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Section 1: 10-K (10-K)

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
þ
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016
or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from_____ to_____
Commission File Number: 001-36160 (Brixmor Property Group Inc.)
Commission File Number: 333-201464-01 (Brixmor Operating Partnership LP)
Brixmor Property Group Inc.
Brixmor Operating Partnership LP
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
Maryland (Brixmor Property Group Inc.)
 
45-2433192
Delaware (Brixmor Operating Partnership LP)
 
80-0831163
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
450 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10017
(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)
212-869-3000
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share.
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Brixmor Property Group Inc. Yes þ No Brixmor Operating Partnership LP Yes þ No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
Brixmor Property Group Inc. Yes No þ Brixmor Operating Partnership LP Yes No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Brixmor Property Group Inc. Yes þ No Brixmor Operating Partnership LP Yes þ No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Brixmor Property Group Inc. Yes þ No Brixmor Operating Partnership LP Yes þ No
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting
company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Brixmor Property Group Inc.
 
 
Brixmor Operating Partnership LP
Large accelerated filer
þ
Non-accelerated filer
 
 
Large accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer
þ
Smaller reporting company
Accelerated filer
 
 
Smaller reporting company
Accelerated filer
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Brixmor Property Group Inc. Yes No þ Brixmor Operating Partnership LP Yes No þ
State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrants’ most recently completed second fiscal quarter.
Brixmor Property Group Inc. $6,072,921,548 Brixmor Operating Partnership LP N/A
(APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE REGISTRANTS)
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.
As of February 1, 2017, Brixmor Property Group Inc. had 304,408,195 shares of common stock outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the definitive proxy statement to be filed by Brixmor Property Group Inc. with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A relating to the registrant’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on May 18, 2017 will be incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K in response to Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Part III. The definitive proxy statement will be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.




EXPLANATORY NOTE
This report combines the annual reports on Form 10-K for the period ended December 31, 2016 of Brixmor Property Group Inc. and Brixmor Operating Partnership LP. Unless stated otherwise or the context otherwise requires, references to the “Parent Company” or “BPG” mean Brixmor Property Group Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries; and references to the “Operating Partnership” mean Brixmor Operating Partnership LP and its consolidated subsidiaries. The terms the “Company,” “Brixmor,” “we,” “our” and “us” mean the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, collectively.

The Parent Company is a real estate investment trust (“REIT”) which owns 100% of the common stock of BPG Subsidiary Inc. (“BPG Sub”), which, in turn, is the sole owner of Brixmor OP GP LLC, or the General Partner, the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership. As of December 31, 2016, the Parent Company beneficially owned, through its direct and indirect interest in BPG Sub and the General Partner, approximately 99.9% of the outstanding partnership common units of interest (the “OP Units”) in the Operating Partnership. Certain current and former members of the Company’s management collectively owned the remaining 0.1% interest in the Operating Partnership.

The Company believes combining the annual reports on Form 10-K of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership into this single report provides the following benefits:

Enhances investors’ understanding of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership by enabling investors to view the business as a whole in the same manner as management views and operates the business;
Eliminates duplicative disclosure and provides a more streamlined and readable presentation; and
Creates time and cost efficiencies through the preparation of one combined report instead of two separate reports.

Management operates the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership as one business. The management of the Parent Company consists of the same individuals as the management of the Operating Partnership. These individuals are officers of both the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership.

We believe it is important to understand the few differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in the context of how the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership operate as a consolidated company. The Parent Company is a REIT, whose only material asset is its indirect interest in the Operating Partnership. As a result, the Parent Company does not conduct business itself other than issuing public equity from time to time. The Parent Company does not incur any material indebtedness. The Operating Partnership holds substantially all of our assets. Except for net proceeds from public equity issuances by the Parent Company, which are contributed to the Operating Partnership in exchange for OP Units, the Operating Partnership generates all remaining capital required by the Company’s business. Sources of this capital include the Operating Partnership’s operations, its direct or indirect incurrence of indebtedness, and the issuance of OP Units.

Stockholders’ equity, partners’ capital, and non-controlling interests are the primary areas of difference between the consolidated financial statements of the Parent Company and those of the Operating Partnership. The Operating Partnership’s capital includes OP Units owned by the Parent Company through BPG Sub and the General Partner as well as OP Units owned by certain current and former members of the our management. OP Units owned by third parties are accounted for in partners’ capital in the Operating Partnership’s financial statements and outside of stockholders’ equity in non-controlling interests in the Parent Company’s financial statements.

In order to highlight the differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, there are sections in this report that separately discuss the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, including separate financial statements (but combined footnotes), separate controls and procedures sections, separate certification of periodic report under Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and separate certification pursuant to 18 U.S.C Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. In the sections that combine disclosure for the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, this report refers to actions or holdings as being actions or holdings of the Company.

The Parent Company consolidates the Operating Partnership for financial reporting purposes, and the Parent Company does not have material assets other than its indirect investment in the Operating Partnership. Therefore, while stockholders’ equity, partners’ capital and non-controlling interests differ as discussed above, the assets and liabilities of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership are materially the same on their respective financial statements.




TABLE OF CONTENTS

Item No.
 
Page
Part I
1.
Business
1A.
Risk Factors
1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
2.
Properties
3.
Legal Proceedings
4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
6.
Selected Financial Data
7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
8
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
9
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
9A.
Controls and Procedures
9B
Other Information
Part III
10.
Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance
11.
Executive Compensation
12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV
15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules




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Forward-Looking Statements


This report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 which reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, our operations and financial performance. You can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of words such as “outlook,” “believes,” “expects,” “potential,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seeks,” “approximately,” “predicts,” “intends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “targets” or the negative version of these words or other comparable words. Such forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, there are or will be important factors that could cause actual outcomes or results to differ materially from those indicated in these statements. We believe these factors include but are not limited to those described under the section entitled “Risk Factors” in this report, as such factors may be updated from time to time in our periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), which are accessible on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. These factors include (1) changes in national, regional or local economic climates; (2) local market conditions, including an oversupply of space in, or a reduction in demand for, properties similar to those in our Portfolio; (3) changes in market rental rates; (4) changes in the regional demographics of our properties; (5) competition from other available properties and the attractiveness of properties in our Portfolio to our tenants; (6) the financial stability of tenants, including the ability of tenants to pay rents and expense reimbursements; (7) in the case of percentage rents, the sales volume of our tenants; and (8) litigation and governmental investigations discussed under the heading “Legal Matters” in Note 14 - Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements in this report. These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with the other cautionary statements that are included in this report and in our other periodic filings. The forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this report, and we expressly disclaim any obligation or undertaking to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except to the extent otherwise required by law.





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PART I

Item 1.     Business
Brixmor Property Group Inc. and subsidiaries (collectively, “BPG”) is an internally-managed real estate investment trust (“REIT”). Brixmor Operating Partnership LP and subsidiaries (collectively, the “Operating Partnership”) is the entity through which BPG conducts substantially all of its operations and owns substantially all of its assets. BPG owns 100% of the common stock of BPG Subsidiary Inc. (“BPG Sub”), which, in turn, is the sole member of Brixmor OP GP LLC (the “General Partner”), the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership. Unless otherwise expressly stated or the context otherwise requires, “we,” “us,” and “our” as used herein refer to each of BPG and the Operating Partnership, collectively. We believe we own and operate the second largest open air retail portfolio by gross leasable area ("GLA") in the United States, comprised primarily of community and neighborhood shopping centers. As of December 31, 2016, we owned interests in 512 shopping centers (the “Portfolio”) with approximately 86 million square feet of GLA, including 511 wholly owned shopping centers and one shopping center held through an unconsolidated joint venture. In addition, we have one land parcel currently under development. Our high quality national Portfolio is primarily located within established trade areas in the top 50 Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and our shopping centers are primarily anchored by non-discretionary and value-oriented retailers, as well as consumer-oriented service providers. Our four largest tenants by annualized base rent are The Kroger Co., The TJX Companies, Inc., Dollar Tree Stores, Inc., and Publix Super Markets, Inc.

As of December 31, 2016, BPG beneficially owned, through its direct and indirect interest in BPG Sub and the General Partner, 99.9% of the outstanding partnership common units of interest (the “OP Units”) in the Operating Partnership. Certain members of the Company's current and former management collectively owned the remaining 0.1% of the outstanding OP Units. Holders of OP Units (other than BPG Sub and the General Partner) may redeem their OP Units for cash based upon the market value of an equivalent number of shares of BPG’s common stock or, at our election, exchange their OP Units for shares of our common stock on a one-for-one basis subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for splits, unit distributions and reclassifications. The number of OP Units in the Operating Partnership beneficially owned by BPG is equivalent to the number of outstanding shares of BPG’s common stock, and the entitlement of all OP Units to quarterly distributions and payments in liquidation is substantially the same as those of BPG's common stockholders. BPG’s common stock is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the ticker symbol “BRX.”
Because the Operating Partnership is managed by BPG, and BPG conducts substantially all of its operations through the Operating Partnership, we refer to BPG’s executive officers as the Operating Partnership’s executive officers, and although, as a partnership, the Operating Partnership does not have a board of directors, we refer to BPG’s board of directors as the Operating Partnership’s board of directors.

Our Shopping Centers
The following table provides summary information regarding our Portfolio as of December 31, 2016.
Number of shopping centers
512
GLA (square feet)
86.0 million
Average shopping center GLA (square feet)
167,982
Leased Occupancy
93%
Average annualized base rent (“ABR”)/SF (1)
$12.99
Percent grocery-anchored shopping centers (2)
69%
Percent of ABR in top 50 U.S. MSAs
65%
Average effective age (3)
24 years
Average population density (4)
190,000
Average household income (4)
$82,000
(1)     ABR/SF is calculated as ABR divided by leased GLA, excluding the GLA of lessee owned leasehold improvements.
(2)
Based on total number of shopping centers.
(3) 
Effective age is calculated based on the year of the most recent redevelopment of the shopping center or based on year built if no redevelopment has occurred.
(4)     Demographics based on five-mile radius and weighted by ABR. Based on U.S. Census data.

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Business Objectives and Strategies
Our primary objective is to maximize total returns to our stockholders through consistent, sustainable growth in cash flow. We seek to achieve this through proactive management and accretive reinvestment in our existing Portfolio of high-quality open air shopping centers and through disciplined capital recycling activity focused on maximizing value at the asset level and achieving critical mass in attractive retail submarkets. Our key strategies to achieve growth in cash flow include:

Capitalizing on below-market expiring leases
Achieving occupancy increases
Pursuing value-enhancing reinvestment opportunities
Prudently executing on acquisition and disposition activity designed to enhance concentrations in attractive retail submarkets and the long-term growth rate of our Portfolio
Maintaining a flexible capital structure positioned for growth

Capitalizing on below-market expiring leases. We believe that our expiring rents over the next several years are below market, which will enable us to renew leases or sign new leases at higher rental rates, while also improving the credit of our tenancy and the vibrancy and relevance of our Portfolio. During 2016, we achieved new lease rent spreads of 31.3% and blended new and renewal lease spreads of 16.5% excluding options or 12.0% including options. For the last 10 quarters ended December 31, 2016, blended lease spreads excluding options have been 15% or better.  We believe that this performance can be sustained given our future expiration schedule, with 9.7% of our leased GLA due to expire in 2017, 12.5% in 2018 and 13.6% in 2019, at a weighted average expiring ABR/SF of $12.39 compared to an average ABR/SF of $14.82 for new and renewal leases signed during 2016, excluding option exercises, with an average ABR/SF of $15.07 for new leases and $14.63 for renewal leases. 

