit 32.4

 Exhibit 99.1

 EX-101.INS XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT

 EX-101.SCH XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA

 EX-101.CAL XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE

 EX-101.LAB XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE

 EX-101.PRE XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE

 EX-101.DEF XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE

 

 

 

6


Filing Format

This combined Form 10-K is being filed separately by Brandywine Realty Trust (the “Parent Company”) and Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P. (the “Operating Partnership”).

Forward-Looking Statements

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a “safe harbor” for forward-looking statements. This report and other materials filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) (as well as information included in oral or other written statements made by us) contain statements that are forward-looking, including statements relating to business and real estate development activities, acquisitions, dispositions, future capital expenditures, financing sources, governmental regulation (including environmental regulation) and competition. We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe-harbor provisions of the 1995 Act. The words “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “will,” “should” and similar expressions, as they relate to us, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, we can give no assurance that our expectations will be achieved. As forward-looking statements, these statements involve important risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the expected results and, accordingly, such results may differ from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations include, but are not limited to:

 

The continuing impact of modest global economic growth, which is having and may continue to have a negative effect on, among other things, the following:

 

the fundamentals of our business, including overall market occupancy, demand for office space and rental rates;

 

the financial condition of our tenants, many of which are financial, legal and other professional firms, our lenders, counterparties to our derivative financial instruments and institutions that hold our cash balances and short-term investments, which may expose us to increased risks of default by these parties;

 

the availability of financing on attractive terms or at all, which may adversely impact our future interest expense and our ability to pursue acquisition and development opportunities and refinance existing debt; and

 

a decline in real estate asset valuations, which may limit our ability to dispose of assets at attractive prices or obtain or maintain debt financing secured by our properties or on an unsecured basis.

 

changes in local real estate conditions (including changes in rental rates and the number of properties that compete with our properties);

 

our failure to lease unoccupied space in accordance with our projections;

 

our failure to re-lease occupied space upon expiration of leases;

 

tenant defaults and the bankruptcy of major tenants;

 

increases in interest rates;

 

failure of interest rate hedging contracts to perform as expected and the effectiveness of such arrangements;

 

failure of acquisitions to perform as expected;

 

unanticipated costs associated with the acquisition, integration and operation of our acquisitions;

 

unanticipated costs to complete, lease-up and operate our developments and redevelopments;

 

unanticipated costs associated with land development, including building moratoriums and inability to obtain necessary zoning, land-use, building, occupancy and other required governmental approvals, construction cost increases or overruns and construction delays;

 

impairment charges;

 

increased costs for, or lack of availability of, adequate insurance, including for terrorist acts or environmental liabilities;

 

actual or threatened terrorist attacks;

 

the impact on workplace and tenant space demands driven by technology, employee culture and commuting patterns;

 

demand for tenant services beyond those traditionally provided by landlords;

 

liability and clean-up costs under environmental or other laws;

 

failure or bankruptcy of real estate venture partners;

 

inability of real estate venture partners to fund venture obligations or perform under our real estate venture development agreements;

 

failure to manage effectively our growth into new product types within our portfolio and real estate venture arrangements;

 

failure of dispositions to close in a timely manner;

 

earthquakes and other natural disasters;

 

the unforeseen impact of climate change and compliance costs relating to laws and regulations governing climate change;

 

risks associated with federal, state and local tax audits;

7


 

complex regulations relating to our status as a real estate investment trust, or REIT, and the adverse consequences of our failure to qualify as a REIT; and

 

the impact of adopting new accounting standards on current and, in instances where application is retrospective, historical financial results.

Given these uncertainties, and the other risks identified in the “Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this report, we caution readers not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. We assume no obligation to update or supplement forward-looking statements that become untrue because of subsequent events.

 

 

PART I

Item 1.

Business

Introduction

We are a self-administered and self-managed REIT that provides leasing, property management, development, redevelopment, acquisition and other tenant-related services for a portfolio of office, residential, retail and mixed-use properties. As of December 31, 2016, we owned 113 properties that contain an aggregate of approximately 17.6 million net rentable square feet and consist of 93 office properties, seven mixed-use properties, one retail property (101 properties, collectively the “Core Properties”), four development properties, three redevelopment properties and five properties classified as held for sale, (collectively, the “Properties”).  In addition, as of December 31, 2016, we owned economic interests in 14 unconsolidated real estate ventures (collectively, the “Real Estate Ventures”), seven of which own properties that contain an aggregate of approximately 8.0 million net rentable square feet of office space; two of which own 4.3 acres of undeveloped parcels of land; two of which own 1.4 acres of land under active development; two of which own residential towers that contain 345 and 321 apartment units, respectively, and one of which owns an apartment complex that contains 398 units. As of December 31, 2016, we also owned 317 acres of undeveloped land, of which five acres were held for sale, and held options to purchase approximately 60 additional acres of undeveloped land.  As of December 31, 2016, the total potential development that these land parcels could support, including the parcels under option, under current zoning and entitlements, amounted to an estimated 12.3 million square feet.  The Properties and the properties owned by the Real Estate Ventures are located in or near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Metropolitan Washington, D.C.; Southern New Jersey; Richmond, Virginia; Wilmington, Delaware; Austin, Texas and Concord California. In addition to managing properties that we own, as of December 31, 2016, we were managing approximately 10.5 million net rentable square feet of office and industrial properties for third parties and Real Estate Ventures.  Unless otherwise indicated, all references in this report to square feet represent net rentable area.  We do not have any foreign operations and our business is not seasonal. Our operations are not dependent on a single tenant or a few tenants and no single tenant accounted for more than 10% of our total 2016 revenue.

Organization

The Parent Company was organized and commenced its operations in 1986 as a Maryland REIT. The Parent Company owns its assets and conducts its operations through the Operating Partnership and subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership. The Operating Partnership was formed in 1996 as a Delaware limited partnership. The Parent Company controls the Operating Partnership as its sole general partner. As of December 31, 2016, the Parent Company owned a 99.1% interest in the Operating Partnership. The remaining 0.9% interest in the Operating Partnership consists of common units of limited partnership interest issued to the holders in exchange for contributions of properties to the Operating Partnership. Our structure as an “UPREIT” is designed, in part, to permit persons contributing properties to us to defer some or all of the tax liability they might otherwise incur in a sale of properties.  Our executive offices are located at 555 East Lancaster Avenue, Suite 100, Radnor, Pennsylvania 19087 and our telephone number is (610) 325-5600. We have offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; McLean, Virginia; Washington, D.C.; Camden, New Jersey; Richmond, Virginia; and Austin, Texas. We have an internet website at www.brandywinerealty.com. We are not incorporating by reference into this report any material from our website. The reference to our website is an inactive textual reference to the uniform resource locator (URL) and is for your reference only.

2016 Transactions

Real Estate Acquisitions

On July 1, 2016, we closed on the acquisition of 34.6 acres of land located in Austin, Texas known as the Garza Ranch for a gross purchase price of $20.6 million. We accounted for this transaction as an asset acquisition and capitalized approximately $1.9 million of acquisition related costs and closing costs as part of land held for development on our consolidated balance sheet. We funded the acquisition with $20.4 million of available corporate funds, net of prorations and other adjustments. We are currently under agreement to sell 9.5 acres (of the 34.6 acres) to two unaffiliated third parties. As of December 31, 2016, the land under these agreements of sale did not meet the criteria to be classified as held for sale. See Note 21, “Subsequent Events,” to the Consolidated Financial Statements

8


for information related to the sale of 1.7 acres. We have a continuing involvement through a completion guaranty, which requires the Company, as developer, to complete certain infrastructure improvements on behalf of the buyers of the land parcels.

Real Estate Dispositions

We sold the following properties during the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands):

Disposition Date

 

Property/Portfolio Name

 

Location

 

Number of Properties

 

 

Rentable Square Feet

 

 

Sales Price

 

 

Net Proceeds on Sale

 

 

Gain (Loss) on Sale (a)

 

 

Occupancy % at Date of Sale

 

October 13, 2016

 

620, 640, 660 Allendale Road

 

King of Prussia, PA

 

 

3

 

 

 

156,669

 

 

$

12,800

 

 

$

12,014

 

 

$

2,382

 

 

 

100.0%

 

September 1, 2016

 

1120 Executive Plaza

 

Mt. Laurel, NJ

 

 

1

 

 

 

95,183

 

 

 

9,500

 

 

 

9,241

 

 

 

(18

)

(b)

 

100.0%

 

August 2, 2016

 

50 East Clementon Road

 

Gibbsboro, NJ

 

 

1

 

 

 

3,080

 

 

 

1,100

 

 

 

1,011

 

 

 

(85

)

 

 

100.0%

 

May 11, 2016

 

196/198 Van Buren Street (Herndon Metro Plaza I&II)

 

Herndon, VA

 

 

2

 

 

 

197,225

 

 

 

44,500

 

 

 

43,412

 

 

 

(752

)

(c)

 

92.9%

 

February 5, 2016

 

2970 Market Street  (Cira Square)

 

Philadelphia, PA

 

 

1

 

 

 

862,692

 

 

 

354,000

 

 

 

350,150

 

 

 

115,828

 

 

 

100.0%

 

February 4, 2016

 

Och-Ziff Portfolio

 

Various (d)

 

 

58

 

 

 

3,924,783

 

 

 

398,100

 

 

 

353,971

 

 

 

(372

)

(e)

 

91.4%

 

Total Dispositions

 

 

 

 

 

 

66

 

 

 

5,239,632

 

 

$

820,000

 

 

$

769,799

 

 

$

116,983

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

Gain/(Loss) on Sale is net of closing and other transaction related costs.

 

(b)

As of June 30, 2016, we determined that the sale of the property was probable and classified this property as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the property exceeded the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. As a result, we recognized a provision for impairment totaling approximately $1.8 million during the three-month period ended June 30, 2016. The fair value measurement was based on the pricing in the purchase and sale agreement for the sale of the property. The loss on sale represents additional closing costs recognized at closing.

 

(c)

During the three-month period ended March 31, 2016, we recognized a provision for impairment totaling approximately $7.4 million on the properties. The loss on sale primarily relates to additional closing costs recognized at closing.

 

(d)

Exhibit 99.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2016 contains a complete list of the 58 properties disposed of in the transactions with Och-Ziff Capital Management Group LLC. See Note 4, "Investment in Unconsolidated Real Estate Ventures," to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further details of the transactions.

 

(e)

During the three-month period ended December 31, 2015, we recognized a provision for impairment totaling approximately $45.4 million. The loss on sale represents additional closing costs recognized at closing. See “MAP Venture” section below.

We sold the following land parcels during the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands):

Disposition Date

 

Property/Portfolio Name

 

Location

 

Number of Parcels

 

 

Acres

 

 

Sales Price

 

 

Net Proceeds on Sale

 

 

Gain on Sale (a)

 

 

December 2, 2016

 

Oakland Lot B

 

Oakland, CA

 

 

1

 

 

 

0.9

 

 

$

13,750

 

 

$

13,411

 

 

$

9,039

 

 

August 19, 2016

 

Highlands Land

 

Mt. Laurel, NJ

 

 

1

 

 

 

2.0

 

 

 

288

 

 

 

284

 

 

 

193

 

 

January 15, 2016

 

Greenhills Land

 

Reading, PA

 

 

1

 

 

 

120.0

 

 

 

900

 

 

 

837

 

 

 

-

 

(b)

Total Dispositions

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

122.9

 

 

$

14,938

 

 

$

14,532

 

 

$

9,232

 

 

 

 

(a)

Gain on Sale is net of closing and other transaction related costs.

 

(b)

The carrying value of the land exceeded the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale as of December 31, 2015, therefore we recognized an impairment loss of $0.3 million during the three-month period ended December 31, 2015. There was no gain or loss recognized on the sale during 2016.

The sales of properties referenced above do not represent a strategic shift that has a major effect on our operations and financial results. As a result, the operating results of these properties remain classified within continuing operations for all periods presented.

Held for Use Impairments

As of December 31, 2016, we evaluated the recoverability of the carrying value of our properties that triggered assessment under the undiscounted cash flow model. Based on our evaluation, we determined that due to the reduction in our intended hold period of three properties located in the Other segment, we would not recover the carrying values of these properties. Accordingly, we recorded impairment charges on the properties of $7.3 million at December 31, 2016, reducing the aggregate carrying values of the properties from $25.8 million to their estimated fair values of $18.5 million. We measured this impairment based on a discounted cash flow

9


analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual capitalization rates and discount rates of 8.75% and 9.00%, respectively. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

During the three-month period ended June 30, 2016, we evaluated the recoverability of the carrying value of our properties that triggered assessment under the undiscounted cash flow model. Based on the analysis, we determined that due to the reduction in our intended hold period of a property located in the Metropolitan D.C. segment, we would not recover the carrying value of that property. Accordingly, we recorded an impairment charge on the property of $3.9 million at June 30, 2016, reducing the aggregate carrying value of the property from $37.4 million to its estimated fair value of $33.5 million. We measured this impairment based on a discounted cash flow analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual capitalization rate and discount rate of 7.75% and 8.25%, respectively. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

During the three-month period ended March 31, 2016, we evaluated the recoverability of the carrying value of the properties that triggered assessment under the undiscounted cash flow model. Based on the analysis, we determined that due to a reduction in our intended hold period, we would not recover the carrying value of two properties located in our Metropolitan D.C. segment. Accordingly, we recorded an impairment charge of $7.4 million at March 31, 2016 reducing the aggregate carrying values of these properties from $51.9 million to their estimated fair values of $44.5 million. We measured these impairments based on a discounted cash flow analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual capitalization rates and discount rates of 7.0%. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

Land Impairments

As of December 31, 2016, we assessed the fair value of the land parcels within our Other segment that we intend to sell in the short-term and based on that assessment, we determined that we would not recover the carrying value of five land parcels, consisting of 108 acres. Accordingly, we recorded impairment charges of $5.6 million at December 31, 2016, reducing the aggregate carrying values of the land parcels from $18.2 million to their estimated fair values of $12.6 million. We measured these impairments using indicative pricing in the markets in which each land parcel is located.  

