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Section 1: 10-K (SFM-10K-20170101)

sfm-10k_20170101.htm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended January 1, 2017

Commission File Number: 001-36029

 

Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

32-0331600

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

5455 East High Street, Suite 111

Phoenix, Arizona 85054

(Address of principal executive offices and zip code)

(480) 814-8016

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

 

Common Stock, $0.001 par value

NASDAQ Global Select Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

As of July 1, 2016, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $3,373,682,066, based on the last reported sale price of such stock as reported on The NASDAQ Global Select Market on such date.

As of February 22, 2017, there were outstanding 136,471,877 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.001 par value per share.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for its 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated. Such Proxy Statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of the registrant’s fiscal year ended January 1, 2017.

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

Page

PART I

Item 1.

Business

1

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

12

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

29

Item 2.

Properties

29

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

30

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

31

 

PART II

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

32

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

36

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

38

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

59

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

60

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

97

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

97

Item 9B.

Other Information

97

 

PART III

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

98

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

98

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

98

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

98

Item 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

98

 

PART IV

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

98

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

101

Signatures

102

 

As used in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, unless the context otherwise requires, references to the “Company,” “Sprouts,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc. and, where appropriate, its subsidiaries.

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. The statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (referred to as the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (referred to as the “Exchange Act”), including, but not limited to, statements regarding our expectations, beliefs, intentions, strategies, future operations, future financial position, future revenue, projected expenses, and plans and objectives of management. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “project,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” “can,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” “objective,” or the negative of these terms, and similar expressions intended to identify forward-looking statements. However, not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. These forward-looking statements reflect our current views about future events and involve known risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance, or achievement to be materially different from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed in the section titled “Risk Factors” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Furthermore, such forward-looking statements

 


 

speak only as of the date of this report. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements.

 

 

 


 

PART I

Item  1.

Business

Sprouts Farmers Market operates as a healthy grocery store that offers fresh, natural and organic food that includes fresh produce, bulk foods, vitamins and supplements, packaged groceries, meat and seafood, deli, baked goods, dairy products, frozen foods, body care and natural household items catering to consumers’ growing interest in health and wellness. Since our founding in 2002, we have grown rapidly, significantly increasing our sales, store count and profitability. With 256 stores in 14 states as of February 23, 2017, we are one of the largest healthy grocery stores selling fresh, natural and organic food in the United States.

At Sprouts, we believe healthy living is a journey and every meal is a choice. The cornerstones of our business are fresh, natural and organic products at compelling prices (which we refer to as “Healthy Living for Less”), an attractive, convenient and differentiated shopping experience featuring a broad selection of innovative healthy products, and knowledgeable team members who we believe provide best-in-class customer engagement and product education.

Healthy Living for Less. Consistent with our farmers market heritage, our offering begins with fresh produce, which we source, warehouse and distribute in-house and sell at prices we believe to be significantly below those of other food retailers. In addition, our scale, operating structure and deep industry relationships position us to consistently deliver competitive prices and promote value throughout the store. Based on our experience, we believe we attract a broad customer base, including conventional supermarket customers, and appeal to a much wider demographic than specialty retailers of natural and organic food. We believe that over time, our compelling prices and product offering convert many “trial” customers into loyal “lifestyle” customers who shop Sprouts with greater frequency and across an increasing number of departments.

Attractive, Differentiated Shopping Experience. In a convenient, small-box format (average store size of 28,000 to 30,000 sq. ft.), our stores have a farmers market feel, with a bright, open-air atmosphere to create a comfortable and engaging in-store experience. We strive to be our customers’ everyday healthy grocery store. We feature fresh produce and bulk foods at the center of the store surrounded by a complete grocery offering. Consistent with our fresh, natural and organic offering, we choose not to carry most of the traditional, national branded consumer packaged goods generally found at conventional grocery retailers. Instead, we offer a full shopping experience featuring high-quality and innovative healthier alternatives that emphasize our focus on fresh, natural and organic products at great values.

Customer Engagement and Education. Our commitment to “Healthy Living for Less” is shared by our more than 24,000 team members throughout the entire organization who are dedicated to our passion for educating and engaging with our customers with the goal of making healthy eating easier and more accessible. We believe our well-trained and engaged team members, as well as the materials we disseminate through our digital and social media platforms, help our customers increasingly understand that they can purchase a wide selection of high-quality, healthy, and great tasting food for themselves and their families at attractive prices by shopping at Sprouts.

Our Heritage

In 2002, we opened the first Sprouts Farmers Market store in Chandler, Arizona. From our founding in 2002 through January 1, 2017, we continued to open new stores while successfully rebranding 43 Henry’s Farmers Market (referred to as “Henry’s”) and 39 Sunflower Farmers Market (referred to as “Sunflower”) stores added through acquisitions to the Sprouts banner. These three businesses all trace their lineage back to Henry’s Farmers Market and were built with similar store formats and operations including a strong emphasis on value, produce and service in smaller, convenient locations. The consistency of these formats and operations was an important factor that allowed us to rapidly and

 

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successfully rebrand and integrate each of these businesses under the Sprouts banner and on a common platform.

On August 1, 2013, our common stock began trading on the NASDAQ Global Select Market and on August 6, 2013, we closed our initial public offering (referred to as our “IPO”).

Our Stores and Operations

We believe our stores represent a blend of conventional supermarkets, farmers markets, natural foods stores, and smaller specialty markets, differentiating us from other food retailers, while also providing a complete offering for our customers.

 

Store Design. Our stores are organized in a “flipped” conventional food retail store model, positioning our produce at the center of the store surrounded by a complete grocery offering. We typically dedicate approximately 15% of a store’s selling square footage to produce, which we believe is significantly higher than many of our peers. The stores are designed with open floor plans and low displays, intended to provide an easy-to-shop environment that allows our customers to view the entire store, and our small box format allows for quick in-and-out service. The below diagram shows a sample layout of our stores:

 

Customer Engagement. We are committed to providing, and believe we have, best-in-class customer engagement, which builds trust with our customers and differentiates the Sprouts shopping experience from that of many of our competitors. We design our stores to maximize customers’ interactions with our team members, as we believe this interaction provides an opportunity to educate customers and provides a valued, differentiated customer service model, which enhances customer loyalty and increases visits and purchases over time.

 

Store Size. Our stores are generally between 28,000 and 30,000 square feet, which we believe is smaller than many of our peers’ average stores. Our stores are located in a variety of mid-sized and larger shopping centers, lifestyle centers and in certain cases, independent single-unit, stand-alone developments. The size of our stores and our real estate strategy provide us flexibility in site selection, including entering into new developments or existing sites formerly operated by other retailers, including other grocery banners, office supply stores, electronics retailers and other second generation space. Further, we believe our value positioning allows us to serve a diverse customer base and provides us significant flexibility to

 

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enter new markets across a variety of socio-economic areas, including markets with varying levels of fresh, natural and organic grocer penetration.

 

Team Members. Our stores are typically staffed with 80 to 90 full and part-time team members including a store manager, an assistant store manager, eight department managers, five assistant department managers, store office staff and other team members. We strive to create a strong and unified company culture and develop team members throughout the entire organization, and we assist our store teams with our store support office and regional teams. We have prioritized making investments in training that we believe enhances our team members’ knowledge, particularly with respect to our expanded and evolving product offerings, so our team members can continue to engage and assist our customers.  We believe our team members contribute to our consistently high service standards and that this helps us successfully open and operate our stores.

Our Product Offering

We are a complete food retailer that offer a full shopping experience for our customers. We focus and tailor our assortment to fresh, natural and organic foods and healthier options throughout all of our departments.

Fresh, Natural and Organic Foods

Our product offerings focus on fresh, natural and organic foods. Foods are generally considered “fresh” if they are minimally processed or in its raw state not subject to any type of preservation or freezing. Natural foods can be broadly defined as foods that are minimally processed and are free of synthetic preservatives, artificial sweeteners, colors, flavors and other additives, growth hormones, antibiotics, hydrogenated oils, stabilizers and emulsifiers. Essentially, natural foods are largely or completely free of non-naturally occurring chemicals and are as near to their whole, natural state as possible.

Organic foods refer to the food itself as well as the method by which it is produced. In general, organic operations must demonstrate that they are protecting natural resources, conserving biodiversity, and using only approved substances and must be certified by a USDA-accredited certifying agency. These organic standards include:

 

Crop production must not use irradiation, sewage sludge, synthetic fertilizers, prohibited pesticides, and genetically modified organisms.

 

Livestock producers must meet animal health and welfare standards, not use antibiotics or growth hormones, use 100% organic feed, and provide animals with access to the outdoors.

 

Multi-ingredient organic food must be comprised of 95% or more certified organic content.

Further, retailers that handle, store or sell organic products must implement measures to protect their organic character.

 

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Products

We categorize the varieties of products we sell as perishable and non-perishable. Perishable product categories include produce, meat, seafood, deli and bakery. Non-perishable product categories include grocery, vitamins and supplements, bulk items, dairy and dairy alternatives, frozen foods, beer and wine, and natural health and body care. The following is a breakdown of our perishable and non-perishable sales mix:

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Perishables

 

 

50.4

%

 

 

50.8

%

 

 

50.8

%

Non-Perishables

 

 

49.6

%

 

 

49.2

%

 

 

49.2

%

 

Departments

While we focus on providing an abundant and affordable offering of natural and organic produce, our stores also include the following departments that enable customers to have a full grocery shopping experience: packaged groceries, meat and seafood, deli, vitamins and supplements, dairy and dairy alternatives, bulk items, baked goods, frozen foods, natural health and body care, and beer and wine. We believe each of our departments provides high-quality, value-oriented offerings for our customers which we continuously refine with our customer preferences in mind, including our ongoing fresh food and deli expansion initiatives in select stores, comprised of freshly prepared proteins and sides, full service deli case, salad bar, fresh juices and soup station to provide more convenient prepared food options for our customers.

Private Label

We have been expanding the breadth of our Sprouts branded products over the last several years and have a dedicated product development team focused on continuing this growth. These products feature competitively priced specialty and innovative products, with great taste profiles and quality and strict ingredient standards that we believe equal or exceed national brands. Our private label program now accounts for over 10% of our revenue and features over 2,150 products. Our private label brands drive value by offering our customers lower prices while still delivering generally higher margin as compared to branded products. We believe our private label products build and enhance the Sprouts brand and allow us to distinguish ourselves from our competitors, promoting customer loyalty and creating a destination shopping experience.

Sourcing and Distribution

We manage the buying of, and set the standards for, the products we sell, and we source our products from over 800 vendors and suppliers, both domestically and internationally.

We believe, based on our industry experience, that our strong relationships in the produce business provide us a competitive advantage and enable us to offer high-quality produce at prices we believe are significantly below those of conventional food retailers and even further below high-end natural and organic food retailers. Given the importance of produce to our stores, we source, warehouse and distribute all produce in-house. This ensures our produce meets our high quality standards. We are supported by dedicated regional procurement teams that provide us flexibility to procure produce on local, regional and national levels.

We have department and product specifications that ensure a consistently high level of quality across product ingredients, production standards and other key measures of freshness, natural and organic standards. These specifications are measured at both entry and exit points to our facilities. We distribute all produce to our stores from two leased distribution facilities and two third-party operated distribution facilities, and we manage every aspect of quality control in this department. We believe we

 

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currently have sufficient capacity at these facilities to support our near-term growth plans in our current markets, but we continue to explore expansion opportunities as our needs evolve.

We believe our scale, together with this decentralized purchasing structure and flexibility generates cost savings, which we then pass on to our customers. Distributors and farmers recognize the volume of goods we sell through our stores and our flexible purchasing and distribution model allows us to opportunistically acquire produce at great value which we will also pass along to our customers.

For all non-produce products, we use third-party distributors and vendors to distribute products directly to our stores following specifications and quality control standards that are set by us.

KeHE Distributors, LLC (referred to as “KeHE”), is our primary supplier of dry grocery and frozen food products, accounting for approximately 33%, 31% and 31% of our total purchases in fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Another 4% of our total purchases in each of fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively, were made through our secondary supplier, United Natural Foods, Inc. (referred to as “UNFI”). See “Risk Factors—Disruption of significant supplier relationships could negatively affect our business.”

Our Pricing, Marketing and Advertising

Pricing

We are committed to a pricing strategy consistent with our motto of “Healthy Living for Less.” As a farmers market style store, we emphasize low prices throughout the entire store, as we are able to pass along the benefits of our scale and purchasing power to our customers. We position our prices with everyday value for our customers with regular promotions on selected products that drive traffic and trial. We typically have about 40% of our approximately 18,900 products on sale at any given time.

Marketing and Advertising

We supplement and support our everyday competitive pricing strategy through weekly advertised specials, a weekly e-circular, online coupons and special promotions. We send over 16 million weekly advertisement circulars to encourage customers to shop at our stores. These circulars focus on product education and offerings and aim to engage the customer. We use sales flyers distributed through direct delivery or inserted into local newspapers as our primary medium for advertising. These sales flyers include representative products from our key departments. In addition, we have a customer database of over one million customers as of January 1, 2017, many of whom receive electronic versions of our weekly circulars or monthly newsletters.