Achieving occupancy increases. During 2016 we experienced strong leasing productivity in our Portfolio, executing 697 new leases for an aggregate of approximately 3.4 million square feet, including 73 new anchor leases for spaces of at least 10,000 square feet. Our continued efforts to improve the quality of our anchor tenancy have also benefited our small shop leasing. For spaces below 10,000 square feet, leased occupancy has increased to 85.1% at December 31, 2016 from 84.3% at December 31, 2015.  Our total leased occupancy increased to 92.8% at December 31, 2016 from 92.6% at December 31, 2015, due to healthy leasing productivity.  We believe that there is additional opportunity for further occupancy gains in our Portfolio, across both our anchor and small shop space.

Pursuing value-enhancing reinvestment opportunities.  We believe that significant opportunity exists to achieve attractive risk-adjusted returns by investing incremental capital in the repositioning and/or redevelopment of certain assets in our Portfolio. During 2016, we completed 41 repositioning, redevelopment and outparcel development projects, with average net operating income (“NOI”) yields of 12%. The aggregate cost of these projects was approximately $67.4 million. As of December 31, 2016, we had 33 projects in process at an expected average NOI yield of approximately 10% and an aggregate cost of $190.4 million. Over the next several years, we expect to accelerate the pace of reinvestment activity across our Portfolio, at expected NOI yields that are generally consistent with those which we have recently realized.

Prudently executing on acquisition and disposition activity designed to enhance concentrations in attractive retail submarkets and the long-term growth rate of our Portfolio. We intend to actively pursue acquisition and disposition activity in order to optimize the quality and long-term growth rate of our Portfolio. During 2016, we disposed of $106.8 million of properties, redeploying $48.0 million into acquisitions in markets where we already have a geographic presence. In general, our disposition strategy focuses on selling assets where we believe value has been maximized, where there is future downside risk to cash flow, or where we have limited ability or desire to build critical mass in the submarket, while our acquisition strategy focuses on buying assets that are located in our existing markets with strong growth potential and may allow us to more effectively leverage our operational platform and expertise. Acquisition activity may include acquisitions of other open-air shopping centers, non-owned anchor spaces, retail buildings and/or outparcels at, or adjacent to, our shopping centers.

Maintaining a Flexible Capital Structure Positioned for Growth. During 2016, we made significant progress on enhancing our financial and operational flexibility through the extension of our debt maturity profile and the significant expansion of our unencumbered asset base. We believe we have access to multiple forms of capital, including unsecured corporate level debt, preferred equity, common equity, including through our at-the-market equity offering program, and additional credit facilities, which will allow us to efficiently execute on our strategic and operational objectives. As of December 31, 2016, we had $1.1 billion of undrawn capacity under our $2.75

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billion senior unsecured credit facility as amended on July 25, 2016 (the “Unsecured Credit Facility”). We currently have investment grade credit ratings from all three major credit rating agencies.

The strategies discussed above are periodically reviewed by our Board of Directors and while it does not have any present intention to amend or revise its strategy, the Board of Directors may do so at any time without a vote of the Company’s shareholders.
Competition
We face considerable competition in the leasing of real estate, which is a highly competitive market. We compete with a number of other companies in providing leases to prospective tenants and in re-leasing space to current tenants upon expiration of their respective leases. We believe that the principal competitive factors in attracting tenants include the quality of the location, co-tenants and physical conditions of our shopping centers. In this regard, we proactively manage and, where and when appropriate, reinvest in and upgrade our shopping centers, with an emphasis on maintaining high occupancy rates with a strong base of nationally and regionally recognized anchor tenants that generate substantial daily traffic. In addition, we believe that the breadth of our national portfolio of shopping centers, the local market knowledge derived from our regional operating teams and the close relationships we have established with certain major, national and regional retailers, allow us to maintain a strong competitive position.
Environmental Exposure
We are subject to federal, state and local environmental regulations that apply generally to the ownership of real property and the operations conducted on real property. For further information regarding our risks related to environmental exposure see "Environmental conditions that exist at some of the properties in our Portfolio could result in significant unexpected costs" in Item 1A. "Risk Factors".
Employees
As of December 31, 2016, we had 442 employees. Four of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement, and we consider our employee relations to be good.
Financial Information about Industry Segments
Our principal business is the ownership and operation of community and neighborhood shopping centers. We do not distinguish or group our operations on a geographical basis when measuring performance. Accordingly, we have a single reportable segment for disclosure purposes in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). In the opinion of our management, no material part of our and our subsidiaries’ business is dependent upon a single tenant, the loss of any one of which would have a material adverse effect on us, and during 2016 no single tenant or single shopping center accounted for 5% or more of our consolidated revenues.
REIT Qualification
We made a tax election to be treated as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes commencing with our taxable year ended December 31, 2011 and expect to continue to operate so as to qualify as a REIT. So long as we qualify as a REIT, we generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on net taxable income that we distribute annually to our stockholders. In order to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, the real estate qualification of sources of our income, the composition and values of our assets, the amounts we distribute to our stockholders and the diversity of ownership of our stock. In order to comply with REIT requirements, we may need to forego otherwise attractive opportunities and limit our expansion opportunities and the manner in which we conduct our operations. See “Risk Factors-Risks Related to our REIT Status and Certain Other Tax Items.”
Corporate Headquarters
Brixmor Property Group Inc., a Maryland corporation, was incorporated in Delaware on May 27, 2011, changed its name to Brixmor Property Group Inc. on June 17, 2013 and changed its jurisdiction of incorporation to Maryland on November 4, 2013. Our principal executive offices are located at 450 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10017, and our telephone number is (212) 869-3000.

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Our website address is http://www.brixmor.com. Information on our website is not incorporated by reference herein and is not a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We make available free of charge on our website or provide a link on our website to our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after those reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. We also make available through our website other reports filed with or furnished to the SEC under the Exchange Act, including our proxy statements and reports filed by officers and directors under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act. To access these filings, go to the “Financial Information” portion of our “Investors” page on our website, and then click on “SEC Filings.” You may also read and copy any document we file at the SEC’s Public Reference Room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20549. Call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room. In addition, these reports and the other documents we file with the SEC are available at a website maintained by the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.
From time to time, we may use our website as a channel of distribution of material information. Financial and other material information regarding our company is routinely posted on and accessible at http://www.brixmor.com. In addition, you may automatically receive e-mail alerts and other information about our company by enrolling your e-mail address by visiting “Email Alerts” under the “Information Request” section of the “Investors” portion of our website at http://www.brixmor.com.

Item 1A. Risk Factors
Risks Related to Our Portfolio and Our Business
Adverse economic, market and real estate conditions may adversely affect our performance.
Properties in our Portfolio consist of community and neighborhood shopping centers. Our performance is, therefore, subject to risks associated with owning and operating these types of real estate assets, including: (1) changes in national, regional and local economic climates; (2) local market conditions, including an oversupply of space in, or a reduction in demand for, properties similar to those in our Portfolio; (3) changes in market rental rates; (4) changes in the regional demographics of our properties; (5) competition from other available properties and the attractiveness of properties in our Portfolio to our tenants; (6) the financial stability of tenants, including the ability of tenants to pay rents and expense reimbursements; (7) in the case of percentage rents, the sales volume of our tenants; (8) the need to periodically fund the costs to repair, renovate and re-lease space; (9) changes in operating costs, including costs for maintenance, utilities, insurance and real estate taxes, which are relatively inflexible and generally do not decrease if revenues or occupancy decrease; (10) earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, damage from rising sea levels due to climate change and other natural disasters, civil unrest, terrorist acts or acts of war, which may result in uninsured or underinsured losses; and (11) changes in laws and governmental regulations, including those governing usage, zoning, the environment and taxes.

Additionally, because properties in our Portfolio consist of shopping centers, our performance is linked to general economic conditions in the market for retail space. Market rents and the overall demand for retail space may be adversely affected by weakness in the national, regional and local economies, changes in the financial condition of large retailing companies, consolidation in the retail sector, excess retail space in certain markets and increasing internet competition. The loss of rental revenues from a number of our tenants and our inability to replace such rental revenue may adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and ability to meet our debt and other financial obligations.

We face considerable competition in the leasing market and may be unable to renew leases or re-lease space as leases expire. Consequently, we may be required to make rent or other concessions and/or incur significant capital expenditures to improve our Portfolio in order to retain and attract tenants, which could adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.
We compete with a number of other landlords for prospective tenants and re-leasing space to current tenants upon expiration of their respective leases. As of December 31, 2016, leases are scheduled to expire on a total of approximately 9.7% of leased GLA in our Portfolio during 2017. If our tenants decide not to renew or extend their leases upon expiration, we may not be able to promptly re-lease the space, rental rates upon renewal or re-leasing may be significantly lower than expected rates, or required renovations or concessions to tenants may be less favorable or more costly than current lease terms, all of which could adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.


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We face considerable competition for tenants and the business of retail shoppers.
There are numerous shopping venues, including regional malls, outlet malls, other shopping centers and the internet, which compete with our Portfolio in attracting retailers and shoppers. In order to maintain our attractiveness to retailers and shoppers, we are required to reinvest in our Portfolio in the form of capital improvements. If we fail to reinvest in our Portfolio, or maintain its attractiveness to retailers and shoppers, or if retailers or shoppers perceive that shopping at other venues is more convenient, cost-effective or otherwise more compelling, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely impacted.

Our performance depends on the collection of rent and the financial condition of tenants in our Portfolio.
Our income is substantially derived from rental income from real property. As a result, our performance depends on the collection of rent from tenants in our Portfolio. Our income would be negatively affected if any major tenants or a significant number of other tenants in our Portfolio, among other things: (1) decline to extend or renew leases upon expiration; (2) renew leases at lower rental rates; (3) fail to make rental payments when due; or (4) become bankrupt or insolvent.

In certain circumstances, a tenant may have a right to terminate its lease. In addition, under certain lease agreements, lease terminations by an anchor tenant or a failure by that anchor tenant to occupy the premises could also result in lease terminations or reductions in rent by other tenants in such shopping centers. In these situations, we cannot be certain that we will be able to re-lease space on similar or economically advantageous terms. The loss of rental revenues from a number of tenants and difficulty replacing such tenants, particularly in the case of a substantial tenant with leases in multiple locations, may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

We may be unable to collect balances due from tenants that file for bankruptcy protection which may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.
If a tenant or lease guarantor files for bankruptcy, we may not be able to collect all pre-bankruptcy amounts owed by that party. In addition, a tenant that files for bankruptcy protection may terminate its lease with us, in which event we would have a general unsecured claim against such tenant that would likely be worth less than the full amount owed to us for the remainder of the lease term, which may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

Real estate property investments are illiquid, and it may not be possible to dispose of assets in a timely manner or on favorable terms.
The return of capital and realization of gains, if any, from a real estate investment generally does not occur until the disposition or refinancing of the underlying property. Our ability to dispose of properties on advantageous terms depends on factors beyond our control, including competition from other sellers and the availability of attractive financing for potential buyers of properties in our Portfolio, and we cannot predict the various market conditions affecting real estate investments that will exist at any particular time in the future. Furthermore, we may be required to expend funds to correct defects or to make capital improvements before a property can be sold. We cannot assure our stockholders that we will have funds available to correct such defects or to make such capital improvements and, therefore, we may be unable to sell a property or may have to sell it at a reduced price. In addition, the ability to sell assets in our Portfolio may also be restricted by certain covenants in our debt agreements and the credit agreement governing our Unsecured Credit Facility. As a result of these real estate market characteristics, we may be unable to realize our investment objectives through dispositions at attractive prices or within any desired period of time, which could adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

We face competition in pursuing acquisition opportunities that could limit our ability to grow and/or increase the cost of such acquisitions.
We continue to evaluate the market for available properties and may acquire properties when we believe strategic opportunities exist. Our ability to acquire properties on favorable terms and successfully integrate, operate or re-develop them is subject to a number of risks. We may be unable to acquire a desired property because of competition from other real estate investors with substantial capital, including from other REITs and institutional investment funds. Even if we are able to acquire a desired property, competition from other potential acquirers may significantly increase the purchase price.