Held for Sale

The following is a summary of properties classified as held for sale at December 31, 2016 but which did not meet the criteria to be classified within discontinued operations at December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

 

Held for Sale Properties Included in Continuing Operations

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

Metropolitan D.C. - Office (a)

 

 

Other Segment - Office (b)

 

 

Other Segment - Land (c)

 

 

Total

 

ASSETS HELD FOR SALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate investments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating properties

$

21,720

 

 

$

51,871

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

73,591

 

Accumulated depreciation

 

(11,935

)

 

 

(20,981

)

 

 

-

 

 

 

(32,916

)

Operating real estate investments, net

 

9,785

 

 

 

30,890

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

40,675

 

Land held for development

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,043

 

 

 

1,043

 

Total real estate investments, net

 

9,785

 

 

 

30,890

 

 

 

1,043

 

 

 

41,718

 

Total assets held for sale, net

$

9,785

 

 

$

30,890

 

 

$

1,043

 

 

$

41,718

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES HELD FOR SALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other liabilities

$

73

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

81

 

Total liabilities held for sale

$

73

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

81

 

 

 

(a)

As of December 31, 2016, we determined that the sale of three office properties in the Metropolitan D.C. segment was probable and classified these properties as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the properties exceeded their fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. As a result, we recognized an impairment loss totaling approximately $3.0 million during the three-month period ended December 31, 2016. We measured this impairment based on a discounted cash flow analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual capitalization rates and discount rates of 9.00% and 10.00%, respectively. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

 

(b)

As of December 31, 2016, we determined that the sale of two office properties in the Other segment was probable and classified these properties as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the properties exceeded the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. As a result, we recognized an impairment loss totaling approximately $11.5 million during the three-month period ended December 31, 2016. We measured this impairment based on a discounted cash flow analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual

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capitalization rates and discount rates of 9.75% and 9.75%, respectively. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

 

(c)

As of December 31, 2016, we determined that the sale of a land parcel in the Other segment was probable and classified the land parcel as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the land approximated the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. The fair value measurement was based on the pricing in the purchase and sale agreement.

The sales of properties referenced above do not represent a strategic shift that has a major effect on our operations and financial results. As a result, the operating results of these properties remain classified within continuing operations for all periods presented. See Note 21, "Subsequent Events," to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding these dispositions.

Brandywine AI Venture: 3141 Fairview Park Drive

On December 20, 2011, we formed a real estate venture, Brandywine - AI Venture LLC, (the "AICC Venture"), with Current Creek Investments, LLC ("Current Creek"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Allstate Insurance Company. We and Current Creek each own a 50% interest in the AICC Venture. The AICC Venture owns three office properties, which we contributed to the AICC Venture upon its formation. The contributed office properties contain an aggregate of 587,317 net rentable square feet and consist of 3130 and 3141 Fairview Park Drive, both located in Falls Church, Virginia, and 7101 Wisconsin Avenue located in Bethesda, Maryland.

We maintained a regional management and leasing office at 3141 Fairview Park Drive. Consistent with the other four properties owned by the AICC Venture, financial control was shared, however, pursuant to the accounting standard for sales-leaseback transactions, the lease that we maintained at 3141 Fairview Park Drive resulted in us having continuing involvement that required 3141 Fairview Park Drive and its related operations to be consolidated by us under the financing method of accounting for sales of real estate. At formation, we concluded under ASC 810, Consolidations that it was appropriate to deconsolidate the remaining two properties and account for them under the equity method of accounting.

On August 31, 2016, we terminated our lease for the regional management and leasing office at 3141 Fairview Park Drive. Accordingly, we no longer have a continuing involvement, other than our equity method investment and property management agreement, with 3141 Fairview Park Drive and recorded the partial sale under the full accrual method of accounting. As a result of the sale accounting, we deconsolidated net assets of $45.6 million, a mortgage loan of $20.6 million and a financing liability of $12.4 million related to the property from our consolidated balance sheet and recorded a $12.6 million equity method investment. Upon recognizing the sale, there was no gain or loss, as 3141 Fairview Park Drive was impaired to its fair value during the second quarter of 2016.

On September 30, 2016, we funded a capital call totaling $10.3 million to the AICC Venture for our 50% share of the mortgage debt on 3141 Fairview Park Drive. Subsequently, the AICC Venture funded $20.6 million for the repayment of its mortgage debt.

Brandywine AI Venture: Station Square Impairment

On July, 10, 2012, Brandywine – AI Venture (the “AISS Venture”), an unconsolidated real estate venture in which we own a 50% interest, acquired a three building office portfolio totaling 497,896 net rentable square feet in Silver Spring, Maryland (“Station Square”) valued at $120.6 million. During the period ended September 30, 2016, the AISS Venture recorded a $10.4 million held for use impairment charge related to Station Square, which is included in our Metropolitan D.C. segment. Our share of this impairment charge was $5.2 million and is reflected in equity in loss of Real Estate Ventures in our consolidated statement of operations for the period ended December 31, 2016.  The fair value of the Station Square properties was primarily determined based on offers received for the properties. The remaining properties in the AISS Venture were evaluated for impairment, and based on an undiscounted cash flow analysis, no additional other than temporary impairment was identified.

We evaluated for other than temporary impairment our investment in the AISS Venture in accordance with ASC 323, Investments - Equity Method and Joint Ventures. The investment in the AISS Venture was determined to be the level of account for evaluation of other than temporary impairment.  The impairment recorded on the three properties was deemed to be an event that indicates the carrying amount of the investment might not be recoverable.  Following the recognition of our proportionate share of the impairment charge through equity in loss of Real Estate Ventures, we evaluated the fair value of the investment in the AISS Venture through a hypothetical liquidation at book value method.  No other than temporary impairment was identified.      

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PJP V

On September 22, 2016, the real estate venture known as PJV V sold its office property, comprised of 73,997 square feet, located in Charlottesville, Virginia. Also on September 22, 2016, using proceeds from the sale, we liquidated our entire 25% interest in the real estate venture for $3.4 million, net of closing costs. The carrying amount of our investment was $0.2 million at the time of sale, resulting in a recognized gain of $3.2 million related to the disposition.

Invesco Venture

On August 19, 2016, we assigned our residual profits interest in an unconsolidated real estate venture known as Invesco, L.P. to the general partner of Invesco L.P. for $7.0 million. At the time of sale, our investment basis in Invesco, L.P. was zero and we held no other ownership interest. As a result, we recorded the entire amount of the proceeds received as a gain on sale of unconsolidated real estate ventures in our consolidated statement of operations.

1000 Chesterbrook

On June 30, 2016, the real estate venture known as 1000 Chesterbrook sold its office property, comprised of 172,286 square feet, located in Berwyn, Pennsylvania for a sales price of $32.1 million. As of June 30, 2016, we owned a 50% interest in the 1000 Chesterbrook real estate venture. The proceeds to 1000 Chesterbrook, net of closing costs, proration adjustments and $23.2 million of debt assumed by the buyer, were $9.8 million. We recorded $3.2 million for our proportionate share of the Venture’s gain which is reflected in the “Net gain on real estate venture transactions” caption on the accompanying consolidated statement of operations. The proceeds from the sale, along with $0.2 million of working capital, were distributed to us during the third quarter of 2016.

evo at Cira Centre South Venture

On March 2, 2016, we paid $12.8 million of cash and HSRE paid $6.6 million of cash to purchase Campus Crest’s entire 30% interest in evo at Cira (See Note 4, “Investment in Unconsolidated Real Estate Ventures,” for further information regarding this venture) and, as a result, each of us and HSRE owns a 50% interest in evo at Cira. Subsequent to the transaction, our investment basis in evo at Cira is $28.3 million. In conjunction with the purchase, we and HSRE entered into an amended and restated operating agreement to govern their rights and obligations as sole members of evo at Cira.

On June 10, 2016, evo at Cira refinanced its $97.8 million construction facility maturing July 25, 2016 with a $117.0 million term loan bearing interest at LIBOR + 2.25% capped at a total maximum interest of 5.25% and maturing on October 31, 2019, with options to extend the term to June 30, 2021. evo at Cira received an advance of $105.0 million at closing. The additional $12.0 million capacity under the term loan may be funded if certain criteria relating to the operating performance of the student housing tower are met. The term loan is secured by a leasehold mortgage that holds absolute assignment of leases and rents. Subsequent to refinancing and the receipt of amounts in escrow under the construction loan, evo at Cira distributed $6.3 million to us.

MAP Venture

On February 4, 2016, Brandywine Operating Partnership, L.P., together with subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership, entered into a series of related transactions (the “Och-Ziff Sale”) with affiliates of Och-Ziff Capital Management Group LLC (“Och-Ziff”) that resulted in the disposition by us of 58 office properties that contain an aggregate of 3,924,783 square feet for an aggregate purchase price of $398.1 million. The 58 properties are located in the Pennsylvania Suburbs, New Jersey/Delaware, Metropolitan Washington, D.C. and Richmond, Virginia. The related transactions involved: (i) the sale by us to MAP Fee Owner LLC, an affiliate of Och-Ziff (the “O-Z Land Purchaser”), of 100% of our fee interests in the land parcels (the “Land Parcels”) underlying the 58 office properties, together with rights to be the lessor under long-term ground leases (the “Ground Leases”) covering the Land Parcels; and (ii) our formation of MAP Ground Lease Venture LLC (the “MAP Venture”) with MAP Ground Lease Holdings LLC, an affiliate of Och-Ziff (the “O-Z Venture Partner”); (iii) our sale to MAP Venture of the office buildings and related improvements (the “Buildings”) situated on the Land Parcels; and (iv) our retention of a 50% non-controlling equity interest in the MAP Venture. 

The MAP Venture leases the Land Parcels from O-Z Land Purchaser through a ground lease that extends through February 2115.  Annual payments by the MAP Venture, as tenant under the Ground Leases, initially total $11.9 million and increase 2.5% annually through November 2025.

At closing on February 4, 2016, the MAP Venture obtained a third party non-recourse debt financing of approximately $180.8 million secured by mortgages on the Buildings of the MAP Venture.

As a result of this transaction, we received $354.0 million in proceeds and maintain a 50% ownership interest in the MAP Venture valued as of February 4, 2016 at $25.2 million, which holds the leasehold interest in the Buildings. The MAP Venture was formed as a limited liability company in which we have been designated as the Managing Member. In addition, through an affiliate, we provide property management services at the Buildings on behalf of the MAP Venture for a market based management fee.

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We are not required to fund the operating losses of the MAP Venture. Accordingly, we can only incur losses equal to our investment basis in the MAP Venture.

We have determined that this transaction does not represent a significant shift in our operations that has a major impact on our economic performance. As a result, the properties are not classified as discontinued operations on the consolidated financial statements.

Coppell Associates

On January 29, 2016, we sold our entire 50% interest in an unconsolidated real estate venture known as Coppell Associates. The proceeds to us, net of closing costs and related debt payoff, were $4.6 million.  The carrying amount of our investment in Coppell Associates was a $1.1 million liability at the sale date, resulting in a $5.7 million gain on sale of our interest in the real estate venture. The investment was in a liability position because we, as a general partner, were required to fund losses of Coppell Associates. The negative investment balance represented our share of unfunded cumulative losses incurred in excess of our investment basis as of the date of sale.

Developments

As of December 31, 2016, we owned 317 acres of undeveloped land, five acres of which were held for sale, and we held options to purchase approximately 60 additional acres of undeveloped land.

933 First Avenue

During the second quarter of 2016, we commenced construction of an 111,000 square foot, four-story, Class A office property located in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.  We anticipate the project cost to total $28.7 million, of which $9.4 million had been funded through December 31, 2016. The project is 100% leased to a single tenant.

FMC Tower at Cira Centre South

On October 31, 2013, we determined to proceed with the development of the FMC Tower at Cira Centre South (the “FMC Tower”), designed as a trophy class, mixed-use office tower at 30th and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We anticipate the project cost to total $385.0 million, of which $367.0 million had been funded through December 31, 2016.  We intend to fund remaining development costs through a combination of potential sources, including existing cash balances, availability under our unsecured revolving credit facility, capital raised through one or more joint venture formations, proceeds from asset sales or equity and debt financing. The costs to complete the project will be funded over the construction period, which commenced in the second quarter of 2014 and is scheduled to conclude during the first half of 2017.  We are a party to a development agreement and related ground lease with the University of Pennsylvania for the land parcel that the FMC Tower is being constructed on. The ground lease has a term through July 2097 and includes a variable rent provision that would provide the University of Pennsylvania, as ground lessor, with a percentage of the cash flow or proceeds of specified capital events subject to our receipt of a priority return on eligible investments.

During the second quarter of 2016 we placed into service the office component of the FMC Tower, consisting of approximately 625,000 square feet. As of December 31, 2016, we had placed into service $166.5 million of building assets and, as of February 1, 2017, had pre-leased an aggregate of 96% of the office square feet at the FMC Tower.  FMC Corporation, a diversified chemical company serving agricultural, consumer and industrial markets globally, is the anchor tenant at the FMC Tower and has leased approximately 280,000 square feet of office space under a 16-year lease. In addition, we have leased 100,000 square feet of office space to the University of Pennsylvania under a 20-year lease. 