We tailor our advertisements to specific markets, which provides us with greater flexibility to offer different promotions and respond to local competitive activity. In addition, we advertise our sales promotions and support our brand image through the use of local radio and billboards, as well as targeted direct mail in specific markets.

We also continue to promote and enhance our digital presence.  We developed and maintain a smartphone app on which we include mobile coupon clip, customized offers based on the user’s preferences and in-store scan features, and our website, www.sprouts.com, on which we display our weekly sales flyers and offer special deals. Our website also features on-line ordering for holiday meals and catering trays. The inclusion of our website address in this Annual Report on Form 10-K does not include or incorporate by reference the information on or accessible through our website herein. We continue to expand our social media platform. As of January 1, 2017, we had approximately 1.4 million Facebook fans. In addition, we have partnered with Amazon Prime to offer 1-hour or 2-hour deliveries from our stores in selected markets. We will continue to explore online ordering opportunities to further connect with our customers.    

 

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In addition to the weekly circulars, we offer numerous other saving opportunities for our customers, all of which are meant to reinforce our value offering and are designed to appeal to specific target customers. In 2016, we had approximately 34 department-wide promotions at each store throughout the year, which included our Vitamin Extravaganza, Frozen Frenzy, Gluten-Free Favorites, and Incredible Bulk Sales, in addition to our routine Double-Ad Wednesday promotion and 72-Hour Sales.

Seasonality

Our business is subject to modest seasonality. Our average weekly sales per store fluctuate throughout the year and are typically highest in the first half of the fiscal year and lowest during the fourth quarter. Produce, which contributed approximately 24% of our net sales for the fiscal year ended January 1, 2017, is generally more available in the first six months of our fiscal year due to the timing of peak growing seasons.

Our Customers

Our target customer seeks a wide assortment of high-quality fresh and nutritious food as well as vitamins and supplements at competitive prices. We believe our value proposition and complete grocery offering engages both conventional and health-focused shoppers.

We have a broad range of customers from those looking for value, to customers seeking specific attribute products, to those seeking to eat healthier. We believe the majority of our customers are initially attracted to our stores by our fresh produce, which we offer at prices we believe are significantly below those of conventional food retailers and even further below high-end natural and organic food retailers. We drive customer traffic by aggressively promoting produce and other items through weekly advertisements designed primarily to reach the everyday supermarket shopper. These customers include “trial” customers that limit their shopping to specific products or departments, such as produce. Through department-specific promotions, in-store signage, and customer education, many customers become “transition” customers that shop new departments and try new products. Over time, through customer service and engagement, targeted marketing, and increased knowledge of our product offering, we believe that transition customers become “lifestyle” customers that shop with greater frequency throughout the entire store.

Responsible Retailing

We are committed to operating our business in a way that respects social and environmental well-being. We call this commitment “responsible retailing,” and we believe we have a unique opportunity to positively impact the communities in which we operate.

Sprouts Sustainable Practices

Our commitment to our communities extends to operating our business in a way that minimizes our impact on the environment and safeguards the health of our communities.  As we grow, we are able to achieve greater scale in the impact of our sustainability initiatives. Through our Food Rescue Program in 2016, we were able to divert 30 million pounds of food from landfills, including 18 million pounds of food donated to local hunger relief agencies and food banks and 12 million pounds of food waste sent to local farms and composting facilities.  Our annual Grab’N’Give campaign funded by contributions from our customers generated over 263,000 personal care and emergency food bags for those in need. In 2016, we were named as a “Leadership Partner” by Feeding America for our continued support to eliminating hunger in the United States.  

 

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Sustainability at Sprouts also encompasses other facets of our operations, including the construction of our stores.  In 2016, we received more “GreenChill” store certifications than any other grocery retailer.  The GreenChill program is a partnership between the Environmental Protection Agency and food retailers to reduce refrigerant emissions and decrease their impact on the ozone layer and climate change. Our environmental stewardship is also reflected in our rigorous recycling program; during 2016, we recycled 70 million pounds of cardboard and 0.5 million pounds of plastics. We believe our sustainable practices strengthen our relationship with customers in the communities we serve.

The Sprouts Healthy Communities Foundation

In 2015, we formed the Sprouts Healthy Communities Foundation (referred to as our “Foundation”), a registered 501(c)(3) organization focused on giving locally in the areas of health education and nutrition, food security and hunger relief and helping people living with disabilities and health concerns. Our Foundation relies on donations from Sprouts, as well as our vendors and customers, to support non-profit organizations that are stewards of health and wellness in the communities where our team members and customers work, live and play.

Our Foundation has multi-year partnerships with three organizations that are committed to making a meaningful difference in the lives of children, individuals and families. REAL School Gardens builds learning gardens in low-income elementary schools that enhance student learning and provide health nutrition education. Vitamin Angels provides access to life saving vitamins and minerals for at-risk populations in need, particularly pregnant women, new mothers and children. Autism Speaks provides resources for adults and children affected by autism. Collectively, our Foundation donated over $1.2 million to these three organizations in 2016.  

In 2016, our Foundation began the Neighborhood Grants program to distribute donations received from Sprouts and our customers entirely in the communities in which the donations were collected. With grants ranging from $2,500 to $10,000, our Foundation contributed over $400,000 to local non-profit organizations aligned with its goal to create stronger and healthier communities. Our stores and engaged team members also contribute to healthy environments through in-kind support and volunteerism at community events.  

Growing Our Business

We believe we are well-positioned to capitalize on two powerful, long-term consumer trends—a growing interest in health and wellness and a focus on value and are pursuing a number of strategies designed to continue our growth and strong financial performance, including:

Expand our store base. We intend to continue expanding our store base by pursuing new store openings in existing markets, expanding into adjacent markets and penetrating new markets. We have opened 24, 27 and 36 new stores in fiscal 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively.  We expect to continue to expand our store base with 32 store openings planned in fiscal 2017, including our initial expansion into Florida and North Carolina, of which three new stores have opened as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We intend to open approximately 30 new stores annually over the near term, with approximately 60-65% in existing markets.

 

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The below diagram shows our store footprint, by state, as of January 1, 2017.

 

 

Continue positive comparable store sales. For 39 consecutive quarters, including throughout the economic downturn from 2008 to 2010, stores under our management have achieved positive comparable store sales growth. We believe the consistency of our performance over time and across geographies and vintages is the result of a number of factors, including our distinctive value positioning and merchandising strategies, product innovation and a well-trained staff focused on customer education and engagement. We believe we can continue to grow the number and size of customer transactions by enhancing our core value proposition and distinctive customer-oriented shopping experience. We aim to grow our average ticket by continuing to expand and refine our fresh, natural and organic product offering, our private label program, our targeted and personalized marketing efforts and our in-store and digital education. We believe these factors, combined with the continued strong growth in fresh, natural and organic food consumption, will allow Sprouts to gain new customers, increase customer loyalty and, over time, convert single-department trial customers into core, lifestyle customers who shop Sprouts with greater frequency and across an increasing number of departments.

Grow the Sprouts Farmers Market brand. We are committed to supporting our stores, product offerings and brand through a variety of marketing programs, expanded private label offerings and corporate partnerships. In addition, we will continue our community outreach and charity programs to more broadly connect with our local communities with the aim of promoting our brand and educating consumers on healthy choices. We will also continue to expand our innovative marketing and promotional strategy through print, digital and social media platforms.

Train Future Leaders. We believe Sprouts is an attractive place to work with significant growth opportunities for our more than 24,000 team members. In 2016, we promoted approximately 3,500 team members. We regularly assess prevailing wages in the markets in which we operate and offer competitive wages and benefits as we believe active, educated and passionate team members contribute to consumer satisfaction. Customer engagement is critical to our culture and growth plans, and we place great importance on recruiting candidates that share our passion for Healthy Living for Less and training our team members on customer engagement and product knowledge to ensure there is friendly, knowledgeable staff in every department in every store. Our team members are trained and empowered to proactively engage with customers throughout the entire store. This includes investing time to educate

 

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them on the benefits of different vitamins, sharing ways to prepare a meal or cutting a piece of produce or opening a package to offer customers product tastings throughout the store. We consider customer education and engagement to be particularly important as many conventional supermarket customers that have not shopped our stores believe that eating healthy is expensive and difficult.

New Store Development

We have an extensive and selective process for new store site selection, which includes in-depth analysis of area demographics, competition, growth potential, traffic patterns, grocery spend and other key criteria. We have a dedicated real estate team as well as a real estate committee that includes certain of our executive officers. Multiple members of this committee will conduct an on-site inspection prior to approving any new location.

We believe that our store model, combined with our rigorous store selection process and a growing interest in health and wellness, contribute to our attractive new store returns on investment and strong cash flows. We have been successful across varying geographies which we believe supports the portability of the Sprouts brand and store model into a wide range of markets. Based on our experience, we believe that our broad product offering and value proposition appeals to a wider demographic than other leading competitors, including higher-priced health food and gourmet food retailers. Sprouts has been successful across a variety of urban, suburban and rural locations in diverse geographies, from coast to coast, underscoring the heightened interest in eating healthy across markets.

We currently anticipate opening approximately 30 new Sprouts Farmers Market stores per year going forward based on our new store site selection analysis. We expect to open approximately two-thirds of our new stores in existing markets and approximately one-third in new markets, as we believe this provides for a good balance, given that our new stores in existing markets mature more quickly than those in new markets.  This mix allows us to focus our resources on developing our new markets so they begin with a solid foundation.

See “Properties” for additional information with respect to our store locations.

Our Competition and Industry

We operate within the intensely competitive and highly fragmented grocery store industry which encompasses a wide array of food retailers, including large conventional independent and chain supermarkets, warehouse clubs, small grocery and convenience stores, and natural and organic, specialty, mass, discount and other food retail formats. According to the Progressive Grocer, U.S. supermarket sales totaled over $649 billion in 2015. Based on our industry experience, we believe we are capturing significant market share from conventional supermarkets and specialty concepts in this supermarket segment.

While the natural and organic food segment is one of the fastest growing segments in the industry, conventional supermarkets have experienced overall share decline from approximately 73% in 2005 to approximately 65% in 2015, according to the Progressive Grocer, as customers have migrated to other grocery retail formats. Conventional supermarket customers are attracted to unique product offerings, formats and differentiated shopping experiences. Based on our industry experience, we also believe consumers are increasingly focused on health and wellness and are actively seeking healthy foods in order to improve eating habits. This overall demand for healthy products is driven by many factors, including increased awareness about the benefits of eating healthy, a greater focus on preventative health measures, and the rising costs of health care. We believe customers are attracted to retailers with comprehensive health and wellness product offerings. As a result, food retailers are offering an increased assortment of fresh, natural and organic foods as well as vitamins and supplements to meet this demand.

 

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Our competitors include conventional supermarkets such as Kroger and Safeway, as well as other food retailers such as Whole Foods, Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage and Trader Joe’s. We believe Sprouts offers consumers a compelling value relative to conventional supermarkets and mass retailers and will continue to benefit from increasing consumer focus on health, wellness and value, as well as their emphasis on an enhanced shopping experience featuring a broad selection of products along with exceptional customer engagement.

Insurance and Risk Management

We use a combination of insurance and self-insurance to provide for potential liability for workers’ compensation, general liability, product liability, director and officers’ liability, team member healthcare benefits, and other casualty and property risks. Changes in legal trends and interpretations, variability in inflation rates, changes in the nature and method of claims settlement, benefit level changes due to changes in applicable laws, insolvency of insurance carriers, and changes in discount rates could all affect ultimate settlements of claims. We evaluate our insurance requirements on an ongoing basis to ensure we maintain adequate levels of coverage.

Trademarks and Other Intellectual Property

We believe that our intellectual property has substantial value and has contributed to the success of our business. In particular, our trademarks, including our registered SPROUTS FARMERS MARKET®, SPROUTS® and HEALTHY LIVING FOR LESS!® trademarks, are valuable assets that we believe reinforce our customers’ favorable perception of our stores. In addition to our trademarks, we believe that our trade dress, which includes the human-scale design, arrangement, color scheme and other physical characteristics of our stores and product displays, is a large part of the farmers market atmosphere we create in our stores and enables customers to distinguish our stores and products from those of our competitors.

From time to time, third parties have used names similar to ours, have applied to register trademarks similar to ours and, we believe, have infringed or misappropriated our intellectual property rights. Third parties have also, from time to time, opposed our trademarks and challenged our intellectual property rights. We respond to these actions on a case-by-case basis. The outcomes of these actions have included both negotiated out-of-court settlements as well as litigation.

Information Technology Systems

We have made significant investments in information technology infrastructure, including purchasing, receiving, inventory, point of sale, warehousing, distribution, accounting, reporting and financial systems. Our recent investments have focused on solutions to enhance our team members’ productivity, including business intelligence, labor management and human resources information systems.  We also maintain modern supply chain systems allowing for operating efficiencies and scalability to support our continued growth. All of our stores operate under one integrated information technology platform. We are making investments to our current information technology infrastructure and plan on continuing to invest in this area to support our growth with systems that scale with and add efficiencies to our growing operations.  

