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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

2016 10K

enXt









UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K



 



(Mark one)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934



For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934



For the transition period from _______________ to _________________



Commission file number: 001-34087



Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)





 

Maryland

52-1889548

(State or other jurisdiction of

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

4800 Montgomery Lane Ste. 220, Bethesda, MD

20814

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

(301)  861-3305

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:



 

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $.01 par value per share

 

The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None



Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [  ]



Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [X]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 or the Exchange Act.



 

Large accelerated filer [  ]

Accelerated filer [  ]

Non-accelerated filer   [  ]  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company [X]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [  ] No [X]



As of June 30, 2016 the aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $7.2 million based on the price at which the common stock was last sold on that date as reported on the Nasdaq Global Market. At February 28, 2017, there were 43,993,705 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.



DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE



Portions of the Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the Registrant’s 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be filed within 120 days of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, are incorporated into Part III. 

 









 


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS











 

 



 

Form 10-K



 

Report

Item No.

 

Page



PART I

 

1

Business 

1A.

Risk Factors 

1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments 

25 

2

Properties 

26 

3

Legal Proceedings 

26 

4

Mine Safety Disclosures 

26 



PART II

 

5

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

27 

6

Selected Financial Data

29 

7

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

31 

7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

49 

8

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

51 

9

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

95 

9A.

Controls and Procedures

95 

9B.

Other Information

95 



PART III

 

10

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

96 

11

Executive Compensation

96 

12

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

96 

13

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

96 

14

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

97 



PART IV

 

15

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

97 





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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS



Certain information both included and incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and as such may involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors which may cause our actual results, performance, or achievements to be materially different from future results, performance, or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on assumptions that management has made in light of experience in the business in which we operate, as well as management’s perceptions of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments, and other factors believed to be appropriate under the circumstances. These statements are not guarantees of performance or results. They involve risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond our control), and assumptions. Management believes that these forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions.



Forward-looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe our future plans, strategies, and expectations are generally identifiable by use of the words “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “intend,” or “project” or the negative thereof or other variations thereon or comparable terminology. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects include, but are not limited to, changes in economic conditions generally and the real estate market specifically, legislative/regulatory changes (including changes to laws governing the taxation of real estate investment trusts), availability of capital, risks associated with debt financing, interest rates, competition, supply and demand for hotel rooms in our current and proposed market areas, policies and guidelines applicable to real estate investment trusts, and other risks and uncertainties described herein, and in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) from time to time.  These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating any forward-looking statements contained or incorporated by reference herein.  We caution readers not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements included in this report which speak only as of the date of this report.



PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS



References to “we,” “our,” “us,” and the “Company” refer to Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc., including, as the context requires, its direct and indirect subsidiaries.



Overview



Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc. (“CDOR,” “Condor,” or the “Company”), which until July 15, 2015 was formerly named Supertel Hospitality, Inc., was incorporated in Virginia on August 23, 1994 and was reincorporated in Maryland on November 19, 2014. Our common stock began to trade on the Nasdaq Stock Market on October 30, 1996 and today trades under the symbol “CDOR”.



CDOR is a self-administered real estate investment trust (“REIT”) for federal income tax purposes that specializes in the investment and ownership of high-quality select-service, limited-service, extended stay, and compact full service hotels.  As of December 31, 2016, the Company owned 19 hotels, representing 2,047 rooms, in 12 states, including one hotel owned through an 80% interest in an unconsolidated joint venture (the “Atlanta JV”).



Our significant events for 2016 include:



·

On various dates throughout the year, the Company sold 25 hotels for total gross proceeds of $61.4 million and primarily used the net proceeds, after repayment of the underlying loans, to fund acquisitions, to build cash reserves for future hotel acquisitions, and for general corporate purposes.

·

On March 16, 2016, the Company raised $30.0 million in a private placement transaction with an affiliate of the StepStone Group. The investment, structured as a new Series D Preferred Stock, includes a 6.25% annual dividend, payable quarterly, and may be converted by the holders into shares of the Company’s common stock at a conversion price of $1.60 per share.  Simultaneously with StepStone’s Series D Preferred Stock investment, the Company’s outstanding 6.25% Series C Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock (“Series C Preferred Stock”), all of which was held by Real Estate Strategies L.P. (“RES”), was also

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exchanged for the newly created Series D Preferred Stock.  The Company used approximately $20.2 million of the proceeds from the $30.0 million raise to redeem all outstanding 8% Series A Cumulative Preferred Stock (“Series A Preferred Stock”) and 10% Series B Cumulative Preferred Stock (“Series B Preferred Stock”), including all unpaid accrued dividends, on April 15, 2016, resulting in one class of preferred stock for which the Company can require conversion entirely into common stock upon the occurrence of defined capital events.  Excess proceeds were utilized by the Company to accelerate the strategic repositioning of its portfolio through the completion of acquisitions. 

·

On May 26, 2016, the Company announced that it had moved its corporate headquarters to Bethesda, Maryland.  The new corporate headquarters are located at 4800 Montgomery Lane, Suite 220, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.  The Company continues to maintain leased office space in both Omaha and Norfolk, Nebraska.

·

On July 11, 2016, the Company reinstated common dividends for the first time since 2009.  The Company declared a common stock dividend of $0.01 per share for the second quarter of 2016.

·

On August 22, 2016, the Company closed on the joint venture acquisition of the 254-room Aloft Atlanta located in downtown Atlanta at 300 Spring Street NW, Atlanta, GA. Condor entered into the Atlanta JV with Three Wall Capital (“TWC”), of which Condor owns 80% and TWC owns 20%, to acquire the hotel. The purchase price for the hotel was $43.6 million.  The hotel is managed by Boast Hotel Management Company, LLC, an affiliate of TWC.

·

On September 16, 2016, the Company announced that it increased its common stock dividend to an annualized $0.12 per share for the third quarter of 2016.

·

On December 8, 2016, the Company declared its fourth quarter dividend of $0.03 per share. 

·

On December 14, 2016, the Company closed on the acquisition of the 156-room Aloft Leawood / Overland Park (Kansas City) located within Park Place Village at 11620 Ash Street, Leawood, KS.  The purchase price for the hotel was $22.5 million.  The hotel is managed by Presidian Hotel and Resorts.

Subsequent to the close of 2016, the Company announced the following significant events.  These events are further discussed in the Subsequent Events footnote to the consolidated financial statements.

·

On January 23, 2017 the Company executed an agreement to purchase a portfolio of four Home2 Suites hotels for $73.8 million.  The portfolio includes the Home2 Suites Memphis / Southaven, the Home2 Suites Austin / Round Rock, the Home 2 Suites Lexington University / Medical Center (Kentucky), and the Home2 Suites Tallahassee State Capitol.  The closing of these acquisitions is anticipated to occur in the first quarter of 2017, but is subject to customary closing conditions including accuracy of representations and warrants and compliance with covenants and obligations. 

·

On February 8, 2017, the Company announced that it had received commitment letters from two banks, KeyBank and The Huntington National Bank, for a $90.0 million secured credit facility.  This credit facility subsequently closed on March 1, 2017.    The new credit facility significantly reduced the Company’s weighted average cost of debt and enabled the refinancing of all 2017 and 2018 maturities.

·

On February 28, 2017, the holders of the Series D Preferred Stock voluntarily converted their shares into 39,032,225 shares of common stock at $1.60 per share pursuant to the terms of the preferred stock.  The terms of the Series D Preferred Stock provided for automatic conversion following certain future common stock offerings, and also provided for potential additional payments to the holders depending on the sales price of common stock in the offerings. As a result of the voluntary conversion, the holders are no longer entitled to the potential payments. To induce the holders of the Series D Preferred Stock to voluntarily convert their shares, the Company issued the holders a $9.3 million of a new series of preferred stock, the Series E Preferred Stock.



We conduct our business through a traditional umbrella partnership REIT, or UPREIT, in which our hotel properties are owned by our operating partnership, Condor Hospitality Limited Partnership and its subsidiaries (“CHLP”), for which we serve as general partner. As of December 31, 2016, we owned an approximate 97.8% ownership interest in CHLP.  In the future, CHLP may issue limited partnership interests to third parties from time to time in connection with our acquisition of hotel properties or the raising of capital.  The Company’s 100% owned E&P Financing Limited Partnership no longer owns any assets or conducts any operations following the sale of its last remaining property in January 2016.

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In order for the income from our hotel property investments to constitute “rents from real properties” for purposes of the gross income tests required by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) for REIT qualification, the income we earn cannot be derived from the operation of any of our hotels.  Therefore, CHLP and its subsidiaries lease our hotel properties to the Company’s wholly owned taxable REIT subsidiary, TRS Leasing, Inc., and its wholly owned subsidiaries (“the TRS”). The TRS in turn engages third-party eligible independent contractors to manage the hotels.  CHLP, the TRS, and their respective subsidiaries are consolidated into the Company’s financial statements. 



We are engaged primarily in the business of owning equity interests in hotel properties and therefore our business is disclosed as one reportable segment.  See the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for certain financial information required in this Item 1.



Mission Statement



Our mission is to provide to our shareholders attractive total returns for the lodging sector through (1) disciplined investment in high-quality select-service, limited-service, extended stay, and compact full service hotels, and (2) intensive asset management to achieve enhanced results.



We achieve this mission through the disciplined and efficient execution of the following Core Strategies:

·

Acquisition Strategy

·

Disposition Strategy

·

Asset Management Strategy

·

Financing Strategy



We understand that we cannot achieve our mission alone and therefore work with the following independent businesses, who we refer to as Business Partners, in the execution of our mission:

·

Franchise Partners

·

Hotel Management Company Partners



Core Strategies



Acquisition Strategy



The objective of our acquisition strategy is to enable us to acquire assets that meet our target property characteristics and investment criteria at attractive valuations. We believe that our existing relationships with owners, operators, and developers of select-service hotels will provide us with access to certain off-market acquisition opportunities ahead of other real estate investors.  Typically, off-market transactions lead to more attractive valuation outcomes.  Our organizational documents do not limit the types of investments we can make; however, our intent is to execute the acquisition strategy as detailed herein.

   

We believe our target property characteristics and investment criteria, coupled with our ability to source off-market transactions, differentiates us from our peers and will enable us to achieve our mission to obtain attractive returns to our shareholders.



Target Property Characteristics



Our target properties are high-quality select-service, limited-service, extended stay, and compact full-service hotels located primarily in the top 100 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (“MSAs”), with a focus on the top 21 – 60 MSAs.  From time to time, we may acquire assets outside these target MSAs if we are able to acquire the asset at an attractive valuation and have confidence in the value proposition of the property.  If within a top 25 MSA, the asset will typically be located within an attractive sub- market of the larger MSA.  The hotels we will look to acquire will be franchised under premium flags by brands such as Hilton, Marriott/Starwood, IHG, and Hyatt and operated by third-party management companies.

   

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In 2016, we acquired two assets that meet our investment criteria: Aloft Atlanta Downtown and the Aloft Leawood.  Subsequent to the close of 2016, we announced our intent to acquire four Home2 Suites hotels in the following markets: Austin-Round Rock (TX), Lexington (KY), Tallahassee (FL), and Memphis-Southaven (MS).  We expect to close on the acquisition of these four assets in the first quarter of 2017, subject to customary closing conditions and diligence.



Investment Criteria



We perform thorough due diligence and utilize extensive research to evaluate any target market or property.  This due diligence and research may include, but is not limited to, analyzing the long-term economic outlook of an MSA, reviewing trends in local lodging demand and supply, assessing property condition and required capital investment, and understanding historical property financial performance.  Specific investment criteria for hotels we are looking to acquire may include but are not limited to:

   

·

hotels that operate under leading premium franchise brands and possess key attributes such as building design and décor that is consistent with current generation brand standards;

·

hotels that are located within the top 100 MSAs, in close proximity to multiple demand drivers, including large corporations, regional hospitals, regional business hubs, recreational travel destinations, significant retail centers, and military installations, among others;

·

hotels that are located within markets that have favorable economic, job growth, and demographic factors;

·

hotels that have illustrated an ability to generate stabilized and dependable revenue and net operating income;

·

hotels that were constructed less than ten years prior to our acquisition or have been recently significantly renovated  to current brand standards, and have significant time (generally ten or more years) remaining on the existing franchise license;

·

hotels that have some value-added growth potential through operating efficiencies, institutional asset management, repositioning, renovations, or rebranding;

·

hotels that can be acquired at a discount to replacement cost; and/or

·

hotels that can be acquired in off-market transactions.