We expect to place into service during the first half of 2017 the residential component of the project, consisting of 268 luxury residential apartments and hotel units.  

JBG Ventures

On May 29, 2015, we and an unaffiliated third party, JBG/DC Manager, LLC ("JBG"), formed 51 N 50 Patterson, Holdings, LLC Venture ("51 N Street") and 1250 First Street Office, LLC Venture ("1250 First Street"), as real estate ventures, with us owning a 70.0% interest and JBG owning a 30.0% interest in each of the two ventures. At formation, we and JBG made cash contributions of $15.2 million and $6.5 million, respectively, to 51 N Street, which was used to purchase 0.9 acres of undeveloped land. At formation, we and JBG made cash capital contributions of $13.2 million and $5.7 million, respectively, to 1250 First Street, which was used to purchase 0.5 acres of undeveloped land. 

51 N Street expects to construct two mixed-use buildings, which will include approximately 278,000 square feet of loft office, residential, ground floor retail, movie theater and on-grade public plaza space in Washington, D.C. 51 N Street expects to develop the

13


office buildings on the 0.9 acre land parcel owned by the venture. As of December 31, 2016, the venture is still in the process of finalizing development plans and total development costs or received committed debt financing for the development.

1250 First Street expects to construct an eleven-story office building, which will include approximately 232,100 square feet of office, 15,300 square feet of retail and 145 below-grade parking spaces in Washington, D.C. 1250 First Street expects to develop the office building on the 0.5 acres land parcel owned by the venture. As of December 31, 2016, the venture is still in the process of finalizing development plans and total development costs or received committed debt financing for the development.

1919 Ventures

On January 20, 2011, we acquired a one acre parcel of land in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for $9.3 million. We thereafter contributed the acquired land into a then newly-formed general partnership, referred to below as “1919 Ventures” in return for a 50.0% general partner interest, with the remaining 50.0% interest owned by an unaffiliated third party, who contributed cash in exchange for its interest. On October 15, 2014, we acquired the 50% interest of the unaffiliated third party at fair value, which approximated carrying value. No remeasurement gain or loss on our previous investment was recorded at that time.

On October 21, 2014, we admitted an unaffiliated third party, LCOR/CalSTRS (“LCOR”) into 1919 Ventures, for $8.2 million representing a 50% interest and, reflecting an agreed upon $16.4 million valuation of the land and improvements incurred by us on behalf of 1919 Ventures.

On October 27, 2014, 1919 Ventures announced a planned 29-story, 455,000 square foot contemporary glass tower development.  The tower has been designed as a mixed-use development consisting of residential, retail and parking components and was substantially complete on September 30, 2016. The residential component of the project is comprised of 321 luxury apartments and was 76% leased as of December 31, 2016. The commercial space consists of 24,000 square feet and was 100% leased at December 31, 2016. The parking component consists of a 215-car structured parking facility.  Total project costs are estimated at $148.1 million. A portion of the costs are being funded with proceeds of an $88.9 million secured construction loan from an unaffiliated institutional lender, and the remaining $59.2 million was fully funded with equity contributions from each of us and LCOR. As of December 31, 2016, $79.3 million was outstanding on the construction loan and equity contributions of $29.6 million had been funded by each of us and LCOR.  The remaining project costs of $9.6 million relate to the amenities floor within the project.

4040 Wilson Venture

On July 31, 2013, we formed 4040 Wilson LLC Venture (“4040 Wilson”) as a joint venture between us and Ashton Park Associates LLC (“Ashton Park”), an unaffiliated third party. We and Ashton Park each own a 50% interest in 4040 Wilson. 4040 Wilson expects to construct a 426,000 square foot office building representing the final phase of the eight building, mixed-use, Liberty Center complex developed by the parent company of Ashton Park in the Ballston submarket of Arlington, Virginia. 4040 Wilson expects to develop the office building on a 1.3 acre land parcel contributed by Ashton Park to 4040 Wilson at an agreed upon valuation of $36.0 million. The total estimated project costs are $202.0 million, which we expect will be financed through approximately $72.0 million of partner capital contributions (consisting of $36.0 million in cash from us, of which $35.6 million has been funded to date, and land with a value of $36.0 million from Ashton Park), with the remaining balance funded by debt financing through an unaffiliated construction lender. During the second quarter of 2015, 4040 Wilson completed the construction of the garage structure.  We expect groundbreaking on the building structure to commence upon achievement of certain pre-leasing levels, at which point 4040 Wilson expects to obtain debt financing for the remainder of the project costs.  During the first quarter of 2016, 4040 Wilson obtained a land loan in order to fund the predevelopment and carry costs of the venture in the amount of $5.8 million.  As of December 31 2016, there was $1.0 million outstanding on the loan.

Other Development Activities

On May 9, 2016, we entered into a master development agreement (the “Development Agreement”) with Drexel University, a Pennsylvania non-profit corporation (“Drexel”), that provides for our rights and obligations, as master developer, of a multi-phase, multi-component development on approximately 10.11 acres of land (the “Development Site”) owned by Drexel and adjacent to Drexel’s main campus in the University City section of Philadelphia.  We refer to the overall development, including the Development Site and four adjacent acres comprising the master planned area as the “Schuylkill Yards Project.”

The Schuylkill Yards Project is contemplated to be developed in six phases over an approximately 20-year period, excluding extension options, and anticipated to consist of an aggregate of approximately 5.1 million of floor area ratio, or FAR, of office, residential, advanced manufacturing, research facilities and academic facilities, as well as accessory green spaces.  

Prior to commencement of construction of the initial facility, we will oversee master planning, including obtaining required government and third party approvals, and completing confirmatory real estate due diligence.  Thereafter, upon commencement, we or a qualifying designee will enter into a 99-year ground lease with Drexel for the portion of the Development Site where the initial

14


facility will be constructed.  We will enter into similar ground leases with Drexel covering additional portions of the Development Site in connection with our construction of additional facilities under subsequent phases of the Schuylkill Yards Project.  

We currently anticipate commencement of construction of the initial phase on or about the first half of 2018 and completion in or about the fourth quarter of 2019.  We contemplate that the initial phase will consist of a mixed-use facility containing approximately 700,000 FAR, with office space comprising at least 60% of the FAR. As of the date of this report, we have not finalized the scope of the development or entered into construction contracts.  

Actual timing and scope of subsequent phases of development will depend on timing and scope of prior phases, third party approvals and design and development-related determinations by Drexel and us.  Overall, approximately 52% of the FAR is designated office, including lab and academic space, and the balance would consist of residential, retail, hospitality and parking.

We intend to fund the costs to develop each development phase of the Schuylkill Yards Project through a combination of cash on hand, capital raised through one or more real estate venture formations, and proceeds from the sale of other assets or debt financing, including project-specific mortgage financing. As of the date of this report, we have not entered into agreements with third parties for real estate venture participation in the project.

The Development Agreement provides for rights, responsibilities and restrictions relating to all phases of the project, including, but not limited to, design and construction; leasing of space; involvement of third party participants; extension and termination rights; and protocols for reaching agreement on subjects customary for long-term collaborative development projects.

On December 3, 2015, we entered into an agreement as development manager to construct Subaru of America’s corporate headquarters (the “Subaru Headquarters Development”), an office property containing five floors and approximately 250,000 square feet, on land owned by Subaru and located in Camden, New Jersey. In addition to development fees, the agreement provides us the ability to earn additional profit if total project costs are less than the not-to-exceed (“NTE”) amount.  The NTE amount, currently at $78.1 million, may be adjusted by change orders agreed upon by both Subaru and us.  If construction costs exceed the NTE amount, we are obligated to pay the excess.  As of December 31, 2016, $39.9 million of the project costs had been funded.

Also on December 3, 2015, we entered into an agreement to construct an 83,000 square foot build-to-suit service center (the “Subaru NSTC Development”) on land parcels owned by us for Subaru of America as the single tenant. On such date, Subaru of America entered into an 18-year lease for the service center. The lease contains a purchase option, which allows Subaru to purchase the property at commencement of the lease, or five years subsequent to inception, at depreciated cost. We currently expect to deliver the building during the second quarter of 2018.  At December 31, 2016, $10.5 million of the project costs, totaling $29.3 million, had been funded.

Business Objective and Strategies for Growth

Our business objective is to deploy capital effectively to maximize our return on investment and thereby maximize our total return to shareholders. To accomplish this objective we seek to:

 

concentrate on urban town centers and central business districts in selected regions, and be the best of class owner and developer in those markets with a full-service office in each of those markets providing property management, leasing, development, construction and legal expertise;

 

maximize cash flow through leasing strategies designed to capture rental growth as rental rates increase and as leases are renewed;

 

attain high tenant retention rates by providing a full array of property management, maintenance services and tenant service amenity programs responsive to the varying needs of our diverse tenant base;

 

continue to cultivate long-term leasing relationships with a diverse base of high-quality and financially stable tenants;

 

form joint ventures with high-quality partners having attractive real estate holdings or significant financial resources;

 

utilize our reputation as a full-service real estate development and management organization to identify acquisition and development opportunities that will expand our business and create long-term value;

 

increase the economic diversification of our tenant base while maximizing economies of scale; and

 

selectively reduce our portfolio over time, in non-core suburban properties that are not located in our core regions.

We also consider the following to be important objectives:

 

to develop and opportunistically acquire high-quality office properties at attractive yields in markets that we expect will experience economic growth and where we can achieve operating efficiencies;

 

to monetize or deploy our land inventory for development of high-quality office properties, or rezone from office/industrial to residential, retail and hotel to align with market and demand shifts as appropriate;

15


 

to control development sites, including sites under option to acquire, that could support approximately 10.2 million square feet of new office, retail and residential development within our core markets;

 

to capitalize on our redevelopment expertise to selectively develop, redevelop and reposition properties in desirable locations that other organizations may not have the resources to pursue;

 

to own and develop high quality office and mixed-use real estate meeting the demands of today’s tenants who require sophisticated telecommunications and related infrastructure, support services, sustainable features and amenities, and to manage those facilities so as to continue to be the landlord of choice for both existing and prospective tenants;

 

to strategically grow our portfolio through the development and acquisition of new product types that support our strategy of transient-oriented and amenity based mixed-use properties located in the central business districts of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Austin, Texas and Washington, D.C.; and

 

to secure third-party development contracts, which can be a significant source of revenue and enable us to utilize and grow our existing development and construction management resources.

We expect to concentrate our real estate activities in markets where we believe that:

 

current and projected market rents and absorption statistics justify construction activity;

 

we can maximize market penetration by accumulating a critical mass of properties and thereby enhance operating efficiencies;

 

barriers to entry (such as zoning restrictions, utility availability, infrastructure limitations, development moratoriums and limited developable land) will create supply constraints on available space; and

 

there is potential for economic growth, particularly job growth and industry diversification.

Operating Strategy

We currently expect to continue to operate in markets where we have a concentration advantage due to economies of scale. We believe that where possible, it is best to operate with a strong base of properties in order to benefit from the personnel allocation and the market strength associated with managing multiple properties in the same market. We also intend to selectively dispose of properties and redeploy capital if we determine a property cannot meet our long term earnings growth expectations. We believe that recycling capital is an important aspect of maintaining the overall quality of our portfolio.

Our broader strategy remains focused on continuing to enhance liquidity and strengthen our balance sheet through capital retention, debt reduction, targeted sales activity and management of our existing and prospective liabilities.

In the long term, we believe that we are well positioned in our current markets and have the expertise to take advantage of both development and acquisition opportunities, as warranted by market and economic conditions, in new markets that have healthy long-term fundamentals and strong growth projections. This capability, combined with what we believe is a conservative financial structure, should allow us to achieve disciplined growth. These abilities are integral to our strategy of having a diverse portfolio of assets, which will meet the needs of our tenants.

We use experienced on-site construction superintendents, operating under the supervision of project managers and senior management, to control the construction process and mitigate the various risks associated with real estate development.

In order to fund developments, redevelopments and acquisitions, as well as refurbish and improve existing properties, we primarily use proceeds from property dispositions and excess cash from operations after satisfying our dividend and other financing requirements. The availability of funds for new investments and maintenance of existing properties largely depends on capital markets and liquidity factors over which we can exert little control.

Policies With Respect To Certain Activities

The following is a discussion of our investment, financing and other policies. These policies have been determined by our Board of Trustees and our Board of Trustees may revise these policies without a vote of shareholders.

Investments in Real Estate or Interests in Real Estate

Our investment objectives are to provide quarterly cash dividends to our shareholders and to achieve long-term capital appreciation through increases in the value of Brandywine Realty Trust.

We expect to continue our investment objectives primarily through the development, purchase or our current ownership in lease income-producing properties for long-term investment, expand and improve the properties presently owned or other properties purchased, or sell such properties, in whole or in part, as circumstances warrant. Although there is no limitation on the types of development activities that we may undertake, we expect that our development activities will meet current market demand and will

16


generally be on a build-to-suit basis for particular tenants where a significant portion of the building is pre-leased before construction begins. We continue to participate with other entities in property ownership through existing joint ventures or other types of co-ownership. Our equity investments may be subject to existing or future mortgage financing and other indebtedness that will have priority over our equity investments.

Securities of or Interests in Entities Primarily Engaged in Real Estate Activities and Other Issuers

Subject to the percentage of ownership limitations and gross income tests necessary for REIT qualification, we may invest in securities of other REITs, other entities engaged in real estate activities or securities of other issuers. We may enter into joint ventures or partnerships for the purpose of obtaining an equity interest in a particular property. We do not currently intend to invest in the securities of other issuers except in connection with joint ventures or acquisitions of indirect interests in properties.