 

Regulatory Compliance

Our stores are subject to various local, state and federal laws, regulations and administrative practices affecting our business. We must comply with provisions regulating health and sanitation

 

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standards, food labeling, equal employment, minimum wages, environmental protection, licensing for the sale of food and, in many stores, licensing for beer and wine or other alcoholic beverages. Our operations, including the manufacturing, processing, formulating, packaging, labeling and advertising of products are subject to regulation by various federal agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration (referred to as the “FDA”), the Federal Trade Commission (referred to as the “FTC”), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (referred to as the “USDA”), the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Food. The FDA has comprehensive authority to regulate the safety of food and food ingredients (other than meat, poultry, catfish and certain egg products), as well as dietary supplements. Food additives and food contact substances are subject to pre-market approvals or notification requirements. The FDA’s overall food safety authority was dramatically enhanced in 2011 with the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act (referred to as “FSMA”). Implementing regulations, which began to go into effect in 2016, require food processors and handlers to design and implement effective measures to ensure food safety. Additionally, FSMA increases the FDA’s authority to institute administrative detentions of adulterated and misbranded foods. FSMA also requires enhanced tracking and tracing of food products and, as a result, imposes new recordkeeping burdens upon our suppliers and contract manufacturers.

The FDA also exercises broad jurisdiction over the labeling and promotion of food. Labeling is a broad concept that, under certain circumstances, extends even to product-related claims and representations made on a company’s website or similar printed or graphic medium. All foods, including dietary supplements, must bear labeling that provides consumers with essential information with respect to ingredients, product weight, etc. The FDA administers a systematic review and approval program for certain “health claims” (claims describing the relationship between a food substance and a health or disease condition). It has also promulgated regulatory definitions for various “nutrient content claims” (e.g., “high in antioxidants,” “low in fat,” etc.). Additional in-store labeling requirements, requiring disclosure of calories and other nutrient information for frequently sold items, are scheduled to go into effect in 2017. In addition the USDA has been directed, through legislation passed in 2016, to promulgate regulations within two years requiring the disclosure of the presence of genetically modified ingredients in food.

FDA and USDA Enforcement. The FDA has broad authority to enforce the provisions of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (referred to as “FDCA”) applicable to the safety, labeling, manufacturing and promotion of foods and dietary supplements, including powers to issue a public warning letter to a company, publicize information about illegal products, institute an administrative detention of food, request or order a recall of illegal products from the market, and request the Department of Justice to initiate a seizure action, an injunction action or a criminal prosecution in the U.S. courts. Similarly, the USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service is the public health agency responsible for ensuring that the nation’s commercial supply of meat, poultry, catfish and certain egg products is safe, wholesome and correctly labeled and packaged.

Dietary Supplements. The FDCA has been amended several times with respect to dietary supplements, in particular by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (referred to as “DSHEA”). DSHEA established a framework governing the composition, safety, labeling, manufacturing and marketing of dietary supplements, defined “dietary supplement” and “new dietary ingredient” and established new statutory criteria for evaluating the safety of substances meeting the respective definitions. In the process, DSHEA removed dietary supplements and new dietary ingredients from pre-market approval requirements that apply to food additives and pharmaceuticals and established a combination of “notification” and “post marketing controls” for regulating product safety, however, non-dietary ingredients in a dietary supplement remain subject to the FDA’s food additive authorities. DSHEA also empowered the FDA to establish binding good manufacturing practice regulations governing key aspects of the production of dietary supplements.

Food and Dietary Supplement Advertising. The FTC exercises jurisdiction over the advertising of foods and dietary supplements. The FTC has the power to institute monetary sanctions and the imposition of consent decrees and penalties that can severely limit a company’s business practices. In

 

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recent years, the FTC has instituted numerous enforcement actions against dietary supplement companies for failure to have adequate substantiation for claims made in advertising or for the use of false or misleading advertising claims.

Compliance. As is common in our industry, we rely on our suppliers and contract manufacturers to ensure that the products they manufacture and sell to us comply with all applicable regulatory and legislative requirements. In general, we seek certifications of compliance, representations and warranties, indemnification and/or insurance from our suppliers and contract manufacturers. However, even with adequate insurance and indemnification, any claims of non-compliance could significantly damage our reputation and consumer confidence in products we sell. In addition, the failure of such products to comply with applicable regulatory and legislative requirements could prevent us from marketing the products or require us to recall or remove such products from our stores. In order to comply with applicable statutes and regulations, our suppliers and contract manufacturers have from time to time reformulated, eliminated or relabeled certain of their products and we have revised certain provisions of our sales and marketing program.

Employees

As of January 1, 2017, we had more than 24,000 team members. None of our team members are subject to collective bargaining agreements. We consider our relations with our team members to be good, and we have never experienced a strike or significant work stoppage.

Corporate Offices

Our principal executive offices are located at 5455 E. High Street, Suite 111, Phoenix, Arizona 85054. Our website address is www.sprouts.com. The information on or accessible through our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K or in any other report or document we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (referred to as the “SEC”).

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

Certain factors may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below, together with all of the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes. Any of the following risks could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, cash flows, financial condition, or prospects and cause the value of our common stock to decline, which could cause you to lose all or part of your investment.

Business and Operating Risks

Our continued growth depends on new store openings, and our failure to successfully open new stores could negatively impact our business and stock price.

Our continued growth depends, in large part, on our ability to open new stores and to operate those stores successfully. Successful implementation of this strategy depends upon a number of factors, including our ability to effectively achieve a level of cash flow or obtain necessary financing to support our expansion; find suitable sites for new store locations; negotiate and execute leases on acceptable terms; secure and manage the inventory necessary for the launch and operation of our new stores; hire, train and retain skilled store personnel; promote and market new stores; and address competitive merchandising, distribution and other challenges encountered in connection with expansion into new geographic areas and markets. Although we plan to expand our store base primarily through new store openings, we may grow through strategic acquisitions. Our ability to grow through strategic acquisitions will depend upon our ability to identify suitable targets and negotiate acceptable terms and conditions for

 

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their acquisition, as well as our ability to obtain financing for such acquisitions, integrate the acquired stores into our existing store base and retain the customers of such stores. If we are ineffective in performing these activities, then our efforts to open and operate new stores may be unsuccessful or unprofitable, and we may be unable to execute our growth strategy.

We opened 36 and 27 stores in fiscal 2016 and 2015, respectively, and we intend to open approximately 30 new stores annually over the near term. However, we cannot assure you that we will achieve this expected level of new store growth. We may not have the level of cash flow or financing necessary to support our growth strategy. Additionally, our proposed expansion will place increased demands on our operational, managerial and administrative resources. These increased demands could cause us to operate our existing business less effectively, which in turn could cause deterioration in the financial performance of our existing stores. Further, new store openings in markets where we have existing stores may result in reduced sales volumes at our existing stores in those markets. If we experience a decline in performance, we may slow or discontinue store openings, or we may decide to close stores that we are unable to operate in a profitable manner. If we fail to successfully implement our growth strategy, including by opening new stores, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows may be adversely affected.

On many of our projects, we have received landlord contributions for leasehold improvements and other build-out costs. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to continue to receive landlord contributions at the same levels or at all. Any reductions of landlord contributions could have an adverse impact on our new store cash-on-cash returns and our operating results.

We may be unable to maintain or increase comparable store sales, which could negatively impact our business and stock price.

We may not be able to maintain or improve the levels of comparable store sales that we have experienced in the past. Our comparable store sales growth could be lower than our historical average for many reasons, including:

 

general economic conditions;

 

product price inflation or deflation;

 

increased competitive activity;

 

price changes in response to competitive factors;

 

the impact of new and acquired stores entering into the comparable store base;

 

the opening of new stores that cannibalize store sales in existing areas;

 

cycling against any year or quarter of above-average sales results;

 

consumer preferences, buying trends and spending levels;

 

slowing in the fresh, natural and organic retail sector;

 

possible supply shortages or other operational disruptions;

 

the number and dollar amount of customer transactions in our stores;

 

our ability to provide product or service offerings that generate new and repeat visits to our stores; and

 

the level of customer engagement that we provide in our stores.

These factors may cause our comparable store sales results to be materially lower than in recent periods, which could harm our business and result in a decline in the price of our common stock.

 

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Disruption of significant supplier relationships could negatively affect our business.

KeHE is our primary supplier of dry grocery and frozen food products, accounting for approximately 33% and 31% of our total purchases in each of fiscal 2016 and 2015, respectively. We also have commitments in place with KeHE to order certain amounts of our distribution-sourced organic and natural produce, and to maintain certain minimum average annual store purchase volumes, including for any new stores we open. Our current primary contractual relationship with KeHE continues through April 2018. Due to this concentration of purchases from a single third-party supplier, the cancellation of our distribution arrangement or the disruption, delay or inability of KeHE to deliver product to our stores in quantities that meet our requirements may materially and adversely affect our operating results while we establish alternative distribution channels. Another 4% of our total purchases in each of fiscal 2016 and 2015 were made through our secondary supplier, UNFI. Our current contractual relationship with UNFI continues through December 31, 2018. There is no assurance UNFI or other distributors will be able to fulfill our needs on favorable terms or at all. In addition, if KeHE, UNFI or any of our other suppliers fail to comply with food safety, labeling or other laws and regulations, or face allegations of non-compliance, their operations may be disrupted. Further, the food distribution and manufacturing industries are dynamic.  Consolidation of distributors or the manufacturers that supply them could reduce our supply options and detrimentally impact the terms under which we purchase products. We cannot assure you that we would be able to find replacement suppliers on commercially reasonable terms, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Any significant interruption in the operations of our distribution centers or supply chain network could disrupt our ability to deliver our produce and other products in a timely manner.

We self-distribute our produce through our two distribution centers located in Arizona and Texas and two third-party distribution centers in California and Georgia. Any significant interruption in the operation of our distribution center infrastructure, such as disruptions due to fire, severe weather or other catastrophic events, power outages, labor disagreements, shipping or infrastructure problems, or contractual disputes with third-party service providers could adversely impact our ability to distribute produce to our stores. Such interruptions could result in lost sales and a loss of customer loyalty to our brand. While we maintain business interruption and property insurance, if the operation of our distribution centers were interrupted for any reason, causing delays in shipment of produce to our stores, our insurance may not be sufficient to cover losses we experience, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In addition, unexpected delays in deliveries from vendors that ship directly to our stores or increases in transportation costs (including through increased fuel costs) could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Labor shortages or work stoppages in the transportation industry, long-term disruptions to the national and international transportation infrastructure, reduction in capacity and industry-specific regulations such as hours-of-service rules that lead to delays or interruptions of deliveries could negatively affect our business.

Disruptions to, or security breaches involving, our information technology systems could harm our ability to run our business.

We rely extensively on information technology systems for point of sale processing in our stores, supply chain, financial reporting, human resources and various other processes and transactions. Our information technology systems are subject to damage or interruption from power outages, computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, security breaches, including breaches of our transaction processing or other systems that could result in the compromise of confidential customer data, catastrophic events, and usage errors by our team members. In March 2016, an email “phishing” scam was perpetrated against one of our team members, who inadvertently disclosed 2015 W-2 statements of our team members to an unauthorized third party purporting to be one of our executive officers. We worked with the FBI and the IRS to investigate this crime and to determine the best ways to protect team member tax information, and offered credit monitoring services to impacted team members. As described under “Legal Proceedings,” we are subject to four complaints related to this scam, each on behalf of a

 

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purported class of our current and former team members whose personally identifiable information was inadvertently disclosed; these matters are covered by our cyber insurance, subject to applicable deductibles.  Additionally, in January 2013, we discovered sophisticated malware installed on certain credit card “pin pads” in a limited number of our stores designed to illegally access our customers’ credit card information. We have implemented numerous additional security protocols since these attacks in order to further tighten security and continue to maintain a customary cyber insurance policy, but there can be no assurance similar breaches will not occur in the future, be detected in a timely manner or be covered by our insurance policy.

Our information technology systems may also fail to perform as we anticipate, and we may encounter difficulties in adapting these systems to changing technologies or expanding them to meet the future needs and growth of our business. If our systems are breached, damaged or cease to function properly, we may have to make significant investments to fix or replace them, suffer interruptions in our operations, incur liability to our customers and others, face costly litigation, and our reputation with our customers may be harmed. Various third parties, such as our suppliers and payment processors, also rely heavily on information technology systems, and any failure of these systems could also cause loss of sales, transactional or other data and significant interruptions to our business. Any material interruption in the information technology systems we rely on may have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.

If we are unable to successfully identify market trends and react to changing consumer preferences in a timely manner, our sales may decrease.