Disposition Strategy



We have been engaged in a process of transitioning our portfolio from economy hotels to high-quality select-service, limited-service, extended stay, and compact full service hotels.  In order to achieve this objective, we have focused on disposing of legacy assets that do not meet the property characteristics and investment criteria discussed above.  Since January 1, 2015, we have sold 42 hotels.  The value unlocked from asset sales has been and will continue to be redeployed into newer, higher-quality assets meeting the acquisition strategy discussed above.  Just as we carefully evaluate the hotels we plan to acquire, our asset management team has evaluated the timing and composition of the legacy hotels to be disposed of in a manner we believe will maximize returns for our shareholders.  We are committed to a disciplined but timely monetization of the legacy assets in order to achieve the strategic repositioning of the portfolio.  In 2017, we will continue to dispose of assets that do not fit the new strategic vision of our portfolio and have announced plans to sell seven additional legacy hotels in the first half of 2017.

   

Additionally, from time to time, we may undertake the sale of one or more hotels that meet the property characteristics and investment criteria discussed above.  These disposition decisions are the result of a thorough analysis and typically in response to changes in market conditions, our current or projected return on our investment in the hotel, or other factors which we deem relevant to the disposition decision.



Asset Management Strategy



Through collaboration with our third-party operators, we seek to maximize value to our shareholders through improvements to our existing hotels’ operating results.  We work toward this goal by constantly monitoring the performance of each individual hotel and identifying opportunities for value-enhancement through intensive asset management strategies.  We will make recommendations to our third-party operators in all aspects of our hotels operations, including revenue management, physical design, guest experience, market positioning, and overall

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property strategy.  Fundamentally, all strategies are focused on growing the revenue of a hotel, controlling expenses, and/or maximizing the guest experience to drive returns.

   

We work with our third-party operators to develop short- and long-term capital investment plans that are focused on generating positive returns for our shareholders.  The capital improvements may involve investments in expansions, additions, renovations, technology upgrades, and/or energy efficiency improvements.

   

Additionally, from time to time, we may come to the conclusion that a particular asset may provide greater returns to our shareholders after an extensive repositioning of the asset in the market.  In these instances, capital investment in a greater amount than typical for an asset may be required to achieve the desired repositioning.  These decisions will be made after a thorough analysis of the property, market conditions, and the potential for a positive return on investment that exceeds our investment hurdle rates.



Financing Strategy



Our financing strategy is to seek to minimize the cost of our capital in order to maximize the returns generated for our shareholders.  We intend to finance our long-term growth with equity capital raises and debt financings that have staggered maturities.  From time to time, when purchasing hotel properties, we may issue limited partnership interests in CHLP to third parties as full or partial consideration to sellers.  Currently, our debt includes a recourse line of credit secured by certain hotels and mortgages secured by our hotel properties.  In the future we plan on using a revolving credit facility, term loans, equity issuances, and mortgage debt financings to fund future acquisitions as well as for property redevelopments, return on investment initiatives, and working capital requirements.



Business Partners



Franchise Partners



We believe that in order to achieve our mission we must partner with the right franchisors of quality brands in our target segments.  To this end, we have built strong relationships with many of who we believe are the leading franchisors of the strongest brands in the segments we target, including Hilton, Marriott/Starwood, IHG, and Hyatt.  The franchisors provide a variety of benefits and value which include national advertising, marketing programs to increase brand awareness, personnel training, and centralized reservation systems.  We are constantly monitoring and evaluating the performance of these franchisors and their respective brands so that, when necessary, we can adapt our franchise partner strategy to maximize returns to our shareholders.



Under our franchise agreements, we are required to pay franchise fees generally between 3.3% and 5.5% of room revenue, plus additional fees for marketing, central reservation systems, and other franchisor programs and services that amount to between 2.5% and 6.0% of room revenue.  The franchise agreements typically have 10 to 25 year terms although certain agreements may be terminated by either party on certain anniversary dates specified in the agreements.  Further, each agreement provides for early termination fees in the event the agreement is terminated before the stated term.



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Our 19 hotels owned at December 31, 2016 operate under the following national and independent brands.  Pursuant to our previously discussed strategy, we envision the composition of this brand portfolio to change dramatically as we continue to transition the portfolio.





 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

Franchise Brand

 

Number of Hotels

 

Number of Rooms

Acquired In or Since 2012:

 

 

 

 

Aloft (1)

 

 

410 

Courtyard by Marriott (1)

 

 

120 

Hilton Garden Inn (2)

 

 

100 

Hotel Indigo (3)

 

 

142 

SpringHill Suites (1)

 

 

116 

Legacy Properties Owned Prior to 2012:

 

 

 

 

Super 8 (4)

 

 

227 

Comfort Inn/Comfort Suites (5)

 

 

535 

Quality Inn (5)

 

 

140 

Days Inn (4)

 

 

176 

Key West Inn (6)

 

 

40 

Supertel Inn (7)*

 

 

41 

Total

 

19 

 

2,047 



(1) Courtyard by Marriott ®, Aloft ®, and SpringHill Suites ® are a registered trademarks of Marriott International

(2) Hilton Garden Inn® is a registered trademark of Hilton Hotels Corporation

(3) Hotel Indigo® is a registered trademark of InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

(4) Super 8® and Days Inn ® are registered trademarks of Wyndham Worldwide

(5) Comfort Inn ®, Comfort Suites ®, and Quality Inn® are registered trademarks of Choice Hotels International, Inc.

(6) Key West Inn ® is a registered trademark of Key West Inns

(7) Supertel Inn® is a registered trademark of Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc.

* Independent hotel brand unassociated with a national franchise brand





Hotel Management Company Partners



As a REIT, we are not permitted to directly operate any of our hotels.  We partner closely with some of who we believe are the leading hotel management companies in order to operate our hotels with the ultimate objective of improving same-store hotel performance throughout our portfolio.  Each management agreement provides for a set term and is subject to early termination upon the occurrence of defaults and certain other events.  As required under the REIT qualification rules, each manager must qualify as an “eligible independent contractor” during the term of the management agreement.



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Our 19 hotels owned at December 31, 2016 are operated by the following third-party management companies:







 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

Management Company

 

Number of Hotels

 

Number of Rooms

Hospitality Management Advisors, Inc.

 

 

672 

Peachtree Hospitality Management, LLC

 

 

378 

Kinseth Hotel Corporation

 

 

268 

K Partners Hotel Management

 

 

160 

Boast Hotel Management Company

 

 

254 

Presidian Hotels

 

 

156 

Cherry Cove Hospitality Management, LLC

 

 

159 

Total

 

19 

 

2,047 



 

 

 

 

Seasonality of Hotel Business



Historically, as a result of the geographic areas in which we operate, the operations of our hotels have been seasonal in nature.  Generally, occupancy rates, revenue, and operating income have been greater in the second and third quarters of the calendar year than in the first and fourth quarters, with the exception of our hotels located in Florida, which experience peak demand in the first and fourth quarters of the year.  The results of the recently acquired premium-branded select-service hotels, because of their locations and chain scale, are expected to be less seasonal in nature than our legacy portfolio of assets.



Competition



The hotel industry is highly competitive.  Each of our hotels is located in a developed area that includes other hotel properties.  The number of competitive hotel properties in a particular area could have a material adverse effect on revenue, occupancy, and the average daily room rate of our hotels or of hotel properties acquired in the future, and thus our financial results.



We may compete for investment opportunities with entities that have substantially greater financial resources than us.  These entities generally may be able to accept more risk than we can prudently manage. Competition in general may reduce the number of suitable investment opportunities for us and increase the bargaining power of property owners seeking to sell. 



Tax Status



The Company qualifies and intends to continue to qualify as a REIT under the applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”), as amended.  In general, under such Code provisions, a trust which has made the required election and, in the taxable year, meets certain requirements and distributes to its shareholders at least 90% of its REIT taxable income, will not be subject to federal income tax to the extent of the income currently distributed to shareholders.  If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we will be subject to federal income tax on our taxable income at regular corporate income tax rates and generally will be unable to re-elect REIT status until the fifth calendar year after the year in which we failed to qualify as a REIT, unless we satisfy certain relief provisions.  Even if the Company qualifies for taxation as a REIT, the Company may be subject to certain state and local taxes on its income and property, and to federal income and excise taxes on its undistributed taxable income.  Taxable income from non-REIT activities managed through the TRS, which is taxed as a C-Corporation, is subject to federal, state, and local income taxes. 



Employees



At December 31, 2016, Condor had 14 employees.  The staff at our hotels are employed by our third-party hotel managers.



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Available Information



Our executive offices are located at 4800 Montgomery Lane, Suite 220, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, our telephone number is (301) 861-3305, and we maintain an Internet website located at www.condorhospitality.com.  Our annual reports on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these reports are available free of charge on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed with the SEC.  We also make available the charters of our board committees and our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics on our website.  Copies of these documents are available in print to any shareholder who requests them.  Requests should be sent to Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc., 4800 Montgomery Lane, Suite 220, Bethesda, MD 20814, Attn: Corporate Secretary.



Item 1A. Risk Factors



The following discussion concerns the risks associated with our business that should be reviewed and considered carefully. Our business faces many risks and the risks described below may not be the only risks we face. Other risks and uncertainties not presently known to us may also materially and adversely affect our business, the value of our shares, and our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders. Additionally, the risks detailed below are interrelated and should be considered as a whole. In connection with the forward-looking statements that appear in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, you should carefully review the section entitled “Forward-Looking Statements.”



For presentation purposes only, we categorize the risk factors into four broad categories:



·

Risk Related to Our Business & Operations

·

Risks Related to the Hotel Industry

·

Risks Related to the Real Estate Industry

·

Risks Related to Our Structure & Organization



Risks Related to Our Business & Operations



Failure of the economy to improve or remain stable may adversely affect our ability to execute our business strategies, which in turn would adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.



Our ability to execute our business strategy is affected by economic conditions, and we cannot assure you that economic fundamentals will improve or remain stable. The housing market collapse and world events outside our control, such as terrorism, have adversely affected the economy in the recent past and contributed to our net losses of $16.3 million, $1.4 million, $10.2 million, and $17.5 million for our 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2011 fiscal years, respectively.  If events like these reoccur, they may adversely affect the economy in the future.  An economic recession could have a dramatic impact on our financial results. In the event conditions in the economy do not improve or remain stable, our ability to execute our business strategies will be adversely effected, which in turn would adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.



The departure of any of our key personnel who have significant experience and relationships in the lodging industry, particularly our Chief Executive Officer, J. William Blackham, could materially and adversely affect us.

 

We depend on the experience and relationships of our executive officers, especially J. William Blackham, our Chief Executive Officer and a member of our board of directors, to manage our day-to-day operations and strategic business direction. Mr. Blackham has extensive experience in the lodging industry, during which time he has established an extensive network of lodging industry contacts and relationships, including relationships with national hotel brands, hotel owners, financiers, operators, commercial real estate brokers, developers and management companies. We can provide no assurances that Mr. Blackham, or any of our key personnel, will continue their employment with us. The loss of the services of any of the members of our management team, or any difficulty attracting and retaining other talented and experienced personnel, could adversely affect our ability to source potential investment opportunities, our relationship with national hotel brands and other industry participants and the execution of our business strategy. Our ability to replace key individuals may be difficult because of the

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limited number of individuals with the breadth of skills and experience needed to excel in the hotel industry and there can be no assurance that we would be able to hire, train, retain, or motivate such individuals. Further, such a loss could be negatively perceived by investors, which could reduce the market value of our common shares.



If we are unable to successfully manage our growth, our operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected.



Our ability to implement our new business strategy and grow our business depends upon our senior executive officers’ business contacts and their ability to successfully hire, train, supervise and manage additional personnel.