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Current and future redevelopment or real estate property acquisitions may not yield expected returns.
We are active in the redevelopment of existing centers and the acquisition of new properties. Redevelopment and acquisition activities are subject to a number of risks, including: (1) abandonment of redevelopment or acquisition activities after expending resources to determine feasibility; (2) construction delays; (3) cost overruns, including construction costs that exceed original estimates; (4) failure to achieve expected occupancy and/or rent levels within the projected time frame, if at all; (5) inability to successfully integrate new properties into existing operations; (6) difficulty in funding and/or difficulty in obtaining external financing to pay for operating expenses and debt service costs associated with redevelopment properties prior to sufficient occupancy; (7) changes to zoning or land use laws or the delays or failures to obtain necessary zoning, occupancy, land use and other governmental permits; and (8) exposure to fluctuations in the general economy due to the significant time lag between commencement and completion of redevelopment projects. If any of these events occur, overall project costs may significantly exceed initial cost estimates, which may result in lower returns or losses from such investments.

Our real estate assets may be subject to impairment charges.
We periodically assess whether there are any indicators that the value of our real estate assets and other investments may be impaired. A property’s value is considered to be impaired only if the estimated aggregate future undiscounted property cash flows are less than the carrying value of the property. In our estimate of cash flows, we consider factors such as trends and prospects and the effects of demand and competition on expected future operating income. If we are evaluating the potential sale of an asset or redevelopment alternatives, the undiscounted future cash flows consider the most likely course of action as of the balance sheet date based on current plans, intended holding periods and available market information. We are required to make subjective assessments as to whether there are impairments in the value of our real estate assets and other investments. Impairment charges have an immediate direct impact on our earnings. There can be no assurance that we will not take additional charges in the future related to the impairment of our assets. Any future impairment could have a material adverse effect on our operating results in the period in which the charge is taken.

Our expenses may remain constant or increase, even if income from our Portfolio decreases, causing our financial condition and operating results to be adversely affected.
Costs associated with our business, such as real estate and personal property taxes, insurance, utilities, mortgage payments and corporate expenses, are relatively inflexible and generally do not decrease in the event that a property is not fully occupied, rental rates decrease, a tenant fails to pay rent or other circumstances cause our revenues to decrease. If we are unable to decrease our operating costs when our revenues decline, our financial condition, operating results and ability to make distributions to our stockholders may be adversely affected. In addition, inflationary price increases could result in increased operating costs for us and our tenants and, to the extent we are unable to pass along those price increases to our tenants, our net operating income may decrease, which may adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

We utilize a significant amount of indebtedness in the operation of our business.
As of December 31, 2016, we had approximately $5.9 billion aggregate principal amount of indebtedness outstanding, including $1.3 billion of secured loans, excluding the impact of unamortized premiums. Our leverage could have important consequences to us. For example, it could (1) require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow to principal and interest payments on our indebtedness, reducing the cash flow available to fund our business, to pay dividends, including those necessary to maintain our REIT qualification, or to use for other purposes; (2) increase our vulnerability to an economic downturn; (3) limit our ability to withstand competitive pressures; and (4) reduce our flexibility to respond to changing business and economic conditions. In addition, non-compliance with the terms of our debt agreements could result in (1) the acceleration of a significant amount of debt or, if such debt contains cross-default or cross-acceleration provisions, other debt; (2) in the case of secured debt, result in the loss of assets, including our shopping centers, due to foreclosure, which could create taxable income without accompanying cash proceeds; and (3) materially impair our ability to borrow unused amounts under existing financing arrangements or to obtain additional financing or refinancing on favorable terms or at all. Any of these outcomes could adversely affect our business, financial condition, liquidity, operating results and prospects as well as the trading price of our common stock or other securities.




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Our cash flows and operating results could be adversely affected by required debt service payments and other risks related to our debt financing.
We are generally subject to risks associated with debt financing. These risks include: (1) required debt payments are not reduced if the economic performance of any property or the Portfolio as a whole declines; (2) capital investments and debt service obligations reduce funds available for distribution to our stockholders; (3) our cash flow may not be sufficient to satisfy required payments of principal and interest; (4) we may not be able to refinance existing indebtedness as necessary or the terms of such refinancing may be less favorable to us than the terms of the existing debt; and (5) any default on our indebtedness could result in acceleration of those obligations, and in the case of secured debt, the possible loss of property to foreclosure. During 2017, we have $291.1 million of secured loans scheduled to mature and we have $21.8 million of scheduled mortgage amortization payments. We currently intend to fund the scheduled maturities and amortization payments with operating cash and borrowings on our Unsecured Credit Facility. Any of these risks could adversely affect our cash flows, ability to grow and our operating results.

Our variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.
Borrowings under our Unsecured Credit Facility and unsecured $600.0 million term loan as amended on July 25, 2016 (the “Term Loan”) bear interest at variable rates. If interest rates were to increase, our debt service obligations on the variable rate indebtedness would increase even though the amount borrowed would remain the same, and our net income and cash flows would correspondingly decrease. In order to partially mitigate our exposure to increases in interest rates, we have entered into interest rate swaps on $1.4 billion of our variable rate debt, which involve the exchange of variable for fixed rate interest payments. Taking into account our current interest rate swap agreements, a 100 basis point increase in interest rates would result in an $8.2 million increase in annual interest expense.

We may be unable to obtain financing through the debt and equity markets, which would have a material adverse effect on our growth strategy and our financial condition and operating results.
We cannot assure you that we will be able to access the capital markets to obtain additional debt or equity financing or that we will be able to obtain financing on terms favorable to us. Our inability to obtain financing could have negative effects on our ability to operate, maintain or reinvest in our Portfolio or acquire new properties. In addition, a lack of ability to access external financing sources may result in (1) an inability to repay or refinance our indebtedness on attractive terms on or before its maturity; (2) the need to dispose of some of our assets on terms which may be unfavorable to us; or (3) the need to issue additional capital stock, which would further dilute the ownership of our existing stockholders.

Covenants in our debt agreements may restrict our operating activities and adversely affect our financial condition.
Our debt agreements contain financial and/or operating covenants, including, among other things, certain coverage ratios, as well as limitations on the ability to incur secured and unsecured debt. In addition, certain of our mortgages contain customary negative covenants which, among other things, limit our ability, without the prior consent of the lender, to further mortgage the property, to enter into new leases or materially modify existing leases with respect to the property, or to redevelop the property. These covenants may limit our operational flexibility and acquisition and disposition activities. The breach of any of these covenants, if not cured within any applicable cure period, could result in a default under our indebtedness, which could result in the acceleration of the maturity of such and other indebtedness. If any of our indebtedness is accelerated prior to maturity, we may not be able to repay such indebtedness or refinance such indebtedness on favorable terms, or at all.

Legal proceedings related to the Audit Committee review may result in significant costs and expenses and divert resources from our operations and therefore could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results or cash flows.
The Company is engaged in legal matters, including investigations and a class action lawsuit, related to the Audit Committee review as discussed under the heading “Legal Matters” in Note 14 - Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements in this report. As a result of these and any other legal proceedings related to the Audit Committee review, we may incur significant professional fees and other costs. If we are unsuccessful in any legal action related to this matter, we may be required to pay a significant amount of monetary damages that may be in excess of our insurance coverage. The SEC and the Department of Justice could impose other sanctions against us or our directors and officers, including injunctions, a cease and desist order, fines and other equitable

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remedies. In addition, our Board of Directors, management and employees may expend a substantial amount of time on these legal proceedings and investigations, diverting resources and attention that would otherwise be directed toward our operations and implementation of our business strategy. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results or cash flows.

An uninsured loss on properties or a loss that exceeds the limits of our insurance policies could result in a loss of our investment or related revenue in our Portfolio.
We carry comprehensive liability, fire, extended coverage, business interruption and acts of terrorism insurance with policy specifications and insured limits customarily carried for similar properties. There are, however, certain types of losses, such as from hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, earthquakes, terrorism or wars, which may be uninsurable, or not economically justifiable based on the cost of insuring against such losses. In addition, tenants generally are required to indemnify and hold us harmless from liabilities resulting from injury to persons or damage to personal or real property, on the premises, due to activities conducted by tenants or their agents on the properties (including without limitation any environmental contamination), and at the tenant’s expense, to obtain and keep in full force during the term of the lease, liability and property damage insurance policies. However, tenants may not properly maintain their insurance policies or have the ability to pay the deductibles associated with such policies. In addition, if the damaged properties are subject to recourse indebtedness, we would continue to be liable for the indebtedness, even if these properties were irreparably damaged. Should a loss occur that is uninsured or in an amount exceeding the combined aggregate limits for the policies noted above, or in the event of a loss that is subject to a substantial deductible under an insurance policy, we could lose all or part of the capital invested in, and anticipated revenue from, one or more of the properties, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.

Environmental conditions that exist at some of the properties in our Portfolio could result in significant unexpected costs.
We are subject to federal, state and local environmental regulations that apply generally to the ownership of real property and the operations conducted on real property. Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, we may be or become liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous substances released on or in our property or disposed of by us or our tenants, as well as certain other potential costs which could relate to hazardous or toxic substances (including governmental fines and injuries to persons and property). Such liability may be imposed whether or not we knew of, or were responsible for, the presence of these hazardous or toxic substances. As is the case with many community and neighborhood shopping centers, many of our properties had or have on site dry cleaners and/or on site gasoline retailing facilities and these prior or current uses could potentially increase our environmental liability exposure. The cost of investigation, remediation or removal of such substances may be substantial, and the presence of such substances, or the failure to properly remediate such substances, may adversely affect our ability to lease such property, to borrow using such property as collateral, or to dispose of such property.

We are aware that soil and groundwater contamination exists at some of the properties in our Portfolio. The primary contaminants of concern at these properties include perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene (associated with the operations of on-site dry cleaners) and petroleum hydrocarbons (associated with the operations of on-site gasoline retailing facilities). There may also be asbestos-containing materials at some of the properties in our Portfolio. Further, no assurance can be given that any environmental studies performed have identified or will identify all material environmental conditions that may exist with respect to any of the properties in our Portfolio.

Further information relating to recognition of remediation obligations in accordance with GAAP is provided in the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in this report.

Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and fire, safety and other regulations may require us to make expenditures that adversely affect our cash flows.
All of the properties in our Portfolio are required to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). The ADA has separate compliance requirements for “public accommodations” and “commercial facilities,” but generally requires that buildings be made accessible to people with disabilities. Compliance with the ADA requirements could require removal of access barriers, and non-compliance could result in the imposition of fines by the United States government or an award of damages to private litigants, or both. We are undertaking an assessment of our Portfolio to determine our compliance with the current requirements of the ADA. While the tenants to whom our Portfolio is leased are obligated to comply with ADA provisions, within their leased premises, if required changes within their

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leased premises involve greater expenditures than anticipated, or if the changes must be made on a more accelerated basis than anticipated, the ability of tenants to cover costs could be adversely affected. Furthermore, we are required to comply with ADA requirements within the common areas of our Portfolio and we may not be able to pass on to our tenants any costs necessary to remediate any common area ADA issues. As a result, we could be required to expend funds to comply with the provisions of the ADA, which could adversely affect our financial condition and operating results. In addition, we are required to operate the properties in compliance with fire and safety regulations, building codes and other land use regulations, as they may be adopted by governmental agencies and bodies and become applicable to our Portfolio. We may be required to make substantial capital expenditures to comply with, and we may be restricted in our ability to renovate or redevelop the properties subject to, those requirements. The resulting expenditures and restrictions could have a material adverse effect on our ability to meet our financial obligations.

We and our tenants face risks relating to cybersecurity attacks that could cause loss of confidential information and other business disruptions.
We rely extensively on computer systems to process transactions and manage our business, and our business is at risk from and may be impacted by cybersecurity attacks. These could include attempts to gain unauthorized access to our data and computer systems. Attacks can be both individual and highly organized attempts by very sophisticated hacking organizations. We employ a number of measures to prevent, detect and mitigate these threats, which include password protection, frequent mandatory password change events, firewall detection systems, frequent backups, a redundant data system for core applications and annual penetration testing; however, there is no guarantee such efforts will be successful in preventing a cyber-attack. A cybersecurity attack could compromise the confidential information of our employees, tenants and vendors. A successful attack could disrupt and affect our business operations, damage our reputation, and result in significant remediation costs. Similarly, our tenants rely extensively on computer systems to process transactions and manage their businesses and thus are also at risk from and may be impacted by cybersecurity attacks. An interruption in the business operations of our tenants or in their reputation resulting from a cybersecurity attack could indirectly impact our business operations. As of December 31, 2016 we have not had any material incidences involving cybersecurity attacks.

We are highly dependent upon senior management, and failure to attract and retain key members of senior management could have a material adverse effect on us.
We are highly dependent on the performance and continued efforts of the senior management team. Our future success is dependent on our ability to continue to attract and retain qualified executive officers and senior management. Any inability to manage our operations effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, cash flow, capital resources and liquidity.

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure
BPG’s board of directors may approve the issuance of stock, including preferred stock, with terms that may discourage a third party from acquiring us.
BPG’s charter permits its board of directors to authorize the issuance of stock in one or more classes or series. Our board of directors may also classify or reclassify any unissued stock and establish the preferences, conversion and other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends and other distributions, qualifications and terms and conditions of redemption of any such stock, which rights may be superior to those of our common stock. Thus, BPG’s board of directors could authorize the issuance of shares of a class or series of stock with terms and conditions which could have the effect of discouraging a takeover or other transaction in which holders of some or a majority of BPG’s outstanding common stock might receive a premium for their shares over the then current market price of our common stock.

Certain provisions in the organizational documents of the partnership agreement for the Operating Partnership may delay or prevent unsolicited acquisitions of us.
Provisions in the organizational documents of the partnership agreement for the Operating Partnership may delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change of control that may involve a premium price for BPG’s common stock. These provisions could discourage third parties from making proposals involving an unsolicited acquisition of us or change of our control, although some stockholders might consider such proposals, if made, desirable. These provisions include, among others:

redemption or exchange rights of qualifying parties;

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transfer restrictions on the OP Units held directly or indirectly by BPG;
our inability in some cases to amend the charter documents of the partnership agreement of the Operating Partnership without the consent of the holders of the Outstanding OP Units;
the right of the holders of the Outstanding OP Units to consent to mergers involving us under specified circumstances;
the right of the holders of the Outstanding OP Units to consent to transfers of the general partnership interest;
the requirement to preserve the rights of OP Unit holders that may restrict us from amending the partnership agreement of our Operating Partnership.

BPG’s bylaws generally may be amended only by its board of directors, which could limit your control of certain aspects of BPG’s corporate governance.
BPG’s board of directors has the sole power to amend BPG’s bylaws, except that amendments to BPG’s bylaws that would allow BPG’s board of directors to repeal its exemption of any transaction between BPG and any other person from the “business combination” provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law (the “MGCL”) or the exemption of any acquisition of BPG’s stock from the “control share” provisions of the MGCL must be approved by BPG’s stockholders. Thus, BPG’s board may amend the bylaws in a way that may be detrimental to your interests without your consent.

BPG’s board of directors may change significant corporate policies without stockholder approval.
BPG’s investment, financing, borrowing and dividend policies and our policies with respect to all other business activities, including strategy and operations, will be determined by BPG’s board of directors. These policies may be amended or revised at any time and from time to time at the discretion of BPG’s board of directors without a vote of our stockholders. BPG’s charter also provides that BPG’s board of directors may revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election without approval of BPG’s stockholders, if it determines that it is no longer in BPG’s best interests to attempt to qualify, or to continue to qualify, as a REIT. In addition, BPG’s board of directors may change BPG’s policies with respect to conflicts of interest provided that such changes are consistent with applicable legal requirements. A change in these policies or the termination of BPG’s REIT election could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, our operating results, our cash flow, the per share trading price of BPG’s common stock and our ability to satisfy our debt service obligations and to pay dividends to BPG’s stockholders.

The rights of BPG and BPG stockholders to take action against BPG’s directors and officers are limited.
BPG’s charter eliminates the liability of BPG’s directors and officers to us and BPG’s stockholders for money damages to the maximum extent permitted under Maryland law. Under current Maryland law and BPG’s charter, BPG’s directors and officers do not have any liability to BPG or BPG’s stockholders for money damages other than liability resulting from:

actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money, property or services; or
active and deliberate dishonesty by the director or officer that was established by a final judgment and is material to the cause of action adjudicated.

BPG’s charter authorizes BPG and BPG’s bylaws require BPG to indemnify each of BPG’s directors or officers who is or is threatened to be made a party to or witness in a proceeding by reason of his or her service in those or certain other capacities, to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law, from and against any claim or liability to which such person may become subject or which such person may incur by reason of his or her status as a present or former director or officer of BPG. In addition, BPG may be obligated to pay or reimburse the expenses incurred by BPG’s present and former directors and officers without requiring a preliminary determination of their ultimate entitlement to indemnification. As a result, BPG and BPG’s stockholders may have more limited rights to recover money damages from BPG’s directors and officers than might otherwise exist absent these provisions in BPG’s charter and bylaws or that might exist with other companies, which could limit your recourse in the event of actions that are not in BPG’s best interests.

BPG’s charter contains a provision that expressly permits BPG’s non-employee directors to compete with us.
BPG’s charter provides that, to the maximum extent permitted from time to time by Maryland law, BPG renounce any interest or expectancy that BPG has in, or any right to be offered an opportunity to participate in, any business opportunities that are from time to time presented to or developed by BPG’s directors or their affiliates, other than to

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those directors who are employed by BPG or BPG’s subsidiaries, unless the business opportunity is expressly offered or made known to such person in his or her capacity as a director. Non-employee directors or any of their affiliates, will not have any duty to refrain from engaging, directly or indirectly, in the same business activities or similar business activities or lines of business in which we or our affiliates engage or propose to engage or to refrain from otherwise competing with us or our affiliates.

BPG’s charter provides that, to the maximum extent permitted from time to time by Maryland law, each of BPG’s non-employee directors, and any of their affiliates, may:

acquire, hold and dispose of shares of BPG’s stock or OP Units for his or her own account or for the account of others, and exercise all of the rights of a stockholder of Brixmor Property Group Inc. or a limited partner of our Operating Partnership, to the same extent and in the same manner as if he, she or it were not BPG’s director or stockholder; and
in his, her or its personal capacity or in his, her or its capacity as a director, officer, trustee, stockholder, partner, member, equity owner, manager, advisor or employee of any other person, have business interests and engage, directly or indirectly, in business activities that are similar to ours or compete with us, that involve a business opportunity that we could seize and develop or that include the acquisition, syndication, holding, management, development, operation or disposition of interests in mortgages, real property or persons engaged in the real estate business.

BPG’s charter also provides that, to the maximum extent permitted from time to time by Maryland law, in the event that any non-employee director, or any of their respective affiliates, acquires knowledge of a potential transaction or other business opportunity, such person will have no duty to communicate or offer such transaction or business opportunity to us or any of our affiliates and may take any such opportunity for itself, himself or herself or offer it to another person or entity unless the business opportunity is expressly offered to such person in their capacity as our director. These provisions may limit our ability to pursue business or investment opportunities that we might otherwise have had the opportunity to pursue, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, our operating results, our cash flow, the per share trading price of our common stock and our ability to satisfy our debt service obligations and to pay dividends to our stockholders.

Conflicts of interest could arise in the future between the interests of BPG’s stockholders and the interests of holders of OP Units.
Because BPG controls the general partner of the Operating Partnership, BPG has fiduciary duties to the other limited partners in the operating partnership, the discharge of which may conflict with the interests of BPG’s stockholders. The limited partners of the Operating Partnership have agreed that, in the event of a conflict between the duties owed by BPG’s directors to BPG and, in BPG’s capacity as the controlling stockholder of the sole member of the general partner of the Operating Partnership, the fiduciary duties owed by the general partner of the Operating Partnership to such limited partners, BPG is under no obligation to give priority to the interests of such limited partners. However, those persons holding OP Units will have the right to vote on certain amendments to the operating partnership agreement (which require approval by a majority of the limited partners, including BPG Sub) and individually to approve certain amendments that would adversely affect their rights. These voting rights may be exercised in a manner that conflicts with the interests of BPG’s stockholders. For example, BPG is unable to modify the rights of limited partners to receive distributions as set forth in the operating partnership agreement in a manner that adversely affects their rights without their consent, even though such modification might be in the best interest of BPG’s stockholders.

Risks Related to our REIT Status and Certain Other Tax Items
If BPG does not maintain its qualification as a REIT, it will be subject to tax as a regular corporation and could face a substantial tax liability.
BPG expects to continue to operate so as to qualify as a REIT under the Code. However, qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex Code provisions for which only a limited number of judicial or administrative interpretations exist. Notwithstanding the availability of cure provisions in the Code, BPG could fail to meet various compliance requirements, which could jeopardize its REIT status. Furthermore, new tax legislation, administrative guidance or court decisions, in each instance potentially with retroactive effect, could make it more difficult or impossible for BPG to qualify as a REIT. If BPG fails to qualify as a REIT in any tax year:


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BPG would be taxed as a regular domestic corporation, which under current laws, among other things, means being unable to deduct distributions to stockholders in computing taxable income;
unless BPG were entitled to relief under applicable statutory provisions, BPG would be required to pay taxes, and thus, BPG’s cash available for distribution to stockholders would be reduced for each of the years during which BPG did not qualify as a REIT and for which BPG had taxable income;
any resulting tax liability could be substantial and could have a material adverse effect on BPG’s book value; and
BPG generally would not be eligible to requalify as a REIT for the subsequent four taxable years.