Investments in Real Estate Mortgages

While our current portfolio consists of, and our business objectives emphasize, common equity investments in commercial real estate, we may, at the discretion of management or our Board of Trustees, invest in other types of equity real estate investments, mortgages and other real estate interests. We do not presently intend to invest to a significant extent in mortgages or deeds of trust, but may invest in participating mortgages or preferred equity if we conclude that we may benefit from the cash flow or any appreciation in the value of the property securing a mortgage. From time to time, we provide seller financing to buyers of our properties. We do this when the buyer requires additional funds for the purchase and provision of seller financing will be beneficial to us and the buyer compared to a mortgage loan from a third party lender.

Dispositions

Our disposition of properties is based upon management’s periodic review of our portfolio and the determination by management or our Board of Trustees that a disposition would be in our best interests. We intend to use selective dispositions to reduce our ownership in non-core markets and fund our capital and refinancing needs.

Financing Policies

A primary objective of our financing policy has been to manage our financial position to allow us to raise capital from a variety of sources at competitive rates. Our mortgages, credit facilities and unsecured debt securities contain restrictions on our ability to incur indebtedness. Our charter documents do not limit the indebtedness that we may incur. Our financing strategy is to maintain a strong and flexible financial position by limiting our debt to a prudent level and minimizing our variable interest rate exposure. We intend to finance future growth and future maturing debt with the most advantageous source of capital then available to us. These sources may include the sale of wholly owned properties or interests in real estate ventures, selling additional common or preferred equity and debt securities through public offerings or private placements, utilizing availability under our credit facilities or incurring additional indebtedness through secured or unsecured borrowings. To qualify as a REIT, we must distribute to our shareholders each year at least 90% of our net taxable income, excluding any net capital gain. This distribution requirement limits our ability to fund future capital needs, including for acquisitions and developments, from income from operations. Therefore, we expect to continue to rely on third party sources of capital to fund future capital needs.

Guarantees

As of December 31, 2016, our unconsolidated real estate ventures had aggregate indebtedness to third parties of $997.5 million.  These loans are generally mortgage or construction loans, most of which are non-recourse to us.  As of December 31, 2016, the loans for which there is recourse to us consists of the following: (i) a $52.5 million payment guaranty on the term loan for evo at Cira; (ii) a $3.2 million payment guarantee on the $56.0 million construction loan for TB-BDN Plymouth Apartments; (iii) a joint and several cost overrun guaranty on the $88.9 million construction loan for the development project being undertaken by 1919 Market Street LP; and (iv) a $0.4 million payment guarantee on a loan provided to PJP VII.  On January 31, 2017, we sold our 50% interest in TB-BDN Plymouth Apartments, L.P. and our $3.2 million guarantee was cancelled. See Note 21, “Subsequent Events,” to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

In connection with the agreements of sale related to the Garza Ranch (See “Real Estate Acquisitions” section above), we entered into a development agreement and related completion guarantee to construct certain infrastructure improvements to the land on behalf of each buyer, estimated to cost $10.3 million. Total estimated costs related to the improvements are included in the sale price of each land parcel. Recognition of the profit earned upon sale of the land parcels is deferred until the improvements are completed.

Also, we have provided a cost overrun guarantee on the Subaru Headquarters Development (See “Other Development Services” section above) for amounts in excess of the NTE amount. The NTE amount, currently at $78.1 million, may be adjusted by change orders agreed upon by both Subaru and us. We are obligated to pay for construction costs in excess of the NTE amount. The terms of the guarantee do not provide a limitation on the costs we may be responsible for.

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In addition, during construction undertaken by real estate ventures, we have provided and expect to continue to provide cost overrun and completion guarantees, with rights of contribution among partners in the real estate ventures, and once construction is complete, customary environmental indemnities and guarantees of customary exceptions to nonrecourse provisions in loan agreements. For additional information regarding these real estate ventures, see Note 4, "Investments in Unconsolidated Ventures," to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

Working Capital Reserves

We maintain working capital reserves and access to borrowings in amounts that our management determines to be adequate to meet our normal contingencies.

Policies with Respect to Other Activities

We expect to issue additional common and preferred equity in the future and may authorize our Operating Partnership to issue additional common and preferred units of limited partnership interest, including to persons who contribute their interests in properties to us in exchange for such units. We have not engaged in trading, underwriting or agency distribution or sale of securities of unaffiliated issuers and we do not intend to do so. We intend to make investments consistent with our qualification as a REIT, unless because of circumstances or changes in the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (or the Treasury Regulations), our Board of Trustees determines that it is no longer in our best interests to qualify as a REIT. We may make loans to third parties, including to joint ventures in which we participate and to buyers of our real estate. We intend to make investments in such a way that we will not be treated as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940.

Management Activities

We provide third-party real estate management services primarily through wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership (collectively, the “Management Companies”). As of December 31, 2016, the Management Companies were managing properties containing an aggregate of approximately 28.1 million net rentable square feet, of which approximately 17.6 million net rentable square feet related to properties owned by us and approximately 10.5 million net rentable square feet related to properties owned by third parties and unconsolidated Real Estate Ventures.

Geographic Segments

During the year ended December 31, 2016, we were managing our portfolio within five segments: (1) Pennsylvania Suburbs, (2) Philadelphia Central Business District (“CBD”), (3) Metropolitan Washington, D.C., (4) Austin, Texas and (5) Other. The Pennsylvania Suburbs segment includes properties in Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery counties in the Philadelphia suburbs. The Philadelphia CBD segment includes properties located in the City of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. The Metropolitan Washington, D.C. segment includes properties in the District of Columbia, Northern Virginia and southern Maryland. The Austin, Texas segment includes properties in the City of Austin, Texas. The Other segment includes properties in Burlington and Camden counties in New Jersey, New Castle county in the state of Delaware and the City of Concord in California. The corporate group is responsible for cash and investment management, development of certain real estate properties during the construction period, and certain other general support functions. See Note 18, “Segment Information,” to our Consolidated Financial Statements for information on selected assets and results of operations of our reportable segments for the three years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014.

Competition

The real estate business is highly competitive. Our Properties compete for tenants with similar properties primarily on the basis of location, total occupancy costs (including base rent and operating expenses), services and amenities provided, and the design and condition of the improvements. We also face competition when attempting to acquire or develop real estate, including competition from domestic and foreign financial institutions, other REITs, life insurance companies, pension funds, partnerships and individual investors. Additionally, our ability to compete depends upon trends in the economies of our markets, investment alternatives, financial condition and operating results of current and prospective tenants, availability and cost of capital, construction and renovation costs, land availability, our ability to obtain necessary construction approvals, taxes, governmental regulations, legislation and population trends.

Sustainability

We intend to establish sustainable office practices consistent with our overall commitment to provide excellent office environments to our customers, our employees and our vendor service providers. We are committed to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions throughout our buildings by providing proper energy management metrics that provide environmentally responsible buildings. As both an owner and developer of property, we continue to improve design and construction of our buildings to achieve leading building performance.

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Insurance

We maintain commercial general liability and “all risk” property insurance on our properties. We intend to obtain similar coverage for properties we acquire in the future. There are types of losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, such as losses from war, terrorism, environmental issues, floods, hurricanes and earthquakes that are subject to limitations in certain areas or which may be uninsurable risks. We exercise our discretion in determining amounts, coverage limits and deductibility provisions of insurance, with a view to maintaining appropriate insurance on our investments at a reasonable cost and on suitable terms. If we suffer a substantial loss, our insurance coverage may not be sufficient to pay the full current market value or current replacement cost of our lost investment. Inflation, changes in building codes and ordinances, environmental considerations and other factors also might make it impractical to use insurance proceeds to fully replace or restore a property after it has been damaged or destroyed.

Employees

As of December 31, 2016, we had 363 full-time employees, including 12 union employees.

Government Regulations Relating to the Environment

Many laws and governmental regulations relating to the environment apply to us and changes in these laws and regulations, or their interpretation by agencies and the courts, occur frequently and may adversely affect us.

Existing conditions at some of our Properties. Independent environmental consultants have conducted Phase I or similar environmental site assessments on our Properties. We generally obtain these assessments prior to the acquisition of a property and may later update them as required for subsequent financing of the property or as requested by a tenant. Site assessments are generally performed to ASTM standards then existing for Phase I site assessments, and typically include a historical review, a public records review, a visual inspection of the surveyed site, and the issuance of a written report. These assessments do not generally include any soil samplings or subsurface investigations. Depending on the age of the property, the Phase I may have included an assessment of asbestos-containing materials. For properties where asbestos-containing materials were identified or suspected, an operations and maintenance plan was generally prepared and implemented. See Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” to our Consolidated Financial Statements for our evaluation in accordance with the accounting standard governing asset retirement obligations.

Historical operations at or near some of our Properties, including the operation of underground storage tanks, may have caused soil or groundwater contamination. We are not aware of any such condition, liability or concern by any other means that would give rise to material, uninsured environmental liability. However, the assessments may have failed to reveal all environmental conditions, liabilities or compliance concerns; there may be material environmental conditions, liabilities or compliance concerns that a review failed to detect or which arose at a property after the review was completed; future laws, ordinances or regulations may impose material additional environmental liability; and current environmental conditions at our Properties may be affected in the future by tenants, third parties or the condition of land or operations near our Properties, such as the presence of underground storage tanks. We cannot be certain that costs of future environmental compliance will not affect our ability to make distributions to our shareholders.

Use of hazardous materials by some of our tenants. Some of our tenants handle hazardous substances and wastes on our Properties as part of their routine operations. Environmental laws and regulations may subject these tenants, and potentially us, to liability resulting from such activities. We generally require our tenants, in their leases, to comply with these environmental laws and regulations and to indemnify us for any related liabilities. We are not aware of any material noncompliance, liability or claim relating to hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum products in connection with any of our Properties, and we do not believe that on-going activities by our tenants will have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Costs related to government regulation and private litigation over environmental matters. Under environmental laws and regulations, we may be liable for the costs of removal, remediation or disposal of hazardous or toxic substances present or released on our Properties. These laws could impose liability without regard to whether we are responsible for, or knew of, the presence or release of the hazardous materials. Government investigations and remediation actions may entail substantial costs and the presence or release of hazardous substances on a property could result in governmental cleanup actions or personal injury or similar claims by private plaintiffs.

Potential environmental liabilities may exceed our environmental insurance coverage limits. We carry what we believe to be sufficient environmental insurance to cover potential liability for soil and groundwater contamination, mold impact, and the presence of asbestos-containing materials at the affected sites identified in our environmental site assessments. Our insurance policies are subject to conditions, qualifications and limitations. Therefore, we cannot provide any assurance that our insurance coverage will be sufficient to cover all liabilities for losses.

Potential environmental liabilities may adversely impact our ability to use or sell assets. The presence of contamination or the failure to remediate contamination may impair our ability to sell or lease real estate or to borrow using the real estate as collateral.

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Code of Conduct

We maintain a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics applicable to our Board of Trustees and all of our officers and employees, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, controller and persons performing similar functions. A copy of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available on our website, www.brandywinerealty.com. In addition to being accessible through our website, copies of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics can be obtained, free of charge, upon written request to Investor Relations, 555 East Lancaster Avenue, Suite 100, Radnor, PA 19087. Any amendments to or waivers of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that apply to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, controller and persons performing similar functions and that relate to any matter enumerated in Item 406(b) of Regulation S-K promulgated by the SEC will be disclosed on our website.

Corporate Governance Principles and Board Committee Charters

Our Corporate Governance Principles and the charters of the Executive Committee, Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Corporate Governance Committee of the Board of Trustees of Brandywine Realty Trust and additional information regarding our corporate governance are available on our website, www.brandywinerealty.com. In addition to being accessible through our website, copies of our Corporate Governance Principles and charters of our Board Committees can be obtained, free of charge, upon written request to Investor Relations, Brandywine Realty Trust, 555 East Lancaster Avenue, Suite 100, Radnor, PA 19087.

Availability of SEC Reports

We file annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K and other information with the SEC. Members of the public may read and copy materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Members of the public may also obtain information on the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-732-0330. The SEC also maintains an Internet web site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers, including us, that file electronically with the SEC. The address of that site is http://www.sec.gov. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K and other information filed by us with the SEC are available, without charge, on our Internet web site, http://www.brandywinerealty.com as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed electronically with the SEC. Copies are also available, free of charge, upon written request to Investor Relations, Brandywine Realty Trust, 555 East Lancaster Avenue, Suite 100, Radnor, PA 19087.

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

Our business, financial condition, results from operations and ability to make distributions on our equity and to pay debt service on our indebtedness may be affected by the risk factors set forth below. All investors (including shareholders in the Parent Company and units in the Operating Partnership) should consider the following risk factors before deciding to purchase our securities.  This section contains forward-looking statements. Please refer to the explanation of the qualifications and limitations on forward-looking statements beginning on page 7.

Adverse economic and geopolitical conditions could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and our ability to pay distributions to our shareholders.