We may not be able to hire and train sufficient personnel or develop management, information and operating systems suitable for our expected growth. If we are unable to manage any future growth effectively, our operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected.



Our future growth is dependent on obtaining new financing and if we cannot secure financing in the future, our growth will be limited.



The success of our growth strategy will depend on access to capital through use of excess cash flow, borrowings or subsequent issuances of common shares or other securities. Acquisitions of new hotel properties will require significant additional capital and existing hotels will require periodic capital improvement initiatives to remain competitive. We may not be able to fund acquisitions or capital improvements solely from cash provided from our operating activities because we must distribute at least 90% of our taxable income (determined before the deduction for dividends paid and excluding any net capital gains) each year to satisfy the requirements for qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. As a result, our ability to fund capital expenditures for acquisitions through retained earnings is very limited. Our ability to grow through acquisitions of hotels will be limited if we cannot obtain satisfactory debt or equity financing, which will depend on capital markets conditions.



Our lack of industry, brand, and/or geographic diversification could have an adverse effect on results.

 

Historically, we  have exclusively bought ownership interest in hotels in the United States.  As a result, we are subject to the risks inherent in investing in a single industry.  A downturn in the U.S. hotel industry may have a pronounced effect on the amount of funds available to us for distribution or on the value of Company’s assets.  Our business is subject to the risks that are common to the hotel industry and that are out of our control.  Additionally, we may face risks associated with any geographic concentration or franchisor concentration. 



Our returns depend on management of our hotels by third parties.



In order to qualify as a REIT, we cannot operate any hotel or participate in the decisions effecting the daily operations of any hotel. Under the REIT Modernization Act of 1999, REITs are permitted to lease their hotels to TRSs. However, a TRS, such as our TRS, may not operate or manage the leased hotels and, therefore, must enter into management agreements with third-party eligible independent contractors to manage the hotels. Thus, an independent operator under a management agreement with our TRS controls the daily operations of each of our hotels. 

   

Under the terms of our management agreements, our ability to participate in operating decisions regarding the hotels is limited. We depend on our management companies to adequately operate our hotels as provided in the management agreements. We do not have the authority to require any hotel to be operated in a particular manner or to govern any particular aspect of the daily operations of any hotel (for instance, setting room rates). Thus, even if we believe our hotels are being operated inefficiently or in a manner that does not result in satisfactory occupancy rates, revenue per available room, and average daily rates, we may not be able to force our management companies to change their methods of operation of our hotels. We can only seek redress if a management company violates the terms of the management agreement with our TRS, and then only to the extent of the remedies provided for under the terms of the applicable management agreement. If any of the foregoing occurs at franchised hotels, our relationship with the franchisors may be damaged, and we may be in breach of one or more of our franchise agreements. Additionally, in the event that we need to replace a management company due to the termination of an

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existing management agreement, we may experience decreased occupancy and other significant disruptions at our hotels and in our operations generally. 

   

We face competition for the acquisition of hotels and we may not be successful in identifying or completing hotel acquisitions that meet our criteria, which may impede our growth.   

   

One component of our business strategy is expansion through acquisitions, and we may not be successful in identifying or completing acquisitions that are consistent with our strategy. We compete with institutional pension funds, private equity investors, other REITs, hotel companies, and others who are engaged in the acquisition of hotels, most of whom have greater financial resources than we do. This competition for hotel investments may increase the price we pay for hotels and these competitors may succeed in acquiring the hotels we seek to acquire. Furthermore, our potential acquisition targets may find our competitors to be more attractive suitors because they may have greater marketing and financial resources, may be willing to pay more, or may have a more compatible operating philosophy. In addition, the number of entities competing for suitable hotels may increase in the future, which would increase demand for these hotels and the prices we must pay to acquire them. If we pay higher prices for hotels, our returns on investment and profitability may be reduced.  Future acquisitions may not yield the returns we expect and may result in stockholder dilution.

   

Future acquisitions may not yield the returns expected, may result in disruptions to our business, may strain management resources, may not be efficiently integrated into operations, and may result in stockholder dilution. 

   

Our business strategy may not ultimately be successful and may not provide positive returns on our investments. Acquisitions may cause disruptions in our operations and divert management’s attention away from day-to-day operations.  If the integration of our acquisitions into our management companies’ operations is not accomplished as efficiently as planned, we will not achieve the expected operating results from the acquisitions.  The issuance of equity securities in connection with any acquisition could be substantially dilutive to our stockholders. 



We may not be able to sell hotels on favorable terms. 

   

Our business strategy may include the disposition of assets.  We may not be able to sell such hotels on favorable terms, and such hotels may be sold at a loss. As with acquisitions, we face competition for buyers of our hotel properties. Other sellers of hotels may have the financial resources to dispose of their hotels on unfavorable terms that we would be unable to accept. If we cannot find buyers for any properties that are designated for sale, we will not be able to implement our disposition strategy. In the event that we cannot fully execute our disposition strategy or realize the benefits therefrom, we may not be able to fully execute our growth strategy. 



We may record additional impairment charges on our properties which will negatively impact our results of operations. 

   

We analyze our assets for impairment when events or circumstances occur that indicate an asset’s carrying value may not be recoverable.  For impaired assets, we record an impairment charge equal to the excess of the property’s carrying value over its fair value.  Our operating results for 2016, 2015, and 2014 include $1.5 million, $3.7 million, and $2.9 million, respectively, of total impairment charges related to our hotels.  Factors, many of which are outside our control, such as increased local competition, age and condition of hotels, and national and local declines in the economy, may result in additional impairment charges, which will negatively affect our results of operations. We can provide no assurance that any impairment loss recognized would not be material to our results of operations. 

   

We will likely seek to sell equity and/or debt securities to meet our need for additional cash, and we cannot assure you that such financing will be available and further, in connection with such sales our current shareholders could experience a material amount of dilution. 

   

We may require additional cash resources based on business conditions and any acquisitions we may decide to pursue.  We will likely seek to sell additional equity and/or debt securities.  We cannot assure you that the sale of such securities will be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If our board determines to sell

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additional shares of common stock or other debt or equity securities, a material amount of dilution may cause the market price of the common stock to decline.

   

We face risks associated with the use of debt, including the ability to obtain debt financing and refinancing risk. 

   

We may not be able to successfully obtain debt financing or we may not be able to extend, refinance, or repay our existing debt due to a number of factors, including decreased property valuations, limited availability of credit, tightened lending standards, or deteriorating economic conditions. If we are unable to refinance our debt on acceptable terms, we may be forced to dispose of hotel properties on disadvantageous terms, potentially resulting in losses. We have placed mortgages on certain of our hotel properties, have assumed mortgages on other hotels we acquired and may place additional mortgages on certain of our hotels to secure other debt. To the extent we cannot meet any future debt service obligations, we will risk losing some or all of our hotel properties that are pledged to secure our obligations to foreclosure.  If we lack the ability to raise debt or refinance existing debt, our ability to execute our business strategy will be significantly hampered and our financial results may be significantly affected.



Our debt service obligations could adversely affect our operating results, may require us to liquidate our properties, and could limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

   

We seek to maintain a total stabilized debt level of no more than 70% of our aggregate property investment at cost. We, however, may change or eliminate this target at any time without the approval of our stockholders. In the future, we and our subsidiaries may incur substantial additional debt, including secured debt. Incurring such debt could subject us to many risks, including the risks that:



·

our cash flow from operations will be insufficient to make required payment of principal and interest;

·

we may be more vulnerable to adverse economic and industry conditions;

·

we may be more vulnerable to adverse economic and industry conditions;

·

we may be required to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the repayment of our debt, thereby reducing the cash available for distribution to our stockholders, funds available for operations and capital expenditures, future investment opportunities, or other purposes;

·

the terms of any refinancing may not be as favorable as the terms of the debt being refinanced; and

·

the use of leverage could adversely affect our stock price and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders



Our results may be negatively affected by interest rate fluctuations and our attempts to hedge this risk may not be effective.



Higher interest rates could increase our debt service requirements and could reduce the amounts available for distribution to our stockholders, as well as reduce funds available for our operations, future investment opportunities, or other purposes. We may obtain in the future one or more forms of interest rate protection—in the form of swap agreements, interest rate cap contracts, or similar agreements—to “hedge” against the possible negative effects of interest rate fluctuations. However, we cannot assure you that any hedging will adequately mitigate the adverse effects of interest rate increases or that counterparties under these agreements will honor their obligations. In addition, we may be subject to risks of default by hedging counterparties. Adverse economic conditions could also cause the terms on which we borrow to be unfavorable. 

   

Operating our hotels under franchise agreements could adversely affect distributions to our shareholders.

   

At December 31, 2016, 18 of our hotels operate under third party franchise agreements and we are subject to the risks of concentrating our hotel investments in several franchise brands. These risks include reductions in business following negative publicity related to any one of our particular brands. Risks associated with our brands could adversely affect our lease revenues and the amounts available for distribution to our shareholders.

   

The maintenance of the franchise licenses for our hotels is subject to our franchisors’ operating standards and other terms and conditions. Our franchisors periodically inspect our hotels to ensure that we and the TRS follow their standards. Failure to maintain these standards or other terms and conditions could result in a franchise license being

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canceled. As a condition of our continued holding of a franchise license, a franchisor could possibly require us to make capital expenditures, even if we do not believe the capital improvements are necessary or desirable or will result in an acceptable return on our investment. Nonetheless, we may risk losing a franchise license if we do not make franchisor-required capital expenditures.

   

If a franchisor terminates the franchise license, we may try either to obtain a suitable replacement franchise or to operate the hotel without a franchise license. The loss of a franchise license could materially and adversely affect the operations or the underlying value of the hotel because of the loss of associated name recognition, marketing support, and centralized reservation systems provided by the franchisor. Loss of a franchise license for several of our hotels could materially and adversely affect our revenue. This loss of revenue could, therefore, also adversely affect our cash available for distribution to shareholders.

   

Joint venture investments could be adversely affected by our lack of sole decision-making authority, our reliance on a co-venturer’s financial condition and disputes between us and our co-venturers.

   

We may co-invest in the future with third parties through partnerships, joint ventures or other entities, acquiring non-controlling interests in or sharing responsibility for managing the affairs of a property, partnership, joint venture or other entity. In such event, we would not be in a position to exercise sole decision-making authority regarding the property, partnership, joint venture or other entity. Investments in partnerships, joint ventures, or other entities may, under certain circumstances, involve risks not present were a third party not involved, including the possibility that partners or co-venturers might become bankrupt or fail to fund their share of required capital contributions. Investments in joint ventures may require that we provide the joint venture entity with the right of first offer or right of first refusal to acquire any new property we consider acquiring directly. Partners or co-venturers may have economic or other business interests or goals which are inconsistent with our business interests or goals, and may be in a position to take actions contrary to our policies or objectives. Such investments may also have the potential risk of impasses on decisions, such as a sale, because neither we nor the partner or co-venturer would have full control over the partnership or joint venture. Disputes between us and partners or co-venturers may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and/or directors from focusing their time and effort on our business. Consequently, actions by, or disputes with, partners or co-venturers might result in subjecting properties owned by the partnership or joint venture to additional risk. We may also, in certain circumstances, be liable for the actions of our third-party partners or co-venturers. For example, we may be required to guarantee indebtedness incurred by a partnership, joint venture or other entity for the purchase or renovation of a hotel property. Such a guarantee may be on a joint and several basis with our partner or co-venturer in which case we may be liable in the event such party defaults on its guaranty obligation. 

   

Unanticipated expenses and insufficient demand for hotels we acquire in new geographic markets could adversely affect our profitability and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

   

We may develop or acquire hotels in geographic areas in which our management may have little or no operating experience and in which potential customers may not be familiar with our franchise brands. As a result, we may have to incur costs relating to the opening, operation and promotion of those new hotel properties that are substantially greater than those incurred in other areas. These hotels may attract fewer customers than our existing hotels, while at the same time, we may incur substantial additional costs with these new hotel properties. Unanticipated expenses and insufficient demand at a new hotel property, therefore, could adversely affect our profitability and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

   

The growth of Internet travel intermediaries could adversely affect the Company’s business and profitability.