Even if BPG qualifies as a REIT, BPG, in certain circumstances, may incur tax liabilities that would reduce BPG’s cash available for distribution to stockholders.
Even if BPG qualifies for taxation as a REIT, BPG may be subject to U.S. federal income taxes and related state and local taxes. Moreover, if BPG has net income from the sale of properties that are “dealer” properties (a “prohibited transaction” under the Code), that income will be subject to a 100% tax. BPG may not make sufficient distributions to avoid excise taxes applicable to REITs. Similarly, if BPG were to fail an income test (and did not lose its REIT status because such failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect) BPG would be subject to tax on the income that does not meet the income test requirements. BPG also may decide to retain net capital gain BPG earns from the sale or other disposition of BPG’s investments and pay income tax directly on such income. In that event, BPG’s stockholders would be treated as if they earned that income and paid the tax on it directly. However, stockholders that are tax-exempt, such as charities or qualified pension plans, would have no benefit from their deemed payment of such tax liability unless they file U.S. federal income tax returns and thereon seek a refund of such tax. BPG also may be subject to state and local taxes on its income or property, including franchise, payroll, mortgage recording and transfer taxes, either directly or at the level of the other companies through which BPG indirectly owns its assets, such as BPG’s taxable REIT subsidiaries (“TRSs”), which are subject to U.S. federal, state, local and foreign corporate-level income taxes. Any taxes BPG pays directly or indirectly will reduce BPG’s cash available for distribution to you.

Complying with REIT requirements may force BPG to liquidate or restructure otherwise attractive investments or forego otherwise attractive investment opportunities.
In order to qualify as a REIT, BPG must also ensure that, at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of its assets consists of cash, cash equivalents, government securities and qualified REIT real estate assets. The remainder of BPG’s investments in securities cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer unless (i) such issuer is a REIT, (ii) BPG and such issuer jointly elect for such issuer to be treated as a “taxable REIT subsidiary” under the Code, or (iii) for purposes of the 10% value limitation only, the securities satisfy certain requirements and are not considered "securities" for this test. The total value of all of BPG’s investments in taxable REIT subsidiaries cannot exceed 25% (20% effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017) of the value of BPG’s total assets. In addition, no more than 5% of the value of BPG’s assets can consist of the securities of any one issuer other than a taxable REIT subsidiary, and no more than 25% of the value of BPG’s total assets may be represented by debt instruments issued by publicly offered REITs that are “nonqualified” (e.g., not secured by real property or interests in real property). If BPG fails to comply with these requirements, BPG must dispose of a portion of its assets within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter in order to avoid losing its REIT status and suffering adverse tax consequences. As a result, BPG may be required to liquidate from its portfolio, or contribute to a TRS, otherwise attractive investments in order to maintain its qualification as a REIT. These actions could have the effect of reducing BPG’s income and amounts available for distribution to its stockholders. BPG may be unable to pursue investments that would otherwise be advantageous to it in order to satisfy the source of income or asset diversification requirements for qualifying as a REIT. Thus, compliance with REIT requirements may hinder BPG’s ability to operate solely on the basis of maximizing profits.

Complying with REIT requirements may limit BPG’s ability to hedge effectively and may cause BPG to incur tax liabilities.
The REIT provisions of the Code substantially limit BPG’s ability to hedge its liabilities. Any income from a hedging transaction BPG enters into to manage risk of interest rate changes with respect to borrowings made or to be made to acquire or carry real estate assets (each such hedge, a "Borrowings Hedge"), or manage the risk of certain currency fluctuations (each such hedge, a "Currency Hedge"), if clearly identified under applicable Treasury Regulations, does not constitute “gross income” for purposes of the 75% or 95% gross income tests that BPG must satisfy in order to maintain its qualification as a REIT. Exclusion from the 95% and 75% gross income tests also

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applies if we previously entered into a Borrowings Hedge or a Currency Hedge, a portion of the hedged indebtedness or property is disposed of, and in connection with such extinguishment or disposition we enter into a new "clearly identified" hedging transaction to offset the prior hedging position. To the extent that BPG enters into other types of hedging transactions, the income from those transactions is likely to be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of both of the gross income tests. As a result of these rules, BPG intends to limit its use of hedging techniques or implement those hedges through a domestic TRS. This could increase the cost of BPG’s hedging activities because its TRS would be subject to tax on gains or it could expose BPG to greater risks associated with changes in interest rates than BPG would otherwise want to bear. In addition, losses in BPG’s TRS will generally not provide any tax benefit, except for being carried forward against future taxable income in the TRS.

Complying with REIT requirements may force BPG to borrow to make distributions to stockholders.
From time to time, BPG’s taxable income may be greater than its cash flow available for distribution to stockholders. If BPG does not have other funds available in these situations, BPG may be unable to distribute substantially all of its taxable income as required by the REIT provisions of the Code. Thus, BPG could be required to borrow funds, dispose of assets at disadvantageous prices or find another alternative. These options could adversely affect BPG's financial condition and operating results.

BPG’s charter does not permit any person to own more than 9.8% of BPG’s outstanding common stock or of BPG’s outstanding stock of all classes or series, and attempts to acquire BPG’s common stock or BPG’s stock of all other classes or series in excess of these 9.8% limits would not be effective without an exemption from these limits by BPG’s board of directors.
For BPG to qualify as a REIT under the Code, not more than 50% of the value of BPG’s outstanding stock may be owned directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals (including certain entities treated as individuals for this purpose) during the last half of a taxable year. For the purpose of assisting BPG’s qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, among other purposes, BPG’s charter prohibits beneficial or constructive ownership by any person of more than a certain percentage, currently 9.8%, in value or by number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of the outstanding shares of BPG’s common stock or 9.8% in value of the outstanding shares of BPG’s stock, which BPG refers to as the “ownership limit.” The constructive ownership rules under the Code and BPG’s charter are complex and may cause shares of the outstanding common stock owned by a group of related persons to be deemed to be constructively owned by one person. As a result, the acquisition of less than 9.8% of BPG’s outstanding common stock or BPG’s stock by a person could cause a person to own constructively in excess of 9.8% of BPG’s outstanding common stock or BPG’s stock, respectively, and thus violate the ownership limit. There can be no assurance that BPG’s board of directors, as permitted in the charter, will not decrease this ownership limit in the future. Any attempt to own or transfer shares of BPG’s stock in excess of the ownership limit without an exemption from BPG’s board of directors will result either in the shares in excess of the limit being transferred by operation of the charter to a charitable trust or the transfer being void, and the person who attempted to acquire such excess shares will not have any rights in such excess shares.

The ownership limit may have the effect of precluding a change in control of BPG by a third party, even if such change in control would be in the best interests of BPG’s stockholders or would result in receipt of a premium to the price of BPG’s stock (and even if such change in control would not reasonably jeopardize BPG’s REIT status). The exemptions to the ownership limit granted to date may limit BPG’s board of directors’ power to increase the ownership limit or grant further exemptions in the future.

Failure to qualify as a domestically-controlled REIT could subject BPG’s non-U.S. stockholders to adverse federal income tax consequences.
BPG will be a domestically-controlled REIT if, at all times during a specified testing period, less than 50% in value of its shares are held directly or indirectly by non-U.S. stockholders. Because its shares are publicly traded, BPG cannot guarantee that it will, in fact, be a domestically-controlled REIT. If BPG fails to qualify as a domestically-controlled REIT, its non-U.S. stockholders that otherwise would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on the gain attributable to a sale of BPG’s shares would be subject to taxation upon such a sale if either (a) the shares were not considered to be “regularly traded” under applicable Treasury regulations on an established securities market, such as the NYSE, or (b) the shares were considered to be “regularly traded” on an established securities market and the selling non-U.S. stockholder owned, actually or constructively, more than 10% in value of the outstanding shares at any time during specified testing periods. If gain on the sale or exchange of BPG’s shares was subject to taxation for these reasons, the non-U.S. stockholder would be subject to federal income tax with respect to any gain on a net

- 17 -



basis in a manner similar to the taxation of a taxable U.S. stockholder, subject to any applicable alternative minimum tax and special alternative minimum tax in the case of nonresident alien individuals, and corporate non-U.S. stockholders may be subject to an additional branch profits tax.

BPG may choose to make distributions in BPG’s own stock, in which case you may be required to pay income taxes without receiving any cash dividends.
In connection with BPG’s qualification as a REIT, BPG is required to annually distribute to its stockholders at least 90% of its REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain. Although it does not currently intend to do so, in order to satisfy this requirement, BPG is permitted, subject to certain conditions and limitations, to make distributions that are in part payable in shares of BPG’s stock. Taxable stockholders receiving such distributions will be required to include the full amount of such distributions as ordinary dividend income to the extent of BPG’s current or accumulated earnings and profits, as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, U.S. stockholders may be required to pay income taxes with respect to such distributions in excess of the cash portion of the distribution received. Accordingly, U.S. stockholders receiving a distribution of BPG’s shares may be required to sell shares received in such distribution or may be required to sell other stock or assets owned by them, at a time that may be disadvantageous, in order to satisfy any tax imposed on such distribution. Furthermore, with respect to certain non-U.S. stockholders, BPG may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such distribution, including in respect of all or a portion of such distribution that is payable in stock, by withholding or disposing of part of the shares included in such distribution and using the proceeds of such disposition to satisfy the withholding tax imposed. In addition, if a significant number of BPG’s stockholders determine to sell shares of BPG’s stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividend income, such sale may put downward pressure on the market price of BPG’s stock.

Various tax aspects of such a taxable cash/stock distribution are uncertain and have not yet been addressed by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”). No assurance can be given that the IRS will not impose requirements in the future with respect to taxable cash/stock distributions, including on a retroactive basis, or assert that the requirements for such taxable cash/stock distributions have not been met.

Dividends payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends.
The maximum tax rate applicable to qualified dividend income payable to certain non-corporate U.S. stockholders has been reduced by legislation to 23.8% (taking into account the 3.8% Medicare tax applicable to net investment income). Dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for the reduced rates. The more favorable rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause certain non-corporate investors to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the stocks of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including BPG.

BPG depends on external sources of capital to finance its growth.
As with other REITs, but unlike corporations generally, BPG’s ability to finance its growth must largely be funded by external sources of capital because BPG generally will have to distribute to its stockholders 90% of its REIT taxable income (determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain) in order to qualify as a REIT, including taxable income where BPG does not receive corresponding cash. BPG’s access to external capital depends upon a number of factors, including general market conditions, BPG’s current and potential future earnings, the market’s perception of BPG’s growth potential, cash distributions and the market price of BPG’s stock.

BPG may be subject to adverse legislative or regulatory tax changes that could increase BPG’s tax liability, reduce BPG’s operating flexibility and reduce the price of BPG’s stock.
In recent years, numerous legislative, judicial and administrative changes have been made in the provisions of U.S. federal income tax laws applicable to investments similar to an investment in shares of BPG’s stock. Additional changes to the tax laws are likely to continue to occur in the 115th U.S. Congress, which convened in January 2017. Such changes could impact laws and regulations directly governing REITs or could reduce the benefit of electing to be taxed as a REIT, such as by reducing corporate tax rates or individual tax rates on dividends from non-REIT corporations. BPG cannot assure you that any such changes will not adversely affect the taxation of a stockholder. Any such changes could have an adverse effect on an investment in BPG’s shares or on the market value or the resale potential of BPG’s assets. You are urged to consult with your tax advisor with respect to the impact changes in

- 18 -



law on your investment in BPG’s shares and the status of legislative, regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and their potential effect on an investment in BPG’s stock.