Our business is affected by global, national and local economic conditions.  Our portfolio consists primarily of office buildings (as compared to real estate companies with portfolios of multiple asset classes).  Our economic performance and the value of our real estate assets, and consequently the value of our securities, are subject to the risk that if our properties do not generate revenues sufficient to meet our operating expenses, including debt service and capital expenditures, our cash flow and ability to pay distributions to our security holders will be adversely affected. The following factors, among others, may adversely affect the income generated by our properties and our performance generally:

 

adverse changes in international, national or local economic and demographic conditions;

 

increased vacancies or our inability to rent space on favorable terms, including market pressures to offer tenants rent abatements, increased tenant improvement packages, early termination rights, below market rental rates or below-market renewal options;

 

significant job losses in the financial and professional services industries may occur, which may decrease demand for office space, causing market rental rates and property values to be negatively impacted;

 

changes in interest rates, reduced availability of financing and reduced liquidity in the capital markets, which may adversely affect our ability or the ability of buyers and tenants of properties to obtain financing on favorable terms, or at all;

 

reduced values of our properties would limit our ability to dispose of assets at attractive prices, limit our access to debt financing secured by our properties and reduce the availability of unsecured loans;

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one or more lenders under our unsecured revolving credit facility could refuse or be unable to fund their financing commitment to us and we may not be able to replace the financing commitment of any such lenders on favorable terms, or at all;

 

declines in the financial condition of our tenants which would impact our ability to collect rents from our tenants;

 

competition from other commercial office, retail, and mixed-use properties and commercial buildings, and increased supply of such buildings;

 

increased operating costs, including insurance expense, utilities, real estate taxes, janitorial costs, state and local taxes, labor shortages and heightened security costs may not be offset by increased market rental rates;

 

civil disturbances, earthquakes and other natural disasters, or terrorist acts or acts of war which may result in uninsured or underinsured losses; and

 

significant expenditures associated with each investment, such as debt service payments, real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance costs which are generally not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in revenues from a property.

Our performance is dependent upon the economic conditions of the markets in which our properties are located.

Our results of operations will be significantly influenced by the economies and other conditions of the real estate markets in which we operate, particularly in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Suburbs, the District of Columbia, Southern New Jersey, Northern Virginia, Southern Maryland and Austin, Texas. Any adverse changes in economic conditions in the future in any of these economies or real estate markets could negatively affect cash available for distribution. Our financial performance and ability to make distributions to our shareholders will be particularly sensitive to the economic conditions in these markets. The local economic climate, which may be adversely impacted by business layoffs or downsizing, industry slowdowns, changing demographics and other factors, and local real estate conditions, such as demand for office space, operating expenses and real estate taxes, may affect revenues and the value of properties, including properties to be acquired or developed. We cannot assure you that these local economies will grow in the future.

We face risks associated with the development of mixed-use commercial properties.

We operate, are currently developing, and may in the future develop, properties either alone or through real estate ventures with other persons that are known as “mixed-use” developments. This means that in addition to the development of office space, the project may also include space for residential, retail, hotel or other commercial purposes. As a result, if a development project includes a non-office or non-retail use, we may seek to develop that component ourselves, sell the rights to that component to a third-party developer with experience in that use or we may seek to partner with such a developer. If we do not sell the rights or partner with such a developer, or if we choose to develop the other component ourselves, we would be exposed not only to those risks typically associated with the development of commercial real estate generally, but also to specific risks associated with the development and ownership of non-office and non-retail real estate. In addition, even if we sell the rights to develop certain components or elect to participate in the development through a real estate venture, we may be exposed to the risks associated with the failure of the other party to complete the development as expected. These include the risk that the other party would default on its obligations necessitating that we complete the other component ourselves (including providing any necessary financing). In the case of residential properties, these risks also include competition for prospective residents from other operators whose properties may be perceived to offer a better location or better amenities or whose rent may be perceived as a better value given the quality, location and amenities that the resident seeks. Because we have limited experience with residential properties, we expect to retain third parties to manage our residential properties. In the case of hotel properties, the risks also include increases in inflation and utilities that may not be offset by increases in room rates. We are also dependent on business and commercial travelers and tourism.  If we decide to not sell or participate in a real estate venture and instead hire a third party manager, we would be dependent on their key personnel to provide services on our behalf and we may not find a suitable replacement if the management agreement is terminated, or if key personnel leave or otherwise become unavailable to us.

We may suffer adverse consequences due to the financial difficulties, bankruptcy or insolvency of our tenants.

Periodically, our tenants experience financial difficulties, including bankruptcy, insolvency or a general downturn in their business, there could be an adverse effect on our financial performance and distributions to shareholders. We cannot assure you that any tenant that files for bankruptcy protection will continue to pay us rent. A bankruptcy filing by or relating to one of our tenants or a lease guarantor would bar efforts by us to collect pre-bankruptcy debts from that tenant or lease guarantor, or its property, unless we receive an order permitting us to do so from the bankruptcy court. In addition, we cannot evict a tenant solely because of bankruptcy. The bankruptcy of a tenant or lease guarantor could delay our efforts to collect past due balances under the relevant leases, and could ultimately preclude collection of these sums. If a lease is assumed by the tenant in bankruptcy, all pre-bankruptcy balances due under the lease must be paid to us in full. If, however, a lease is rejected by a tenant in bankruptcy, we would have only a general, unsecured claim for damages. Any such unsecured claim would only be paid to the extent that funds are available and only in the same percentage as is paid to all other holders of general, unsecured claims. Restrictions under the bankruptcy laws further limit the amount of any other claims that we can make if a lease is rejected. As a result, it is likely that we would recover substantially less than the full

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value of the remaining rent during the term. See Item 7., Managements Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Factors that May Influence Future Results of Operations - Tenant Credit Risk.

An increase in interest rates would increase our interest costs on variable rate debt and could adversely impact our ability to refinance existing debt or sell assets on favorable terms or at all.

Rising interest rates could limit our ability to refinance existing debt when it matures or significantly increase our future interest expense. From time to time, we enter into interest rate swap agreements and other interest rate hedging contracts. While these agreements are intended to lessen the impact of rising interest rates on us, they also expose us to the risk that the other parties to the agreements will not perform, we could incur significant costs associated with the settlement of the agreements, the agreements will be unenforceable and the underlying transactions will fail to qualify as highly-effective cash flow hedges under the applicable accounting guidance. In addition, an increase in interest rates could decrease the amounts third-parties are willing to pay for our assets, thereby limiting our ability to recycle capital and change our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions.

Our degree of leverage could limit our ability to obtain additional financing or affect the market price of our equity shares or debt securities.

Like other real estate companies which incur debt, we are subject to risks associated with debt financing, such as the insufficiency of cash flow to meet required debt service payment obligations and the inability to refinance existing indebtedness. If our debt cannot be paid, refinanced or extended at maturity, we may not be able to make distributions to shareholders at expected levels or at all. Furthermore, an increase in our interest expense could adversely affect our cash flow and ability to make distributions to shareholders. If we do not meet our debt service obligations, any properties securing such indebtedness could be foreclosed on, which would have a material adverse effect on our cash flow and ability to make distributions and, depending on the number of properties foreclosed on, could threaten our continued viability. Our degree of leverage could also make us more vulnerable to a downturn in business or the economy in general.

The terms and covenants relating to our indebtedness could adversely impact our economic performance.

Our credit facilities, term loans and the indenture governing our unsecured public debt securities contain (and any new or amended facility and term loans will contain) restrictions, requirements and other limitations on our ability to incur indebtedness, including total debt to asset ratios, secured debt to total asset ratios, debt service coverage ratios and minimum ratios of unencumbered assets to unsecured debt which we must maintain. Our ability to borrow under our credit facilities is subject to compliance with such financial and other covenants. In the event that we fail to satisfy these covenants, we would be in default under the credit facilities, the term loans and the indenture and may be required to repay such debt with capital from other sources. Under such circumstances, other sources of capital may not be available to us, or may be available only at unattractive terms. In addition, the mortgages on our properties, including mortgages encumbering our Real Estate Ventures, contain customary covenants such as those that limit our ability, without the prior consent of the lender, to further mortgage the applicable property or to discontinue insurance coverage. If we breach covenants in our secured debt agreements, the lenders can declare a default and take possession of the property securing the defaulted loan.

A downgrading of our debt could subject us to higher borrowing costs.

In the event that our unsecured debt is downgraded by Moody’s Investor Services and Standard & Poor’s from the current ratings, we would likely incur higher borrowing costs and the market prices of our common shares and debt securities might decline.

We may experience increased operating costs, which might reduce our profitability.

Our properties are subject to increases in operating expenses such as for cleaning, electricity, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, administrative costs and other costs associated with security, landscaping and repairs and maintenance of our properties. In general, our tenant leases allow us to pass through all or a portion of these costs to them. We cannot assure you, however, that tenants will actually bear the full burden of these higher costs, or that such increased costs will not lead them, or other prospective tenants, to seek office space elsewhere. If operating expenses increase, the availability of other comparable office space in our core geographic markets might limit our ability to increase rents; if operating expenses increase without a corresponding increase in revenues, our profitability could diminish and limit our ability to make distributions to shareholders.

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Our investment in property development or redevelopment may be more costly or difficult to complete than we anticipate.

Property ground-up development is a component of our operating and investment strategy. We intend to continue pursuing select ground-up development opportunities for long-term investment and construction of office or mixed use properties as opportunities arise. Once made, these investments may not produce results in accordance with our expectations. Risks associated with our development and construction activities include:

 

the unavailability of favorable financing alternatives in the private and public debt markets;

 

having sufficient capital to pay development costs;

 

limited experience developing or redeveloping properties in certain of our geographic markets;

 

dependence on the financial and professional services sector as part of our tenant base;

 

construction costs exceeding original estimates due to rising interest rates, diminished availability of materials and labor, and increases in the costs of materials and labor;

 

construction and lease-up delays resulting in increased debt service, fixed expenses and construction or renovation costs;

 

expenditure of funds and devotion of management’s time to projects that we do not complete;

 

the unavailability or scarcity of utilities;

 

occupancy rates and rents at newly completed properties may fluctuate depending on a number of factors, including market and economic conditions, resulting in lower than projected rental rates and a corresponding lower return on our investment;

 

complications (including building moratoriums and anti-growth legislation) in obtaining necessary zoning, occupancy and other governmental permits; and

 

increased use restrictions by local zoning or planning authorities limiting our ability to develop and impacting the size of developments.

See Item 7., “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Factors that May Influence Future Results of Operations - Development Risk.

Our development projects and third party property management business may subject us to certain liabilities.

We may hire and supervise third party contractors to provide construction, engineering and various other services for wholly owned development projects, development projects undertaken by real estate ventures in which we hold an equity interest and manage or properties we are managing on behalf of unaffiliated third parties.  Certain of these contracts may be structured such that we are the principal rather than the agent.  As a result, we may assume liabilities in the course of the project and be subjected to, or become liable for, claims for construction defects, negligent performance of work or other similar actions by third parties we have engaged. Adverse outcomes of disputes or litigation could negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition, particularly if we have not limited the extent of the damages to which we may be liable, or if our liabilities exceed the amounts of the insurance that we carry. Moreover, our tenants and third party customers may seek to hold us accountable for the actions of contractors because of our role even if we have technically disclaimed liability as a legal matter, in which case we may determine it necessary to participate in a financial settlement for purposes of preserving the tenant or customer relationship.

Acting as a principal may also mean that we pay a contractor before we have been reimbursed, which exposes us to additional risks of collection in the event of a bankruptcy or insolvency. The reverse can occur as well, where a contractor we have paid files bankruptcy or commits fraud with the funds before completing a project which we have funded in part or in full. As part of our project management business, we are responsible for managing the various other contractors required for a project, including general contractors, in order to ensure that the cost of a project does not exceed the contract amount and that the project is completed on time. In the event that one or more of the contractors involved does not, or cannot, perform as a result of bankruptcy or for another reason, we may be responsible for cost overruns, as well as the consequences of late delivery. In the event that we have not accurately estimated our own costs of providing services under guaranteed cost contracts, we may be exposed to such losses on the contract until we are able to legally terminate them.

We face risks associated with property acquisitions.

We have acquired in the past and intend to continue to pursue the acquisition of properties, including large portfolios that would increase our size and potentially alter our capital structure.  The success of such transactions is subject to a number of factors, including the risks that:

 

we may not be able to obtain financing for such acquisitions on favorable terms;

 

acquired properties may fail to perform as expected;

 

even if we enter into an acquisition agreement for a property, we may be unable to complete that acquisition after making a non-refundable deposit and incurring certain other acquisition-related costs;

 

the actual costs of repositioning, redeveloping or maintaining acquired properties may be higher than our estimates;

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the acquired properties may be located in new markets where we may have limited knowledge and understanding of the local economy, an absence of business relationships in the area or unfamiliarity with local governmental and permitting procedures; and

 

we may not be able to efficiently integrate acquired properties, particularly portfolios of properties, into our organization and manage new properties in a way that allows us to realize cost savings and synergies.

Acquired properties may subject us to known and unknown liabilities.

Properties that we acquire may be subject to known and unknown liabilities for which we would have no recourse, or only limited recourse, to the former owners of such properties. As a result, if a liability were asserted against us based upon ownership of an acquired property, we might be required to pay significant sums to settle it, which could adversely affect our financial results and cash flow. Unknown liabilities relating to acquired properties could include:

 

liabilities for clean-up of pre-existing disclosed or undisclosed environmental contamination;

 

claims by tenants, vendors, municipalities or other persons arising on account of actions or omissions of the former owners of the properties; and

 

liabilities incurred in the ordinary course of business.

We have agreed not to sell certain of our properties and to maintain indebtedness subject to guarantees.

We acquired in the past and in the future may acquire properties or portfolios of properties through tax deferred contribution transactions in exchange for partnership interests in our Operating Partnership. This acquisition structure has the effect, among other factors, of reducing the amount of tax depreciation we can deduct over the tax life of the acquired properties, and typically requires that we agree to protect the contributors’ ability to defer recognition of taxable gain through restrictions on our ability to dispose of the acquired properties and/or the allocation of partnership debt to the contributors to maintain their tax bases.  We agreed not to sell some of our properties for varying periods of time, in transactions that would trigger taxable income to the former owners, and we may enter into similar arrangements as a part of future property acquisitions. These agreements generally provide that we may dispose of the subject properties only in transactions that qualify as tax-free exchanges under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code or in other tax deferred transactions. Such transactions can be difficult to complete and can result in the property acquired in exchange for the disposed of property inheriting the tax attributes (including tax protection covenants) of the sold property. Violation of these tax protection agreements would impose significant costs on us. As a result, we are restricted with respect to decisions related to financing, encumbering, expanding or selling these properties.  These restrictions on dispositions could limit our ability to sell an asset or pay down partnership debt during a specified time, or on terms, that would be favorable absent such restrictions.