Although a majority of rooms sold via the Internet are sold through hotel franchisor websites, some of the Company’s hotel rooms are booked through Internet travel intermediaries.  These Internet travel intermediaries purchase rooms at a negotiated, net of fees, discount from participating hotels, which typically results in lower room rates than the Company’s franchisor or manager otherwise could have obtained.  Although the Company’s managers and franchisors may have established agreements with many of these intermediaries that limit transaction fees for hotels, there be no assurance that the Company’s managers and franchisors will be able to renegotiate such agreements upon their expirations with terms as favorable as the provisions that exist today.  An increase in the

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growth of Internet travel intermediaries may negatively affect our hotel revenues.



We and our hotel managers rely on information technology in our operations, and any material failure, inadequacy, interruption or security failure of that technology could harm our business.



We and our hotel managers rely on information technology networks and systems, including the Internet, to process, transmit and store electronic information, and to manage or support a variety of business processes, including financial transactions and records, personal identifying information, reservations, billing and operating data. We purchase some of our information technology from vendors, on whom our systems depend. We rely on commercially available systems, software, tools and monitoring to provide security for processing, transmission and storage of confidential customer information, such as individually identifiable information, including information relating to financial accounts. Although we have taken steps to protect the security of our information systems and the data maintained in those systems, it is possible that our safety and security measures will not be able to prevent the systems’ improper functioning or damage, or the improper access or disclosure of personally identifiable information such as in the event of cyber-attacks. Security breaches, including physical or electronic break-ins, computer viruses, attacks by hackers and similar breaches, can create system disruptions, shutdowns or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. Any failure to maintain proper function, security and availability of our information systems could interrupt our operations, damage our reputation, subject us to liability claims or regulatory penalties and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders.

   

Uninsured and underinsured losses and our ability to satisfy our obligations could adversely affect our operating results and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

   

We intend to maintain comprehensive insurance on each of our hotel properties, including liability, fire, and extended coverage, of the type and amount we believe are customarily obtained for or by hotel owners. There are no assurances that current coverage will continue to be available at reasonable rates. Various types of catastrophic losses, like earthquakes and floods, or losses from foreign or domestic terrorist activities, may not be insurable or may not be economically insurable. Initially, we do not expect to obtain terrorism insurance on our hotel properties because it is costly. Lenders may require such insurance and our failure to obtain such insurance could constitute a default under loan agreements. Depending on our access to capital, liquidity and the value of the properties securing the effected loan in relation to the balance of the loan, a default could reduce our net income and limit our ability to obtain future financing.

   

In the event of a substantial loss, our insurance coverage may not be sufficient to cover the full current market value or replacement cost of our lost investment or the cash flows lost due to the interruption in operations. Should an uninsured loss or a loss in excess of insured limits occur, we could lose all or a portion of the capital we have invested in a hotel, as well as the anticipated future revenue from the hotel. In that event, we might nevertheless remain obligated for any mortgage debt or other financial obligations related to the property. Inflation, changes in building codes and ordinances, environmental considerations and other factors might also keep us from using insurance proceeds to replace or renovate a hotel after it has been damaged or destroyed. Under those circumstances, the insurance proceeds we receive might be inadequate to restore our economic position on the damaged or destroyed property.



Risks Related to the Hotel Industry



A recession could have a material adverse effect on the hotel industry and our results of operations. 

   

The performance of the hotel industry usually follows the general economy.  During the recession of 2008 and 2009, overall travel was reduced, which had a significant effect on our results of operations.  Uncertainty in the strength and direction of the recovery have slowed the pace of the overall economic recovery.  A stall in the economic recovery or a resurgent recession could have a material adverse effect on the hotel industry and, thus, on our results of operations.

   

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Our ability to make distributions to our shareholders may be affected by factors in the hotel industry that are beyond our control.  

   

Our hotels are subject to various operating risks found throughout the hotel industry. Many of these risks are beyond our control. These include, among other things, the following:

·

competitors with substantially greater marketing and financial resources than us;

·

over-building in our markets, which adversely effects occupancy and revenues at our hotels;

·

dependence on business and commercial travelers and tourism;

·

terrorist incidents which may deter travel;   

·

increases in hotel operating costs, energy costs, airline fares and other expenses, which may affect travel patterns and reduce the number of business and commercial travelers and tourists; and

·

adverse effects of general, regional and local economic conditions.



These factors could adversely affect the amount of rent we receive from leasing our hotels and reduce the net operating profits of the TRS, which in turn could adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our shareholders. Decreases in room revenues of our hotels will result in reduced operating profits for the TRS and decreased lease revenues to our company under our current percentage leases with the TRS. 

 

The hotel industry is seasonal in nature and may affect our cash flow.

 

Demand for our hotels is seasonal. We generally expect that we will have lower revenue, operating income, and cash flow in the first and fourth quarters and higher revenue, operating income and cash flow in the second and third quarters. These general trends are, however, influenced by overall economic cycles and the geographic locations of our hotels. To the extent that cash flow from operations is insufficient during any quarter, due to temporary or seasonal fluctuations in revenue, we expect to utilize cash on hand or borrowings under our credit facility to pay expenses, debt service or to make distributions to our equity holders.



The cyclical nature of the lodging industry may cause fluctuations in our operating performance, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

The hotel industry is highly cyclical in nature. Fluctuations in lodging demand and, therefore, operating performance, are caused largely by general economic and local market conditions, which subsequently affects levels of business and leisure travel. In addition to general economic conditions, hotel room supply growth is an important factor that can affect the lodging industry's performance.  Overbuilding has in the past and will continue to have the potential to further exacerbate the negative impact of an economic recession. Room rates and occupancy, and thus Revenue per Available Room (“RevPAR”), tend to increase when demand growth exceeds supply growth. We can provide no assurances regarding whether, or the extent to which, lodging demand will rebound or whether any such rebound will be sustained. An adverse change in lodging fundamentals in our markets could result in returns that are substantially below our expectations or result in losses, which could have a material adverse effect on us.



Competition from other hotels in the markets in which we operate could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.



The lodging industry is highly competitive. Our hotels compete with other hotels for guests in each market in which our hotels operate based on a number of factors, including location, convenience, brand affiliation, guestroom rates, range of services and guest amenities or accommodations offered and quality of customer service. Competition is often specific to the individual markets in which our hotels are located and includes competition from existing and new hotels. Our competitors may have an operating model that enables them to offer guestrooms at lower rates than we can, which could result in our competitors increasing their occupancy at our expense. Competition could adversely affect our occupancy, Average Daily Rate (“ADR”) and RevPAR, and may require us to provide additional amenities or make capital improvements that we otherwise would not have to make, which could reduce our profitability and could materially and adversely affect our results of operations.



The need for business-related travel and, thus, demand for rooms in our hotels may be materially and adversely

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affected by the increased use of business-related technology.



The increased use of teleconference and video-conference technology by businesses could result in decreased business travel as companies increase the use of technologies that allow multiple parties from different locations to participate at meetings without traveling to a centralized meeting location, such as our hotels. To the extent that such technologies play an increased role in day-to-day business and the necessity for business-related travel decreases, demand for our hotel rooms may decrease and we could be materially and adversely affected.



The increasing use of Internet travel intermediaries by consumers may adversely affect our profitability.



Our hotel guestrooms are likely to be booked through Internet travel intermediaries, including, but not limited to Travelocity.com, Expedia.com and Priceline.com. As these Internet bookings increase, these intermediaries may be able to obtain higher commissions, reduced guestroom rates or other significant contract concessions from our management companies. Moreover, some of these Internet travel intermediaries are attempting to offer hotel guestrooms as a commodity, by increasing the importance of price and general indicators of quality (such as “three-star downtown hotel”) at the expense of brand identification. These agencies hope that consumers will eventually develop brand loyalties to their reservations system rather than to the brands under which our hotels are franchised. If the amount of sales made through Internet intermediaries increases significantly, guestroom revenue may flatten or decrease and our profitability may be adversely affected.



In the past, economic trends, terrorist acts, and military action have adversely affected the hotel industry generally, and similar future events could adversely affect the industry in the future. 

   

Terrorist attacks and the after-effects (including the prospects for more terror attacks in the United States and abroad) have, in the past, substantially reduced business and leisure travel and lodging industry RevPAR generally. We cannot predict the extent to which these factors will directly or indirectly impact your investment in our securities, the lodging industry or our operating results in the future.



Declining RevPAR at our hotels would reduce our net income and restrict our ability to fund capital improvements at our hotels and our ability to make distributions to stockholders necessary to maintain our status as a REIT. Additional terrorist attacks, acts of war or similar events could have further material adverse effects on the markets on which shares of our stock will trade, as well as on the lodging industry in general and our operations in particular.

   

The hotel business is capital intensive.

   

Our hotels have an ongoing need for renovations and other capital improvements, including replacements, from time to time, of furniture, fixtures and equipment. The franchisors of our hotels also require periodic capital improvements as a condition of keeping the franchise licenses. The costs of all of these capital improvements could adversely affect our financial condition and reduce the amounts available for distribution to our shareholders. These renovations may give rise to the following risks:

·

possible environmental problems;

·

construction cost overruns and delays;

·

a possible shortage of available cash to fund renovations and the related possibility that financing for these renovations may not be available to us on affordable terms; and

·

uncertainties as to market demand or a loss of market demand after renovations have begun



The lenders under some of the mortgage debt that we will assume will require us to set aside varying amounts each year for capital improvements at our hotels. We may not be able to fund capital improvements or acquisitions solely from cash provided from our operating activities and, thus, may need to raise capital in order to finance any required capital expenditures.

   

Noncompliance with governmental regulations could adversely affect our operating results.

   

Environmental Matters

   

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Our hotel properties are subject to various federal, state, and local environmental laws. Under these laws, courts and government agencies have the authority to require the owner of a contaminated property to clean up the property, even if the owner did not know of or was not responsible for the contamination. These laws also apply to persons who owned a property at the time it became contaminated. In addition to the costs of cleanup, contamination can affect the value of a property and, therefore, an owner’s ability to borrow funds using the property as collateral.

   

Under these environmental laws, courts and government agencies also have the authority to require that a person who sent waste to a waste disposal facility, like a landfill or an incinerator, pay for the clean-up of that facility if it becomes contaminated and threatens human health or the environment. Furthermore, court decisions have established that third parties may recover damages for injury caused by property contamination. For instance, a person exposed to asbestos while staying in a hotel may seek to recover damages if he suffers injury from the asbestos. Lastly, some of these environmental laws restrict the use of a property or place conditions on various activities at a property. One example is laws that require a business using chemicals to manage them carefully and to notify local officials that the chemicals are being used.

   

Our Company could be responsible for the costs discussed above if it found itself in one or more of these situations. The costs to clean up a contaminated property, to defend against a claim, or to comply with environmental laws could be material and could affect the funds available for distribution to our shareholders. To determine whether any costs of this nature might be required, we commission Phase I environmental site assessments, or “ESAs”, before we acquire our hotels, and at certain times have commissioned new ESAs for certain of our hotels in conjunction with a refinancing of the debt obligations of those hotels. These studies typically included a review of historical information and a site visit, but not soil or groundwater testing. We obtain the ESAs to help us identify whether we might be responsible for cleanup costs or other costs in connection with our hotels. The ESAs on our hotels did not reveal any environmental conditions that are likely to have a material adverse effect on our business, assets, results of operations, or liquidity. However, ESAs do not always identify all potential problems or environmental liabilities. Consequently, we may have material environmental liabilities of which we are unaware.

   

Americans with Disabilities Act and Other Changes in Governmental Rules and Regulations

   

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or ADA, all public accommodations must meet various federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. Compliance with the ADA’s requirements could require removal of access barriers and non-compliance could result in the U.S. government imposing fines or in private litigants obtaining damages. If we were required to make substantial modifications to our hotels, whether to comply with the ADA or other changes in governmental rules and regulations, our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and meet our other obligations could be adversely affected.

   

Risks Related to the Real Estate Industry

   

Illiquidity of real estate investments could significantly impede our ability to respond to adverse changes in the performance of our properties and harm our financial condition.