We believe our success depends, in substantial part, on our ability to:

 

anticipate, identify and react to fresh, natural and organic grocery and dietary supplement trends and changing consumer preferences and demographics in a timely manner;

 

translate market trends into appropriate, saleable product and service offerings in our stores before our competitors; and

 

develop and maintain vendor and service provider relationships that provide us access to the newest merchandise and customer engagement options on reasonable terms.

Consumer preferences often change rapidly and without warning, moving from one trend to another among many product or retail concepts. Our performance is impacted by trends regarding healthy lifestyles, dietary preferences, natural and organic products, and vitamins and supplements, as well as new and evolving methods of engaging with and delivering our products to our customers. Consumer preferences towards vitamins, supplements or natural and organic food products might shift as a result of, among other things, economic conditions, food safety perceptions, scientific research or findings regarding the benefits or efficacy of such products, national media attention and the cost of these products. Our store offerings currently include natural and organic products and dietary supplements. A change in consumer preferences away from our offerings would have a material adverse effect on our business. Additionally, negative publicity over the safety, efficacy or benefits of any such items may adversely affect demand for our products, and could result in lower customer traffic, sales, results of operations and cash flows.

If we are unable to anticipate and satisfy consumer preferences in the regions where we operate with respect to product offerings and customer engagement options, our sales may decrease, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

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Our newly opened stores may negatively impact our financial results in the short-term, and may not achieve sales and operating levels consistent with our more mature stores on a timely basis or at all.

We have actively pursued new store growth and plan to continue doing so in the future. We cannot assure you that our new store openings will be successful or reach the sales and profitability levels of our existing stores. New store openings may negatively impact our financial results in the short-term due to the effect of store opening costs and lower sales and contribution to overall profitability during the initial period following opening. New stores build their sales volume and their customer base over time and, as a result, generally have lower margins and higher operating expenses, as a percentage of net sales, than our more mature stores. New stores may not achieve sustained sales and operating levels consistent with our more mature store base on a timely basis or at all. This may have an adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results.

In addition, we may not be able to successfully integrate new stores into our existing store base and those new stores may not be as profitable as our existing stores. Further, we have experienced in the past, and expect to experience in the future, some sales volume transfer from our existing stores to our new stores as some of our existing customers switch to new, closer locations. If our new stores are less profitable than our existing stores, or if we experience sales volume transfer from our existing stores, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected.

We may be unable to maintain or improve our operating margins, which could adversely affect our financial condition and ability to grow.

If we are unable to successfully manage the potential difficulties associated with store growth, we may not be able to capture the efficiencies of scale that we expect from expansion. If we are not able to continue to capture efficiencies of scale, improve our systems, continue our cost discipline, and maintain appropriate store labor levels and disciplined product selection, our operating margins may stagnate or decline. In addition, competition and pricing pressures from competitors may also adversely impact our operating margins. Both our inability to capture the efficiencies from scale and competition could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and adversely affect the price of our common stock.

Real or perceived concerns that products we sell could cause unexpected side effects, illness, injury or death could result in their discontinuance or expose us to lawsuits, either of which could result in unexpected costs and damage to our reputation.

There is increasing governmental scrutiny of and public awareness regarding food safety. Unexpected side effects, illness, injury, or death caused by products we prepare and/or sell or involving vendors that supply us with products could result in the discontinuance of sales of these products or our relationship with such vendors or prevent us from achieving market acceptance of the affected products. Such side effects, illnesses, injuries and death could also expose us to product liability or negligence lawsuits. Any claims brought against us may exceed our existing or future insurance policy coverage or limits. Any judgment against us that is in excess of our policy limits would have to be paid from our cash reserves, which would reduce our capital resources. Further, we may not have sufficient capital resources to pay a judgment, in which case our creditors could levy against our assets.

As a fresh, natural and organic retailer, we believe that many customers choose to shop our stores because of their interest in health, nutrition and food safety. As a result, we believe that our customers hold us to a high food safety standard. Therefore, real or perceived quality or food safety concerns, whether or not ultimately based on fact, and whether or not involving products prepared and/or sold at our stores or vendors that supply us with products, would cause negative publicity and lost confidence regarding our company, brand, or products, which could in turn harm our reputation and net sales, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

 

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If we fail to maintain our reputation and the value of our brand, our sales may decline.

We believe our continued success depends on our ability to maintain and grow the value of the Sprouts brand. Maintaining, promoting and positioning our brand and reputation will depend largely on the success of our marketing and merchandising efforts and our ability to provide a consistent, high-quality customer experience. Brand value is based in large part on perceptions of subjective qualities, and even isolated incidents involving our company, our team members, suppliers, agents or third-party service providers, or the products we sell can erode trust and confidence, particularly if they involve our private label products, or result in adverse publicity, governmental investigations or litigation. Our brand could be adversely affected if we fail to achieve these objectives, or if our public image or reputation were to be tarnished by negative publicity.

The loss of key management could negatively affect our business.

We are dependent upon a number of key management and other team members. If we were to lose the services of a significant number of key team members within a short period of time, this could have a material adverse effect on our operations as we may not be able to find suitable individuals to replace them on a timely basis, if at all. In addition, any such departure could be viewed in a negative light by investors and analysts, which may cause our stock price to decline. We do not maintain key person insurance on any team member.

If we are unable to attract, train and retain team members, we may not be able to grow or successfully operate our business.

The food retail industry is labor intensive. Our continued success is dependent upon our ability to attract and retain qualified team members in our stores and at our regional and store support offices who understand and appreciate our culture and are able to represent our brand effectively and establish credibility with our business partners and consumers. We face intense competition for qualified team members, many of whom are subject to offers from competing employers. Our ability to meet our labor needs, while controlling wage and labor-related costs, is subject to numerous external factors, including the availability of a sufficient number of qualified persons in the work force in the markets in which we are located, unemployment levels within those markets, unionization of the available work force, prevailing wage rates, changing demographics, health and other insurance costs and changes in employment legislation. In the event of increasing wage rates, if we fail to increase our wages competitively, the quality of our workforce could decline, causing our customer engagement to suffer, while increasing our wages could cause our earnings to decrease. If we are unable to hire and retain team members capable of meeting our business needs and expectations, our business and brand image may be impaired. Any failure to meet our staffing needs or any material increase in turnover rates of our team members or team member wages may adversely affect our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

Union attempts to organize our team members could negatively affect our business.

None of our team members are currently subject to a collective bargaining agreement. As we continue to grow and enter different regions, unions may attempt to organize all or part of our team member base at certain stores or within certain regions. Responding to such organization attempts may distract management and team members and may have a negative financial impact on individual stores, or on our business as a whole.

Our lease obligations could adversely affect our financial performance and may require us to continue paying rent for store locations that we no longer operate.

We are subject to risks associated with our current and future store, distribution center and administrative office real estate leases. Our high level of fixed lease obligations will require us to use a portion of cash generated by our operations to satisfy these obligations, and could adversely impact our ability to obtain future financing, if required, to support our growth or other operational investments. We will require substantial cash flows from operations to make our payments under our operating leases, all

 

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of which provide for periodic increases in rent. If we are not able to make the required payments under the leases, the lenders or owners of the relevant stores, distribution centers or administrative offices may, among other things, repossess those assets, which could adversely affect our ability to conduct our operations. In addition, our failure to make payments under our operating leases could trigger defaults under other leases or under agreements governing our indebtedness, which could cause the counterparties under those agreements to accelerate the obligations due thereunder.

Further, we generally cannot cancel our leases, so if we decide to close or relocate a location, we may nonetheless be committed to perform our obligations under the applicable lease, including paying the base rent for the remaining lease term. In addition, as our leases expire, we may fail to negotiate renewals, either on commercially acceptable terms or any terms at all, which could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

Claims under our insurance plans may differ from our estimates, which could materially impact our results of operations.

We use a combination of insurance and self-insurance plans to provide for the potential liabilities for workers’ compensation, general liability (including, in connection with legal proceedings described under “—Legal proceedings could materially impact our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows” below), property insurance, director and officers’ liability insurance, vehicle liability and team member health-care benefits. Liabilities associated with the risks that are retained by us are estimated, in part, by considering historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors and other actuarial assumptions. Our results could be materially impacted by claims and other expenses related to such plans if future occurrences and claims differ from these assumptions and historical trends.

We may be unable to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our debt service obligations, which could adversely impact our business.

As of January 1, 2017, we had outstanding indebtedness of $255.0 million under our credit agreement (referred to as the “Credit Facility”). We may incur additional indebtedness in the future, including borrowings under our Credit Facility. Our indebtedness, or any additional indebtedness we may incur, could require us to divert funds identified for other purposes for debt service and impair our liquidity position. If we cannot generate sufficient cash flow from operations to service our debt, we may need to refinance our debt, dispose of assets or issue equity to obtain necessary funds. We do not know whether we will be able to take any of such actions on a timely basis, on terms satisfactory to us or at all.

The fact that a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations could be needed to make payments on this indebtedness could have important consequences, including the following:

 

reducing our ability to execute our growth strategy, including new store development;

 

impacting our ability to continue to execute our operational strategies in existing stores;

 

increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

reducing the availability of our cash flow for other purposes;

 

limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the market in which we operate, which would place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that may have less debt;

 

limiting our ability to borrow additional funds; and

 

failing to comply with the covenants in our debt agreements could result in negative consequences, including all of our indebtedness becoming immediately due and payable.

Our ability to obtain necessary funds through borrowing will depend on our ability to generate cash flow from operations. Our ability to generate cash is subject to general economic, financial, competitive,

 

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legislative, regulatory, and other factors that are beyond our control. If our business does not generate sufficient cash flow from operations or if future borrowings are not available to us under our Credit Facility or otherwise in amounts sufficient to enable us to fund our liquidity needs, our operating results and financial condition may be adversely affected. Our inability to make scheduled payments on our debt obligations in the future would require us to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before maturity, sell assets, delay capital expenditures, or seek additional equity investment.

Covenants in our debt agreements restrict our operational flexibility.

The agreement governing our Credit Facility contains usual and customary restrictive covenants relating to our management and the operation of our business, including the following:

 

incurring additional indebtedness;

 

making certain investments;

 

merging, dissolving, liquidating, consolidating, or disposing of all or substantially all of our assets;

 

paying dividends, making distributions, or redeeming capital stock;

 

entering into transactions with our affiliates; and

 

granting liens on our assets.

Our Credit Facility also requires us to maintain a specified total net leverage ratio and minimum interest coverage ratio at the end of any fiscal quarter at any time the facility is drawn. Our ability to meet these ratios, if applicable, could be affected by events beyond our control. Failure to comply with any of the covenants under our Credit Facility could result in a default under the facility, which could cause our lenders to accelerate the timing of payments and exercise their lien on substantially all of our assets, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

Market and Other External Risks

General economic conditions that impact consumer spending or result in competitive responses could adversely affect our business.

The retail food business is sensitive to changes in general economic conditions. Recessionary economic cycles, increases in interest rates, higher prices for commodities, fuel and other energy, inflation, high levels of unemployment and consumer debt, depressed home values, high tax rates and other economic factors that affect consumer spending and confidence or buying habits may materially adversely affect the demand for products we sell in our stores. In recent years, the U.S. economy has experienced volatility due to uncertainties related to energy prices, credit availability, difficulties in the banking and financial services sectors, decreases in home values and retirement accounts, instability in foreign markets, high unemployment and falling consumer confidence. As a result, consumers are more cautious and could shift their spending to lower-priced competition, such as warehouse membership clubs, dollar stores or extreme value formats, which could have a material and adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.

In addition, prolonged inflation or deflation can impact our business. Food deflation across multiple categories, particularly in produce, could reduce sales growth and earnings if our competitors react by lowering their retail pricing and expanding their promotional activities, which can lead to retail deflation higher than cost deflation that could reduce our sales, gross profit margins and comparable store sales. Food inflation, when combined with reduced consumer spending, could also reduce sales, gross profit margins and comparable store sales. As a result, our operating results and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

 

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Competition in our industry is intense, and our failure to compete successfully may adversely affect our revenues and profitability.

We operate in the highly competitive retail food industry. Our competitors include supermarkets, natural food stores, mass or discount retailers, warehouse membership clubs, online retailers and specialty stores, as well as restaurants and home meal solution providers. These businesses compete with us for products, customers and locations. We compete on a combination of factors, primarily product selection and quality, customer engagement, store format, location, price and delivery options. Our success depends on our ability to offer products and services that appeal to our customers’ preferences, and our failure to offer such products or services could lead to a decrease in our sales. To the extent that our competitors lower prices, our ability to maintain profit margins and sales levels may be negatively impacted. In addition, some competitors are aggressively expanding their number of stores or their product offerings, increasing the space allocated to perishable, prepared and specialty foods, including fresh, natural and organic foods, and enhancing options of engaging with and delivering their products to customers. Some of these competitors may have been in business longer or may have greater financial or marketing resources than we do and may be able to devote greater resources to sourcing, promoting and selling their products. As competition in certain areas intensifies or competitors open stores within close proximity to our stores, our results of operations and cash flows may be negatively impacted through a loss of sales, decrease in market share, reduction in margin from competitive price changes or greater operating costs.