BPG’s ownership of and relationship with any TRS is restricted, and a failure to comply with the restrictions would jeopardize BPG’s REIT status and may result in the application of a 100% excise tax.
A REIT may own up to 100% of the stock of one or more TRSs. A TRS may hold assets and earn income that would not be qualifying assets or income if earned directly by a REIT. Both the subsidiary and the REIT must jointly elect to treat the subsidiary as a TRS. A corporation of which a TRS directly or indirectly owns more than 35% of the voting power or value of the stock will automatically be treated as a TRS. Overall, no more than 25% (20% effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017) of the value of a REIT’s assets may consist of stock or securities of one or more TRSs. The value of BPG’s interests in and thus the amount of assets held in a TRS may also be restricted by BPG’s need to qualify for an exclusion from regulation as an investment company under the Investment Company Act. A TRS will pay U.S. federal, state and local income tax at regular corporate rates on any income that it earns and its after-tax net income is available for distribution to BPG but is not required to be distributed to BPG. In addition, the TRS rules limit the deductibility of interest paid or accrued by a TRS to its parent REIT to assure that the TRS is subject to an appropriate level of corporate taxation. The rules also impose a 100% excise tax on certain transactions between a TRS and its parent REIT that are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis. Although BPG plans to continue to monitor its investments in TRSs, there can be no assurance that BPG will be able to comply with the TRS limitations discussed above or avoid application of the 100% excise tax discussed above.

Risks Related to Ownership of BPG’s Common Stock
The cash available for distribution to stockholders may not be sufficient to pay dividends at expected levels, we may use borrowed funds to make distributions or we may be unable to make distributions in the future.
If cash available for distribution generated by our assets decreases in future periods from expected levels, our inability to make expected distributions could result in a decrease in the market price of BPG’s common stock. See “Item 5. Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.” All distributions will be made at the discretion of BPG’s board of directors and will depend on our earnings, our financial condition, maintenance of BPG’s REIT qualification and other factors as BPG’s board of directors may deem relevant from time to time. We may not be able to make distributions in the future or we may need to fund a portion or all of the distribution with borrowed funds. To the extent that we decide to make distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits, such distributions would generally be considered a return of capital for federal income tax purposes to the extent of the holder’s adjusted tax basis in their shares. A return of capital is not taxable, but it has the effect of reducing the holder’s adjusted tax basis in its investment. To the extent that distributions exceed the adjusted tax basis of a holder’s shares, they will be treated as gain from the sale or exchange of such stock. If we borrow to fund distributions, our future interest costs would increase, thereby reducing our earnings and cash available for distribution from what they otherwise would have been.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they downgrade their recommendations regarding BPG’s common stock, BPG’s share price and trading volume may decline.
The trading market for BPG’s shares is influenced by the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. Events that could adversely affect BPG's share price and trading volume include: (1) BPG’s operating results being below the expectations of securities and industry analysts and investors; (2) downgrades or inaccurate or unfavorable research about BPG's business published by analysts; or (3) the termination of research coverage or the failure by analysts to regularly publish reports on us, which may cause us to lose visibility in the financial markets. A less liquid market for BPG's shares may also impair our ability to raise capital by issuing shares and may impair our ability to acquire additional properties or other businesses by using BPG’s shares as consideration

The market price of BPG’s common stock could be adversely affected by market conditions and by our actual and expected future earnings and level of cash dividends.
The stock market in general, and the NYSE and REIT markets in particular experience significant price and volume fluctuations. This market volatility, as well as general economic, market or political conditions, could reduce the market price of shares without regard to our operating performance. For example, the trading prices of equity securities issued by REITs have historically been affected by changes in market interest rates. An increase in market

- 19 -



interest rates, or a decrease in our distributions to stockholders, may lead prospective purchasers of shares of BPG’s common stock to demand a higher distribution rate or seek alternative investments. The market value of the equity securities of a REIT is also based upon the market’s perception of the REIT’s growth potential and its current and potential future cash distributions, whether from operations, sales or refinancings, and is secondarily based upon the real estate market value of the underlying assets. Our failure to meet the market’s expectations with regard to future earnings and cash distributions would likely adversely affect the market price of BPG’s common stock.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.

Item 2.    Properties
Our Portfolio at December 31, 2016 consisted of 512 shopping centers, including 511 wholly owned shopping centers and one shopping center held through an unconsolidated joint venture.  In addition, we have one land parcel currently under development. Approximately 65% of the ABR in our Portfolio as of December 31, 2016 is derived from shopping centers located in the top 50 U.S. MSAs by population. Our top markets by ABR include the MSAs of New York, Philadelphia and Houston.

With an average shopping center size of 167,982 square feet as of December 31, 2016, our Portfolio is comprised predominantly of community and neighborhood shopping centers. Our shopping centers have an appropriate mix of anchor and small shop GLA, with approximately one-third of our Portfolio GLA comprised of small shop space. Our shopping centers are anchored by a mix of leading grocers, national and regional discount and general merchandise retailers and category-dominant anchors, as well as costumer-oriented service providers. We believe that the non-discretionary and value-oriented merchandise mix of the retail tenants in our centers reduces our exposure to macro-economic cycles and consumer purchases via the internet. Such retailers provide goods and services that consumers purchase regularly such as food, health care items and household supplies. Such retailers also sell items such as clothing at lower prices than other traditional retailers.

Overall, in our Portfolio we have a broad and highly diversified retail tenant base that includes more than 5,500 tenants, with no one tenant representing more than 3.3% of the total ABR generated from our shopping centers as of December 31, 2016. Our three largest tenants are The Kroger Co., The TJX Companies and Dollar Tree Stores, Inc., representing 3.3%, 3.2% and 2.0% of total Portfolio ABR as of December 31, 2016, respectively.


























- 20 -



The following table summarizes the top 20 tenants by ABR in our Portfolio as of December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands):
Retailer
 
Owned Leases
 
Leased GLA
 
Percent of Total
Portfolio GLA
 
Leased ABR
 
Percent of Portfolio Leased ABR
The Kroger Co.
 
71

 
4,646,159

 
5.4
%
 
$
31,995

 
3.3
%
The TJX Companies, Inc.
 
94

 
2,917,997

 
3.4
%
 
30,457

 
3.2
%
Dollar Tree Stores, Inc.
 
168

 
1,880,205

 
2.2
%
 
18,848

 
2.0
%
Publix Super Markets, Inc.
 
39

 
1,802,591

 
2.1
%
 
17,048

 
1.8
%
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
 
28

 
3,491,147

 
4.1
%
 
16,486

 
1.7
%
Ahold Delhaize
 
29

 
1,536,305

 
1.8
%
 
16,238

 
1.7
%
Albertsons Companies, Inc.
 
23

 
1,295,471

 
1.5
%
 
14,048

 
1.5
%
Burlington Stores, Inc.
 
20

 
1,452,122

 
1.7
%
 
11,340

 
1.2
%
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc.
 
30

 
736,350

 
0.9
%
 
9,394

 
1.0
%
Big Lots, Inc.
 
46

 
1,527,517

 
1.8
%
 
9,393

 
1.0
%
PetSmart, Inc.
 
30

 
652,714

 
0.8
%
 
9,391

 
1.0
%
Ross Stores, Inc.
 
31

 
860,356

 
1.0
%
 
9,366

 
1.0
%
Best Buy Co., Inc.
 
16

 
660,392

 
0.8
%
 
8,967

 
0.9
%
Sears Holdings Corporation
 
21

 
2,027,931

 
2.4
%
 
8,839

 
0.9
%
Office Depot, Inc.
 
32

 
705,127

 
0.8
%
 
7,870

 
0.8
%
PETCO Animal Supplies, Inc.
 
34

 
450,480

 
0.5
%
 
7,491

 
0.8
%
Kohl's Corporation
 
12

 
1,002,715

 
1.2
%
 
7,335

 
0.8
%
Staples, Inc.
 
28

 
586,564

 
0.7
%
 
7,064

 
0.7
%
Party City Corporation
 
34

 
480,983

 
0.6
%
 
7,051

 
0.7
%
DICK'S Sporting Goods, Inc.
 
12

 
493,856

 
0.6
%
 
6,660

 
0.7
%
TOP 20 RETAILERS
 
798

 
29,206,982

 
34.3
%
 
$
255,281

 
26.7
%

































- 21 -



The following table summarizes the geographic diversity of our Portfolio by state as of December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands, expect per square foot information):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Percent of
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Number of
 
 
 
Percent
 
Percent
 
 
 
 
 
Number of
 
Percent
 
Percent
 
State
 
Properties
 
 GLA
 
Billed
 
Leased
 
 ABR
 
 ABR / SF (1) 
 