   

Because real estate investments are relatively illiquid, our ability to promptly sell one or more hotel properties or investments in our portfolio in response to changing economic, financial and investment conditions may be limited.  The real estate market is affected by many factors that are beyond our control, including: 



·

adverse changes in international, national, regional and local economic and market conditions;

·

changes in interest rates and in the availability, cost and terms of debt financing;

·

changes in governmental laws and regulations, fiscal policies and zoning ordinances and the related costs of compliance with laws and regulations, fiscal policies and ordinances;

·

the ongoing need for capital improvements, particularly in older structures;

·

changes in operating expenses; and

·

civil unrest, acts of God, including earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters and acts of war or terrorism, including the consequences of terrorist acts such as those that occurred on September 11, 2001, which may result in uninsured losses. 



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We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any hotel property or investment for the price or on the terms set by us, or whether any price or other terms offered by a prospective purchaser would be acceptable to us. We also cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a hotel property or loan.

   

We may be required to expend funds to correct defects or to make improvements before a hotel property can be sold. We cannot assure you that we will have funds available to correct those defects or to make those improvements. In acquiring a hotel property, we may agree to lock-out provisions that materially restrict us from selling that hotel property for a period of time or impose other restrictions, such as limitation on the amount of debt that can be placed or repaid on that hotel property. These facts and any others that would impede our ability to respond to adverse changes in the performance of our hotel properties could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition, as well as our ability to make distributions to stockholders.

   

Increases in property taxes would adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our shareholders.

 

Hotel properties are subject to real and personal property taxes. These taxes may increase as tax rates change and as the properties are assessed or reassessed by taxing authorities. In particular, our property taxes could increase following our hotel purchases as the acquired hotels are reassessed. If property taxes increase, our financial condition, results of operations, and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders could be materially and adversely affected.



Our hotels may contain or develop harmful environmental challenges which could lead to liability for adverse health effects and costs of remediating the problem.

   

Bed bug infestation can cause adverse health effects, including skin rashes, psychological effects and allergic symptoms. When excessive moisture accumulates in buildings or on building materials, mold growth may occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains undiscovered or is not addressed over a period of time. Some molds may produce airborne toxins or irritants. Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing, as exposure to mold may cause a variety of adverse health effects and symptoms, including allergic or other reactions. As a result, the presence of significant mold or bed bugs at any of our properties could require us to undertake a costly remediation program to contain or remove the mold or remove the bed bugs from the effected property, the cost of which would reduce our cash available for distribution. In addition, the presence of significant mold or bed bugs could expose us to liability from our guests, employees or our management companies and others if property damage or health concerns arise.



Risks Related to our Organization and Structure



We cannot assure you that we will qualify, or remain qualified, as a REIT.



We currently are taxed as a REIT, and we expect to qualify as a REIT for future taxable years, but we cannot assure you that we will remain qualified as a REIT. If we fail to remain qualified as a REIT, all of our earnings will be subject to federal income taxation, which will reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to our stockholders, and we will not be required to distribute our income to our stockholders.

   

Our TRS lessee structure subjects us to the risk of increased operating expenses.

   

Operating Risks



Our hotels are subject to various operating risks found throughout the hotel industry. Many of these risks are beyond our control. These include, among other things, the following:



·

competitors with substantially greater marketing and financial resources than us;

·

dependence on business and commercial travelers and tourism;

·

over-building of hotels in our markets, which could adversely affect occupancy and revenue at the hotels we acquire;

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·

increases in energy costs and other expenses affecting travel, which may affect travel patterns and reduce the number of business and commercial travelers and tourists;

·

increases in operating costs, including increased real estate and personal property taxes, due to inflation and other factors that may not be offset by increased guestroom rates;

·

potential increases in labor costs at our hotels, including as a result of unionization of the labor force and increasing health care insurance expense;

·

adverse effects of international, national, regional and local economic and market conditions;

·

changes in governmental laws and regulations, fiscal policies and zoning ordinances and the related costs of compliance with laws and regulations, fiscal policies and ordinances; and

·

events beyond our control, such as instability in the national, European or global economy, terrorist attacks, travel related health concerns including pandemics and epidemics such as H1N1 influenza (swine flu), Zika virus, avian bird flu, Ebola and SARS, travel-related environmental concerns including water contamination and air pollution, political instability, regional hostilities, increases in fuel prices, imposition of taxes or surcharges by regulatory authorities and travel-related accidents and unusual weather patterns, including natural disasters such as hurricanes.



These factors could adversely affect the amount of rent we receive from leasing our hotels and reduce the net operating profits of the TRS, which in turn could adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. Decreases in room revenues of our hotels will result in reduced operating profits for the TRS and decreased lease revenues to our company under our current percentage leases with the TRS.



Competition and Financing for Acquisitions



We compete for investment opportunities with entities that have substantially greater financial resources than we do. These entities generally may be able to accept more risk than we can manage wisely. This competition may generally limit the number of suitable investment opportunities offered to us. This competition may also increase the bargaining power of property owners seeking to sell to us, making it more difficult for us to acquire new properties on attractive terms. Additionally, current economic conditions present difficult challenges to obtaining financing for acquisitions.



Seasonality of Hotel Business



Historically, as a result of the geographic areas in which we operate, the operations of our hotels have been seasonal in nature. Generally, occupancy rates, revenue, and operating income have been greater in the second and third quarters of the calendar year than in the first and fourth quarters, with the exception of our hotels located in Florida, which experience peak demand in the first and fourth quarters of the year.



Investment Concentration in Particular Segments of Single Industry



Our entire business is hotel-related. Although we intend to invest in premium-branded upper-midscale and upscale select-service properties in the future, our current hotel portfolio is concentrated in midscale and economy hotel properties. Therefore, a downturn in the hotel industry in general and our segments in particular will have a material adverse effect on our revenues and amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.



Capital Expenditures



Our hotels have an ongoing need for renovations and other capital improvements, including replacements, from time to time, of furniture, fixtures and equipment. The franchisors of our hotels also require periodic capital improvements as a condition of keeping the franchise licenses. The costs of all of these capital improvements could adversely affect our financial condition and reduce the amounts available for distribution to our stockholders. These renovations may give rise to the following risks:



·

possible environmental problems;

·

construction cost overruns and delays;

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·

a possible shortage of available cash to fund renovations and the related possibility that financing for these renovations may not be available to us on affordable terms; and

·

uncertainties as to market demand or a loss of market demand after renovations have begun.



Our ability to make distributions on our common and preferred stock is subject to fluctuations in our financial performance, operating results, and capital improvement requirements.

   

As a REIT, we generally are required to distribute annually at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction, to our stockholders. Downturns in our operating results and financial performance or unanticipated capital improvements to our hotel properties may affect our ability to declare or pay distributions to our stockholders.  Further, we may not generate sufficient cash in order to fund distributions to our stockholders, which may require us to sell assets or borrow money to satisfy the REIT distribution requirements.

   

Among the factors which could adversely affect our results of operations and our distributions to stockholders are reduced net operating profits or operating losses, increased debt service requirements, and capital expenditures at our hotel properties. Among the factors which could reduce our net operating profits are decreases in hotel property revenue and increases in hotel property operating expenses. Hotel property revenue can decrease for a number of reasons, including increased competition from a new supply of rooms and decreased demand for rooms. These factors can reduce both occupancy and room rates at our hotel properties.

   

The timing and amount of distributions are at the sole discretion of our Board of Directors, which will consider, among other factors, our actual results of operations, debt service requirements, capital expenditure requirements for our properties, and our operating expenses.  We cannot guarantee future distributions. 



We have restrictive debt covenants that could adversely affect our ability to run our business.



We are required to meet or maintain quarterly loan covenants with certain of our lenders. Weakness in the economy and the lodging industry at large may result in non-compliance with our loan covenants. Such noncompliance with our loan covenants may result in our lenders restricting the use of our operating funds for capital improvements to our existing hotels, including improvements required by our franchise agreements, or causing the debt maturity to accelerate. We cannot assure you that we can maintain compliance with our loan covenants and maintain our business strategy.



Our restrictive debt covenants may jeopardize our tax status as a REIT.



To maintain our REIT status, we generally must distribute at least 90% of our REIT taxable income to our stockholders annually. In addition, we are subject to a 4% non-deductible excise tax if the actual amount distributed to stockholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount specified under federal income tax laws. In the event we do not comply with our debt service obligations, our lenders may limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders, which could adversely affect our REIT status.



Joint venture investments could be adversely affected by our lack of sole decision-making authority, our reliance on a co-venturer’s financial condition and disputes between us and our co-venturers.



On August 22, 2016, we entered into a joint venture which acquired the 254-room Aloft hotel in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. Our joint venture partner has joint approval rights with us with respect to most major decisions regarding the hotel or the joint venture. In addition, we may co-invest in the future with third parties through partnerships, joint ventures or other entities, acquiring non-controlling interests in or sharing responsibility for managing the affairs of a property, partnership, joint venture or other entity. In such event, we may not be in a position to exercise sole decision-making authority regarding the property, partnership, joint venture or other entity. Investments in partnerships, joint ventures, or other entities may, under certain circumstances, involve risks not present were a third party not involved, including the possibility that partners or co-venturers might become bankrupt or fail to fund their share of required capital contributions. Investments in joint ventures may require that we provide the joint venture entity with the right of first offer or right of first refusal to acquire any new property we consider acquiring directly. Partners or co-venturers may have economic or other business interests or goals which are inconsistent with our

20

 


 

 

business interests or goals, and may be in a position to take actions contrary to our policies or objectives. Such investments may also have the potential risk of impasses on decisions, such as a sale, because neither we nor the partner or co-venturer would have full control over the partnership or joint venture.



Disputes between us and partners or co-venturers may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and directors from focusing their time and effort on our business.  Consequently, actions by, or disputes with, partners or co-venturers might result in subjecting properties owned by the partnership or joint venture to additional risk. We may also, in certain circumstances, be liable for the actions of our third-party partners or co-venturers. If a joint venture partner becomes bankrupt or otherwise defaults on its obligations under a joint venture agreement, we and any other remaining joint venture partners would generally remain liable for the joint venture liabilities. For example, we may be required to guarantee indebtedness incurred by a partnership, joint venture or other entity for the purchase or renovation of a hotel property. Such a guarantee may be on a joint and several basis with our partner or co-venturer in which case we may be liable in the event such party defaults on its guaranty obligation. Furthermore, if a joint venture partner becomes bankrupt or otherwise defaults on its obligations under a joint venture agreement, we may be unable to continue the joint venture other than by purchasing such joint venture partner’s interests or the underlying assets at a premium to the market price. If any of the above risks are realized, it could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.



Our two largest shareholders hold significant voting power and have the right to designate seven of our nine directors, which provides these shareholders with significant power to influence our business and affairs. 

   

RES and its affiliates hold 49% and SREP III Flight-Investco, L.P. (“SREP”) and its affiliates hold 42.6% of the combined voting power of all Condor voting stock.  RES and SREP each have a contractual preemptive right, but not the obligation, to purchase up to their pro rata share (based on their ownership on a fully diluted basis) of any equity securities we offer in future offerings on the same terms as other investors.  RES has the right to appoint four directors to our board of directors and SREP has the right to appoint three directors to our board of directors. 



As discussed further in the Subsequent Events footnote to the consolidated financial statements, on February 28, 2017, RES and SREP, the holders of the Series D Preferred Stock, voluntarily converted their shares into 39,032,225 shares of common stock at $1.60 per share pursuant to the terms of the preferred stock.  The terms of the Series D Preferred Stock provided for automatic conversion following certain future common stock offerings, and also provided for potential additional payments to the holders depending on the sales price of common stock in the offerings. As a result of the voluntary conversion, the holders are no longer entitled to the potential payments. To induce the holders of the Series D Preferred Stock to voluntarily convert their shares, the Company issued the holders a $9.25 million in face amount of a new series of preferred stock, the Series E Preferred Stock. The Series D Preferred Stock, while it was outstanding, had the right to vote separately as a class to approve certain significant corporate events.  Similarly, the Series E Preferred Stock votes as a class on matters generally affecting the Series E Preferred Stock, and as long as 434,750 shares of Series E Preferred Stock (47% of the originally issued shares of Series E Preferred Stock) remain outstanding, then 75% approval of the Series E Preferred Stock will be required to approve merger, consolidation, liquidation or winding up of Condor, related party transactions exceeding $120,000, payment of dividends on common stock except from funds from operations or to maintain REIT status, the grant of exemptions from Condor’s charter limitation on ownership of 9.9% of any class or series of its securities (exclusive of persons currently holding exemptions), issuance of preferred stock, or commitment or agreement to do any of the foregoing. 