We rely heavily on sales of fresh produce and quality natural and organic products, and product supply disruptions may have an adverse effect on our profitability and operating results.

We have a significant focus on perishable products, including fresh produce and natural and organic products. Sales of produce accounted for approximately 24% and 25% of our net sales in fiscal 2016 and 2015, respectively. Although we have not experienced difficulty to date in maintaining the supply of our produce and fresh, natural and organic products that meet our quality standards, there is no assurance that these products will be available to meet our needs in the future. The availability of such products at competitive prices depends on many factors beyond our control, including the number and size of farms that grow natural or organic crops or raise livestock that meet our quality, welfare and production standards, tariffs and import regulations or restrictions on foreign-sourced products and the ability of our vendors to maintain organic, non-genetically modified or other applicable third-party certifications for such products. Produce is also vulnerable to adverse weather conditions and natural disasters, such as floods, droughts, storms, frosts, earthquakes, hurricanes, pestilences and other extreme or abnormal environmental conditions. Adverse weather conditions and natural disasters can lower crop yields and reduce crop size and quality, which in turn could reduce the available supply of, or increase the price of, fresh produce, which may adversely impact sales of our fresh produce and our other products that rely on produce as a key ingredient.

In addition, we and our suppliers compete with other food retailers in the procurement of fresh, natural and organic products, which are often less available than conventional products. If our competitors significantly increase their fresh, natural and organic product offerings due to increases in consumer demand or otherwise, we and our suppliers may not be able to obtain a sufficient supply of such products on favorable terms, or at all, and our sales may decrease, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. We could also suffer significant inventory losses in the event of disruption of our distribution network or extended power outages in our distribution centers. If we are unable to maintain inventory levels suitable for our business needs, it would materially adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Higher wage and benefit costs could adversely affect our business.

Changes in federal and state minimum wage laws and other laws relating to employee benefits, including the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (or its successor or replacement), could cause us to incur additional wage and benefit costs. Increased labor costs brought about by changes in minimum wage laws, other regulations or prevailing market conditions would increase our expenses and have an adverse impact on our profitability.

 

20


 

The current geographic concentration of our stores creates an exposure to local or regional downturns or catastrophic occurrences.

As of January 1, 2017, we operated 96 stores in California, making California our largest market representing 38% of our total stores in fiscal 2016. We also have store concentration in Texas, Arizona and Colorado, operating 40, 32 and 30 stores in those states, respectively, and representing 16%, 13% and 12% of our total stores in fiscal 2016, respectively. In addition, we source a large portion of our produce from California, ranging from approximately 40% to approximately 70% depending on the time of year. As a result, our business is currently more susceptible to regional conditions than the operations of more geographically diversified competitors, and we are vulnerable to economic downturns in those regions. Any unforeseen events or circumstances that negatively affect these areas in which we have stores or from which we obtain products could materially adversely affect our revenues and profitability. These factors include, among other things, changes in demographics, population and employee bases, wage increases, changes in economic conditions, prolonged droughts or other severe weather conditions and other catastrophic occurrences. Such conditions may result in reduced customer traffic and spending in our stores, physical damage to our stores, loss of inventory, closure of one or more of our stores, inadequate work force in our markets, temporary disruption in the supply of products, delays in the delivery of goods to our stores and a reduction in the availability of products in our stores. Any of these factors may disrupt our business and materially adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Fluctuations in commodity prices and availability may impact profitability.

Many products we sell include ingredients such as wheat, corn, oils, milk, sugar, cocoa, nuts and other key commodities. Many commodity prices are subject to significant price fluctuations. Any increase in prices of such key ingredients may cause our vendors to seek price increases from us, and price decreases may result in our competitors reducing retail prices on items containing such ingredients. We cannot assure you that we will be able to mitigate vendor efforts to increase our costs or competitive responses to decreasing prices, either in whole or in part. In the event we are unable to continue mitigating potential vendor price increases, we may in turn consider raising our prices, and our customers may be deterred by any such price increases. In addition, we may lower our retail prices in response to lower commodity costs or competitive conditions.  Our profitability may be impacted either through increased costs to us or lower prices and loss of customers due to competitive conditions, which may impact gross margins, or through reduced revenue as a result of a decline in the number and average size of customer transactions.

Increases in certain costs affecting our marketing, advertising and promotions may adversely impact our ability to advertise effectively and reduce our profitability.

Postal rate increases, and increasing paper and printing costs affect the cost of our promotional mailings. In response to any future increase in mailing costs, we may consider reducing the number and size of certain promotional pieces. In addition, we rely on discounts from the basic postal rate structure, such as discounts for bulk mailings and sorting by zip code and carrier routes. We are not party to any long-term contracts for the supply of paper. Future increases in costs affecting our marketing, advertising and promotions could adversely impact our ability to advertise effectively and our profitability.

A widespread health epidemic could materially impact our business.

Our business could be severely impacted by a widespread regional, national or global health epidemic. A widespread health epidemic may cause customers to avoid public gathering places such as our stores or otherwise change their shopping behaviors. Additionally, a widespread health epidemic could also adversely impact our business by disrupting production and delivery of products to our stores and by impacting our ability to appropriately staff our stores.

 

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We may require additional capital to fund the expansion of our business, and our inability to obtain such capital could harm our business.

To support our expanding business, we must have sufficient capital to continue to make significant investments in our new and existing stores and advertising. We cannot assure you that cash generated by our operations will be sufficient to allow us to fund such expansion. If cash flows from operations are not sufficient, we may need additional equity or debt financing to provide the funds required to expand our business. If such financing is not available on satisfactory terms or at all, we may be unable to expand our business or to develop new business at the rate desired and our operating results may suffer. Debt financing increases expenses, may contain covenants that restrict the operation of our business, and must be repaid regardless of operating results. Equity financing, or debt financing that is convertible into equity, could result in additional dilution to our existing stockholders.

Our inability to obtain adequate capital resources, whether in the form of equity or debt, to fund our business and growth strategies may require us to delay, scale back or eliminate some or all of our operations or the expansion of our business, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition or prospects.

Increasing energy costs, unless offset by more efficient usage or other operational responses, may impact our profitability.

We utilize natural gas, water, sewer and electricity in our stores and use gasoline and diesel in trucks that deliver products to our stores. We may also be required to pay certain adjustments or other amounts pursuant to our supply and delivery contracts in connection with increases in fuel prices. Increases in energy costs, whether driven by increased demand, decreased or disrupted supply, increased environmental regulations or an anticipation of any such events will increase the costs of operating our stores. Although fuel prices declined during the second half of 2014 and persisted through 2016, our shipping costs also may increase if fuel and freight prices increase. We may not be able to recover these rising costs through increased prices charged to our customers, and any increased prices may exacerbate the risk of customers choosing lower-cost alternatives. In addition, if we are unsuccessful in attempts to protect against these increases in energy costs through long-term energy contracts, improved energy procurement, improved efficiency and other operational improvements, the overall costs of operating our stores will increase, which would impact our profitability, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Financial Reporting, Legal and Other Regulatory Risks

We, as well as our vendors, are subject to numerous laws and regulations and our compliance with these laws and regulations may increase our costs, limit or eliminate our ability to sell certain products, raise regulatory enforcement risks not present in the past, or otherwise adversely affect our business, reputation, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

As a retailer of food, vitamins and supplements and a seller of many of our private label products, we are subject to numerous health and safety laws and regulations. Our suppliers and contract manufacturers are also subject to such laws and regulations. These laws and regulations apply to many aspects of our business, including the manufacturing, packaging, labeling, distribution, advertising, sale, quality and safety of products we sell, as well as the health and safety of our team members and the protection of the environment. We are subject to regulation by various government agencies, including the FDA, the USDA, the FTC, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as various state and local agencies.

We are also subject to the USDA’s Organic Rule, which facilitates interstate commerce and the marketing of organically produced food, and provides assurance to our customers that such products meet consistent, uniform standards. Compliance with the USDA’s Organic Rule also places a significant burden on some of our suppliers, which may cause a disruption in some of our product offerings.

 

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As a retailer of supplements, our sales of vitamins and supplements are regulated under DSHEA, a statute which is administered by the FDA as part of its responsibilities under the FDCA. DSHEA expressly permits vitamins and supplements to bear statements describing how a product affects the structure, function and/or general well-being of the body. However, no statement may expressly or implicitly represent that a supplement will diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent a disease.

New or revised government laws and regulations, such as FSMA, passed in January 2011, portions of which went into effect in 2016, grant the FDA greater authority over the safety of the national food supply, as well as increased enforcement by government agencies, and could result in additional compliance costs and civil remedies. Such regulations mandate that risk-based preventive controls be observed by the majority of food producers. This authority applies to all domestic food facilities and, by way of imported food supplier verification requirements, to all foreign facilities that supply food products.

With respect to both food and dietary supplements, FSMA meaningfully augments the FDA’s ability to access a producer’s records and a supplier’s records. This increased access could permit the FDA to identify areas of concern it had not previously considered to be problematic either for us or for our suppliers. FSMA is also likely to result in enhanced tracking and tracing of food requirements and, as a result, added recordkeeping burdens upon our suppliers. In addition, under FSMA, the FDA has the authority to inspect certifications and therefore evaluate whether foods and ingredients from our suppliers are compliant with the FDA’s regulatory requirements. Such inspections may delay the supply of certain products or result in certain products being unavailable to us for sale in our stores.

DSHEA established that no notification to the FDA is required to market a dietary supplement if it contains only dietary ingredients that were present in the U.S. food supply prior to DSHEA’s enactment. However, for a dietary ingredient not present in the food supply prior to DSHEA’s enactment, the manufacturer is required to provide the FDA with information supporting the conclusion that the ingredient will reasonably be expected to be safe at least 75 days before introducing a new dietary ingredient into interstate commerce. This or similar informational requirements could materially adversely affect the availability of dietary supplement products.

The FDA has broad authority to enforce the provisions of the FDCA applicable to the safety, labeling, manufacturing and promotion of foods and dietary supplements, including powers to issue a public warning letter to a company, publicize information about illegal products, institute an administrative detention of food, request or order a recall of illegal products from the market, and request the Department of Justice to initiate a seizure action, an injunction action or a criminal prosecution in the U.S. courts.

In connection with the marketing and advertisement of products we sell, we could be the target of claims relating to false or deceptive advertising, including under the auspices of the FTC and the consumer protection statutes of some states. Furthermore, in recent years, the FDA has been aggressive in enforcing its regulations with respect to nutrient content claims (e.g., “low fat,” “good source of,” “calorie free,” etc.), unauthorized “health claims” (claims that characterize the relationship between a food or food ingredient and a disease or health condition), and other claims that impermissibly suggest therapeutic benefits for certain foods or food components. These events could interrupt the marketing and sales of products in our stores, including our private label products, severely damage our brand reputation and public image, increase the cost of products in our stores, result in product recalls or litigation, and impede our ability to deliver merchandise in sufficient quantities or quality to our stores, which could result in a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our reputation could also suffer from real or perceived issues involving the labeling or marketing of products we sell as “natural.” Although the FDA and the USDA have each issued statements regarding the appropriate use of the word “natural,” and the FDA has requests for comment now pending on the issue, there is no single, U.S. government-regulated definition of the term “natural” for use in the food industry. The resulting uncertainty has led to consumer confusion, distrust and legal challenges. Plaintiffs have commenced legal actions against a number of food companies and retailers that market “natural” products, asserting false, misleading and deceptive advertising and labeling claims, including claims

 

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related to genetically modified ingredients. Should we become subject to similar claims, consumers may avoid purchasing products from us or seek alternatives, even if the basis for the claim is unfounded. Adverse publicity about these matters may discourage consumers from buying our products. The cost of defending against any such claims could be significant. Any loss of confidence on the part of consumers in the truthfulness of our labeling or ingredient claims would be difficult and costly to overcome and may significantly reduce our brand value. Any of these events could adversely affect our reputation and brand and decrease our sales, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We are also subject to laws and regulations more generally applicable to retailers. Compliance with such laws and regulations may increase our costs, limit or eliminate our ability to sell certain products or otherwise adversely affect our business, reputation, results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.

We are also subject to laws and regulations more generally applicable to retailers, including labor and employment, taxation, zoning and land use, environmental protection, workplace safety, public health, community right-to-know and alcoholic beverage sales. Our stores are subject to unscheduled inspections on a regular basis, which, if violations are found, could result in the assessment of fines, suspension of one or more needed licenses and, in the case of repeated “critical” violations, closure of the store until a re-inspection demonstrates that we have remediated the problem. Further, our new store openings could be delayed or prevented or our existing stores could be impacted by difficulties or failures in our ability to obtain or maintain required approvals or licenses. In addition, we are subject to environmental laws pursuant to which we could be held responsible for all of the costs or liabilities relating to any contamination at our or our predecessors’ past or present facilities and at third-party waste disposal sites, regardless of our knowledge of, or responsibility for, such contamination, and such costs may exceed our environmental liability insurance coverage.