We have also entered into agreements that provide prior owners of properties with the right to guarantee specific amounts of indebtedness and, in the event that the specific indebtedness that they guarantee is repaid or reduced, we would be required to provide substitute indebtedness for them to guarantee. These agreements may hinder actions that we may otherwise desire to take to repay or refinance guaranteed indebtedness because we would be required to make payments to the beneficiaries of such agreements if we violate these agreements.

We may be unable to renew leases or re-lease space as leases expire; certain leases may expire early.

If tenants do not renew their leases upon expiration, we may be unable to re-lease the space. Even if the tenants do renew their leases or if we can re-lease the space, the terms of renewal or re-leasing (including the cost of required renovations) may be less favorable than the current lease terms. Certain leases grant the tenants an early termination right upon payment of a termination penalty or if we fail to comply with certain material lease terms. Our inability to renew or release spaces and the early termination of certain leases could affect our ability to make distributions to shareholders. See Item 7., “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Factors that May Influence Future Results of Operations - Tenant Rollover Risk.

Competition could limit our ability to lease residential rental properties or increase or maintain rents.

Through the recent development of the FMC Tower and the real estate ventures at 1919 Market Street and evo at Cira Centre South, our future income contributions from residential real estate will increase. These properties, which are luxury apartments, corporate suites and upscale student housing located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, will compete with other housing alternatives to attract residents, including rental apartments, condominiums and other single-family homes available for rent as well as new and existing condominiums and single-family homes for sale. Our competitors may offer a more desirable location or have leasing terms more favorable than those we can provide. In addition, our ability to compete and generate favorable returns depends upon, among other factors, trends of the national and local economies, the financial condition and liquidity of current and prospective renters, availability and cost of capital, taxes and governmental regulations. Given significant competition, we expect that as our competitors seek to capitalize on opportunities to purchase undervalued properties in this market and convert them to productive uses, the supply of rental

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properties may increase and the competition for tenants will intensify, which may adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.

We face significant competition from other real estate developers.

We compete with real estate developers, operators and institutions for tenants and acquisition and development opportunities. Some of these competitors may have significantly greater financial resources than we have. Such competition may reduce the number of suitable investment opportunities available to us, may interfere with our ability to attract and retain tenants and may increase vacancies, which could result in increased supply and lower market rental rates, reducing our bargaining leverage and adversely affect our ability to improve our operating leverage. In addition, some of our competitors may be willing (e.g., because their properties may have vacancy rates higher than those for our properties) to make space available at lower rental rates or with higher tenant concession percentages than available space in our properties. We cannot assure you that this competition will not adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to make distributions to shareholders.

Property ownership through real estate ventures may limit our ability to act exclusively in our interest.

We develop, acquire, and contribute properties in real estate ventures with other persons or entities when we believe circumstances warrant the use of such structures. As of December 31, 2016, we held ownership interests in 14 unconsolidated Real Estate Ventures for an aggregate investment balance of $281.3 million. We could become engaged in a dispute with one or more of our real estate venture partners that might affect our ability to operate a jointly-owned property. Moreover, our real estate venture partners may, at any time, have business, economic or other objectives that are inconsistent with our objectives, including objectives that relate to the appropriate timing and terms of any sale or refinancing of a property. In some instances, our real estate venture partners may have competing interests in our markets that could create conflicts of interest. If the objectives of our real estate venture partners or the lenders to our Real Estate Ventures are inconsistent with our own objectives, we may not be able to act exclusively in our interests and the value of our investment in the Real Estate Ventures may be affected.

Because real estate is illiquid, we may not be able to sell properties when in our best interest.

Real estate investments generally, and in particular large office and mixed use properties like those that we own, often cannot be sold quickly. The capitalization rates at which properties may be sold could be higher than historic rates, thereby reducing our potential proceeds from sale. Consequently, we may not be able to alter our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions. In addition, the Internal Revenue Code limits our ability to sell properties that we have held for fewer than two years without potential adverse consequences to our shareholders. Furthermore, properties that we have developed and have owned for a significant period of time or that we acquired in exchange for partnership interests in the Operating Partnership often have a low tax basis. If we were to dispose of any of these properties in a taxable transaction, we may be required under provisions of the Internal Revenue Code applicable to REITs to distribute a significant amount of the taxable gain to our shareholders and this could, in turn, impact our cash flow. In some cases, tax protection agreements with third parties will prevent us from selling certain properties in a taxable transaction without incurring substantial costs. In addition, purchase options and rights of first refusal held by tenants or partners in real estate ventures may also limit our ability to sell certain properties. All of these factors reduce our ability to respond to changes in the performance of our investments and could adversely affect our cash flow and ability to make distributions to shareholders as well as the ability of someone to purchase us, even if a purchase were in our shareholders’ best interests.

Some potential losses are not covered by insurance.

We currently carry property insurance against all-risks of physical loss or damage (unless otherwise excluded in the policy) including time element and commercial general liability coverage on all of our properties. There are, however, types of losses, such as lease and other contract claims, biological, radiological and nuclear hazards and acts of war that generally are not insured. We cannot assure you that we will be able to renew insurance coverage in an adequate amount or at reasonable prices. In addition, insurance companies may no longer offer coverage against certain types of losses, such as losses due to earthquake, terrorist acts and mold, flood, or, if offered, these types of insurance may be prohibitively expensive. Should an uninsured loss or a loss in excess of insured limits occur, we could lose all or a portion of the capital we have invested in a property, as well as the anticipated future revenue from the property. In such an event, we might nevertheless remain obligated for any mortgage debt or other financial obligations related to the property. We cannot assure you that material losses in excess of insurance proceeds will not occur in the future. If any of our properties were to experience a catastrophic loss, it could seriously disrupt our operations, delay revenue and result in large expenses to repair or rebuild the property. Such events could adversely affect our cash flow and ability to make distributions to shareholders. If one or more of our insurance providers were to fail to pay a claim as a result of insolvency, bankruptcy or otherwise, the nonpayment of such claims could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if one or more of our insurance providers were to become subject to insolvency, bankruptcy or other proceedings and our insurance policies with the provider were terminated or cancelled as a result of those proceedings, we cannot guarantee that we would be able to find alternative coverage in adequate amounts or at reasonable prices. In such case, we could experience a lapse in any or adequate insurance coverage with respect to one

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or more properties and be exposed to potential losses relating to any claims that may arise during such period of lapsed or inadequate coverage.

In addition to property and casualty insurance, we use a combination of insurance products, some of which include deductibles and self-insured retention amounts, to provide risk mitigation for the potential liabilities associated with various liabilities, including workers’ compensation, general contractors, directors and officers and employee health-care benefits. Liabilities associated with the risks that are retained by us are estimated, in part, by considering historical claims experience and actuarial assumptions. While we carry general liability and umbrella policies to mitigate such losses on our general liability risks, our results could be materially impacted by claims and other expenses related to such insurance plans if future occurrences and claims differ from these assumptions and historical trends or if employee health-care claims which we self-insure up to a set limit per employee (and which are insured above such self-insured retention amount) exceed our expectations or historic trends.

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may adversely impact our performance and may affect the markets on which our securities are traded.

Terrorist attacks against our properties, or against the United States or our interests, may negatively impact our operations and the value of our securities. Attacks or armed conflicts could result in increased operating costs; for example, it might cost more in the future for building security, property and casualty insurance, and property maintenance. As a result of terrorist activities and other market conditions, the cost of insurance coverage for our properties could also increase. In addition, our insurance policies may not recover all of our property replacement costs and lost revenue resulting from an attack. We might not be able to pass through the increased costs associated with such increased security measures and insurance to our tenants, which could reduce our profitability and cash flow. Furthermore, any terrorist attacks or armed conflicts could result in increased volatility in or damage to the United States and worldwide financial markets and economy. Such adverse economic conditions could affect the ability of our tenants to pay rent and our cost of capital, which could have a negative impact on our results.

Our ability to make distributions is subject to various risks.

Historically, we have paid quarterly distributions to our shareholders. Our ability to make distributions in the future will depend upon:

 

the operational and financial performance of our properties;

 

capital expenditures with respect to existing, developed and newly acquired properties;

 

general and administrative costs associated with our operation as a publicly-held REIT;

 

the amount of, and the interest rates on, our debt;

 

capital needs of our Real Estate Ventures; and

 

the absence of significant expenditures relating to environmental and other regulatory matters.

Certain of these matters are beyond our control and any significant difference between our expectations and actual results could have a material adverse effect on our cash flow and our ability to make distributions to shareholders.

Changes in the tax rates and regulatory requirements may adversely affect our cash flow.

Because increases in income and service taxes are generally not passed through to tenants under leases, such increases may adversely affect our cash flow and ability to make expected distributions to shareholders. Our properties are also subject to various regulatory requirements, such as those relating to the environment, fire and safety. Our failure to comply with these requirements could result in the imposition of fines and damage awards and could result in a default under some of our tenant leases. Moreover, the costs to comply with any new or different regulations could adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to make distributions. We cannot assure you that these requirements will not change or that newly imposed requirements will not require significant expenditures in order to be compliant.

Potential liability for environmental contamination could result in substantial costs.

Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, we may be liable for the costs to investigate and remove or remediate hazardous or toxic substances on or in our properties, often regardless of whether we know of or are responsible for the presence of these substances. These costs may be substantial. While we do maintain environmental insurance, we cannot be assured that our insurance coverage will be sufficient to protect us from all of the aforesaid remediation costs. Also, if hazardous or toxic substances are present on a property, or if we fail to properly remediate such substances, our ability to sell or rent the property or to borrow using that property as collateral may be adversely affected.

Other laws and regulations govern indoor and outdoor air quality including those that can require the abatement or removal of asbestos-containing materials in the event of damage, demolition, renovation or remodeling and also govern emissions of and exposure to asbestos fibers in the air. The maintenance and removal of lead paint and certain electrical equipment containing

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polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and underground storage tanks are also regulated by federal and state laws. We are also subject to risks associated with human exposure to chemical or biological contaminants such as molds, pollens, viruses and bacteria which, above certain levels, can be alleged to be connected to allergic or other health effects and symptoms in susceptible individuals. We could incur fines for environmental compliance and be held liable for the costs of remedial action with respect to the foregoing regulated substances or tanks or related claims arising out of environmental contamination or human exposure to contamination at or from our properties.

Additionally, we develop, manage, lease and/or operate various properties for third parties. Consequently, we may be considered to have been or to be an operator of these properties and, therefore, potentially liable for removal or remediation costs or other potential costs that could relate to hazardous or toxic substances.

Data security breaches may cause damage to our business and reputation.

In the ordinary course of our business we maintain sensitive data, including our proprietary business information and the information of our tenants and business partners, in our data centers and on our networks. The risk of a security breach or disruption, particularly through cyber-attack or cyber intrusion, including by computer hackers, foreign governments and cyber terrorists, has generally increased in number, intensity and sophistication. Notwithstanding the security measures undertaken, our information technology may be vulnerable to attacks or breaches resulting in proprietary information being publicly disclosed, lost or stolen.  There can be no assurance that our security efforts and measures will be effective or that attempted security breaches or disruptions would not be successful or damaging. Protected information, networks, systems and facilities remain vulnerable because the techniques used in such attempted security breaches evolve and may not be recognized or detected until launched against a target. Accordingly, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate security barriers or other preventative measures.

Data and security breaches could:

 

disrupt the proper functioning of our networks and systems and therefore our operations and/or those of our client tenants;

 

result in misstated financial reports, violations of loan covenants, missed reporting deadlines, and/or missed permitting deadlines;

 

result in our inability to properly monitor our compliance with the rules and regulations regarding our qualification as a REIT;

 

result in the unauthorized access to, and destruction, loss, theft, misappropriation, or release of proprietary, confidential, sensitive, or otherwise valuable information of ours or others, which others could use to compete against us or for disruptive, destructive, or otherwise harmful purposes and outcomes;

 

result in our inability to maintain the building systems relied upon by our client tenants for the efficient use of their leased space;

 

require significant management attention and resources to remedy any damages that result;

 

subject us to claims for breach of contract, damages, credits, penalties, or termination of leases or other agreements; and/or

 

damage our reputation among our client tenants and investors generally.

While we maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions including deductibles, cover certain aspects of cyber risks, such insurance coverage may be insufficient to cover all losses.

Americans with Disabilities Act compliance could be costly.

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended (“ADA”), requires that all public accommodations and commercial facilities, including office buildings, meet certain federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. Compliance with ADA requirements could involve the removal of structural barriers from certain disabled persons’ entrances which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Other federal, state and local laws may require modifications to or restrict further renovations of our properties with respect to such accesses. Noncompliance with the ADA or similar or related laws or regulations could result in the United States government imposing fines or private litigants being awarded damages against us. In addition, changes to existing requirements or enactments of new requirements could require significant expenditures. Such costs may adversely affect our cash flow and ability to make distributions to shareholders.