Properties
 
of GLA
 
of ABR
1

Texas
 
65

 
9,484,409

 
90.1
%
 
92.6
%
 
$
107,540

 
$
13.02

 
12.7
%
 
11.0
%
 
11.2
%
2

Florida
 
56

 
8,787,102

 
89.5
%
 
91.5
%
 
104,873

 
13.53

 
10.9
%
 
10.2
%
 
10.9
%
3

California
 
30

 
5,963,224

 
95.6
%
 
98.0
%
 
97,122

 
17.95

 
5.9
%
 
6.9
%
 
10.1
%
4

Pennsylvania
 
35

 
5,928,279

 
92.8
%
 
94.5
%
 
67,166

 
14.31

 
6.8
%
 
6.9
%
 
7.0
%
5

New York
 
33

 
4,340,537

 
89.3
%
 
91.3
%
 
65,401

 
16.91

 
6.4
%
 
5.0
%
 
6.8
%
6

Illinois
 
24

 
4,856,592

 
88.5
%
 
91.3
%
 
52,362

 
12.25

 
4.7
%
 
5.7
%
 
5.5
%
7

Georgia
 
37

 
5,262,166

 
88.2
%
 
91.0
%
 
47,438

 
10.11

 
7.2
%
 
6.1
%
 
4.9
%
8

New Jersey
 
18

 
3,088,237

 
90.5
%
 
92.0
%
 
41,951

 
15.70

 
3.5
%
 
3.6
%
 
4.4
%
9

Ohio
 
23

 
4,305,805

 
91.0
%
 
93.7
%
 
41,912

 
11.76

 
4.5
%
 
5.0
%
 
4.4
%
10

North Carolina
 
21

 
4,326,381

 
89.3
%
 
91.5
%
 
41,419

 
11.19

 
4.1
%
 
5.0
%
 
4.4
%
11

Michigan
 
19

 
3,660,577

 
89.8
%
 
93.5
%
 
33,912

 
12.43

 
3.7
%
 
4.3
%
 
3.5
%
12

Connecticut
 
15

 
2,260,206

 
93.1
%
 
93.6
%
 
30,164

 
15.24

 
2.9
%
 
2.7
%
 
3.1
%
13

Tennessee
 
15

 
3,063,908

 
91.1
%
 
93.9
%
 
29,853

 
10.91

 
2.9
%
 
3.6
%
 
3.1
%
14

Kentucky
 
12

 
2,600,414

 
98.2
%
 
98.4
%
 
22,809

 
9.49

 
2.3
%
 
3.1
%
 
2.4
%
15

Massachusetts
 
11

 
1,873,814

 
92.8
%
 
93.6
%
 
20,983

 
15.24

 
2.1
%
 
2.2
%
 
2.2
%
16

Colorado
 
6

 
1,471,970

 
89.9
%
 
94.0
%
 
18,667

 
13.55

 
1.2
%
 
1.7
%
 
1.9
%
17

Minnesota
 
10

 
1,471,078

 
89.2
%
 
90.5
%
 
15,875

 
12.69

 
2.0
%
 
1.7
%
 
1.7
%
18

Indiana
 
12

 
1,977,752

 
84.8
%
 
88.2
%
 
15,796

 
10.21

 
2.3
%
 
2.3
%
 
1.7
%
19

Virginia
 
11

 
1,446,508

 
87.5
%
 
88.4
%
 
14,624

 
12.03

 
2.1
%
 
1.7
%
 
1.5
%
20

South Carolina
 
8

 
1,368,161

 
84.2
%
 
86.7
%
 
13,623

 
11.74

 
1.6
%
 
1.6
%
 
1.4
%
21

Maryland
 
5

 
776,427

 
99.7
%
 
99.7
%
 
10,047

 
13.03

 
1.0
%
 
0.9
%
 
1.0
%
22

Nevada
 
3

 
613,061

 
94.3
%
 
95.4
%
 
8,346

 
16.17

 
0.6
%
 
0.7
%
 
0.9
%
23

New Hampshire
 
5

 
772,770

 
80.1
%
 
88.9
%
 
7,518

 
14.05

 
1.0
%
 
0.9
%
 
0.8
%
24

Wisconsin
 
5

 
760,882

 
89.1
%
 
90.3
%
 
7,193

 
10.47

 
1.0
%
 
0.9
%
 
0.8
%
25

Alabama
 
4

 
984,573

 
92.0
%
 
92.3
%
 
7,120

 
9.73

 
0.8
%
 
1.1
%
 
0.7
%
26

Missouri
 
6

 
862,861

 
87.3
%
 
88.4
%
 
6,194

 
8.26

 
1.2
%
 
1.0
%
 
0.6
%
27

Iowa
 
4

 
723,408

 
90.0
%
 
93.8
%
 
4,356

 
6.52

 
0.8
%
 
0.8
%
 
0.5
%
28

Louisiana
 
4

 
612,250

 
96.0
%
 
96.8
%
 
3,946

 
6.66

 
0.8
%
 
0.7
%
 
0.4
%
29

Mississippi
 
2

 
333,275

 
96.3
%
 
96.3
%
 
3,538

 
11.22

 
0.4
%
 
0.4
%
 
0.4
%
30

Kansas
 
2

 
367,779

 
90.4
%
 
92.7
%
 
2,996

 
11.35

 
0.4
%
 
0.4
%
 
0.3
%
31

Arizona
 
2

 
288,110

 
76.9
%
 
78.8
%
 
2,792

 
12.30

 
0.4
%
 
0.3
%
 
0.3
%
32

Delaware
 
1

 
191,974

 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
2,348

 
12.23

 
0.2
%
 
0.2
%
 
0.2
%
33

West Virginia
 
2

 
251,500

 
98.8
%
 
98.8
%
 
2,051

 
8.25

 
0.4
%
 
0.3
%
 
0.2
%
34

Vermont
 
1

 
224,514

 
98.6
%
 
98.6
%
 
1,970

 
8.90

 
0.2
%
 
0.3
%
 
0.2
%
35

Maine
 
1

 
287,513

 
99.3
%
 
99.3
%
 
1,964

 
16.76

 
0.2
%
 
0.3
%
 
0.2
%
36

Oklahoma
 
1

 
186,851

 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
1,792

 
9.59

 
0.2
%
 
0.2
%
 
0.2
%
37

Rhode Island
 
1

 
148,126

 
83.8
%
 
83.8
%
 
1,356

 
10.92

 
0.2
%
 
0.2
%
 
0.1
%
38

New Mexico
 
2

 
83,800

 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
966

 
11.53

 
0.4
%
 
0.1
%
 
0.1
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TOTAL
 
512

 
86,006,794

 
90.7
%
 
92.8
%
 
$
959,983

 
$
12.99

 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
(1)     ABR/SF is calculated as ABR divided by leased GLA, excluding the GLA of lessee owned leasehold improvements.















- 22 -



The following table summarizes certain information for our Portfolio by unit size as of December 31, 2016 (dollars in thousands, expect per square foot information):
 
Number of
Units
 
GLA
 
Percent Billed
 
Percent Leased
 
Percent of Vacant GLA
 
 ABR
 
ABR/SF (1)
≥ 35,000 SF
574

 
35,628,875

 
96.6
%
 
97.9
%
 
12.3
%
 
$
278,230

 
$
9.27

20,000 – 34,999 SF
556

 
14,644,193

 
92.4
%
 
95.3
%
 
11.3
%
 
136,158

 
9.91

10,000 - 19,999 SF
747

 
10,184,394

 
88.7
%
 
91.1
%
 
14.8
%
 
116,555

 
12.90

5,000 - 9,999 SF
1,375

 
9,467,031

 
83.3
%
 
86.5
%
 
20.8
%
 
129,198

 
16.40

< 5,000 SF
7,746

 
16,082,301

 
81.5
%
 
84.3
%
 
40.8
%
 
299,842

 
22.66

TOTAL
10,998

 
86,006,794

 
90.7
%
 
92.8
%
 
100.0
%
 
$
959,983

 
$
12.99

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TOTAL ≥ 10,000 SF
1,877

 
60,457,462

 
94.2
%
 
96.1
%
 
38.4
%
 
$
530,943

 
$
10.06

TOTAL < 10,000 SF
9,121

 
25,549,332

 
82.2
%
 
85.1
%
 
61.6
%
 
429,040

 
20.32

(1)     ABR/SF is calculated as ABR divided by leased GLA, excluding the GLA of lessee owned leasehold improvements.

The following table summarizes lease expirations for leases in place within our Portfolio for each of the next ten calendar years and thereafter, assuming no exercise of renewal options over the lease term and including the GLA of lessee owned leasehold improvements, as of December 31, 2016:
 
 
Number of Leases
 
Leased GLA
 
% of Leased GLA
 
% of In-Place ABR
 
In-Place ABR/SF
 
ABR/SF at Expiration
M-M
 
307

 
856,675

 
1.1
%
 
1.3
%
 
$
14.32

 
$
14.32

2017
 
1,463

 
7,738,485

 
9.7
%
 
10.1
%
 
12.55

 
12.56

2018
 
1,600

 
9,973,312

 
12.5
%
 
13.2
%
 
12.70

 
12.79

2019
 
1,477

 
10,884,436

 
13.6
%
 
13.3
%
 
11.75

 
11.89

2020
 
1,283

 
11,552,592

 
14.5
%
 
13.4
%
 
11.11

 
11.32

2021
 
1,172

 
10,401,714

 
13.0
%
 
12.8
%
 
11.80

 
12.11

2022
 
597

 
6,985,055

 
8.7
%
 
8.2
%
 
11.26

 
12.01

2023
 
301

 
3,443,046

 
4.3
%
 
4.1
%
 
11.48

 
12.37

2024
 
310

 
3,734,494

 
4.7
%
 
4.6
%
 
11.80

 
12.87

2025
 
275

 
3,175,408

 
4.0
%
 
4.4
%
 
13.39

 
14.48

2026
 
323

 
3,266,969

 
4.1
%
 
4.9
%
 
14.52

 
15.75

2027+
 
378

 
7,832,731

 
9.8
%
 
9.7
%
 
11.84

 
13.59


We believe that all of the properties in our Portfolio are suitable for use as community or neighborhood shopping centers.

More specific information with respect to each of our property interests is set forth in Exhibit 99.1, which is incorporated herein by reference.

Leases
Our anchor tenants generally have leases with original terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. Such leases frequently contain renewal options for one or more additional periods. Smaller tenants typically have leases with terms ranging from three to five years, which may or may not contain renewal options. Leases in our Portfolio generally provide for the payment of fixed monthly rent. Leases may also provide for the payment of additional rent based upon a percentage of the tenant’s gross sales above a certain threshold level. Leases typically contain contractual increases in base rent over both the primary terms and renewal periods. Our leases generally include tenant reimbursements of common area expenses, insurance and real estate taxes. Utilities are generally paid by tenants either through separate meters or reimbursement.

The foregoing general description of the characteristics of the leases of our Portfolio is not intended to describe all leases, and material variations in the lease terms exist.




- 23 -



Insurance
We have a wholly owned captive insurance company, Brixmor Incap, LLC (“Incap”). Incap underwrites the first layer of general liability insurance programs for the Company’s properties. The Company formed Incap as part of its overall risk management program and to stabilize insurance costs, manage exposure and recoup expenses through the functions of the captive program. Incap is capitalized in accordance with the applicable regulatory requirements.

We also maintain commercial liability, fire, extended coverage, earthquake, business interruption and rental loss insurance covering all of the properties in our Portfolio. We select coverage specifications and insured limits which we believe to be appropriate given the relative risk of loss, the cost of the coverage, industry practice, and the nature of the shopping centers in our Portfolio. In addition, tenants generally are required to indemnify and hold us harmless from liabilities resulting from injury to persons or damage to personal or real property due to activities conducted by tenants or their agents on the properties (including without limitation any environmental contamination), and at the tenant’s expense, to obtain and keep in full force during the term of the lease, liability and property damage insurance policies. In the opinion of our management, all of the properties in our Portfolio are currently adequately insured. We do not carry insurance for generally uninsured losses such as losses from war. See “Risk Factors-Risks Related to Our Portfolio and Our Business - An uninsured loss on properties or a loss that exceeds the limits of our insurance policies could result in a loss of our investment or related revenue in our Portfolio.”

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings
The information contained under the heading “Legal Matters” in Note 14 - Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements in this report is incorporated by reference into this Item 3.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.


- 24 -



PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table sets forth for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015 the high and low sales prices for each quarter of BPG’s common stock, which trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the trading symbol “BRX,” and the quarterly declared dividend per share of common stock for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015:
 
 
Stock Price
 
 
Period
 
High
 
Low
 
Cash Dividends Declared
2016:
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Quarter
 
$
26.98

 
$
19.91

 
$
0.245

Second Quarter
 
27.35

 
24.50

 
0.245

Third Quarter
 
29.14

 
26.39

 
0.245

Fourth Quarter
 
27.49

 
23.38

 
0.260

2015:
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Quarter
 
$
27.43

 
$
24.22

 
$
0.225

Second Quarter
 
26.70

 
22.97

 
0.225

Third Quarter
 
25.50

 
20.78

 
0.225

Fourth Quarter
 
26.48

 
23.00

 
0.245


As of February 1, 2017, the number of holders of record of BPG’s common stock was 256.  This figure does not represent the actual number of beneficial owners of BPG’s common stock because shares of BPG’s common stock are frequently held in “street name” by securities dealers and others for the benefit of beneficial owners who may vote the shares.

The Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), generally requires that a REIT distribute annually at least 90% of its REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gains, and imposes tax on any taxable income retained by a REIT, including capital gains. To satisfy the requirements for qualification as a REIT and generally not be subject to U.S. federal income and excise tax, BPG intends to make regular quarterly distributions of all or substantially all of BPG’s REIT taxable income to holders of BPG’s common stock out of assets legally available for such purposes.

BPG’s future distributions will be at the sole discretion of BPG’s Board of Directors. When determining the amount of future distributions, we expect that BPG’s Board of Directors will consider, among other factors; (1) the amount of cash generated from our operating activities; (2) our expectations of future cash flows; (3) our determination of near-term cash needs for debt repayments, existing or future share repurchases, and selective acquisitions of new properties; (4) near term cash needs for capital expenditures, leasing and redevelopment; (5) our ability to continue to access additional sources of capital; (6) the amount required to be distributed to maintain BPG’s status as a REIT and to reduce any income and excise taxes that BPG otherwise would be required to pay; (7) any limitations on our distributions contained in our credit or other agreements, including, without limitation, in our Unsecured Credit Facility; and (8) the sufficiency of legally-available assets.