As is common in our industry, we rely on our suppliers and contract manufacturers to ensure that the products they manufacture and sell to us comply with all applicable regulatory and legislative requirements. In general, we seek certifications of compliance, representations and warranties, indemnification and/or insurance from our suppliers and contract manufacturers. However, even with adequate insurance and indemnification, any claims of non-compliance could significantly damage our reputation and consumer confidence in our products. In order to comply with applicable statutes and regulations, our suppliers and contract manufacturers have from time to time reformulated, eliminated or relabeled certain of their products and we have revised certain provisions of our sales and marketing program.

We cannot predict the nature of future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, or determine what effect either additional government regulations or executive or administrative orders, when and if promulgated, or disparate federal, state and local regulatory schemes would have on our business in the future. They could, however, increase our costs; require the reformulation of certain products or alternative sourcing from domestic suppliers or otherwise to meet new standards, regulations or trade restrictions; the recall or discontinuance of certain products not able to be reformulated or alternatively sourced in compliance with new regulations or restrictions; additional recordkeeping; expanded documentation of the properties of certain products; expanded or different labeling; and/or scientific substantiation. Any or all of such requirements could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Legal proceedings could materially impact our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our operations, which are characterized by a high volume of customer traffic and by transactions involving a wide variety of product selections, carry a higher exposure to consumer litigation risk when compared to the operations of companies operating in some other industries. Consequently, we may be a party to individual personal injury, product liability, intellectual property, employment-related and other legal actions in the ordinary course of our business, including litigation arising from food-related illness or

 

24


 

product labeling. The outcome of litigation, particularly class action lawsuits, is difficult to assess or quantify. Plaintiffs in these types of lawsuits may seek recovery of very large or indeterminate amounts, and the magnitude of the potential loss relating to such lawsuits may remain unknown for substantial periods of time. While we maintain insurance, insurance coverage may not be adequate, and the cost to defend against future litigation may be significant. There may also be adverse publicity associated with litigation that may decrease consumer confidence in our business, regardless of whether the allegations are valid or whether we are ultimately found liable. As a result, litigation may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may be unable to adequately protect our intellectual property rights, which could harm our business.

We rely on a combination of trademark, trade secret, copyright and domain name law and internal procedures and nondisclosure agreements to protect our intellectual property. In particular, we believe our trademarks, including SPROUTS FARMERS MARKET®, SPROUTS® and HEALTHY LIVING FOR LESS!®, and our domain names, including sprouts.com, are valuable assets. However, there can be no assurance that our intellectual property rights will be sufficient to distinguish our products and services from those of our competitors and to provide us with a competitive advantage. From time to time, third parties may use names and logos similar to ours, may apply to register trademarks or domain names similar to ours, and may infringe or otherwise violate our intellectual property rights. There can be no assurance that our intellectual property rights can be successfully asserted against such third parties or will not be invalidated, circumvented or challenged. Asserting or defending our intellectual property rights could be time consuming and costly and could distract management’s attention and resources. If we are unable to prevent our competitors from using names, logos and domain names similar to ours, consumer confusion could result, the perception of our brand and products could be negatively affected, and our sales and profitability could suffer as a result. We also license the SPROUTS FARMERS MARKETS trademark to a third party for use in operating two grocery stores. If the licensee fails to maintain the quality of the goods and services used in connection with this trademark, our rights to, and the value of, this and similar trademarks could potentially be harmed. Negative publicity relating to the licensee could also be incorrectly associated with us, which could harm the business. Failure to protect our proprietary information could also have a material adverse effect on our business.

We may also be subject to claims that our activities or the products we sell infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate the intellectual property rights of others. Any such claims can be time consuming and costly to defend and may distract management’s attention and resources, even if the claims are without merit. Such claims may also require us to enter into costly settlement or license agreements (which could, for example, prevent us from using our trademarks in certain geographies or in connection with certain products and services), pay costly damage awards, and face a temporary or permanent injunction prohibiting us from marketing or providing the affected products and services, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Changes in accounting standards may materially impact reporting of our financial condition and results of operations.

Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and related accounting pronouncements, implementation guidelines, and interpretations for many aspects of our business, such as accounting for inventories, goodwill and intangible assets, store closures, leases, insurance, income taxes, stock-based compensation and accounting for mergers and acquisitions, are complex and involve subjective judgments. Changes in these rules or their interpretation may significantly change or add significant volatility to our reported earnings without a comparable underlying change in cash flow from operations. As a result, changes in accounting standards may materially impact our reported financial condition and results of operations.

Specifically, changes to financial accounting standards will require such leases to be recognized on our balance sheet. In addition to our indebtedness, we have significant obligations relating to our current operating leases. All of our existing stores are subject to leases, which have average remaining terms of

 

25


 

nine years and, as of January 1, 2017, we had undiscounted operating lease commitments of approximately $1.5 billion, scheduled through 2035, related primarily to our stores, including stores that are not yet open. These commitments represent the minimum lease payments due under our operating leases, excluding common area maintenance, insurance and taxes related to our operating lease obligations, and do not reflect fair market value rent reset provisions in the leases. These leases are classified as operating leases and disclosed in Note 19 to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, but are not reflected as liabilities on our consolidated balance sheets. During fiscal 2016, our rent expense charged under operating leases was approximately $104.8 million.

We incur substantial costs as a result of being a public company.

As a public company, we are subject to public company reporting obligations under the Exchange Act, and the rules and regulations regarding corporate governance practices, including those under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (referred to as the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, and the listing requirements of the NASDAQ Global Select Market. We incur significant legal, accounting, and other expenses as a public company, including costs resulting from our public company reporting obligations and maintenance of corporate governance practices. Our management and other personnel devote a substantial amount of time to ensure that we comply with all of these requirements.

If we are unable to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, we may fail to prevent or detect material misstatements in our financial statements, in which case investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and the market price of our common stock may decline.

As a public company, we are required to maintain internal control over financial reporting. Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we are required to file a report by management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, and our independent registered public accounting firm is required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.

If we are unable to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, if we identify any material weaknesses therein, if we are unsuccessful in our efforts to remediate any such material weakness, if our management is unable to report that our internal control over financial reporting is effective when required, or if our independent registered public accounting firm is unable to express an opinion as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting when required, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and the market price of our common stock could be negatively affected. In addition, we could become subject to investigations by the NASDAQ Global Select Market, the SEC, or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources.

If our goodwill or other intangible assets become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings.

We have a significant amount of goodwill and other intangible assets. As of January 1, 2017, we had goodwill and intangible assets of approximately $368.1 million and $197.6 million, respectively, which represented approximately 26% and 14% of our total assets as of such date, respectively. Goodwill is reviewed for impairment on an annual basis in the fourth fiscal quarter or whenever events occur or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of our reporting unit below its carrying amount. Fair value is determined based on the discounted cash flows and the market value of our single reporting unit. If the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying value, the fair value of the implied goodwill is calculated as the difference between the fair value of our reporting unit and the fair value of the underlying assets and liabilities, excluding goodwill. In the event an impairment to goodwill is identified, an immediate charge to earnings in an amount equal to the excess of the carrying value over the implied fair value would be recorded, which would adversely affect our operating results. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Estimates—Goodwill and Intangible Assets.”

 

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Determining market values using a discounted cash flow method requires that we make significant estimates and assumptions, including long-term projections of cash flows, market conditions and appropriate market rates. Our judgments are based on historical experience, current market trends and other information. In estimating future cash flows, we rely on internally generated forecasts for operating profits and cash flows, including capital expenditures. Based on our annual impairment test during fiscal 2014, 2015 and 2016, no goodwill impairment charge was required to be recorded. Changes in estimates of future cash flows caused by items such as unforeseen events or changes in market conditions could negatively affect our reporting unit’s fair value and result in an impairment charge. Factors that could cause us to change our estimates of future cash flows include a prolonged economic crisis, successful efforts by our competitors to gain market share in our core markets, our inability to compete effectively with other retailers or our inability to maintain price competitiveness. An impairment of a significant portion of our goodwill could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Our nutrition-oriented educational activities may be impacted by government regulation or our inability to secure adequate liability insurance.

We provide nutrition-oriented education to our customers, and these activities may be subject to state and federal regulation, and oversight by professional organizations. In the past, the FDA has expressed concerns regarding summarized health and nutrition-related information that (i) does not, in the FDA’s view, accurately present such information, (ii) diverts a consumer’s attention and focus from FDA-required nutrition labeling and information or (iii) impermissibly promotes drug-type disease-related benefits. If our team members or third parties we engage to provide this information do not act in accordance with regulatory requirements, we may become subject to penalties that could have a material adverse effect on our business. We believe we are currently in compliance with relevant regulatory requirements. However, we cannot predict the nature of future government regulation and oversight, including the potential impact of any such regulation on this activity. Furthermore, the availability of professional liability insurance or the scope of such coverage may change, or our insurance coverage may prove inadequate, which may adversely impact the ability of our customer educators to provide some information to our customers. The occurrence of any such developments could negatively impact the perception of our brand, our sales and our ability to attract new customers.

Common Stock Ownership Risks

Our stock price may be volatile, and you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the price you paid for them or at all.

There is no guarantee that our common stock will appreciate in value or even maintain the price at which our stockholders have purchased their shares. The trading price of our common stock may be volatile and subject to wide price fluctuations in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following:

 

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly or annual financial results;

 

the financial guidance we may provide to the public, any changes in such guidance, or our failure to meet such guidance;

 

failure of industry or securities analysts to maintain coverage of our company, changes in financial estimates by any industry or securities analysts that follow our company, or our failure to meet such estimates;

 

various market factors or perceived market factors, including rumors, whether or not correct, involving us or our competitors;

 

fluctuations in stock market prices and trading volumes of securities of similar companies;

 

sales, or anticipated sales, of large blocks of our stock;

 

short selling of our common stock by investors;

 

additions or departures of key personnel;

 

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new store openings or entry into new markets by us or by our competitors;

 

regulatory or political developments;

 

changes in accounting principles or methodologies;

 

litigation and governmental investigations;

 

acquisitions by us or by our competitors; and

 

general financial market conditions or events.

Furthermore, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many companies. These fluctuations often have been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. These and other factors may cause the market price and demand for our common stock to fluctuate substantially, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their shares of common stock and may otherwise negatively affect the price or liquidity of our common stock. In addition, in the past, when the market price of a stock has been volatile, holders of that stock have sometimes instituted securities class action litigation against the company that issued the stock. If any of our stockholders were to bring a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit or paying for settlements or damages. Such a lawsuit could also divert the time and attention of our management from our business.

Anti-takeover provisions could impair a takeover attempt and adversely affect existing stockholders.

Certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and applicable provisions of Delaware law may have the effect of rendering more difficult, delaying, or preventing an acquisition of our company, even when this would be in the best interest of our stockholders. Our corporate governance documents include the following provisions:

 

creating a classified board of directors whose members serve staggered three-year terms;

 

authorizing “blank check” preferred stock, which could be issued by our board of directors without stockholder approval and may contain voting, liquidation, dividend, and other rights superior to our common stock;

 

limiting the liability of, and providing indemnification to, our directors and officers;

 

prohibiting our stockholders from acting by written consent, thereby requiring stockholder action to be taken at an annual or special meeting of stockholders;

 

prohibiting our stockholders from calling special meetings of stockholders, which may delay the ability of our stockholders to force consideration of a proposal or the ability of holders controlling a majority of our capital stock to take any action, including the removal of directors;

 

requiring advance notice of stockholder proposals for business to be conducted at meetings of our stockholders and for nominations of candidates for election to our board of directors;

 

controlling the procedures for the conduct and scheduling of board and stockholder meetings;

 

providing the board of directors with the express power to postpone previously scheduled annual meetings and to cancel previously scheduled special meetings;

 

permitting newly created directorships resulting from an increase in the authorized number of directors or vacancies on our board of directors to be filled only by a majority of our remaining directors, even if less than a quorum is then in office, or by a sole remaining director; and

 

providing that our board of directors is expressly authorized to make, repeal, alter, or amend our bylaws.

 

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In addition, Delaware law imposes conditions on the voting of “control shares” and on certain business combination transactions with “interested stockholders.

These provisions, alone or together, could delay or prevent hostile takeovers and changes in control or changes in our management. Any provision of our certificate of incorporation or bylaws or Delaware law that has the effect of delaying or deterring a change in control could limit the opportunity for our stockholders to receive a premium for their shares of our common stock, and could also affect the price that some investors are willing to pay for our common stock.

If securities or industry analysts cease publishing research or reports about us, our business, or our market, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding our stock, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock is influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts may publish about us, our business, our market or our competitors. If we do not maintain adequate research coverage, or if any of the analysts who may cover us downgrade our stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business or provide relatively more favorable recommendations about our competitors, our stock price could decline. If any analyst who may cover us were to cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

Since we do not expect to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future, investors may be forced to sell their stock in order to obtain a return on their investment.