By virtue of their voting power and board designation rights, preemptive right to purchase additional equity securities in future stock offerings and approval rights, RES and SREP, collectively and separately, have the power to significantly influence our business and affairs and the outcome of matters required to be submitted to shareholders for approval, including the election of our directors, amendments to our charter, mergers, or sales of assets. Their influence over our business and affairs may not be consistent with the interests of some or all of our shareholders and might negatively affect the market price of our common stock.



The holders of the Series E Preferred Stock have rights senior to holders of common stock.

   

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RES and SREP, our two largest shareholders, own all of the issued and outstanding shares our Series E Preferred Stock.  The Series E Preferred Stock ranks senior to our common stock and any other preferred stock issuances and receives preferential cumulative cash dividends at a rate of 6.25% annually per annum of the $10.00 face value per share. If we fail to pay a dividend, then during the period that dividends are not paid, the dividend rate increases to 12.5%, if specific equity offering or offerings have not occurred, and increases 9.25% per annum if such equity or equity offerings have occurred.  Dividends on the Series E Preferred Stock accrue whether or not we have earnings, whether or not there are funds legally available for the payment of such dividends, whether or not such dividends are declared, and whether or not such dividends are prohibited by agreement.

 

Our failure to qualify as a REIT under the federal tax laws would result in adverse tax consequences.

   

The federal income tax laws governing REITs are complex and subject to revision.

   

We currently operate as a REIT under the federal income tax laws. The REIT qualification requirements are extremely complex and interpretations of the federal income tax laws governing qualification as a REIT are limited. Accordingly, we cannot be certain that we would be successful in operating so that we can qualify as a REIT. At any time, new laws, interpretations, or court decisions may change the federal tax laws or the federal income tax consequences of our qualification as a REIT. We have not applied for or obtained rulings from the IRS that we will qualify as a REIT.

   

Failure to qualify as a REIT would subject us to federal income tax. 

   

If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we will be subject to federal income tax on our taxable income. We might need to borrow money or sell assets in order to pay any such tax. If we cease to be a REIT, we no longer would be required to distribute most of our taxable income to our stockholders. Unless we were entitled to relief under certain federal income tax laws, we could not re-elect REIT status during the four calendar years after the year in which we failed to qualify as a REIT. 

   

Failure to make required distributions would subject us to tax.

   

In order to qualify as a REIT, we generally are required to distribute at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction, each year to our stockholders. To the extent that we satisfy this distribution requirement, but distribute less than 100% of our taxable income, we will be subject to federal income tax on our undistributed taxable income. In addition, we will be subject to a 4% non-deductible excise tax if the actual amount that we pay out to our stockholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount specified under federal tax laws. As a result, for example, of differences between cash flow and the accrual of income and expenses for tax purposes, or of nondeductible expenditures, our REIT taxable income in any given year could exceed our cash available for distribution. In addition, to the extent we may retain earnings of the TRS in those subsidiaries, such amount of cash would not be available for distribution to our stockholders to satisfy the 90% distribution requirement. Accordingly, we may be required to borrow money or sell assets to make distributions sufficient to enable us to pay out enough of our taxable income to satisfy the distribution requirement and to avoid federal corporate income tax and the 4% non-deductible excise tax in a particular year.

   

The formation of the TRS increases our overall tax liability.

   

The TRS is subject to federal and state income tax on its taxable income, which in the case of the TRS currently consists and generally will continue to consist of revenues from the hotel properties leased by the TRS, net of the operating expenses for such properties and rent payments to us. Accordingly, although our ownership of the allows us to participate in the operating income from our hotel properties in addition to receiving rent, that operating income is fully subject to income tax. Such taxes could be substantial. The after-tax net income of the TRS is available for distribution to us.

   

We incur a 100% excise tax on transactions with the TRS that are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis. For example, to the extent that the rent paid by the TRS exceeds an arm’s-length rental amount, such amount potentially

22

 


 

 

is subject to the excise tax. We intend that all transactions between us and the TRS will continue to be conducted on an arm’s-length basis and, therefore, that the rent paid by the TRS to us will not be subject to the excise tax.

   

We may be subject to adverse legislative or regulatory tax changes that could increase our tax liability, reduce our operating flexibility and reduce the market price of our shares.



At any time, the federal income tax laws governing REITs or the administrative and judicial interpretations of those laws may be amended or changed. We cannot predict when or if any new federal income tax law, regulation or administrative and judicial interpretation, or any amendment to any existing federal income tax law, regulation or administrative or judicial interpretation, will be adopted, promulgated or become effective and any such law, regulation or interpretation may take effect retroactively.  We and our shareholders could be adversely affected by any such change in, or any new, federal income tax law, regulation or administrative and judicial interpretation.



If our hotel managers do not qualify as "eligible independent contractors” the Company would likely fail to qualify as a REIT.

 

Rent paid by a lessee that is a "related party tenant" of ours will not be qualifying income for purposes of the two gross income tests applicable to REITs. We lease substantially all of our hotels to our TRS. The TRS will not be treated as a "related party tenant," and will not be treated as directly operating a lodging facility to the extent the TRS leases properties from us that are managed by an "eligible independent contractor." In addition, our TRS holding companies will fail to qualify as “taxable REIT subsidiaries” if they lease or own a lodging facility that is not managed by an “eligible independent contractor.”

  

If our hotel managers do not qualify as "eligible independent contractors," we would fail to qualify as a REIT. Each of the hotel management companies that enters into a management contract with our TRS must qualify as an "eligible independent contractor" under the REIT rules in order for the rent paid to us by our TRS to be qualifying income for our REIT income test requirements and for our TRS holding companies to qualify as “taxable REIT subsidiaries”. Among other requirements, in order to qualify as an eligible independent contractor a manager must not own more than 35% of our outstanding shares (by value) and no person or group of persons can own more than 35% of our outstanding shares and the ownership interests of the manager, taking into account only owners of more than 5% of our shares and, with respect to ownership interests in such managers that are publicly traded, only holders of more than 5% of such ownership interests. Complex ownership attribution rules apply for purposes of these 35% thresholds. Although we intend to monitor ownership of our shares by our property managers and their owners, there can be no assurance that these ownership levels will not be exceeded.



If our leases with our TRS are not respected as true leases for federal income tax purposes, we would fail to qualify as a REIT.

 

To qualify as a REIT, we are required to satisfy two gross income tests, pursuant to which specified percentages of our gross income must be passive income, such as rent. For the rent paid pursuant to the hotel leases with our TRS, which should constitute substantially all of our gross income, to qualify for purposes of the gross income tests, the leases must be respected as true leases for federal income tax purposes and must not be treated as service contracts, joint ventures or some other type of arrangement. We have structured our leases, and intend to structure any future leases, so that the leases will be respected as true leases for federal income tax purposes, but there can be no assurance that the IRS will agree with this characterization, not challenge this treatment or that a court would not sustain such a challenge. If the leases were not respected as true leases for federal income tax purposes, we would not be able to satisfy either of the two gross income tests applicable to REITs and likely would fail to qualify for REIT status.



We may be subject to the 100% prohibited transaction tax on the gain recognized on the hotels we sold. 



A REIT will incur a 100% tax on the net income derived from any sale or other disposition of property that the REIT holds primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business. We undertook specific disposition programs beginning in 2001 (that included the sale of 23 hotels through December 31, 2004) and 2008 (that included the sale of 112 hotels through December 31, 2016). We held the disposed hotels for an average period

23

 


 

 

of 14.0 years and did not acquire the hotels for purposes of resale. We believe that such sales are not prohibited transactions. However, if the IRS would successfully assert that we held such hotels primarily for sale in the ordinary course of our business, the gain from such sales could be subject to a 100% prohibited transaction tax.



Complying with REIT requirements may cause us to forego attractive opportunities that could otherwise generate strong risk-adjusted returns and instead pursue less attractive opportunities, or none at all.   

   

To continue to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, the nature and diversification of our assets, the amounts we distribute to our stockholders and the ownership of our stock. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to operate solely on the basis of generating strong risk-adjusted returns on invested capital for our stockholders.

   

Complying with REIT requirements may force us to liquidate otherwise attractive investments, which could result in an overall loss on our investments.

   

To continue to qualify as a REIT, we must also ensure that at the end of each calendar quarter at least 75% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash items, government securities and qualified REIT real estate assets. The remainder of our investment in securities (other than government securities and qualified real estate assets) generally cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or more than 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer. In addition, in general, no more than 5% of the value of our assets (other than government securities and qualified real estate assets) can consist of the securities of any one issuer, and no more than 25% of the value of our total securities can be represented by securities of one or more TRSs. If we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any calendar quarter, we must correct such failure within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter to avoid losing our REIT status and suffering adverse tax consequences. If we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any calendar quarter, we may be able to preserve our REIT status by benefiting from certain statutory relief provisions. Except with respect to a de minimis failure of the 5% asset test or the 10% vote or value test, we can maintain our REIT status only if the failure was due to reasonable cause and not to willful neglect. In that case, we will be required to dispose of the assets causing the failure within six months after the last day of the quarter in which we identified the failure, and we will be required to pay an additional tax of the greater of $50,000 or the product of the highest applicable tax rate (currently 35%) multiplied by the net income generated on those assets. As a result, we may be required to liquidate otherwise attractive investments.

   

Taxation of dividend income could make our common stock less attractive to investors and reduce the market price of our common stock.



At any time, the federal income tax laws governing REITs or the administrative interpretations of those laws may be amended or changed. Any of those new laws or interpretations may take effect retroactively and could adversely affect us or you as a stockholder. Since 2013, the maximum tax rate on dividend income for certain taxpayers has been at 20% for qualified dividends and 39.6% on non-qualified dividends (plus a 3.8% net investment income tax). Generally, dividends from REITs do not qualify for reduced dividend tax rates because, as a result of the dividends paid deduction to which REITs are entitled, REITs generally do not pay corporate level tax on income that they distribute to stockholders. As a result of that legislation, individual, trust, and estate investors could view stocks of non-REIT corporations as more attractive relative to shares of REITs than was the case previously because the dividends paid by non-REIT corporations are subject to lower tax rates for such investors.

   

Provisions of our charter and substantial voting power held by two shareholders may limit the ability of a third party to acquire control of our company.

   

In order to maintain our REIT qualification, no more than 50% in value of our outstanding capital stock may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals (as defined in the federal income tax laws to include various kinds of entities) during the last half of any taxable year. Our articles of incorporation contain the ownership limitation, which prohibits both direct and indirect ownership of more than 9.9% of the outstanding shares of our common stock or 9.9% of any series of our preferred stock by any person, subject to several exceptions. Generally,

24

 


 

 

any shares of our capital stock owned by affiliated owners will be added together for purposes of the ownership limitation.

   

Our articles of incorporation permit our board, in its sole discretion, to exempt a person from the 9.9% ownership limitation if the person provides representations and undertakings that enable our board to determine that granting the exemption would not result in the loss of our REIT qualification. Under the IRS rules, REIT shares owned by certain entities are considered owned proportionately by owners of the entities for REIT qualification purposes. RES and SREP each provided a letter at the time of the issuance of the Series D Preferred Stock that permitted our board to grant such an exemption. The stock ownership by RES and SREP, which was permitted with our board’s approval, represents such substantial voting power that it may limit the ability of a third party to acquire control of our company. 