Failure to qualify as a REIT would subject us to U.S. federal income tax which would reduce the cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

We operate our business to qualify to be taxed as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. We have not requested and do not plan to request a ruling from the IRS that we qualify as a REIT, and the statements in this Report are not binding on the IRS or any court. As a REIT, we generally will not be subject to federal income tax on the income that we distribute currently to our shareholders. Many of the REIT requirements, however, are highly technical and complex. The determination that we are a REIT requires an analysis of various factual matters and circumstances that may not be totally within our control. For example, to qualify as a REIT, at least 95%

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of our gross income must come from specific passive sources, such as rent, that are itemized in the REIT tax laws. In addition, to qualify as a REIT, we cannot own specified amounts of debt and equity securities of some issuers. We also are required to distribute to our shareholders with respect to each year at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (excluding net capital gains). The fact that we hold substantially all of our assets through the Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries and real estate ventures further complicates the application of the REIT requirements for us. Even a technical or inadvertent mistake could jeopardize our REIT status and, given the highly complex nature of the rules governing REITs and the ongoing importance of factual determinations, we cannot provide any assurance that we will continue to qualify as a REIT. Changes to the rules governing REITS were made by the Protecting Americans From Tax Hikes Act of 2015, signed into law on December 18, 2015, and Congress and the IRS might make further changes to the tax laws and regulations, and the courts might issue new rulings, that make it more difficult, or impossible, for us to remain qualified as a REIT. If we fail to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes and are able to avail ourselves of one or more of the statutory savings provisions in order to maintain our REIT status, we would nevertheless be required to pay penalty taxes of $50,000 or more for each such failure.

If we fail to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, and are unable to avail ourselves of certain savings provisions set forth in the Internal Revenue Code, we would be subject to federal income tax at regular corporate rates on all of our income. As a taxable corporation, we would not be allowed to take a deduction for distributions to shareholders in computing our taxable income or pass through long term capital gains to individual shareholders at favorable rates. We also could be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax and possibly increased state and local taxes. We would not be able to elect to be taxed as a REIT for four years following the year we first failed to qualify unless the IRS were to grant us relief under certain statutory provisions. If we failed to qualify as a REIT, we would have to pay significant income taxes, which would reduce our net earnings available for investment or distribution to our shareholders. This likely would have a significant adverse effect on our earnings and likely would adversely affect the value of our securities. In addition, we would no longer be required to pay any distributions to shareholders.

Failure of the Operating Partnership (or a subsidiary partnership or real estate venture) to be treated as a partnership would have serious adverse consequences to our shareholders.

If the IRS were to successfully challenge the tax status of the Operating Partnership or any of its subsidiary partnerships or real estate ventures for federal income tax purposes, the Operating Partnership or the affected subsidiary partnership or real estate venture would be taxable as a corporation. In such event we would cease to qualify as a REIT and the imposition of a corporate tax on the Operating Partnership, subsidiary partnership or real estate venture would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution from the Operating Partnership to us and ultimately to our shareholders.

To maintain our REIT status, we may be forced to borrow funds on a short term basis during unfavorable market conditions.

As a REIT, we are subject to certain distribution requirements, including the requirement to distribute 90% of our REIT taxable income. That may result in our having to make distributions at a disadvantageous time or to borrow funds at unfavorable rates. Compliance with this requirement may hinder our ability to operate solely on the basis of maximizing profits.

We will pay some taxes even if we qualify as a REIT, which will reduce the cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

Even if we qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we will be required to pay certain federal, state and local taxes on our income and property. For example, we will be subject to income tax to the extent we distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income, including capital gains. Additionally, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on the amount, if any, by which dividends paid by us in any calendar year are less than the sum of 85% of our ordinary income, 95% of our capital gain net income and 100% of our undistributed income from prior years. Moreover, if we have net income from “prohibited transactions,” that income will be subject to a 100% penalty tax. In general, prohibited transactions are sales or other dispositions of property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. The determination as to whether a particular sale is a prohibited transaction depends on the facts and circumstances related to that sale. We cannot guarantee that sales of our properties would not be prohibited transactions unless we comply with certain statutory safe-harbor provisions.

In addition, any net taxable income earned directly by our taxable REIT subsidiaries, or through entities that are disregarded for federal income tax purposes as entities separate from our taxable REIT subsidiaries, will be subject to federal and possibly state corporate income tax. In this regard, several provisions of the laws applicable to REITs and their subsidiaries ensure that a taxable REIT subsidiary will be subject to an appropriate level of federal income taxation. For example, a taxable REIT subsidiary is limited in its ability to deduct certain interest payments made to an affiliated REIT. In addition, the REIT has to pay a 100% penalty tax on some payments that it receives or on some deductions taken by a taxable REIT subsidiary if the economic arrangements between the REIT, the REIT’s customers, and the taxable REIT subsidiary are not comparable to similar arrangements between unrelated parties. Finally, some state and local jurisdictions may tax some of our income even though as a REIT we are not subject to federal income tax on that income because not all states and localities follow the federal income tax treatment of REITs. To the extent that we and our affiliates are required to pay federal, state and local taxes, we will have less cash available for distributions to our shareholders.

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We face possible federal, state and local tax audits.

Because we are organized and qualify as a REIT, we are generally not subject to federal income taxes, but are subject to certain state and local taxes. Certain entities through which we own real estate have undergone tax audits.  There can be no assurance that future audits will not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Legislative or regulatory tax changes related to REIT’s could materially and adversely affect our business.

At any time, the federal income tax laws or regulations governing REITs or the other administrative interpretations of those laws or regulations may be changed, possibly with retroactive effect. We cannot predict if or when any new federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, or any amendment to any existing federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, will be adopted, promulgated or become effective or whether any such law, regulation or interpretation may take effect retroactively. We and our shareholders could be adversely affected by any such change in, or any new, federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation.

Competition for skilled personnel could increase labor costs.

We compete with various other companies in attracting and retaining qualified and skilled personnel. We depend on our ability to attract and retain skilled management personnel who are responsible for the day-to-day operations of our company. Competitive pressures may require that we enhance our pay and benefits package to compete effectively for such personnel. We may not be able to offset such added costs by increasing the rates we charge our tenants. If there is an increase in these costs or if we fail to attract and retain qualified and skilled personnel, our business and operating results could be harmed.

We are dependent upon our key personnel.

We are dependent upon our key personnel, particularly Gerard H. Sweeney - President and Chief Executive Officer, Thomas Wirth - Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Jeffrey DeVuono - Executive Vice President and Senior Managing Director, William Redd – Executive Vice President and Senior Managing Director and George Johnstone - Executive Vice President, Operations. Among the reasons that Messrs. Sweeney, Wirth, DuVuono, Redd and Johnstone are important to our success is that each has a beneficial reputation, which attracts business and investment opportunities and assists us in negotiations with lenders, joint venture partners and other investors.  If we lost their services, our relationships with lenders, potential tenants and industry personnel could be affected. We are dependent on our other executive officers for strategic business direction and real estate experience. Loss of their services could adversely affect our operations.

Certain limitations will exist with respect to a third party’s ability to acquire us or effectuate a change in control.

Limitations imposed to protect our REIT status. In order to protect us against the loss of our REIT status, our Declaration of Trust limits any shareholder from owning more than 9.8% in value of our outstanding shares, although we have granted in the past, and may continue to grant in the future certain waivers of this limitation to certain shareholders under certain conditions. The ownership limit may have the effect of precluding acquisition of control of us. If anyone acquires shares in excess of the ownership limit, we may:

 

consider the transfer to be null and void;

 

not reflect the transaction on our books;

 

institute legal action to stop the transaction;

 

not pay dividends or other distributions with respect to those shares;

 

not recognize any voting rights for those shares; and

 

consider the shares held in trust for the benefit of a person to whom such shares may be transferred.

Limitation due to our ability to issue preferred shares. Our Declaration of Trust authorizes our Board of Trustees to cause us to issue preferred shares, without limitation as to amount and without shareholder consent. Our Board of Trustees is able to establish the preferences and rights of any preferred shares issued and these shares could have the effect of delaying or preventing someone from taking control of us, even if a change in control were in our shareholders’ best interests.

Limitation imposed by the Maryland Business Combination Law. The Maryland General Corporation Law, as applicable to Maryland REITs, establishes special restrictions against “business combinations” between a Maryland REIT and “interested shareholders” or their affiliates unless an exemption is applicable. An interested shareholder includes a person, who beneficially owns, and an affiliate or associate of the trust who, at any time within the two-year period prior to the date in question, was the beneficial owner of, ten percent or more of the voting power of our then-outstanding voting shares. Among other things, Maryland law prohibits (for a period of five years) a merger and certain other transactions between a Maryland REIT and an interested shareholder unless the board of trustees had approved the transaction before the party became an interested shareholder. The five-year period runs from the most recent date on which the interested shareholder became an interested shareholder. Thereafter, any such business combination must be

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recommended by the board of trustees and approved by two super-majority shareholder votes unless, among other conditions, the common shareholders receive a minimum price for their shares and the consideration is received in cash or in the same form as previously paid by the interested shareholder for our shares or unless the board of trustees approved the transaction before the party in question became an interested shareholder. The business combination statute could have the effect of discouraging offers to acquire us and of increasing the difficulty of consummating any such offers, even if the acquisition would be in our shareholders’ best interests.

Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act. Maryland law provides that “control shares” of a REIT acquired in a “control share acquisition” shall have no voting rights except to the extent approved by a vote of two-thirds of the vote eligible to be cast on the matter under the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act. Shares construed as “control shares” means that, if aggregated with all other shares previously acquired by the acquirer or in respect of which the acquirer is able to exercise or direct the exercise of voting power (except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy), would entitle the acquirer to exercise voting power in electing trustees within one of the following ranges of voting power: one-tenth or more but less than one-third, one-third or more but less than a majority or a majority or more of all voting power. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained shareholder approval. A “control share acquisition” means the acquisition of control shares, subject to certain exceptions. If voting rights or control shares acquired in a control share acquisition are not approved at a shareholder’s meeting, then subject to certain conditions and limitations the issuer may redeem any or all of the control shares for fair value. If voting rights of such control shares are approved at a shareholder’s meeting and the acquirer becomes entitled to vote a majority of the shares entitled to vote, all other shareholders may exercise appraisal rights. Any control shares acquired in a control share acquisition which are not exempt under our Bylaws are subject to the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act. Our Bylaws contain a provision exempting from the control share acquisition statute any and all acquisitions by any person of our shares. We cannot assure you that this provision will not be repealed, amended or eliminated by us at any time in the future.

Maryland Unsolicited Takeover Act.  Subtitle 8 of Title 3 of the Maryland General Corporation Law permits our Board of Trustees, without shareholder approval, and regardless of what is currently in our charter or bylaws, to implement (i) a classified board; (ii) a two-thirds vote requirement for removing a trustee; (iii) a requirement that the number of trustees be fixed only by vote of the trustees; (iv) a requirement that a vacancy on the board be filled only by the remaining trustees and for the remainder of the full term of the class of trustees in which the vacancy occurred; and (v) a majority requirement for the calling by shareholders of a special meeting of shareholders.  This statute could have the effect of discouraging offers to acquire us and of increasing the difficulty of consummating any such offers, even if the acquisition would be in our shareholders’ best interests.

Advance Notice Provisions for Shareholder Nominations and Proposals. Our bylaws require advance notice for shareholders to nominate persons for election as trustees at, or to bring other business before, any meeting of our shareholders. This bylaw provision limits the ability of shareholders to make nominations of persons for election as trustees or to introduce other proposals unless we are notified in a timely manner prior to the meeting.

Many factors can have an adverse effect on the market value of our securities.

A number of factors might adversely affect the price of our securities, many of which are beyond our control. These factors include:

 

increases in market interest rates, relative to the dividend yield on our securities. If market interest rates go up, prospective purchasers of our securities may require a higher yield. Higher market interest rates would not, however, result in more funds for us to distribute and, to the contrary, would likely increase our borrowing costs and potentially decrease funds available for distribution. Thus, higher market interest rates could cause the market price of our common shares to go down;

 

anticipated benefit of an investment in our securities as compared to investment in securities of companies in other industries (including benefits associated with tax treatment of dividends and distributions);

 

perception by market professionals of REITs generally and REITs comparable to us in particular;

 

level of institutional investor interest in our securities;

 

relatively low trading volumes in securities of REITs;

 

our results of operations and financial condition; and

 

investor confidence in the stock market generally.

The market value of our common shares is based primarily upon the market’s perception of our growth potential and our current and potential future earnings and cash distributions. Consequently, our common shares may trade at prices that are higher or lower than our net asset value per common share. If our future earnings or cash distributions are less than expected, it is likely that the market price of our common shares will diminish.

Additional issuances of equity securities may be dilutive to shareholders.

The interests of our shareholders could be diluted if we issue additional equity securities to finance future developments or acquisitions or to repay indebtedness. Our Board of Trustees may authorize the issuance of additional equity securities without shareholder approval. Our ability to execute our business strategy depends upon our access to an appropriate blend of debt financing,

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including unsecured lines of credit and other forms of secured and unsecured debt, and equity financing, including the issuance of common and preferred equity.

The issuance of preferred securities may adversely affect the rights of holders of our common shares.

Because our Board of Trustees has the power to establish the preferences and rights of each class or series of preferred shares, we may afford the holders in any series or class of preferred shares preferences, distributions, powers and rights, voting or otherwise, senior to the rights of holders of common shares. Our Board of Trustees also has the power to establish the preferences and rights of each class or series of units in the Operating Partnership, and may afford the holders in any series or class of preferred units preferences, distributions, powers and rights, voting or otherwise, senior to the rights of holders of common units.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of integrated internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results.