We do not anticipate declaring or paying in the foreseeable future any cash dividends on our capital stock. Instead, we plan to retain any earnings to finance our operations and growth plans. In addition, our Credit Facility contains covenants that would restrict our ability to pay cash dividends. Accordingly, investors must rely on sales of their common stock after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize any return on their investment. As a result, investors seeking cash dividends should not purchase our common stock.

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

 

Item 2.

Properties

As of January 1, 2017, we had 253 stores located in thirteen states, as shown in the chart below:

 

State

 

Number of Stores

 

 

State

 

Number of Stores

 

Alabama

 

 

4

 

 

Nevada

 

 

6

 

Arizona

 

 

32

 

 

New Mexico

 

 

7

 

California

 

 

96

 

 

Oklahoma

 

 

10

 

Colorado

 

 

30

 

 

Tennessee

 

 

4

 

Georgia

 

 

12

 

 

Texas

 

 

40

 

Kansas

 

 

4

 

 

Utah

 

 

5

 

Missouri

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In fiscal 2015, we opened 27 new stores, and in fiscal 2016 we opened 36 new stores. As of February 23, 2017, we have opened three stores in fiscal 2017, bringing our total store count to 256.

We lease all of our stores from unaffiliated third parties. A typical store lease is for an initial 10 to 15 year term with four renewal options of five years each. We expect that we will be able to renegotiate these leases or relocate these stores as necessary. In addition to new store openings, we remodel or

 

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relocate stores periodically in order to improve performance. In fiscal 2016, we remodeled eight stores and in fiscal 2017, we plan to remodel approximately eight stores.

As of January 1, 2017, we leased our two distribution warehouses, as well as our current corporate office in Phoenix, Arizona, from unaffiliated third parties. Information about such facilities is set forth in the table below:

 

Facility

 

State

 

Square Footage*

 

Corporate Office

 

Arizona

 

 

71,000

 

Distribution Warehouse

 

Arizona

 

 

106,000

 

Distribution Warehouse

 

Texas

 

 

117,000

 

 

 

*

Rounded to the nearest 1,000 square feet

We believe our portfolio of long-term leases is a valuable asset supporting our retail operations, but we do not believe that any individual store property is material to our financial condition or results of operations.

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

From time to time we are a party to legal proceedings, including matters involving personnel and employment issues, product liability, personal injury, intellectual property and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, which have not resulted in any material losses to date. Although management does not expect that the outcome in these proceedings will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations, litigation is inherently unpredictable. Therefore, we could incur judgments or enter into settlements of claims that could materially impact our results.

Securities Action

On March 4, 2016, a complaint was filed in the Superior Court for the State of Arizona against our company and certain of our directors and officers on behalf of a purported class of purchasers of shares of our common stock in our underwritten secondary public offering which closed on March 10, 2015 (the “March 2015 Offering”). The complaint purports to state claims under Sections 11, 12 and 15 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, based on an alleged failure by our company to disclose adequate information about produce price deflation in the March 2015 Offering documents. The complaint seeks damages on behalf of the purported class in an unspecified amount, rescission, and an award of reasonable costs and attorneys’ fees. On March 24, 2016, we removed the action to federal court in the District of Arizona. On April 18, 2016, the plaintiffs filed a motion to remand the case to state court, and that motion is currently under consideration. We intend to defend this case vigorously, but it is not possible at this time to reasonably estimate the outcome of, or any potential liability from, the case.

“Phishing” Scam Actions

In April 2016, four complaints were filed, two in the federal courts of California, one in the Superior Court of California and one in the federal court in the District of Colorado, each on behalf of a purported class of our current and former team members whose personally identifiable information (referred to as “PII”) was inadvertently disclosed to an unauthorized third party that perpetrated an email “phishing” scam against one of our team members. The complaints allege we failed to properly safeguard the PII in accordance with applicable law.  The complaints seek damages on behalf of the purported class in unspecified amounts, attorneys’ fees and litigation expenses. In June 2016, a motion was filed before the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (referred to as “JPML”) to transfer and consolidate all four of the cases to the federal court in the District of Arizona. The JPML granted the motion on October 6, 2016, and the cases remained stayed pending the court’s scheduling of an initial case management conference. We intend to defend these cases vigorously, but it is not possible at this time to reasonably estimate the outcome of, or any potential liability from, the cases.

 

30


 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

 

 

31


 

PART II

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information

Our common stock began trading on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “SFM” on August 1, 2013. The price range per share of common stock presented below represents the highest and lowest closing prices for our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market for each full quarterly period for fiscal years 2015 and 2016.

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

38.45

 

 

$

32.56

 

Second quarter

 

$

36.13

 

 

$

26.98

 

Third quarter

 

$

27.77

 

 

$

16.41

 

Fourth quarter

 

$

27.34

 

 

$

19.75

 

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

30.00

 

 

$

21.18

 

Second quarter

 

$

29.37

 

 

$

21.10

 

Third quarter

 

$

24.52

 

 

$

18.70

 

Fourth quarter

 

$

22.63

 

 

$

18.88

 

 

The closing price of our common stock as of February 21, 2017 was $19.32 per share, and the number of stockholders of record of our common stock as of February 21, 2017 was 66. This number excludes stockholders whose stock is held in nominee or street name by brokers.

Dividend Policy

Since we became a publicly traded company on August 1, 2013, we have not declared or paid, and do not anticipate declaring or paying in the foreseeable future, any cash dividends on our capital stock. Any future determination as to the declaration and payment of dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on then existing conditions, including our operating results, financial condition, contractual restrictions, capital requirements, business prospects, and other factors our board of directors may deem relevant. Our Credit Facility contains covenants that would restrict our ability to pay cash dividends.

 

32


 

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The following tables provide information about our share repurchase activity for each share repurchase program.

2015 Common Stock Share Repurchase Program

 

Period (1)

 

Total number

of shares

purchased

 

 

Average

price paid

per share

 

 

Total number of

shares purchased

as part of publicly

announced plans

or programs (2)

 

 

Approximate dollar

value of shares

that may yet be

purchased under

the plans or

programs (2)

 

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

1,068,279

 

 

$

24.09

 

 

 

1,068,279

 

 

$

124,265,253

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

 

2,431,721

 

 

$

24.39

 

 

 

2,431,721

 

 

$

64,956,714

 

Second quarter

 

 

2,547,971

 

 

$

25.49

 

 

 

2,547,971

 

 

$

-

 

Total

 

 

6,047,971

 

 

$

24.80

 

 

 

6,047,971

 

 

$

-

 

 

2016 Common Stock Share Repurchase Program

 

Period (3)

 

Total number

of shares

purchased

 

 

Average

price paid

per share

 

 

Total number of

shares purchased

as part of publicly

announced plans

or programs (4)

 

 

Approximate dollar

value of shares

that may yet be

purchased under

the plans or

programs (4)

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third quarter

 

 

3,189,818

 

 

$

19.93

 

 

 

3,189,818

 

 

$

186,428,090

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

5,072,973

 

 

$

20.98

 

 

 

5,072,973

 

 

$

80,000,000

 

Total

 

 

8,262,791

 

 

$

20.57

 

 

 

8,262,791

 

 

$

80,000,000

 

 

(1)

Periodic information is presented by reference to our quarterly periods during fiscal years 2015 and 2016.

(2)

On November 4, 2015, our Board of Directors authorized a $150 million common stock share repurchase program. The shares may be purchased from time to time over a two year period, subject to general business and market conditions and other investment opportunities, through open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions or other means, including through Rule 10b5-1 trading plans. The purchase program may be commenced, suspended or discontinued at any time.

(3)

Periodic information is presented by reference to our quarterly periods during fiscal year 2016.

(4)

On September 6, 2016, our board of directors authorized a $250 million share repurchase program of our common stock. The shares may be purchased on a discretionary basis from time to time through December 31, 2017, subject to general business and market conditions and other investment opportunities, through open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions, or other means, including through Rule 10b5-1 trading plans.

 

Share repurchase activity during the fourth fiscal quarter of 2016 was as follows:

 

33


 

 

Period (1)

 

Total number

of shares

purchased

 

 

Average

price paid

per share

 

 

Total number of

shares purchased

as part of publicly

announced plans

or programs

 

 

Approximate dollar

value of shares

that may yet be

purchased under

the plans or

programs

 

Oct. 3, 2016 - Oct. 30, 2016

 

 

2,744,798

 

 

$

21.22

 

 

 

2,744,798

 

 

$

128,175,720

 

Oct.31, 2016 - Nov. 27, 2016

 

 

1,349,565

 

 

$

20.88

 

 

 

1,349,565

 

 

$

100,000,000

 

Nov. 28, 2016 - Jan. 1, 2017

 

 

978,610

 

 

$

20.44

 

 

 

978,610

 

 

$

80,000,000

 

Total

 

 

5,072,973

 

 

$

20.98

 

 

 

5,072,973

 

 

$

80,000,000

 

 

(1)

Periodic information is presented by reference to our fiscal periods during the fourth quarter of 2016.

Performance Graph

The graph set forth below compares the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock between August 1, 2013 (the date our stock began trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market) and January 1, 2017, with the cumulative total return of (i) the Nasdaq Composite Index and (ii) the S&P Food Retail Index, over the same period.

 

34


 

The comparison assumes that $100.00 was invested in our common stock, the Nasdaq Composite Index and the S&P Food Retail Index, and assumes reinvestment of dividends, if any. The graph assumes the initial value of our common stock on August 1, 2013 was the closing sale price on that day of $40.11 per share and not the initial offering price to the public of $18.00 per share. The performance shown on the graph below is based on historical results and is not intended to suggest future performance.

 

This performance graph shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act or otherwise subject to the liabilities under that section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing of Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc. under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

35


 

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

 

 

 

Fiscal

2016(5)

 

 

Fiscal

2015(4)

 

 

Fiscal

2014(3)

 

 

Fiscal

2013(2)

 

 

Fiscal

2012(1)

 

 

 

(dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

Statements of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

4,046,385

 

 

$

3,593,031

 

 

$

2,967,424

 

 

$

2,437,911

 

 

$

1,794,823

 

Cost of sales, buying and occupancy

 

 

2,864,379

 

 

 

2,541,403

 

 

 

2,082,221

 

 

 

1,712,644

 

 

 

1,264,514

 

Gross profit

 

 

1,182,006

 

 

 

1,051,628

 

 

 

885,203

 

 

 

725,267

 

 

 

530,309

 

Direct store expenses

 

 

828,943

 

 

 

706,044

 

 

 

581,621

 

 

 

496,183

 

 

 

368,323

 

Selling, general and administrative

   expenses

 

 

126,929

 

 

 

106,412

 

 

 

95,397

 

 

 

81,795

 

 

 

86,364

 

Store pre-opening costs

 

 

12,974

 

 

 

8,616

 

 

 

7,749

 

 

 

5,734

 

 

 

2,782

 

Store closure and exit costs

 

 

228

 

 

 

1,802

 

 

 

725

 

 

 

2,051

 

 

 

2,155

 

Income from operations

 

 

212,932

 

 

 

228,754

 

 

 

199,711

 

 

 

139,504

 

 

 

70,685

 

Interest expense

 

 

(14,794

)

 

 

(17,723

)

 

 

(25,063

)

 

 

(37,203

)

 

 

(35,488

)

Other income

 

 

454

 

 

 

443

 

 

 

596

 

 

 

487

 

 

 

562

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

(5,481

)

 

 

(1,138

)

 

 

(18,721

)

 

 

(992

)

Income before income taxes

 

 

198,592

 

 

 

205,993

 

 

 

174,106

 

 

 

84,067

 

 

 

34,767

 

Income tax provision

 

 

(74,286

)

 

 

(77,002

)

 

 

(66,414

)

 

 

(32,741

)

 

 

(15,267

)

Net income

 

$

124,306

 

 

$

128,991

 

 

$

107,692

 

 

$

51,326

 

 

$

19,500

 

Per Share Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income per share—basic

 

$

0.84

 

 

$

0.84

 

 

$

0.72

 

 

$

0.38

 

 

$

0.16

 

Net income per share—diluted

 

$

0.83

 

 

$

0.83

 

 

$

0.70

 

 

$

0.37

 

 

$

0.16

 

Weighted average shares outstanding—

   basic

 

 

147,311

 

 

 

153,099

 

 

 

149,751

 

 

 

134,622

 

 

 

119,427

 

Weighted average shares outstanding—

   diluted

 

 

149,653

 

 

 

155,877

 

 

 

154,328

 

 

 

139,765

 

 

 

121,781

 

 

 

 

Fiscal

2016

 

 

Fiscal

2015

 

 

Fiscal

2014 (3)

 

 

Fiscal

2013(2)

 

 

Fiscal

2012(1)

 

Comparable store sales growth

 

 

2.7

%

 

 

5.8

%

 

 

9.9

%

 

 

10.7

%

 

9.7% (6)

 

Stores at end of period

 

 

253

 

 

 

217

 

 

 

191

 

 

 

167

 

 

 

148

 

Other Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stores at beginning of period

 

 

217

 

 

 

191

 

 

 

167

 

 

 

148

 

 

 

103

 

Opened

 

 

36

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

24

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

9

 

Acquired

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37

 

Closed

 

 

 

 

 

(1

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1

)

Stores at end of period(7)

 

 

253

 

 

 

217

 

 

 

191

 

 

 

167

 

 

 

148

 

Gross square feet at end of period

 

 

7,070,248

 

 

 

5,976,780

 

 

 

5,252,851

 

 

 

4,582,743

 

 

 

4,064,888

 

Average store size at end of period

   (gross square feet)

 

 

27,946

 

 

 

27,572

 

 

 

27,502

 

 

 

27,442

 

 

 

27,465

 

 

 

 

As of

 

 

 

January 1,

2017

 

 

January 3,

2016

 

 

December 28,

2014

 

 

December 29,

2013(2)

 

 

December 30,

2012(1)

 

Balance Sheet Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

12,465

 

 

$

136,069

 

 

$

130,513

 

 

$

77,652

 

 

$

67,211

 

Total assets

 

 

1,439,893

 

 

 

1,426,364

 

 

 

1,368,407

 

 

 

1,171,450

 

 

 

1,101,749

 

Total capital and finance lease obligations,

   including current portion

 

 

129,736

 

 

 

130,472

 

 

 

150,698

 

 

 

119,572

 

 

 

107,639

 

Total long-term debt, including current

   portion

 

 

255,000

 

 

 

160,000

 

 

 

255,691

 

 

 

310,286

 

 

 

425,057

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

672,909

 

 

 

822,992

 

 

 

685,389

 

 

 

513,771

 

 

 

386,755

 

 

36


 

 

(1)

Commencing on May 29, 2012, our consolidated financial statements also include the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Sunflower. Fiscal 2012 included $19.5 million of expenses related to the acquisition and integration of Sunflower and Henry’s. Fiscal 2012 includes 52 weeks.