   

These ownership limitations may prevent an acquisition of control of our company by a third party without our board of directors’ approval, even if our stockholders believe the change of control is in their best interests. Our charter authorizes our board of directors to issue shares of common stock and shares of preferred stock, and to set the preferences, rights and other terms of the preferred stock. Furthermore, our board of directors may, without any action by the stockholders, amend our charter from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares of stock of any class or series of preferred stock that we have authority to issue. Issuances of additional shares of stock may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change in control of our company that might involve a premium to the market price of our common stock or otherwise be in our stockholders’ best interests.

   

Our ownership limitation may prevent a shareholder from engaging in certain transfers of our capital stock. 

   

If anyone transfers shares in a way that would violate the ownership limitation described above or prevent us from continuing to qualify as a REIT under the federal income tax laws, we will consider the transfer to be null and void from the outset, and the intended transferee of those shares will be deemed never to have owned the shares. Those shares instead will be transferred to a trust for the benefit of a charitable beneficiary and will be either redeemed by our company or sold to a person whose ownership of the shares will not violate the ownership limitation. Anyone who acquires shares in violation of the ownership limitation or the other restrictions on transfer in our articles of incorporation bears the risk that he will suffer a financial loss when the shares are redeemed or sold if the market price of our stock falls between the date of purchase and the date of redemption or sale.

   

The ability of our board of directors to change our major corporate policies may not be in your interest.

   

Our board of directors determines our major corporate policies, including our acquisition, financing, growth, operations and distribution policies. Our board may amend or revise these and other policies from time to time without the vote or consent of our stockholders.



ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS



None.



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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES



Our Company headquarters is located in Bethesda,  Maryland, with additional office space in Omaha, Nebraska and Norfolk, Nebraska. The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the hotels owned by us as of December 31, 2016:









 

 

 

 

 

 

Brand

 

City

 

State

 

Rooms



 

 

 

 

 

 

Upscale/Upper Midscale Select Service Hotels

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hilton Garden Inn

 

Dowell

 

Maryland

 

100 

Hotel Indigo

 

Atlanta (Airport) (2)

 

Georgia

 

142 

SpringHill Suites

 

San Antonio (Downtown) (2)

 

Texas

 

116 

Courtyard by Marriott

 

Jacksonville (2)

 

Florida

 

120 

Aloft

 

Leawood-Overland Park (2)

 

Kansas

 

156 

Aloft

 

Atlanta (Downtown) (3)

 

Georgia

 

254 



 

 

 

 

 

888 

Legacy Hotels Held for Use

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comfort Suites

 

South Bend

 

Indiana

 

135 

Comfort Suites

 

Fort Wayne

 

Indiana

 

127 

Comfort Inn & Suites

 

Warsaw

 

Indiana

 

71 

Quality Inn

 

Solomons

 

Maryland

 

59 

Super 8 

 

Creston

 

Iowa

 

121 

Supertel Inn

 

Creston

 

Iowa

 

41 



 

 

 

 

 

554 

Legacy Hotels Held for Sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comfort Suites

 

Lafayette

 

Indiana

 

62 

Comfort Inn

 

New Castle

 

Pennsylvania

 

79 

Comfort Inn

 

Harlan (1)

 

Kentucky

 

61 

Quality Inn

 

Morgantown

 

West Virginia

 

81 

Days Inn

 

Bossier City

 

Louisiana

 

176 

Super 8

 

Billings

 

Montana

 

106 

Key West Inn

 

Key Largo

 

Florida

 

40 



 

 

 

 

 

605 



 

 

 

Total Rooms

 

2,047 

(1)

This property is subject to a long-term ground lease

(2)

Wholly owned property acquired in 2015 or 2016

(3)

Joint venture property acquired in 2016



All of our properties are encumbered by either our revolving credit agreement or by mortgage debt at December 31, 2016.  Additional property information is found in Item 8 Schedule III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.



ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS



Various claims and legal proceedings arise in the ordinary course of business and may be pending against the Company and its properties. We are not currently involved in any material litigation, nor, to our knowledge, is any material litigation threatened against us.  The Company has insurance to cover potential material losses and we believe it is not reasonably possible that such matters will have a material impact on our financial condition or results of operations.



ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES



Not applicable.

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PART II



ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY / RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES



Market Information



Our common stock trades on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “CDOR”.  The closing sales price for the common stock on February 28, 2017 was $2.13 per share.  The table below sets forth the high and low sales prices per share reported on the Nasdaq Global Market for the periods indicated: 







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc.

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

High

 

Low

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

2.27 

 

$

1.42 

Second quarter

 

$

3.70 

 

$

1.61 

Third quarter

 

$

2.74 

 

$

0.80 

Fourth quarter 

 

$

1.59 

 

$

1.00 



 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

2.24 

 

$

.70

Second quarter

 

$

2.60 

 

$

1.51 

Third quarter

 

$

3.14 

 

$

1.70 

Fourth quarter 

 

$

2.19 

 

$

1.53 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholder Information



As of February 28, 2017, the approximate number of holders of record of our common stock was 51.  However, because the vast majority of our common shares are held by brokers and other institutions on behalf of shareholders, we believe that there are considerably more beneficial holders of our common shares than record holders.



Distribution Information



Distributions to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for federal income tax purposes generally will be taxable to a shareholder as ordinary income.  Distributions in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits generally will be treated as a nontaxable reduction of the shareholder’s basis in such shareholder’s shares, to the extent thereof, and thereafter as taxable capital gain.  Distributions that are treated as a reduction of the shareholder’s basis in its shares will have the effect of increasing the amount of gain, or reducing the amount of loss, recognized upon the sale of the shareholder’s shares.



The actual amount of future dividends will be determined by the Board of Directors based on the actual results of operations, economic conditions, capital expenditure requirements, the annual distribution requirements under the REIT provisions of the Code, and other factors that the Board of Directors deems relevant.



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For income tax purposes, distributions paid per share in 2016 were characterized as follows:







 

 

 

 



For the year ended December 31, 2016



Amount

 

%

Common Shares:

 

 

 

 

Ordinary income

$

0.070000 

 

100% 

Capital gain

 

 -

 

 -

Return of capital

 

 -

 

 -

Total

$

0.070000 

 

100% 



 

 

 

 

Series C Preferred Stock:

 

 

 

 

Ordinary income

$

1.649124 

 

100% 

Capital gain

 

 -

 

 -

Return of capital

 

 -

 

 -

Total

$

1.649124 

 

100% 



 

 

 

 

Series D Preferred Stock:

 

 

 

 

Ordinary income

$

0.494792 

 

100% 

Capital gain

 

 -

 

 -

Return of capital

 

 -

 

 -

Total

$

0.494792 

 

100% 



The common and preferred share distributions declared on December 6, 2016 and paid on January 5, 2017 and January 3, 2017, respectively, were treated as 2016 dividend distributions for federal income tax purposes. 



A portion of the redemption price of the Series A and B Preferred Stock that was redeemed for cash on April 15, 2016 included amounts equal to the accrued and unpaid dividends on such stock.  However, the entire redemption price, inclusive of amounts equal to accrued and unpaid dividends, was treated as payment in exchange for the redeemed stock and none of the redemption price is treated as a distribution of dividends under the Code for federal income tax purposes.



No dividends on common stock or preferred stock were paid in or declared related to 2015 or 2014.



Shares Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans



See Part III, Item 12 for a description of securities authorized for issuance under our 2016 Stock Plan.



Share Performance



The following graph compares the yearly percentage change in the cumulative total shareholder return on our common stock for the period December 31, 2011 through December 31, 2016, with the cumulative total return on the SNL Securities Hotel REIT Index (“Hotel REITs Index”) and the Nasdaq Composite (“Nasdaq—Total US Index”) for the same period.  The Hotel REIT Index is comprised of publicly traded REITs that focus on investments in hotel properties.  The Nasdaq Composite is comprised of all United States common shares traded on the Nasdaq Stock Market.  The comparison assumes a starting investment of $100 on December 31, 2011 in our common stock and in each of the indices shown and assumes that all dividends are reinvested.  The performance graph is not necessarily indicative of future investment performance.



28

 


 

 

Picture 2





ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA



The following sets forth selected financial and operating data on a historical consolidated basis.  The following information should be read in conjunction with “Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto, appearing elsewhere in this document.



29

 


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

As of and for the years ended December 31,

In thousands, except share and per share data

 

 

 

 



2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Room rentals and other hotel services

$

50,647 

 

$

58,714 

 

$

58,799 

 

$

55,027 

 

$

56,990 

Operating expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hotel and property operations

 

37,092 

 

 

43,367 

 

 

44,391 

 

 

43,033 

 

 

42,056 

Depreciation and amortization

 

5,190 

 

 

5,400 

 

 

6,437 

 

 

6,300 

 

 

6,393 

General and administrative

 

5,792 

 

 

5,493 

 

 

4,192 

 

 

3,923 

 

 

3,908 

Acquisitions and terminated transactions

 

550 

 

 

684 

 

 

 -

 

 

713 

 

 

240 

Terminated equity transactions

 

 -

 

 

246 

 

 

76 

 

 

1,050 

 

 

 -

Total operating expenses

 

48,624 

 

 

55,190 

 

 

55,096 

 

 

55,019 

 

 

52,597 

Operating income

 

2,023 

 

 

3,524 

 

 

3,703 

 

 

 

 

4,393 

Net gain (loss) on disposition of assets

 

23,132 

 

 

4,798 

 

 

(1)

 

 

(47)

 

 

(9)

Equity in loss of joint venture

 

(244)

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

Unrealized derivative gain (loss)

 

6,377 

 

 

11,578 

 

 

(14,430)

 

 

10,028 

 

 

(247)

Other income

 

55 

 

 

114 

 

 

116 

 

 

34 

 

 

103 

Interest expense

 

(4,710)

 

 

(5,522)

 

 

(7,116)

 

 

(5,620)

 

 

(5,283)

Loss on debt extinguishment

 

(2,187)

 

 

(213)

 

 

(158)

 

 

(458)

 

 

(138)

Impairment loss

 

(1,477)

 

 

(3,829)

 

 

(1,269)

 

 

(2,438)

 

 

(97)

Earnings (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes

 

22,969 

 

 

10,450 

 

 

(19,155)

 

 

1,507 

 

 

(1,278)

Income tax (expense) benefit

 

(125)

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

6,588 

Earnings (loss) from continuing operations

 

22,844 

 

 

10,450 

 

 

(19,155)

 

 

1,507 

 

 

(7,866)

Gain (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

678 

 

 

3,872 

 

 

2,896 

 

 

(2,860)

 

 

(2,354)

Net earnings (loss)

 

23,522 

 

 

14,322 

 

 

(16,259)

 

 

(1,353)

 

 

(10,220)

(Earnings) loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

 

(727)

 

 

(1,197)

 

 

23 

 

 

 

 

10 

Net earnings (loss) attributable to controlling interests

 

22,795 

 

 

13,125 

 

 

(16,236)

 

 

(1,351)

 

 

(10,210)

Dividends declared and undeclared and in kind dividends deemed on preferred stock

 

(20,748)

 

 

(3,632)

 

 

(3,452)

 

 

(3,349)

 

 

(3,169)

Net earnings (loss) attributable to common shareholders

$

2,047 

 

$

9,493 

 

$

(19,688)

 

$

(4,700)

 

$

(13,379)



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares - basic

 

4,947 

 

 

4,886 

 

 

3,897 

 

 

2,890 

 

 

2,885 

Weighted average number of common shares - diluted

 

35,981 

 

 

23,241 

 

 

3,897 

 

 

2,890 

 

 

2,885 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic EPS from continuing operations

$

0.28 

 

$

1.24 

 

$

(5.79)

 

$

(0.64)

 

$

(3.82)

Basic EPS from discontinued operations

 

0.13 

 

 

0.70 

 

 

0.74 

 

 

(0.99)

 

 

(0.81)

Total EPS Basic

$

0.41 

 

$

1.94 

 

$

(5.05)

 

$

(1.63)

 

$

(4.63)

Diluted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted EPS from continuing operations

$

0.12 

 

$

(0.15)

 

$

(5.79)

 

$

(0.64)

 

$

(3.82)

Diluted EPS from discontinued operations

 

0.02 

 

 

0.15 

 

 

0.74 

 

 

(0.99)

 

 

(0.81)

Total EPS Diluted

$

0.14 

 

$

 -

 

$

(5.05)

 

$

(1.63)

 

$

(4.63)

Balance sheet data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total investment in hotel properties, net

$

114,871 

 

$

130,699 

 

$

139,182 

 

$

164,356 

 

$

191,091 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

8,326 

 

$

4,870 

 

$

173 

 

$

45 

 

$

891 

Total assets

$

140,665 

 

$

142,346 

 

$

144,820 

 

$

169,500 

 

$

199,223 

Total debt, net of deferred financing costs, including convertible debt at fair value

$

64,035 

 

$

86,011 

 

$

91,063 

 

$

115,460 

 

$

130,197 

Total equity

$

70,799 

 

$

34,495 

 

$

19,092 

 

$

32,726 

 

$

36,651 



30

 


 

 







ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS



Overview



Condor Hospitality Trust, Inc. is a self-administered REIT for federal income tax purposes that specializes in the investment and ownership of high-quality select-service, limited-service, extended stay, and compact full service hotels.  Substantially all of our operations are conducted through CHLP, our operating partnership, of which the Company is the sole general partner.  As of December 31, 2016, the Company owned 19 hotels, representing 2,047 rooms, in 12 states, including one hotel owned through an 80% interest in an unconsolidated joint venture.