An effective system of internal control over financial reporting is necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports, prevent fraud and operate successfully as a public company. As part of our ongoing monitoring of internal controls, we may discover material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal controls that we believe require remediation. If we discover such weaknesses, we will make efforts to improve our internal controls in a timely manner. Any system of internal controls, however well designed and operated, is based in part on certain assumptions and can only provide reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Any failure to maintain effective internal controls, or implement any necessary improvements in a timely manner, could have a materially adverse effect on our business and operating results, or cause us to not meet our reporting obligations, which could affect our ability to remain listed with the New York Stock Exchange. Ineffective internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which would likely have a negative effect on the trading price of our securities.

Changes in accounting pronouncements could adversely affect our operating results, in addition to the reported financial performance of our tenants.

Accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. Uncertainties posed by various initiatives of accounting standard-setting by the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the Securities and Exchange Commission, which create and interpret applicable accounting standards for U.S. companies, may change the financial accounting and reporting standards or their interpretation and application of these standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements.  

These changes could have a material effect on our reported financial condition and results of operations.  In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in potentially material restatements of prior period financial statements. Similarly, these changes could have a material impact on our tenants’ reported financial condition or results of operations or could affect our tenants’ preferences regarding leasing real estate.  

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

 

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Item 2.

Properties

Property Acquisitions

On July 1, 2016, we closed on the acquisition of 34.6 acres of land located in Austin, Texas known as the Garza Ranch for a gross purchase price of $20.6 million. We accounted for this transaction as an asset acquisition and capitalized approximately $1.9 million of acquisition related costs and closing costs as part of land held for development on our consolidated balance sheet. We funded the acquisition with $20.4 million of available corporate funds, net of prorations and other adjustments. As of December 31, 2016, we were under agreement to sell 9.5 acres (of the 34.6 acres) to two unaffiliated third parties. As of December 31, 2016, the land under this agreement of sale did not meet the criteria to be classified as held for sale. See Note 21, “Subsequent Events,” to the Consolidated Financial Statements for information related to the sale of 1.7 acres. We have a continuing involvement through a completion guaranty, which requires the Company, as developer, to complete certain infrastructure improvements on behalf of the buyers of the land parcels.

Developments

933 First Avenue

During the second quarter of 2016, we commenced construction of an 111,000 square foot, four-story, Class A office property located in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.  We anticipate the project cost to total $28.7 million, of which $9.4 million had been funded through December 31, 2016. The project is 100% leased to a single tenant.

FMC Tower at Cira Centre South

 

As of December 31, 2016, we were substantially complete with the construction of the office component of FMC Tower in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The building contains a total of 870,000 square feet and is expected to cost $385.0 million, of which $367.0 million has been funded through December 31, 2016.  The remaining spend relates to tenant improvements and the residential component of FMC Tower, which is expected to be funded in the first half of 2017. See Item 1., “Business – Developments” for further details on the project.

Other Development Services

On December 3, 2015, we entered into an agreement as development manager to construct Subaru of America’s corporate headquarters (the “Subaru Headquarters Development”), an office property containing five floors and approximately 250,000 square feet, on land owned by Subaru and located in Camden, New Jersey. In addition to development fees, the agreement provides us the ability to earn additional profit if total project costs are less than the not-to-exceed (“NTE”) amount.  The NTE amount, currently at $78.1 million, may be adjusted by change orders agreed upon by both Subaru and us.  If construction costs exceed the NTE amount, we are obligated to pay the excess.  As of December 31, 2016, $39.9 million of the project costs had been funded.

Also on December 3, 2015, we entered into an agreement to construct an 83,000 square foot build-to-suit service center (the “Subaru NSTC Development”) on land parcels owned by us for Subaru of America as the single tenant. On such date, Subaru of America entered into an 18-year lease for the service center. The lease contains a purchase option, which allows Subaru to purchase the property at commencement of the lease, or five years subsequent to inception, at depreciated cost. We currently expect to deliver the building during the first quarter of 2018.  At December 31, 2016, $10.5 million of the project costs, totaling $29.3 million, had been funded.

 

As discussed above in Item 1., “Business - Developments,” as of December 31, 2016, we were proceeding through four of our unconsolidated real estate ventures’ development projects at 51 N Street and 1250 First Street in Washington, D.C, 1919 Market Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and 4040 Wilson in Arlington, Virginia.

32


Property Sales

We sold the following properties during the year ended December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands):

 

Disposition Date

 

Property/Portfolio Name

 

Location

 

Number of Properties

 

 

Rentable Square Feet

 

 

Sales Price

 

 

Net Proceeds on Sale

 

 

Gain (Loss) on Sale (a)

 

 

Occupancy % at Date of Sale

 

October 13, 2016

 

620, 640, 660 Allendale Road

 

King of Prussia, PA

 

 

3

 

 

 

156,669

 

 

$

12,800

 

 

$

12,014

 

 

$

2,382

 

 

 

100.0%

 

September 1, 2016

 

1120 Executive Plaza

 

Mt. Laurel, NJ

 

 

1

 

 

 

95,183

 

 

 

9,500

 

 

 

9,241

 

 

 

(18

)

(b)

 

100.0%

 

August 2, 2016

 

50 East Clementon Road

 

Gibbsboro, NJ

 

 

1

 

 

 

3,080

 

 

 

1,100

 

 

 

1,011

 

 

 

(85

)

 

 

100.0%

 

May 11, 2016

 

196/198 Van Buren Street (Herndon Metro Plaza I&II)

 

Herndon, VA

 

 

2

 

 

 

197,225

 

 

 

44,500

 

 

 

43,412

 

 

 

(752

)

(c)

 

92.9%

 

February 5, 2016

 

2970 Market Street  (Cira Square)

 

Philadelphia, PA

 

 

1

 

 

 

862,692

 

 

 

354,000

 

 

 

350,150

 

 

 

115,828

 

 

 

100.0%

 

February 4, 2016

 

Och-Ziff Portfolio

 

Various (d)

 

 

58

 

 

 

3,924,783

 

 

 

398,100

 

 

 

353,971

 

 

 

(372

)

(e)

 

91.4%

 

Total Dispositions

 

 

 

 

 

 

66

 

 

 

5,239,632

 

 

$

820,000

 

 

$

769,799

 

 

$

116,983

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

Gain/(Loss) on Sale is net of closing and other transaction related costs.

 

(b)

As of June 30, 2016, we determined that the sale of the property was probable and classified this property as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the property exceeded the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. As a result, we recognized a provision for impairment totaling approximately $1.8 million during the three-month period ended June 30, 2016. The fair value measurement was based on the pricing in the purchase and sale agreement. The loss on sale represents additional closing costs recognized at closing.

 

(c)

During the three-month period ended March 31, 2016, we recognized a provision for impairment totaling approximately $7.4 million on the properties. The loss on sale primarily relates to additional closing costs recognized at closing.

 

(d)

Exhibit 99.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2016 contains a complete list of the 58 properties disposed of in the transactions with Och-Ziff Capital Management Group LLC. See Note 4, "Investment in Unconsolidated Real Estate Ventures," to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further details of the transactions.

 

(e)

During the three-month period ended December 31, 2015, we recognized a provision for impairment totaling approximately $45.4 million. The loss on sale represents additional closing costs recognized at closing.

We sold the following land parcels during the year ended December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands):

Disposition Date

 

Property/Portfolio Name

 

Location

 

Number of Parcels

 

 

Acres

 

 

Sales Price

 

 

Net Proceeds on Sale

 

 

Gain on Sale (a)

 

 

December 2, 2016

 

Oakland Lot B

 

Oakland, CA

 

 

1

 

 

 

0.9

 

 

$

13,750

 

 

$

13,411

 

 

$

9,039

 

 

August 19, 2016

 

Highlands Land

 

Mt. Laurel, NJ

 

 

1

 

 

 

2.0

 

 

 

288

 

 

 

284

 

 

 

193

 

 

January 15, 2016

 

Greenhills Land

 

Reading, PA

 

 

1

 

 

 

120.0

 

 

 

900

 

 

 

837

 

 

 

-

 

(b)

Total Dispositions

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

122.9

 

 

$

14,938

 

 

$

14,532

 

 

$

9,232

 

 

 

 

(a)

Gain on Sale is net of closing and other transaction related costs.

 

(b)

The carrying value of the land exceeded the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale as of December 31, 2015, therefore we recognized an impairment loss of $0.3 million during the three-month period ended December 31, 2015. There was no gain or loss recognized on the sale during 2016.

The sales of properties referenced above do not represent a strategic shift that has a major effect on our operations and financial results. As a result, the operating results of these properties remain classified within continuing operations for all periods presented.

33


Held for Sale

The following is a summary of properties classified as held for sale but which did not meet the criteria to be classified within discontinued operations at December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

 

Held for Sale Properties Included in Continuing Operations

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

Metropolitan D.C. - Office (a)

 

 

Other Segment - Office (b)

 

 

Other Segment - Land (c)

 

 

Total

 

ASSETS HELD FOR SALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate investments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating properties

$

21,720

 

 

$

51,871

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

73,591

 

Accumulated depreciation

 

(11,935

)

 

 

(20,981

)

 

 

-

 

 

 

(32,916

)

Operating real estate investments, net

 

9,785

 

 

 

30,890

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

40,675

 

Land held for development

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,043

 

 

 

1,043

 

Total real estate investments, net

 

9,785

 

 

 

30,890

 

 

 

1,043

 

 

 

41,718

 

Total assets held for sale, net

$

9,785

 

 

$

30,890

 

 

$

1,043

 

 

$

41,718

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES HELD FOR SALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other liabilities

$

73

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

81

 

Total liabilities held for sale

$

73

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

81

 

 

 

(a)

As of December 31, 2016, we determined that the sale of three office properties in the Metropolitan D.C. segment was probable and classified these properties as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the properties exceeded their fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. As a result, we recognized an impairment loss totaling approximately $3.0 million during the three-month period ended December 31, 2016. We measured this impairment based on a discounted cash flow analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual capitalization rates and discount rates of 9.00% and 10.00%, respectively. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

 

(b)

As of December 31, 2016, we determined that the sale of two office properties in the Other segment was probable and classified these properties as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the properties exceeded the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. As a result, we recognized an impairment loss totaling approximately $11.5 million during the three-month period ended December 31, 2016. We measured this impairment based on a discounted cash flow analysis, using a hold period of 10 years and residual capitalization rates and discount rates of 9.75% and 9.75%, respectively. The results were comparable to indicative pricing in the market.

 

(c)

As of December 31, 2016, we determined that the sale of a land parcel in the Other segment was probable and classified the land parcel as held for sale in accordance with applicable accounting standards for long lived assets. At such date, the carrying value of the land approximated the fair value less the anticipated costs of sale. The fair value measurement was based on the pricing in the purchase and sale agreement.

The sales of properties referenced above do not represent a strategic shift that has a major effect on our operations and financial results. As a result, the operating results of these properties remain classified within continuing operations for all periods presented. See Note 21, "Subsequent Events," to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding these dispositions.

Properties

As of December 31, 2016, we owned 113 properties that contain an aggregate of approximately 17.6 million net rentable square feet and consist of 93 office properties, seven mixed-use properties, one retail property (101 core properties), four development properties, three redevelopment properties and five properties classified as held for sale (collectively, the “Properties”).  The properties are located in or near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Metropolitan Washington, D.C.; Southern New Jersey; Richmond, Virginia; Wilmington, Delaware; Austin Texas; and Concord, California. As of December 31, 2016, the properties, excluding development and redevelopment, were approximately 93.3% occupied by 825 tenants and had an average age of approximately 24.1 years. The office properties are a combination of urban and transit-oriented suburban office buildings containing an average of approximately 159,350 net rentable square feet. The mixed-use properties accommodate a variety of tenant uses, including retail, residential apartment units and a hotel. We carry comprehensive liability, fire, extended coverage and rental loss insurance covering all of the properties, with policy specifications and insured limits which we believe are adequate.

34


The following table sets forth information with respect to our core properties at December 31, 2016:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location

 

State

 

Year Built/ Renovated

 

Net Rentable Square Feet

 

 

Percentage Leased as of December 31, 2016 (a)

 

 

Total Base Rent for the Twelve Months Ended December 31, 2016 (b) (000’s)

 

 

Average Annualized Rental Rate as of December 31, 2016 (c)

 

PENNSYLVANIA SUBURBS SEGMENT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

150 Radnor Chester Road

 

 

 

Radnor

 

PA

 

1983

 

 

340,380

 

 

 

98.8

%

 

$

10,849

 

 

$

35.64

 

201 King of Prussia Road

 

 

 

Radnor

 

PA

 

2001

 

 

251,434

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

7,304

 

 

 

35.02

 

555 Lancaster Avenue

 

 

 

Radnor

 

PA

 

1973

 

 

241,687

 

 

 

98.8

%

 

 

6,889

 

 

 

34.58

 

401 Plymouth Road

 

 

 

Plymouth Meeting

 

PA

 

2001

 

 

204,186

 

 

 

98.8

%

 

 

6,145

 

 

 

33.03

 

One Radnor Corporate Center

 

 

 

Radnor

 

PA

 

1998

 

 

201,874

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

5,423

 

 

 

30.12

 

101 West Elm Street

 

 

 

W. Conshohocken

 

PA

 

1999

 

 

173,827

 

 

 

96.6

%

 

 

4,474

 

 

 

26.42

 

Five Radnor Corporate Center

 

 

 

Radnor

 

PA

 

1998

 

 

164,505

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

5,258

 

 

 

34.63

 

Four Radnor Corporate Center

 

 

 

Radnor

 

PA

 

1995

 

 

164,464

 

 

 

91.4

%

 

 

4,822

 

 

 

33.98

 

660 West Germantown Pike

 

 

 

Plymouth Meeting

 

PA

 

2014

 

 

161,521

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

4,709

 

 

 

31.82

 

630 Allendale Road

 

 

 

King of Prussia

 

PA

 

2000

 

 

150,000