To the extent BPG is prevented by provisions of our financing arrangements or otherwise from distributing 100% of BPG’s REIT taxable income or otherwise do not distribute 100% of BPG’s REIT taxable income, BPG will be subject to income tax, and potentially excise tax, on the retained amounts. If our operations do not generate sufficient cash flow to allow BPG to satisfy the REIT distribution requirements, we may be required to fund distributions from working capital, borrow funds, sell assets or reduce such distributions. BPG’s Board of Directors reviews the alternative funding sources available to us from time to time. For more information regarding risk factors that could materially adversely affect our actual results of operations, please see Item 1A. “Risk Factors.”
Because BPG is a holding company and has no material assets other than its ownership of shares of common stock of BPG Sub and no material operations other than those conducted by BPG Sub, we fund any distributions from legally-available assets authorized by our Board of Directors in three steps:

first, the Operating Partnership makes distributions to those of its partners which are holders of OP Units, including BPG Sub. When the Operating Partnership makes such distributions, in addition to BPG Sub and its

- 25 -



wholly owned subsidiaries, the other partners of the Operating Partnership are also entitled to receive equivalent distributions on their partnership interests in the Operating Partnership on a pro rata basis;
second, BPG Sub distributes to Brixmor Property Group Inc. its share of such distributions; and
third, Brixmor Property Group Inc. distributes the amount authorized by its Board of Directors and declared by Brixmor Property Group Inc. to its common stockholders on a pro rata basis.
Distributions to the extent of the Company’s current and accumulated earnings and profits for federal income tax purposes will be taxable to shareholders as with ordinary dividend income or capital gain income.  Distributions in excess of taxable earnings and profits generally will be treated as non-taxable return of capital.  These distributions, to the extent that they do not exceed the shareholder’s adjusted tax basis in its common shares, have the effect of deferring taxation until the sale of the shareholder’s common shares.  To the extent that distributions are both in excess of taxable earnings and profits and in excess of the shareholder’s adjusted tax basis in its common shares, the distribution will be treated as capital gain from the sale of common shares.  For the taxable year ended December 31, 2016, 97.4% of the Company’s distributions to shareholders constituted taxable ordinary income and 2.6% of the Company's distributions to shareholders constituted a return of capital.

BPG’s Total Stockholder Return Performance
The following performance chart compares, for the period from October 30, 2013 through December 31, 2016, the cumulative total stockholder return on BPG’s common stock with the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Index and the cumulative total return of the FTSE NAREIT Equity Shopping Centers Index. Equity real estate investment trusts are defined as those which derive more than 75% of their income from equity investments in real estate assets. All stockholder return performance assumes the reinvestment of dividends. The information in this paragraph and the following performance chart are deemed to be furnished, not filed.
38013944_brxitem5graph2016.jpg
Sales of Unregistered Equity Securities
There were no unregistered sales of equity securities during the year ended December 31, 2016.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
BPG did not repurchase any of its equity securities during the year ended December 31, 2016.

- 26 -



Item 6.    Selected Financial Data
The following table shows our selected consolidated financial data for BPG and the Operating Partnership and their respective subsidiaries for the periods indicated. This information should be read together with the audited financial statements and notes thereto of BPG and its subsidiaries and the Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries and with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

- 27 -



BRIXMOR PROPERTY GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rental income
$
998,118

 
$
984,548

 
$
960,715

 
$
887,466

 
$
851,311

Expense reimbursements
270,548

 
276,032

 
268,035

 
242,803

 
225,710

Other revenues
7,106

 
5,400

 
7,849

 
16,135

 
11,233

Total revenues
1,275,772

 
1,265,980

 
1,236,599

 
1,146,404

 
1,088,254

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating costs
133,429

 
129,477

 
129,148

 
116,522

 
118,876

Real estate taxes
174,487

 
180,911

 
179,504

 
168,468

 
155,142

Depreciation and amortization
387,302

 
417,935

 
441,630

 
438,547

 
488,524

Provision for doubtful accounts
9,182

 
9,540

 
11,537

 
10,899

 
11,542

Impairment of real estate assets
5,154

 
1,005

 

 
1,531

 

General and administrative
92,248

 
98,454

 
80,175

 
121,082

 
88,936

Total operating expenses
801,802

 
837,322

 
841,994

 
857,049

 
863,020

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other income (expense)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends and interest
542

 
315

 
602

 
832

 
1,138

Interest expense
(226,671
)
 
(245,012
)
 
(262,812
)
 
(343,193
)
 
(376,237
)
Gain on sale of real estate assets and acquisition of joint venture interest
35,613

 
11,744

 
378

 
2,223

 
501

Gain (loss) on extinguishment of debt, net
(832
)
 
1,720

 
(13,761
)
 
(20,028
)
 

Other
(4,957
)
 
(348
)
 
(8,431
)
 
(11,014
)
 
(1,045
)
Total other expense
(196,305
)
 
(231,581
)
 
(284,024
)
 
(371,180
)
 
(375,643
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) before equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures
277,665

 
197,077

 
110,581

 
(81,825
)
 
(150,409
)
Equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures
477

 
459

 
370

 
1,167

 
687

Gain on disposition of investments in unconsolidated joint ventures

 

 
1,820

 

 

Impairment of investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

 

 

 

 
(314
)
Income (loss) from continuing operations
278,142

 
197,536

 
112,771

 
(80,658
)
 
(150,036
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Discontinued operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 
4,909

 
3,505

 
(2,447
)
Gain on disposition of operating properties

 

 
15,171

 
3,392

 
5,369

Impairment of real estate held for sale

 

 

 
(45,122
)
 
(13,599
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 
20,080

 
(38,225
)
 
(10,677
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
278,142

 
197,536

 
132,851

 
(118,883
)
 
(160,713
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net (income) loss attributable to non-controlling interests
(2,514
)
 
(3,816
)
 
(43,849
)
 
25,349

 
38,146

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) attributable to Brixmor Property Group Inc.
275,628

 
193,720

 
89,002

 
(93,534
)
 
(122,567
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Preferred stock dividends
(150
)
 
(150
)
 
(150
)
 
(162
)
 
(296
)
Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders
$
275,478

 
$
193,570

 
$
88,852

 
$
(93,696
)
 
$
(122,863
)
Per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
0.91

 
$
0.65

 
$
0.36

 
$
(0.33
)
 
$
(0.64
)
Diluted
$
0.91

 
$
0.65

 
$
0.36

 
$
(0.33
)
 
$
(0.64
)
Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
0.91

 
$
0.65

 
$
0.36

 
$
(0.50
)
 
$
(0.68
)
Diluted
$
0.91

 
$
0.65

 
$
0.36

 
$
(0.50
)
 
$
(0.68
)
Weighted average shares:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
301,601

 
298,004

 
243,390

 
188,993

 
180,675

Diluted
305,060

 
305,017

 
244,588

 
188,993

 
180,675

Cash dividends declared per common share
$
0.995

 
$
0.92

 
$
0.825

 
$
0.127

 
$



- 28 -



BRIXMOR PROPERTY GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
SELECT BALANCE SHEET INFORMATION
(in thousands)
 
 
December 31,
Balance Sheet Data as of the end of each year
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
Real estate, net
 
$
8,842,004

 
$
9,052,165

 
$
9,253,015

 
$
9,647,558

 
$
9,098,130

Total assets
 
$
9,319,685

 
$
9,498,007

 
$
9,681,913

 
$
10,143,487

 
$
9,569,544

Debt obligations, net (1)
 
$
5,838,889

 
$
5,974,266

 
$
6,022,508

 
$
5,952,860

 
$
6,465,171

Total liabilities
 
$
6,392,525

 
$
6,577,705

 
$
6,701,610

 
$
6,837,500

 
$
7,271,723

Redeemable non-controlling interests
 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
21,467

 
$
21,467

Total equity
 
$
2,927,160

 
$
2,920,302

 
$
2,980,303

 
$
3,284,520

 
$
2,276,354

(1) Debt includes secured loans, notes payable, and credit agreements, including unamortized premium or net of unamortized discount and unamortized debt issuance costs.





















































- 29 -



BRIXMOR OPERATING PARTNERSHIP LP AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rental income
$
998,118

 
$
984,548

 
$
960,715

 
$
887,466

 
$
851,311

Expense reimbursements
270,548

 
276,032

 
268,035

 
242,803

 
225,710

Other revenues
7,106

 
5,400

 
7,849

 
16,135

 
11,233

Total revenues
1,275,772

 
1,265,980

 
1,236,599

 
1,146,404

 
1,088,254

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating costs
133,429

 
129,477

 
129,148

 
116,522

 
118,876

Real estate taxes
174,487

 
180,911

 
179,504

 
168,468

 
155,142

Depreciation and amortization
387,302

 
417,935

 
441,630

 
438,547

 
488,524

Provision for doubtful accounts
9,182

 
9,540

 
11,537

 
10,899

 
11,542

Impairment of real estate assets
5,154

 
1,005

 

 
1,531

 

General and administrative
92,248

 
98,454

 
80,175

 
121,078

 
88,931

Total operating expenses
801,802

 
837,322

 
841,994

 
857,045

 
863,015

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other income (expense)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends and interest
542

 
315

 
602

 
825

 
1,125

Interest expense
(226,671
)
 
(245,012
)
 
(262,812
)
 
(343,193
)
 
(376,237
)
Gain on sale of real estate assets and acquisition of joint venture interest
35,613

 
11,744

 
378

 
2,223

 
501

Gain (loss) on extinguishment of debt, net
(832
)
 
1,720

 
(13,761
)
 
(20,028
)
 

Other
(4,957
)
 
(348
)
 
(8,431
)
 
(11,005
)
 
(513
)
Total other expense
(196,305
)
 
(231,581
)
 
(284,024
)
 
(371,178
)
 
(375,124
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) before equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures
277,665

 
197,077

 
110,581

 
(81,819
)
 
(149,885
)
Equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures
477

 
459

 
370

 
1,167

 
687

Gain on disposition of investments in unconsolidated joint ventures

 

 
1,820

 

 

Impairment of investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

 

 

 

 
(314
)
Income (loss) from continuing operations
278,142

 
197,536

 
112,771

 
(80,652
)
 
(149,512
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Discontinued operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 
4,909

 
3,505

 
(2,447
)
Gain on disposition of operating properties

 

 
15,171

 
3,392

 
5,369

Impairment on real estate held for sale

 

 

 
(45,122
)
 
(13,599
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 
20,080

 
(38,225
)
 
(10,677
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
278,142

 
197,536

 
132,851

 
(118,877
)
 
(160,189
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to non-controlling interests

 

 
(1,181
)
 
(1,355
)
 
(1,306
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) attributable to Brixmor Operating Partnership LP
$
278,142

 
$
197,536

 
$
131,670

 
$
(120,232
)
 
$
(161,495
)
Net income (loss) attributable to:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Series A interest
$

 
$

 
$
21,014

 
$
3,451

 
$

  Partnership common units
278,142

 
197,536

 
110,656

 
(123,683
)
 
(161,495
)
Net income (loss) attributable to Brixmor Operating Partnership LP
$
278,142

 
$
197,536

 
$
131,670