Condor experienced another year of positive transition in 2016 with significant enhancements to its portfolio composition, equity structure, debt profile, and brand.  The Company’s new strategy enabled the Company to announce its first common dividend since 2009.  The Company declared and paid three consecutive quarterly dividends commencing in the second quarter of 2016. Significant accomplishments for 2016 are summarized as follows:



Portfolio Composition:  In 2016, the Company sold 25 legacy hotels generating $61.4 million of gross proceeds.  These legacy asset sales were completed in individual transactions at valuations management believes were attractive. The net proceeds were recycled into two acquisitions. In August 2016, the Company closed on a joint venture to acquire the Aloft Atlanta Downtown for $43.6 million.  In December 2016, the Company acquired the Aloft Leawood for $22.5 million.  Both of these assets are representative of the Company’s new investment strategy to acquire high-quality, premium-branded, select-service assets.   Subsequent to the close of the year, on January 23, 2017, the Company announced that it had executed an agreement to purchase a portfolio of four Home2 Suites hotels for $73.8 million.  The transaction is expected to close in the first quarter of 2017, subject to customary closing conditions.    



Equity Structure:  On March 16, 2016, the Company closed on a $30.0 million private placement, enabling the full redemption, including accrued dividends, of the Series A and Series B Preferred Stock.  Simultaneously with the sale and issuance of Condor’s Series D Preferred Stock in the $30.0 million private placement, the Company exchanged all of its outstanding Series C Preferred Stock for new Series D Preferred Stock.  Subsequent to the close of 2016, on February 28, 2017, the holders of the Series D Preferred Stock voluntarily converted to common stock.  At the time of conversion, the Series D holders were granted $9.3 million of newly created Series E Preferred Stock. 



Debt Profile: Subsequent to the close of the year, on March 1, 2017, the Company closed a new $90.0 million secured credit facility.   KeyBank and The Huntington National Bank served as the joint lead arrangers for the revolving credit facility.  The new credit facility significantly reduced the Company’s weighted average cost of debt and enabled the refinancing of all 2017 and 2018 maturities.  The credit facility also enables the Company to accelerate the closing of acquisitions.  Management believes the new facility is a strong indicator of Condor’s credit-worthiness and the confidence of the debt community in the Company’s new strategic direction.



Rebranding: The Company completed a comprehensive rebranding in 2016.  The Company launched a new website in March 2016 and revised all reporting materials to reflect the new strategic direction of the Company.



With the aforementioned successes serving as a foundation for future growth, Condor’s management is excited about 2017 and is confident in its ability to achieve the mission of providing attractive total returns in the lodging sector to Condor’s shareholders.

   

Condor remains cautiously optimistic on the outlook of the hospitality sector in 2017.  The hospitality sector experienced its seventh straight year of positive RevPAR growth in 2016.  The expected decline in the pace of RevPAR growth materialized in 2016 and is expected to continue into 2017.  Most industry forecasts estimate that U.S. RevPAR will grow at a slower pace in 2017, generally between 2.0% - 3.0%.  The slower pace of RevPAR growth we believe is primarily driven by concerns on new supply and concerns on slowing economic growth.  Condor management believes the sectors and segments it targets will see growth in excess of these estimates.  While many primary markets have a large influx of new supply, the markets Condor targets are experiencing less

31

 


 

 

aggressive supply growth.  Additionally, the markets Condor targets are less affected, we believe, by alternative lodging platforms like Airbnb. These supply factors, combined with the possibility of continued positive economic growth, we believe should enable our hotels to experience growth in RevPAR in 2017.

   

We believe that the performance of the hotel industry is strongly correlated with the performance of the macro-economy. The equity markets have so far reacted favorably following the U.S. Presidential election. However, it is unknown if the new administration’s policies will have a position or negative impact on the economy.  Additionally, the continued threat of terrorism and economic and geopolitical turbulence abroad could derail the macro-economy.  Barring any major disruption to the U.S. economy, we expect a continued improvement in lodging fundamentals, with a more tepid improvement in lodging fundamentals in 2017 than in 2016.  The manner in which the economy continues to grow, if at all, is not predictable and outside of our control.  As a result, there can be no assurances that we will be able to grow our hotel revenue, ADR, occupancy, or RevPAR.  Factors that might contribute to less than anticipated performance are detailed in “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”  Condor’s management continually monitors the economic environment and works to adjust its strategy to seek to maximize value and returns to shareholders.



Hotel Property Portfolio Activity



Acquisitions



On August 1, 2016, the Company entered into a joint venture with TWC to acquire a 254-room Aloft hotel in downtown Atlanta, Georgia.  The Company accounts for the Atlanta JV under the equity method.  Condor owns 80% of the Atlanta JV with TWC owning the remaining 20%.  The Atlanta JV is comprised of two companies: Spring Street Hotel Property II LLC, of which CHLP indirectly owns an 80% equity interest, and Spring Street Hotel OpCo II LLC, of which our TRS indirectly owns an 80% equity interest.  TWC owns the remaining 20% equity interest in these two companies.



On August 22, 2016, the Atlanta JV closed on the acquisition of the Atlanta Aloft hotel for a purchase price of $43.6 million, subject to working capital and similar adjustments.  A summary of this acquisition and its funding as completed by the Atlanta JV is as follows (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hotel

 

Land

 

Buildings, improvements, and vehicles

 

Furniture and equipment

 

Land option (1)

 

Total purchase price

 

Debt originated at acquisition

 

Net cash

Aloft

 

$

13,025 

 

$

34,048 

 

$

2,667 

 

$

(6,190)

 

$

43,550 

 

$

33,750 

 

$

9,800 

Atlanta, GA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



(1)

The purchase agreement includes a provision which permits the seller to purchase the surface parking lot north of the hotel exercisable for ten years at less than market rates



The purchase price for the Atlanta Aloft was paid by the Atlanta JV with $9.8 million in cash, of which $7.8 million was contributed by Condor and $2.0 million was contributed by TWC, and $33.8 million of proceeds from a term loan secured by the property.  Condor additionally contributed $1.4 million and TWC additionally contributed $0.4 million to the Atlanta JV to cover acquisition costs and to provide working capital to the entity. 



On December 14, 2016, we also acquired one wholly-owned hotel, the 156-room Aloft Leawood / Overland Park (Kansas City) through a single-purpose bankruptcy remove entity 100% owned by CHLP.  A summary of this acquisition and its funding is as follows (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hotel

 

Land

 

Buildings, improvements, and vehicles

 

Furniture and equipment

 

Total purchase price

 

Debt originated at acquisition

 

Issuance of CHLP common units

 

Net cash

Aloft

 

$

3,339 

 

$

18,046 

 

$

1,115 

 

$

22,500 

 

$

15,925 

 

$

50 

 

$

6,525 

Leawood, KS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



32

 


 

 

The $22.5 million purchase price was funded with the proceeds of two mortgage loans provided by Great Western Bank totaling $15.9 million, approximately $6.5 million in cash, and the issuance of 213,904 operating units in CHLP with a value of $50,000.



During 2015, we acquired three wholly-owned premium select-service hotel properties through three single-purpose bankruptcy remote entities 100% owned by CHLP from affiliates of Peachtree Hotel Group II, LLC.  A summary of these acquisitions and their funding is as follows (in thousands):





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hotel

 

Acquisition date

 

Land

 

Building, improvements, and vehicles

 

Furniture and equipment

 

Total purchase price

 

Assumption of debt

 

Debt originated at acquisition

 

Issuance of CHLP common units

 

Net cash

Hotel Indigo

 

10/2/2015

 

$

800 

 

$

8,700 

 

$

1,500 

 

$

11,000 

 

$

 -

 

$

5,000 

 

$

150 

 

$

5,850 

Atlanta, GA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marriott Courtyard

 

10/2/2015

 

 

2,100 

 

 

11,050 

 

 

850 

 

 

14,000 

 

 

 -

 

 

10,100 

 

 

150 

 

 

3,750 

Jacksonville, FL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SpringHill Suites

 

10/1/2015

 

 

1,597 

 

 

14,353 

 

 

1,550 

 

 

17,500 

 

 

11,220 

 

 

 -

 

 

150 

 

 

6,130 

San Antonio, TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

$

4,497 

 

$

34,103 

 

$

3,900 

 

$

42,500 

 

$

11,220 

 

$

15,100 

 

$

450 

 

$

15,730 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The $42.5 million purchase price was funded with the assumption of one loan with an aggregate outstanding principal balance of $11.2 million and two newly originated GE Capital loans (sold to Western Alliance Bank (“WAB”) in April 2016) totaling $15.1 million. The remaining $16.2 million was funded with $14.9 million in cash, approximately $0.8 million of borrowings from the Company’s existing credit facility with Great Western Bank, and the issuance of operating units from CHLP representing limited partnership interest in that entity. A total of 2,298,879 operating units in CHLP were issued with a value of $450,000.



There were no hotel acquisitions in 2014.



Additionally, as discussed further in the Subsequent Events footnote to the consolidated financial statements, on January 23, 2017 the Company executed an agreement to purchase a portfolio of four Home2 Suites hotels for $73.8 million.  The portfolio includes the Home2 Suites Memphis / Southaven, the Home2 Suites Austin / Round Rock, the Home2 Suites Lexington University / Medical Center (Kentucky), and the Home2 Suites Tallahassee State Capitol.  The closing of these acquisitions is anticipated to occur in the first quarter of 2017, but is subject to customary closing conditions including accuracy of representations and warrants and compliance with covenants and obligations.



33

 


 

 

Dispositions



Pursuant to our disposition strategy, the following hotel sales were executed in 2016:







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

Gross proceeds

Date of sale

 

Location

 

Brand

 

Condor lender

 

rooms

 

(in thousands)

01/04/16

 

Kirksville, MO

 

Super 8

 

Great Western

 

61 

 

$

1,525 

01/07/16

 

Lincoln, NE

 

Super 8

 

Great Western

 

133 

 

 

2,800 

01/08/16

 

Greenville, SC

 

Savannah Suites

 

Western Alliance Bank

 

170 

 

 

2,700 

03/30/16

 

Portage, WI

 

Super 8

 

Morgan Stanley

 

61 

 

 

2,375 

04/25/16

 

O'Neill, NE

 

Super 8

 

Morgan Stanley

 

72 

 

 

1,725 

05/10/16

 

Culpeper, VA

 

Quality Inn

 

Morgan Stanley

 

49 

 

 

2,200 

05/19/16

 

Storm Lake, IA

 

Super 8

 

Morgan Stanley

 

59 

 

 

2,800 

05/24/16

 

Cleveland, TN

 

Clarion

 

Morgan Stanley

 

59 

 

 

2,231 

05/26/16

 

Coralville, IA

 

Super 8

 

Morgan Stanley

 

84