(2)

Fiscal 2013 selling, general and administrative expense included $3.2 million for IPO related bonuses and $2.0 million for expenses related to our November 2013 secondary offering. Fiscal 2013 includes 52 weeks.

(3)

Fiscal 2014 selling, general and administrative expense included $2.6 million for expenses related to our April 2014 secondary offering and our August 2014 secondary offering. Fiscal 2014 includes 52 weeks.

(4)

Fiscal 2015 includes 53 weeks.

(5)

Fiscal 2016 includes 52 weeks.

(6)

Comparable store sales growth for 2012 reflects comparable store sales growth calculated including $196.1 million of sales for Sunflower stores. Our practice is to include sales from a store in comparable store sales beginning on the first day of the 61st week following the store’s opening and to exclude sales from a closed store from comparable store sales on the day of closure.

(7)

During each of fiscal 2014 and 2016, we also relocated one store.

 

 

 

37


 

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with the consolidated financial statements and related notes that are included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This discussion contains forward-looking statements based upon current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including those set forth under “Risk Factors” or in other parts of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Please also see the section entitled “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.”

Business Overview

Sprouts Farmers Market operates as a healthy grocery store that offers fresh, natural and organic food that includes fresh produce, bulk foods, vitamins and supplements, packaged groceries, meat and seafood, deli, baked goods, dairy products, frozen foods, body care and natural household items catering to consumers’ growing interest in health and wellness. Since our founding in 2002, we have grown rapidly, significantly increasing our sales, store count and profitability. With 253 stores in 13 states as of January 1, 2017, we are one of the largest specialty retailers of fresh, natural and organic food in the United States. As of February 23, 2017, we have grown to 256 stores in 14 states.

At Sprouts, we believe healthy living is a journey and every meal is a choice. The cornerstones of our business are fresh, natural and organic products at compelling prices (which we refer to as “Healthy Living for Less”), an attractive and differentiated shopping experience featuring a broad selection of innovative healthy products, and knowledgeable team members who we believe provide best-in-class customer engagement and product education.

Our History

In 2002, we opened the first Sprouts Farmers Market store in Chandler, Arizona. From our founding in 2002 through January 1, 2017, we continued to open new stores while successfully rebranding 43 Henry’s Farmers Market and 39 Sunflower Farmers Market stores added through acquisitions to the Sprouts banner (referred to as the “Transactions”). These three businesses all trace their lineage back to Henry’s Farmers Market and were built with similar store formats and operations including a strong emphasis on value, produce and service in smaller, convenient locations. The consistency of these formats and operations was an important factor that allowed us to rapidly and successfully rebrand and integrate each of these businesses under the Sprouts banner and on a common platform.

Outlook

We are pursuing a number of strategies designed to continue our growth, including expansion of our store base, continuing positive comparable store sales and growing the Sprouts brand. We intend to continue expanding our store base by pursuing new store openings in our existing markets, expanding into adjacent markets and penetrating new markets. Although we plan to expand our store base primarily through new store openings, we may grow through strategic acquisitions if we identify suitable targets and are able to negotiate acceptable terms and conditions for acquisition. We intend to open 32 new stores in 2017, of which three have opened through February 23, 2017, and approximately 30 new stores per year for the near term.

We also believe we can continue to deliver positive comparable store sales growth by enhancing our core value proposition and distinctive customer-oriented shopping experience, as well as through expanding and refining our fresh, natural and organic product offerings, our targeted and personalized marketing efforts and our in-store education. We are committed to growing the Sprouts brand by

 

38


 

supporting our stores, product offerings and corporate partnerships, including the expansion of innovative marketing and promotional strategies through print, digital and social media platforms.

Components of Operating Results

We report our results of operations on a 52- or 53-week fiscal year ending on the Sunday closest to December 31, with each fiscal quarter generally divided into three periods consisting of two four-week periods and one five-week period. Fiscal 2016 was a 52-week year ending on January 1, 2017. Fiscal 2015 was a 53-week year ending on January 3, 2016 and fiscal 2014 was a 52-week year ending on December 28, 2014. In the discussion below, we discuss the impact of the 53rd week of fiscal 2015 on our financial results.

Net Sales

We recognize sales revenue at the point of sale, with discounts provided to customers reflected as a reduction in sales revenue. Proceeds from sales of gift cards are recorded as a liability at the time of sale, and recognized as sales when they are redeemed by the customer. In 2015, we determined that we had sufficient data to estimate gift card breakage. We do not include sales taxes in net sales.

We monitor our comparable store sales growth to evaluate and identify trends in our sales performance. Comparable store sales growth reflects comparable store sales growth on a pro forma basis calculated including all stores acquired in the Transactions. Our practice is to include sales from a store in comparable store sales beginning on the first day of the 61st week following the store’s opening and to exclude sales from a closed store from comparable store sales on the day of closure. This practice may differ from the methods that other retailers use to calculate similar measures. We use comparable store sales to calculate pro forma comparable store sales growth, when applicable, as referenced in footnote (6) to Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

Our net sales have increased as a result of new store openings and comparable store sales growth. Factors that influence comparable store sales growth and other sales trends include:

 

general economic conditions and trends, including levels of disposable income and consumer confidence;

 

product price inflation or deflation;

 

our competition, including competitive store openings in the vicinity of our stores and competitor pricing and merchandising strategies;

 

consumer preferences and buying trends;

 

our ability to identify market trends, and to source and provide product offerings that promote customer traffic and growth in average ticket;

 

the number of customer transactions and average ticket;

 

the prices of our products, including the effects of inflation and deflation;

 

opening new stores in the vicinity of our existing stores; and

 

advertising, in-store merchandising and other marketing activities.

Cost of sales, buying and occupancy and gross profit

Cost of sales includes the cost of inventory sold during the period, including direct costs of purchased merchandise (net of discounts and allowances), distribution and supply chain costs, buying costs and supplies. Merchandise incentives received from vendors are reflected in the carrying value of inventory when earned or as progress is made toward earning the rebate or allowance, and are reflected

 

39


 

as a component of cost of sales as the inventory is sold. Inflation and deflation in the prices of food and other products we sell may periodically affect our gross profit and gross margin. The short-term impact of inflation and deflation is largely dependent on whether or not we pass the effects through to our customers, which will depend upon competitive market conditions.

Occupancy costs include store rental, property taxes, utilities, common area maintenance, amortization of favorable and unfavorable leasehold interests and property insurance. Occupancy costs do not include building depreciation, which is classified as a direct store expense.

Our cost of sales, buying and occupancy and gross profit are correlated to sales volumes. As sales increase, gross margin is affected by the relative mix of products sold, pricing strategies, inventory shrinkage and improved leverage of fixed costs of sales, buying and occupancy.

Direct store expenses

Direct store expenses consist of store-level expenses such as salaries and benefits, related equity-based compensation, supplies, depreciation and amortization for buildings, store leasehold improvements, equipment and other store specific costs. As sales increase, direct store expenses generally decline as a percentage of sales.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses primarily consist of salaries and benefits costs, equity-based compensation, advertising, acquisition-related costs and corporate overhead.

We charge third-parties to place advertisements in our in-store guide and circulars. We record consideration received from vendors in connection with cooperative advertising programs as a reduction to advertising costs when the allowance represents reimbursement of a specific and identifiable cost. Advertising costs are expensed as incurred.

Store pre-opening costs

Store pre-opening costs include rent expense during construction of new stores and costs related to new store openings, including costs associated with hiring and training personnel and other miscellaneous costs. Store pre-opening costs are expensed as incurred.

Store closure and exit costs

We recognize a reserve for future operating lease payments associated with facilities that are no longer being utilized in our current operations. The reserve is recorded based on the present value of the remaining non-cancelable lease payments after the cease use date less an estimate of subtenant income. If subtenant income is expected to be higher than the lease payments, no accrual is recorded. Lease payments included in the closed store reserve are expected to be paid over the remaining terms of the respective leases. Our assumptions about subtenant income are based on our experience and knowledge of the area in which the closed property is located, guidance received from local brokers and agents and existing economic conditions. Adjustments to the closed store reserve relate primarily to changes in actual or estimated subtenant income and changes in actual lease payments from original estimates. Adjustments are made for changes in estimates in the period in which the change becomes known, considering timing of new information regarding market, subleases or other lease updates. Changes in reserve estimates are classified as store closure and exit costs in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

40


 

Factors Affecting Comparability of Results of Operations

Additional Week in 2015

Fiscal 2015 consisted of 53 weeks. The 53rd week resulted in additional sales and expenses as further discussed in “—Comparison of Fiscal 2016 to Fiscal 2015” below.

April 2015 Refinancing

In April 2015, we completed a transaction in which we refinanced our debt (referred to as the “April 2015 Refinancing”), as further discussed in “—Liquidity and Capital Resources” below. The April 2015 Refinancing resulted in an decrease in borrowings, a reduction in interest rate and the recording of a loss on extinguishment of debt.

 

 

41


 

Results of Operations for Fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014

The following tables set forth our results of operations and other operating data for the periods presented. The period-to-period comparison of financial results is not necessarily indicative of financial results to be achieved in future periods. Fiscal 2015 consisted of 53 weeks, while each of fiscal 2016 and fiscal 2014 consisted of 52 weeks.

 

 

 

Fiscal 2016

 

 

Fiscal 2015

 

 

Fiscal 2014

 

 

 

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

Consolidated Statement of Operations

   Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

4,046,385

 

 

$

3,593,031

 

 

$

2,967,424

 

Cost of sales, buying and occupancy

 

 

2,864,379

 

 

 

2,541,403

 

 

 

2,082,221

 

Gross profit

 

 

1,182,006

 

 

 

1,051,628

 

 

 

885,203

 

Direct store expenses

 

 

828,943

 

 

 

706,044

 

 

 

581,621

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

126,929

 

 

 

106,412

 

 

 

95,397

 

Store pre-opening costs

 

 

12,974

 

 

 

8,616

 

 

 

7,749

 

Store closure and exit costs

 

 

228

 

 

 

1,802

 

 

 

725

 

Income from operations

 

 

212,932

 

 

 

228,754

 

 

 

199,711

 

Interest expense

 

 

(14,794

)

 

 

(17,723

)

 

 

(25,063

)

Other income

 

 

454

 

 

 

443

 

 

 

596

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

(5,481

)

 

 

(1,138

)

Income before income taxes

 

 

198,592

 

 

 

205,993

 

 

 

174,106

 

Income tax provision

 

 

(74,286

)

 

 

(77,002

)

 

 

(66,414

)

Net income

 

$

124,306

 

 

$

128,991

 

 

$

107,692

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding

 

 

147,311

 

 

 

153,099

 

 

 

149,751

 

Dilutive effect of equity-based awards

 

 

2,342

 

 

 

2,778

 

 

 

4,577

 

Weighted average shares and

   equivalent shares outstanding

 

 

149,653

 

 

 

155,877

 

 

 

154,328

 

Diluted net income per share

 

$

0.83

 

 

$

0.83

 

 

$

0.70

 

 

 

 

Fiscal 2016

 

 

Fiscal 2015

 

 

Fiscal 2014

 

Other Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparable store sales growth

 

 

2.7

%

 

 

5.8

%

 

 

9.9

%

Stores at beginning of period

 

 

217

 

 

 

191

 

 

 

167

 

Opened

 

 

36